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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Process for producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen from methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen which comprises contacting methanol vapor at a temperature of 200 degrees to 300 degrees C with an indirectly heated zinc containing catalyst to obtain an effluent gas in which the components of carbon monoxide and hydrogen constitute at least 90% by volume of said gas. At least a part of the impurities from said effluent gas are removed and said effluent gas is deparated into its carbon monoxide and hydrogen components by adsorption. The effluent gas can be separated into its carbon monoxide and hydrogen components by use of a plurality of adsorbers containing zeolite-type molecular sieve material where the zeolite is substantially permeable to hydrogen but sorbs carbon monoxide.

Jockel, H.; Marschner, F.; Moller, F.W.; Mortel, H.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

2

Carbon and carbon monoxide hydrogenation on nickel: support effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of carbon, deposited on nickel catalysts by CO disproportionation, was investigated by temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) for four oxide supports, alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/), silica (SiO/sub 2/), titanium oxide (TiO/sub 2/), and SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was measured by temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) for comparison. The rate of carbon hydrogenation to methane was found to be independent of the support and an average activation energy of 42 kJ/mol was estimated. In contrast, the rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was very sensitive to the catalyst support. Nickel (Ni) supported on TiO/sub 2/ exhibited the highest specific activity, and two distinct sites for methanation were observed on Ni/TiO/sub 2/ and Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The lowest specific activities were observed for Ni/SiO/sub 2/ and Ni/SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. For all catalysts, carbon hydrogenation occurred at a lower temperature than carbon monoxide hydrogenation. For both TPR and TPSR, small amounts of ethane were formed and at a lower temperature than methane. The amount of less-active, ..beta..-carbon observed in TPSR experiments was very small on all catalysts. These results indicate that at high coverages, carbon hydrogenation does not depend on the support, and thus it is not rate-determining for CO hydrogenation in excess hydrogen. The support is also shown to change the specific rate of carbon monoxide methanation; activity differences seen in steady-state experiments are not just due to differences in site densities. 5 figures, 5 tables.

Ozdogan, S.Z.; Gochis, P.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Some observations on the kinetics of the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the hydrogenation of CO a positive order of hydrogen and a slightly negative or a zero order in carbon monoxide are generally reported. The negative (or zero) order in carbon monoxide is often explained by assuming a strong adsorption of carbon monoxide on the same sites as used by the hydrogen. It is then assumed that the surface is ''almost totally'' covered by carbon monoxide. From experiments in which the surface products on an unsupported cobalt catalyst after the reaction were stripped off by a hydrogen treatment it was concluded that more than 95% of the surface (as determined from the adsorption of carbon monoxide at room temperature) was covered by carbon-containing species. This paper illustrates that ''zero order in carbon monoxide'' can be obtained with much lower coverage of carbon-containing species in equilibrium with gas-phase carbon monoxide than indicated above. Equations for reaction rates are presented, and data is calculated on the fraction of the catalyst surface covered by active carbon-containing species when the reaction is zero order in CO. The results suggest that only a small fraction of the catalyst surface is actively engaged in the hydrogenation of CO. This further suggests that the low turnover frequencies found for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis could be caused by a small number of sites which are active in the rate-determining step. (MWF)

Rautavuoma, A.O.I.; van der Baan, H.S.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

Golden, Timothy Christopher (Allentown, PA); Farris, Thomas Stephen (Bethlehem, PA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Coadsorption of hydrogen and ethylene, and carbon monoxide and ethylene on the Ru(001) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed investigation of the coadsorption of ethylene with both preadsorbed hydrogen and preadsorbed carbon monoxide on the Ru(001) surface is reported here. Both preadsorbed hydrogen and carbon monoxide reduce the saturation coverage of subsequently chemisorbed ethylene. The coadsorption of hydrogen with ethylene results in detectable hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane below 250 K, whereas no self-hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane is observed. High-resolution electron energy loss spectra show that ethylene coadsorbed with either hydrogen or carbon monoxide decomposes to ethylidyne (CCH/sub 3/) and acetylide (CCH), as it does on the clean surface. Carbon monoxide preadsorption enhances the stability of the ethylidyne such that it decomposes at approximately 420 K, rather than 355 K as on the initially clean Ru(001) surface. Preadsorbed carbon monoxide also reduces the ratio of ethylidyne to acetylide that is formed from ethylene, compared to the ratio observed from an equivalent coverage of ethylene on the clean surface; hydrogen preadsorption, on the other hand, increases this ratio.

Hills, M.M.; Parmeter, J.E.; Weinberg, W.H.

1986-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

Mechanism of methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen on copper catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors examine possible mechanisms of methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen on supported copper catalysts. Two broad categories of reaction mechanism can be identified: (a) Type I: Carbon monoxide, adsorbed on the copper surface, is hydrogenated by the addition of hydrogen atoms while the C-O bond remains intact. A second C-O bond is neither formed nor broken. (b) Type II: Carbon monoxide (or a partially hydrogenated intermediate, e.g., HCO) reacts with an oxygen atom on the catalyst surface to give an intermediate, typically a formate, which contains two C-O bonds. Subsequent reaction leads overall to methanol and the reformation of the surface oxygen atom. Both mechanisms are discussed.

Fakley, M.E.; Jennings, J.R.; Spencer, M.S. (ICI Chemicals and Polymers Ltd, Billingham, Cleveland (England))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electrochemical Removal of Carbon Monoxide in Reformate Hydrogen for Fueling Proton Exchange Membrane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical Removal of Carbon Monoxide in Reformate Hydrogen for Fueling Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Sivagaminathan Balasubramanian, Charles E. Holland,* and John W. Weidner*,z Center in reformate hydrogen. In this design, the potential and gas flow are switched between the two filter cells so

Weidner, John W.

8

An experimental investigation of the ignition properties of hydrogen and carbon monoxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for syngas turbine applications S.M. Walton *, X. He, B.T. Zigler, M.S. Wooldridge Department of Mechanical of simulated syngas mixtures of hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and carbon mechanism for H2 and CO. Ă? 2006 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

9

Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Study of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on modified Zn/Cr catalysts by adsorption calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential heat of adsorption (q) of hydrogen (a) and carbon monoxide (b) as a function of the adsorbed amount (a) on Zn/Cr catalysts at 463/sup 0/K; 1) unpromoted catalyst, 2) catalyst promoted with 2.5% of K/sub 2/O.

Yoshin, S.V.; Klyacho, A.L.; Kondrat'ev, L.T.; Leonov, V.E.; Skripchenko, G.B.; Sushchaya, L.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Kinetics of the Reduction of Wüstite by Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide for the Chemical Looping Production of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced could be stored, e.g. by geological sequestration, making the overall process “carbon-neutral”, or “carbon-negative” when biomass is used as fuel. In addition, the hydrogen produced during the oxidation of FexO and metallic Fe in steam can be kept... Kinetics of the reduction of wüstite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide for the chemical looping production of hydrogen Wen Liu a,n, Jin Yang Lim b, Marco A. Saucedo a, Allan N. Hayhurst b, Stuart A. Scott a, J.S. Dennis b a Department of Engineering...

Liu, Wen; Lim, Jin Yang; Saucedo, Marco A.; Hayhurst, Allan N.; Scott, Stuart A.; Dennis, J. S.

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts which were examined by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The metal particle size and number of particles per area of catalyst increased with increasing metal loading. The particles were approx. 10 A. in diameter, cubo-octahedral shaped, and approx. 80-90% disperse. The STEM electron beam caused negligible damage to the samples. Hydrogen adsorption measurements showed that the hydrogen-iridium atom ratio was 1.2:1-1.3:1 and increased with decreasing metal loading. Temperature-programed desorption showed four types of adsorbed hydrogen desorbing at -90/sup 0/C (I), 15/sup 0/C (IV), 115/sup 0/C (II), and 245/sup 0/C (III). Types II and IV desorb from single atom sites and Types I and III from multiple atom sites. Type I is in rapid equilibrium with the gas phase. All desorption processes appear to be first order. Carbon monoxide adsorbed nondissociatively at 25/sup 0/C with approx. 0.7:1 CO/Ir atom ratio. It adsorbed primarily in linear forms at low coverage, but a bridged form appeared at high coverage.

Etherton, B.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Carbon monoxide absorbing liquid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present disclosure is directed to a carbon monoxide absorbing liquid containing a cuprous ion, hydrochloric acid and titanum trichloride. Titanium trichloride is effective in increasing the carbon monoxide absorption quantity. Furthermore, titanium trichloride remarkably increases the oxygen resistance. Therefore, this absorbing liquid can be used continuously and for a long time.

Arikawa, Y.; Horigome, S.; Kanehori, K.; Katsumoto, M.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Process for the production of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a metal boride, nitride, carbide and/or silicide catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contacting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a metal boride, carbide, nitride and/or silicide catalyst, such as titanium carbide, vanadium boride, manganese nitride or molybdenum silicide.

McGuiggan, M.F.; Kuch, P.L.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

17

Why sequence carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? Many microbes that use carbon monoxide as an energy source are found in high temperature environments such as geothermal areas. Researchers think that these carboxydotrophs may be involved in reducing potentially toxic carbon monoxide hotspots by combine with water to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which are in turn used for thermophilic energy conservation and carbon sequestration mechanisms. The project focuses on sequencing two closely related microbes, one of which is Carboxydothermus hydrogenformans. A strain of C. hydrogenformans has been grown in hydrogen-enriched synthesis gas (syngas), which contains a mix of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Researchers are interested in sequencing both microbial strains to track the genome's evolution and

18

Association of hydrogen metabolism with unitrophic or mixotrophic growth of Methanosarcina barkeri on carbon monoxide.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by the simultaneous consumption of methanol and CO...by the simultaneous consumption of methanol and CO...conbustion of fossil fuels. Carbon monoxide is...involves the production and consumption of a carbonyl group...served as experi- mental vessels. Immediately after...

J M O'Brien; R H Wolkin; T T Moench; J B Morgan; J G Zeikus

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Enhanced carbon monoxide utilization in methanation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide - containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is subsequently reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Surprisingly, hydrogen and water vapor present in the feed gas do not adversely affect CO utilization significantly, and such hydrogen actually results in a significant increase in CO utilization.

Elek, Louis F. (Peekskill, NY); Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Isotopic equilibration of carbon monoxide catalyzed by supported ruthenium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopic equilibration of carbon monoxide catalyzed by supported ruthenium was studied with oxygen-18 and carbon-13 labeled carbon monoxide in the presence and absence of hydrogen. The results showed that carbon monoxide was present on commercial alumina-supported ruthenium in a reactive undissociated form at 373/sup 0/K; that it adsorbed as a single carbonyl and in a geminal dicarbonyl form; and that hydrogen inhibited the exchange reaction by competitive adsorption and by stabilizing the carbonyl bond. The results elucidate the carbon monoxide methanation and Fischer-Tropsch reactions on this catalyst.

Bossi, A. (Cent. Ric. Novara); Zanderighi, L.; Carnisio, G.; Garbassi, F.; Giunchi, G.; Petrini, G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Photochemical generation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reduction of carbon dioxide and water under visible light irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO2...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO2...energy by producing fuels (hydrogen, carbon...M) in the reaction vessel; the gas contained...

Jean-Marie Lehn; Raymond Ziessel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Some general laws of the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The catalytic properties of supported transition metals in the hydrogenation of CO to hydrocarbons have been studied. A kinetic model interpreting the unusual dependence of the activation energy on temperature is proposed. It is shown that the catalytic activity (r) decreases and the selectivity with respect to methane (SCH/sub 4/) increases with an increase in the heat of adsorption of CO.

Golodets, G.I.; Pavlenko, N.V.; Tripol'skii, A.I.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Effect of the type of carrier on the properties of cobalt catalysts in the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of catalysts used in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ are determined to a significant degree by the carriers used in their preparation. This paper deals with a study of the effect of the type of carrier on the properties of cobalt-based catalysts in the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/. Co catalysts that are active in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ are those on which the adsorption of H/sub 2/ exceeds 3.10/sup -2/ mmole/g Co and the adsorptin of carbon monoxide exceeds 7.10/sup -2/ mmole/g Co. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen are adsorbed on active catalysts in weakly bound forms. A mechanism is proposed for the formatin of an active center and the adsorption of carbon monoxide on Co-catalysts which includes the appearance of a partial positive charge on the cobalt atom.

Lapidus, A.L.; Jem, H.C.; Krylova, A.Y.

1983-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

Carbon monoxide sensor and method of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide sensors suitable for use in hydrogen feed streams and methods of use thereof are disclosed. The sensors are palladium metal/insulator/semiconductor (Pd-MIS) sensors which may possess a gate metal layer having uniform, Type 1, or non-uniform, Type 2, film morphology. Type 1 sensors display an increased sensor response in the presence of carbon monoxide while Type 2 sensors display a decreased response to carbon monoxide. The methods and sensors disclosed herein are particularly suitable for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

McDaniel; Anthony H. (Livermore, CA), Medlin; J. Will (Boulder, CO), Bastasz; Robert J. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

25

SENSITIVE OPTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF CARBON MONOXIDE BY RESONANCE ABSORPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monoxide by Resonance Absorption Robert Gerlach and Nabil M.MONOXIDE BY RESONANCE ABSORPTION Robert Gerlach and Nabil M.the context of atmospheric absorption. The carbon monoxide

Gerlach, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster presented at the 16th Directions...

27

Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

Wayland, B.B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Desorption of carbon monoxide from nickel using mercaptans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An IR spectroscopic study on the displacement of carbon monoxide with 1-propyl, 2-propyl-, 1-butyl-, 2-butyl-, and tert.-butyl mercaptan from nickel foil and silica-supported nickel showed that at low carbon monoxide coverage on supported nickel, mercaptan adsorption initially converted bridged to linear carbon monoxide surface species. At higher mercaptan pressures, carbon monoxide desorbed into the gas phase. A small amount of carbon monoxide remained on the surface when the poisoned sample was evacuated, and additional carbon monoxide adsorbed when 5 mm Hg of carbon monoxide was added to the evacuated sample.

Neff, L.D.; Sturdivant, A.E.; Wallace, J.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Disproportionation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disproportionation of carbon monoxide was investigated mainly on a 5.5% Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst by infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption. The reaction was found to be of first order with respect to the surface concentration of CO below 200/sup 0/C, while at 450/sup 0/C the reaction proceeded as a second order reaction for the pressure of CO. Results obtained with predeposited carbon indicated that the disproportionation reaction requires an ensemble of several nickel atoms. In agreement with this result, the disproportionation did not take place readily on a 1.1% Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst on which a high dispersion of the metal was indicated by both infrared spectroscopy and the chemisorption of hydrogen. In the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) carbon monoxide desorbed in a single peak before 300/sup 0/C. Some of the carbon monoxide, however, underwent disproportionation during TPD and a carbon dioxide peak appeared at about 220/sup 0/C. Furthermore, carbon thus deposited on the surface was oxidized to carbon monoxide by oxygen supplied from the catalysts and gave a second peak of CO in TPD at temperatures higher than 300/sup 0/C. Possible sources of the oxygen were discussed.

Galuszka, J.; Chang, J.R.; Amenomiya, Y.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Catalytic activation of carbon monoxide on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In discussing the important basic aspects of carbon monoxide chemistry, this review covers the adsorption and reaction of CO with H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ on reduced metal surfaces. Carbon monoxide adsorption of the Group VIII metals exhibits certain patterns. Typically, as coverages exceed one-half, compression occurs in the monolayer and the molecules lose registry with the surface metal atoms. Particular sites associated with rough surfaces facilitate CO dissociation to the surface carbon; these sites may have a significant effect on selectivity in the CO hydrogenation reaction. The support used and the metal crystallite size both affect the catalyst activity and product selectivity. Indications are strong that a better knowledge of metal-support interactions combined with a more complete understanding of the surface chemistry involved will lead to improved catalyst systems in the future.

Vannice, M.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Carbon Monoxide Concentration Trends in Urban Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BOVE, J.L., AIRBORNE LEAD AND CARBON MONOXIDE...various procedures that release transmitter has been...conclusion for trans-mitter release. He also provided evidence...suburban counties, a larger fraction of the gasoline is undoubtedly...in the huts (indoor fires are used for space heating...

Merril Eisenbud; Laurel R. Ehrlich

1972-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

FTIR study of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on Pt/TiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZrO{sub 2}, and Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pt/TiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZrO{sub 2}, and Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts submitted to low-temperature reduction (LTR,200 C) and high-temperature reduction (HTR, 500 C) and exposed to hydrogen and carbon monoxide at room temperature were studied by infrared spectroscopy. There is a strong loss of transmission in the entire infrared spectra on Pt/TiO{sub 2} after its exposure to hydrogen, which is related to the reducibility of the support. A typical SMSI behavior (strong metal-support interaction), such as the decrease in carbon monoxide adsorption capacity, was detected on Pt/TiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZrO{sub 2} after exposure to hydrogen, even for the catalysts submitted to LTR treatment. Also a carbonyl band shift to lower wavenumber was observed on LTR-treated Pt/TiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZrO{sub 2}, and Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} after exposure to hydrogen. The authors interpreted this SMSI behavior as an electronic rather than morphological effect, which was induced by the presence of hydrogen spillover.

Benvenutti, E.V.; Franken, L.; Moro, C.C.; Davanzo, C.U.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

Reformer-pressure swing adsorption process for the production of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved process for the production of carbon monoxide by the steam reforming of hydrocarbons is described comprising: (a) catalytically reacting a fluid hydrocarbon feed stream with steam in a steam reformer; (b) passing the reformer effluent containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from the steam reformer, without scrubbing to remove the carbon dioxide content thereof, to a pressure swing adsorption system having at least four adsorbent beds, each bed of which, on a cyclic basis, undergoes a processing sequence; (c) recycling the carbon dioxide-rich stream to the steam reformer for reaction with additional quantities of the hydrocarbon feed stream being passed to the stream reformer to form additional quantities of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, with product recovery being enhanced and the need for employing a carbon dioxide wash system being obviated.

Fuderer, A.

1988-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

34

Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster Location P-19 Gregory K. Lilik, Andr L. Boehman Department of Energy & Mineral Engineering EMS Energy...

35

Mechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice analog samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be produced via radiolysis of carbon monoxide ices.5 Indeed, the effects of ionizing radiation on pure carbonMechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice901220f Binary ice mixtures of two carbon monoxide isotopomers, 13 C16 O and 12 C18 O, were subjected

Kaiser, Ralf I.

36

CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

Biraud, S

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Catalysis of the Carbon Monoxide-Steam Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The Catalysis of the Carbon Monoxide-Steam Reaction F. J. Long K. W. Sykes The kinetics of the carbon monoxide-steam reaction occurring heterogeneously at...nearly unity, while that with respect to steam is correspondingly lowered; a slight...

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient carbon monoxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FACT SHEET Carbon monoxide (CO), known as the Invisible Killer... , propane, oil, wood, coal, and gasoline. Exposure to carbon monoxide can cause flu-like symptoms and can... .)...

39

Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of low-level carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency in patients with ischemic heart disease has not been thoroughly studied. The issue is of concern because of the potential proarrhythmic effect of carbon monoxide in patients with ischemic heart disease. We studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. By using appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria, subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study to determine the effects of carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency at rest, during exercise, and during ambulatory activities. The carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. The carbon monoxide exposure protocol produced target levels in 60 minutes, and the levels were maintained for an additional 90 minutes to provide adequate time to assess the impact of carbon monoxide on the frequency of ventricular ectopic beats. The data on total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were analyzed for seven specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide or air exposure; (3) during a two-hour rest period; (4) during an exercise period; (5) during an exercise recovery period; (6) six hours after carbon monoxide or air exposure; and (7) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity.

Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.; Wiens, R.D. (St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Comparison of Three CarbonComparison of Three Carbon Monoxide Databases in ConnecticutMonoxide Databases in Connecticut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Three CarbonComparison of Three Carbon Monoxide Databases in ConnecticutMonoxide Databases in Connecticut Brian Toal, MSPHBrian Toal, MSPH Patricia Miskell, MPHPatricia Miskell, MPH Connecticut Department of Public HealthConnecticut Department of Public Health Environmental & Occupational

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reduction of Carbon Monoxide. Past Research Summary  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Research programs for the year on the preparation, characterization, and reactions of binuclear tantalum complexes are described. All evidence to date suggest the following of these dimeric molecules: (1) the dimer does not break into monomers under mild conditions; (2) intermolecular hydride exchange is not negligible, but it is slow; (3) intermolecular non-ionic halide exchange is fast; (4) the ends of the dimers can rotate partially with respect to one another. The binuclear tantalum hydride complexes were found to react with carbon monoxide to give a molecule which is the only example of reduction of CO by a transition metal hydride to give a complex containing a CHO ligand. Isonitrides also reacted in a similar manner with dimeric tantalum hydride. (ATT)

Schrock, R. R.

1982-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nickel and iron EXAFS of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum strain DSM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nickel and iron EXAFS of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum strain DSM ...

Neil R. Bastian; Gabriele. Diekert; Eric C. Niederhoffer; Boon Keng. Teo; Christopher T. Walsh; William H. Orme-Johnson

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b , Y.F. Zheng a , C.S. Lee a , N was used to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a hot-Âźlament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system in the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT)s. The CNTs synthesized from carbon monoxide validate

Zheng, Yufeng

44

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization October 5, 2010 - 10:56am Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me? Getting your heating pipes fixed can not only save you money, but also improve your health. "If we'd had a couple cold nights where I would've had to use my heat more than usual, it probably would've put me to sleep and left me there -- it was just too much carbon monoxide coming out in the house," says Mark Pickartz, of Van Buren, Ark. Pickartz's home was weatherized in February by his local community action agency, Crawford-Sebastian Community Development Council (C-SCDC). When energy auditors arrived to his house, they found that his home's heater was severely leaking the poisonous gas. C-SCDC, based in Fort Smith, Ark.,

45

Carbon Monoxide Toxicity after Lighting Coals at a Hookah Bar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unintentional non-fire-related (UNFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings continue to account for a significant health and economic burden in the United States. While most of these poisonings are related to faulty...

Ryan Misek; Christine Patte

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Carbon monoxide-silicon carbide interaction in HTGR fuel particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The corrosion of the coating-layers of silicon carbide (SiC) by carbon monoxide (CO) was observed in irradiated Triso-coated uranium dioxide particles, used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, by optical ...

Kazuo Minato; Toru Ogawa; Satoru Kashimura; Kousaku Fukuda…

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Titanium dioxide based high temperature carbon monoxide selective sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Titanium dioxide based high temperature carbon monoxide selective sensor Nancy O. Savagea , Sheikh as a trap for the oxidation products of CO and CH4. Upon oxidation of CO on ALC, carbonate species were detected, whereas the reaction of CH4 produced negligible carbonate species. The insensitivity of the ALC

Dutta, Prabir K.

48

Determination of the atherogenic potential of inhaled carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

he effects of chronic exposure to moderate levels of carbon monoxide upon the augmentation of arteriosclerotic plaque development were investigated in a series of in vivo studies in the cockerel (young rooster). This animal model has been well characterized, especially regarding the role of environmental agents in exacerbating early stages of plaque development. Cockerels injected with subtumorigenic doses of carcinogens exhibit markedly accelerated development of aortic arteriosclerotic plaques. Inhalation of mainstream smoke from two packs of cigarettes (100 minutes/day for 16 weeks) causes small but statistically significant increases in plaque size. As is the case with many animal models of plaque development, raised fat-proliferative plaques also appear in these animals following cholesterol feeding. Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous pollutant in urban environments, where it is derived largely from mobile sources and cigarette smoke. Exposure to chronically elevated carbon monoxide levels has been implicated in a number of health-related problems. Whether such exposure plays a role in the development of arteriosclerosis has not been determined conclusively. In the present study, three questions were posed: 1. Will inhaled carbon monoxide at levels of 50 to 200 parts per million (ppm)* (two hours/day for 16 weeks) be sufficient to augment arteriosclerotic plaque development in cockerels, in the absence of other plaque-promoting agents 2. Will the inhalation of 100 ppm carbon monoxide (two hours/day for 16 weeks), concomitant with the feeding of low levels (0.1%) of cholesterol, yield larger plaques than those obtained with either of these agents administered alone 3. Will inhalation of 100 ppm carbon monoxide (two hours/day for 11 or 22 weeks), by cockerels in whom plaques have already appeared, further augment plaque development Cockerels were exposed to carefully regulated levels of carbon monoxide in stainless-steel and Plexiglas dynamic exposure chambers.

Penn, A. (New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute carbon monoxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

28, 2007 Summary: OSHAReproToxin AcutelyHazardousWaste Carbon monoxide CalOSHAReproToxin Carbon Tetrachloride IARC-2BNTP Carbonic... toxins, biotoxins and acutely toxic...

51

Kinetic model of catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mechanism is proposed for describing the previous disclosed multiplicity of equilibrium states in the oxidation of carbon monoxide on metallic nickel. In contrast to the known mechanism for oxidation of CO on platinum metals it includes a nonlinear stage of carbon monoxide adsorption and a linear stage of oxygen adsorption. A kinetic model has been obtained and stage velocity constants have been found, providing a basis for obtaining a quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimental relations between the reaction velocity and the reagent concentrations. Opinions are stated in relation to the causes for evolution of the CO oxidation reaction from platinum metals to nickel.

Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Ostapyuk, V.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Terpolymerization of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a high molecular weight terpolymer of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide stable to 280.degree. C. and containing as little as 36 mol % ethylene and about 41-51 mol % sulfur dioxide; and to the method of producing said terpolymer by irradiation of a liquid and gaseous mixture of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide by means of Co-60 gamma rays or an electron beam, at a temperature of about 10.degree.-50.degree. C., and at a pressure of about 140 to 680 atmospheres, to initiate polymerization.

Johnson, Richard (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Photobiogeochemical cycling of carbon monoxide in the southeastern Beaufort Sea in spring and autumn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photobiogeochemical cycling of carbon monoxide in the southeastern Beaufort Sea in spring the distribution, photoproduction, microbial uptake, and air­sea exchange of carbon monoxide (CO), a key that in warmer seas. Carbon monoxide (CO) is the dominant sink for hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, thus

Vincent, Warwick F.

54

Infrared spectra of carbon monoxide adsorbed on palladium black  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors investigate the heterogeneous adsorption of carbon monoxide and the concurrent catalytic and sorptive properties of palladium black from the standpoint of a comprehensive analysis of the infrared spectra of the reaction pathways and their various products as well as the pressure dependence of the line behavior at various wavelengths.

Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Levintova, T.D.; Sokol'skii, D.V.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Catalyst for the methanation of carbon monoxide in sour gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention involves the synergistic effect of the specific catalytic constituents on a specific series of carriers for the methanation of carbon monoxide in the presence of sulfur at relatively high temperatures and at low steam to gas ratios in the range of 0.2:1 or less. This effect was obtained with catalysts comprising the mixed sulfides and oxides of nickel and chromium supported on carriers comprising magnesium aluminate and magnesium silicate. Conversion of carbon monoxide to methane was in the range of from 40 to 80%. Tests of this combination of metal oxides and sulfides on other carriers and tests of other metal oxides and sulfides on the same carrier produced a much lower level of conversion.

Kustes, William A. (Louisville, KY); Hausberger, Arthur L. (Louisville, KY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Synthesis and reactivity of sterically congested metallacyclobutenes and metal-mediated carbon-sulfur bond activation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methods for this conversion typically involve the production of byproducts like carbon monoxide and hydrogen

Vélez, Carmen L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON NICKEL FILMS: A LOW TEMPERATURE THERMAL DETECTION TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. B. Optical System Absorption Signal C. Small SignalNoise . Sensitivity of Absorption Spectroscopy EXPERIMENTSINFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON

Bailey, Robert Brian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Carbon Monoxide Oxidation by Bacteria Associated with the Roots of Freshwater Macrophytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consumption and production of atmospheric carbon monoxide by...the consumption of atmospheric carbon monoxide by...rapid oxidation of atmospheric CO to CO2 by soils...D. Influence of water table on carbon dioxide...rice fields and biogas generators: CH4, N2O, CO...

Jeremy J. Rich; G. M. King

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monoxide Poisoning from Propane- Fueled Forklifts." JournalMonoxide Poisoning from Propane- Fueled Fotklifts" Journalto the Indoor Use of Propane-Fueled Forklifts in Colorado

Apte, Michael G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Removal of carbon monoxide. Physical adsorption on natural and synthetic zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The utilization of natural zeolite materials in the elimination of polluting gases is investigated. Carbon monoxide pollution is emphasized because its concentration may reach dangerous levels in places such as vehicle tunnels, underground parking lots, etc. The elimination of carbon monoxide is also of interest in some industrial processes relating to the production of pure gases.

Alfani, F.; Greco, G. Jr.; Iroio, G.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Submitted to the Annals of Applied Statistics INTERPOLATING FIELDS OF CARBON MONOXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transport. CO AMS 2000 subject classifications: Carbon monoxide; satellite data; Bayesian hierarchi- cal models; interpolation; data assimilation 1 imsart-aoas ver. 2007/04/13 file: COpaper.tex date: March 24Submitted to the Annals of Applied Statistics INTERPOLATING FIELDS OF CARBON MONOXIDE DATA USING

Nychka, Douglas

62

Interaction of carbon monoxide with supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of carbon monoxide with Pt/..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ containing 0.5-5% Pt by weight has been investigated by means of thermal desorption and IR spectroscopy. It has been shown that CO is adsorbed in three different forms, corresponding to the desorption temperature intervals 25-250/sup 0/C (I), and 250-700/sup 0/C (II), and 550-850/sup 0/C (III). In the adsorption of CO in the first two forms, the metal takes part (absorption band at 2080 cm/sup -1/), and also the support (1800, 1260, 1390, 1470, 1550, and 1640 cm/sup -1/). The adsorption in form III probably takes place on oxidized platinum centers with the formation of strong surface carbonate structures. High temperatures tend to increase the adsorption of CO in forms II and III.

Savel'eva, G.A.; Galeev, T.K.; Popova, N.M.; Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Mishchenko, V.M.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity ...

Judy L. Mumford; Ron W. Williams; Debra B. Walsh; Robert M. Burton; David J. Svendsgaard; Jane C. Chuang; Virginia S. Houk; Joellen Lewtas

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Influence of the electrode material on carbon monoxide adsorption and electroreduction in aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide electroreduction was studied at rotating disk electrodes made of different materials (Cu, Au, Zn, Cd; amalgamated Cu; Al, Ga, In, glassy carbon, Sn, Pb, Mo, Fe, Ni, and certain binary systems). Positive partial currents which are evidence for a direct electroreduction of CO have been observed only at Zn, Ga, and Cd. The observation that CO is less susceptible to electroreduction than carbon dioxide is explained by the stronger chemisorption of carbon monoxide on the electrodes.

Osetrova, N.V.; Vasil'ev, Yu.B.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Reduction of carbon monoxide emissions with regenerative thermal oxidizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) have been extensively used for the control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from various sources. However, very little information is available on the ability of RTOs to control carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. This paper presents the results of extensive tests conducted on two RTOs to determine their VOC and CO control efficiencies. The inlet gas stream to the RTOs includes VOC and CO concentrations as high as 2,000 ppm and 3,600 ppm, respectfully. The testing demonstrated that both RTOs were capable of controlling greater than 98% of both inlet VOCs and CO. While the destruction efficiencies within the combustion chambers exceeded 99.9%, direct leakage past valves accounted for the lower control efficiencies. The tests indicated that the overall VOC and CO control efficiencies of the RTOs may be limited by valve leakage. The design and permitting of a RTO should include conservative control estimates which account for possible valve leakage.

Firmin, S.M.; Lipke, S.; Baturay, A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Crystallographic Snapshots of Cyanide- and Water-Bound C-Clusters from Bifunctional Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase/Acetyl-CoA Synthase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs) reversibly catalyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and are of vital importance in the global carbon cycle. The unusual catalytic CODH C-cluster ...

Kung, Yan

67

Chemisorption of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides on highly dispersed technetium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to study, in infrared spectroscopy, the surface compounds formed on adsorption of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides on Tc/SiO/sub 2/. The samples were prepared by soaking Aerosil with aqueous solution of ammonium pertechnetate containing 10 wt.% of Tc. Reduction with hydrogen to the metal was carried out at 700-800/sup 0/C. Results indicated that chemisorption of CO on highly dispersed technetium gives rise to a single type of linear and several types of multicentered adsorption forms. Occurrence of bridge form of adsorbed CO was also suggested on the basis of the data on chemisorption stoichiometry. Formation of a structure characterizable by absorption at 1790 cm/sup -1/ may indicate, only after protracted analysis, that the surface of the technetium introduced gradually suffers significant rearrangement facilitating formation of this type of complexes.

Serebryakova, N.V.; Sokolova, N.P.; Spitsyn, V.S.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Role of Microorganisms in the Consumption and Production of Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide by Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Winzer. 1932. Uber die Bildung von Essigsaure bei der biologischen Umsetzung von Kohlenoxyd und Kohlensaure mit Wasserstoff zu Methan. Biochem. Z. 245:2-12. 14. Fuchs, G., U. Schnitker, and R. K. Thauer. 1974. Carbon monoxide...

Ralf Conrad; Wolfgang Seiler

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Quantum cascade laser-based carbon monoxide detection on a second time scale from human breath  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present three different detection schemes for measuring carbon monoxide (CO) in direct absorption using a thermoelectrically cooled, distributed-feedback pulsed quantum cascade (qc) laser operating between 217...

B.W.M. Moeskops; H. Naus; S.M. Cristescu; F.J.M. Harren

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Sulfur tolerant molten carbonate fuel cell anode and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Molten carbonate fuel cell anodes incorporating a sulfur tolerant carbon monoxide to hydrogen water-gas-shift catalyst provide in situ conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen for improved fuel cell operation using fuel gas mixtures of over about 10 volume percent carbon monoxide and up to about 10 ppm hydrogen sulfide.

Remick, Robert J. (Naperville, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Continuous Measurement of Carbon Monoxide Improves Combustion Efficiency of CO Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF CARBON MONOXIDE IMPROVES COMBUSTION EFFICIENCY OF CO BOILERS Russell L. Branham ana James J. Prichard Ashland Oil Company Catlettsburg, KY ABSTRACT The paper describes the application of in-situ flue gas CO... measurement in the operation of CO Boilers and details the steps needed to optimize combustion efficiency. INTRODUCTION In the petroleum industry, the efficient operation of a fluid-cata1ytic-cracking unit, produces gases rich in carbon monoxide...

Gilmour, W. A.; Pregler, D. N.; Branham, R. L.; Prichard, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Analysis of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions and photochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and known emission factors for black carbon (BC) from South Asia yields 0.7 Tg yrĂ?1 (upper limit of about 1 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325); KEYWORDS: Soot, black carbon, CO, emissions, India Citation of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions

Dickerson, Russell R.

73

Hydrogen storage in multilayer carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multilayer carbon nanotubes obtained by pyrolysis and mechanical activation of plant-derived amorphous carbon are excellent sorbents for hydrogen.

D. V. Onishchenko; V. P. Reva; V. G. Kuryavyi

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Carbon monoxide annealed TiO2 nanotube array electrodes for efficient biosensor applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide annealed TiO2 nanotube array electrodes for efficient biosensor applications by anodic oxidation of titanium foil followed with O2 and CO annealing were employed as matrices consisted of Ti3+ defects with carbon-doping and exhibited well defined quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric

Cao, Guozhong

75

Factors Affecting the Efficiency of Carbon Monoxide Photoproduction in the St. Lawrence Estuarine System (Canada)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Factors Affecting the Efficiency of Carbon Monoxide Photoproduction in the St. Lawrence Estuarine System (Canada) ... The solar insolation-weighted mean apparent quantum yield of CO (?CO) decreased as much as fourfold with increasing salinity and showed a strong positive correlation with the dissolved organic carbon-specific absorption coefficient at 254 nm. ...

Yong Zhang; Huixiang Xie; Guohua Chen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10{degrees}C to 30{degrees}C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

Apte, M.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solar Carbon Monoxide, Thermal Profiling, and the Abundances of C, O, and their Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A solar photospheric "thermal profiling" analysis is presented, exploiting the infrared rovibrational bands of carbon monoxide (CO) as observed with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Kitt Peak, and from above the Earth's atmosphere by the Shuttle-borne ATMOS experiment. Visible continuum intensities and center-limb behavior constrained the temperature profile of the deep photosphere, while CO center-limb behavior defined the thermal structure at higher altitudes. The oxygen abundance was self consistently determined from weak CO absorptions. Our analysis was meant to complement recent studies based on 3-D convection models which, among other things, have revised the historical solar oxygen (and carbon) abundance downward by a factor of nearly two; although in fact our conclusions do not support such a revision. Based on various considerations, an oxygen abundance of 700+/-100 ppm (parts per million relative to hydrogen) is recommended; the large uncertainty reflects the model sensitivity of CO. New solar isotopic ratios also are reported for 13C, 17O, and 18O.

Thomas R. Ayres; Claude Plymate; Christoph U. Keller

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Carbon monoxide oxidation on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the CO2 product  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide oxidation on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the CO2 product J. I and angular distributions of CO2 produced by CO oxidation on Rh 111 have been measured as a function a fundamental and a practical point of view. CO2 formation serves as a model recombina- tion reaction

Sibener, Steven

79

Observations of rotating jets of carbon monoxide in comet Hale-Bopp with the IRAM interferometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of rotating jets of carbon monoxide in comet Hale-Bopp with the IRAM interferometer;eres, France Abstract. CO was observed on March 11, 1997 in comet Hale-Bopp with the IRAM Plateau de for parent molecules. We have developed a 3-D model simulating rotating spiral jets of CO gas. We present

Demoulin, Pascal

80

Crystallization and mutational studies of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from moorella thermoacetica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase (CODH), also known as Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS), is one of seven known Ni containing enzymes. CODH/ACS is a bifunctional enzyme which oxidizes CO to CO2 reversibly and synthesizes acetyl-CoA. Recently, X-ray crystal...

Kim, Eun Jin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Effect of redox potential, sulfide ions and a persulfide forming cysteine residue on carbon monoxide dehydrogenase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ni-Fe-S C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODH), which catalyzes the reversible oxidation of CO to CO2, can be stabilized in four redox states: Cox, Cred1, Cint, and Cred2. The best-supported mechanism of catalysis involves a one...

Feng, Jian

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Performance of Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cells using Hydrogen-depleted Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since solid oxide fuel cells can operate on fuel containing both hydrogen and carbon monoxide, it may prove possible to remove hydrogen from syngas streams… (more)

Burnette, David D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

84

Metal supported carbon nanostructures for hydrogen storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon nanocones are the fifth equilibrium structure of carbon, first synthesized in 1997. They have been selected for investigating hydrogen storage capacity, because initial temperature… (more)

Matelloni, Paolo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hydrogenation of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards the development of a useful mechanism for hydrogen storage, we have studied the hydrogenation of single-walled carbon nanotubes with atomic hydrogen using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We find that atomic hydrogen creates C-H bonds with the carbon atoms in the nanotube walls and such C-H bonds can be com-pletely broken by heating to 600 oC. We demonstrate approximately 65+/-15 at % hydrogenation of carbon atoms in the single-walled carbon nanotubes which is equivalent to 5.1+/-1.2 weight % hydrogen capacity. We also show that the hydrogenation is a reversible process.

Anton Nikitin; Hirohito Ogasawara; David Mann; Reinhard Denecke; Zhiyong Zhang; Hongjie Dai; KJ Cho; Anders Nilsson

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

Carbon Monoxide Tolerant Electrocatalyst with Low Platinum Loading...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particle. When used as an electrocatalyst for the oxidation of fuel at a fuel cell anode, this structure exhibits low platinum loading and elevated tolerance to carbon...

87

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

88

Relative and kinetic properties of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on a graphite surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) results after chemisorption of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) on polycrystalline graphite are presented. CO adsorbs onto graphite with a very low sticking coefficient. After CO chemisorption CO (mass 28 amu) desorbs in two temperature regions, between 400 and 700 K and between 1000 and 1300 K, and CO/sub 2/ (mass 44 amu) desorbs below 950 K. The intensity of the CO/sub 2/ signal is less than 1 order of magnitude lower than the CO intensity. After CO/sub 2/ adsorption the major desorption product is CO at high temperatures (1000 < T (K) < 1300), whereas a small amount of CO/sub 2/ desorbs around 450 K. The adsorption of C/sup 16/O/sub 2/ and C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ mixture leads to a nearly total oxygen scrambling of the CO/sub 2/ desorbed. A mechanism for CO and CO/sub 2/ interconversion on the graphite surface is presented in terms of surface oxide species, mainly lactones and semiquinones, and their relative stability. Assignments of the TPD features are proposed accordingly. Reaction studies on the CO/sub 2/ gasification of clean graphite and the CO disproportionation (Boudouard reaction) have been performed. A good agreement is found between the activation energies obtained and the desorption energies calculated from the analysis of the TPD results.

Marchon, B.; Tysoe, W.T.; Carrazza, J.; Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

1988-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Catalytic reactions on well-characterized vanadium oxide catalysts. 1. Oxidation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of carbon monoxide over unsupported and supported vanadium oxide catalysts was investigated from the standpoint of structure sensitivity. The activity of unsupported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ markedly decreased the turnover frequency, while the reduction-oxidation treatment of the fused catalyst increased it. The turnover frequency of V/sub 2/O/sub 5//TiO/sub 2/ with low V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content was much smaller than that of the V/sub 2/O/sub 5//TiO/sub 2/ with high V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content or the unsupported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Such a retarding effect of the TiO/sub 2/ support on the activity of the oxidation of carbon monoxide is in contrast to the known promoting effect of TiO/sub 2/ for the oxidations of various hydrocarbons. From these results coupled with the characterization of the catalysts, it was concluded that the oxidation of carbon monoxide on vanadium oxide catalysts is a structure-sensitive reaction and that the activity of surface defects such as steps, kinks, and vacancies is much higher than that of the surface V=O species in the smooth (010) face of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. 39 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

Mori, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Murakami, Y.

1984-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gravimetric study of adsorbed intermediates in methanation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to more fully elucidate the adsorbed intermediates and mechanism involved in catalytic methanation of CO on a typical nickel methanation catalyst. Rates of adsorption and desorption of surface species and of gasification of carbon were measured gravimetrically to determine their kinetics and possible roles in methanation. 19 refs.

Gardner, D.C.; Bartholomew, C.H.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Doped Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doped Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage U. S. DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Review May, 2003 structure carbon nanotube systems ·Not restricted to physisorption or chemisorption (weak covalent bond structures of doped carbon nanotubes APPROACH Based on C-H bond Dihydrogen bond H H M = + charge = - charge

92

Hydrogen storage in sonicated carbon materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen storage in purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs...3...for various periods of time using an ultrasonic probe of the alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The goal of this treatment was to open the carbon nanotubes...

M. Hirscher; M. Becher; M. Haluska; U. Dettlaff-Weglikowska…

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Mechanism of iron catalysis of carbon monoxide decomposition in refractories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors discuss the catalytic effects of selected iron phases (metals, oxides, sulfides, and carbides) on the Boudouard reaction studied in an effort to more fully understand the disintegration of refractories when exposed to CO for long periods of time. It was found that active Fe atoms generated from the reduction of the iron oxides, especially {alpha}-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, are the actual catalysts for the Boudouard reaction. The catalytic process confirmed by thermodynamic calculations, kinetic data, and X-ray diffraction data, consists of adsorption and decomposition of CO simultaneously forming carbides of iron. The chemisorption and subsequent decomposition of the iron carbides, rather than diffusion, constitute the rate-controlling process for carbon deposition.

Xu, M.W.P.; Brown, J.J. Jr. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Detection of Carbon Monoxide within the Magellanic Bridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mopra 22m and SEST 15m telescopes have been used to detect and partially map a region of 12CO(1-0) line emission within the Magellanic Bridge, a region lying between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The emission appears to be embedded in a cloud of neutral hydrogen, and is in the vicinity of an IRAS source. The CO emission region is found to have a 60um/100um flux density ratio typical for 12CO(1-0) detections within the SMC, although it has a significantly lower 12CO brightness and velocity width. These suggest that the observed region is of a low metallicity, supporting earlier findings that the Magellanic Bridge is not as evolved as the SMC and Magellanic Stream, which are themselves of a lower metallicity than the Galaxy. Our observations, along with empirical models based on SMC observations, indicate that the radius of the detected CO region has an upper limit of ~16 pc. This detection is, to our knowledge, the first detection of CO emission from the Magellanic Bridge and is the only direct evidence of star formation through molecular cloud collapse in this region.

E. Muller; L. Staveley-Smith; W. Zealey

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with...

96

Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic study of the interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benzene on the Pt(111) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benezene has been studied on the Pt(111) crystal surface by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The adsorptive changes reported in previous studies for carbon monoxide and benzene when potassium is coadsorbed are correlated with the UPS results presented here and are explained with the aid of a molecular orbital analysis. The authors find that the valence molecular orbitals increase their binding energy slightly when the potassium is coadsorbed, implying a model in which the adsorbates sense the potassium-induced changes in dipole field at the surface. 36 references, 11 figures.

Kudo, M.; Garfunkel, E.L.; Somorjai, G.A.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Observation of two-dimensional compositional ordering of a carbon monoxide and argon monolayer mixture physisorbed on graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commensurate monolayers of a mixture of 70% carbon monoxide and 30% argon on graphite are studied by neutron and low-energy-electron diffraction. A 2 x 2 superstructure due to 3:1 compositional ordering is observed below 25 K. The compositional ordering is most likely due to molecular-axis ordering of carbon monoxide molecules into a pinwheel pattern with argon atoms at the central sites of each pinwheel. Such a pinwheel structure has been predicted by Harris, Mouritsen, and Berlinsky for planar rotors with anisotropic interactions on a triangular lattice with vacancies.

You, H.; Fain, S.C. Jr.; Satija, S.; Passell, L.

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by rhenium and manganese polypyridyl catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compressed air and hydrogen production are all frequently discussed as viable options for future energy storage.

Smieja, Jonathan Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Impact of the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide on Gas Oil Hydrotreatment: Investigation on Liquids from Biomass Cotreatment with Petroleum Cuts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide on Gas Oil Hydrotreatment: Investigation on Liquids from Biomass Cotreatment with Petroleum Cuts ... A potential way of utilizing these bioliquids as fuels could be the direct hydrotreatment(6) or the cohydrotreatment with petroleum fractions,(7) such as atmospheric gas oils, to achieve the technical and environmental fuel standards, especially in terms of sulfur content. ...

Ana Pinheiro; Nathalie Dupassieux; Damien Hudebine; Christophe Geantet

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

Alan C. Cooper

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Design and Development of a Mid-Infrared Carbon Monoxide Sensor for a High-Pressure Combustor Rig  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A sensor for carbon monoxide measurement has been developed using a mid-infrared quantum-cascade (QC) laser operating in the fundamental band (?v= 1) of CO near 4.5 ?m. The fundamental band was chosen due to its stronger absorption line...

Camou, Alejandro

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

102

Transformation of carbon monoxide dimer surface structures on yttrium oxide modified by silver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been established that introducing ions of silver(II) in yttrium(III) oxide leads to the formation of a significant concentration of a paramagnetic dimer species (CO)/sub 2/-in the course of the adsorption of carbon monoxide, and that these dimers exhibit high thermal stability and reactivity. Reactions are proposed for the formation of the dimer species (CO)/sub 2//sup 2 -/ and (CO)/sub 2//sup -/ on the surface of the Ag/Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst that involve the reduction of the anion vacancies and a change in the oxidation state of the silver ions. Modifying the yttrium oxide with ionic silver leads to a marked decrease in the strength of the oxidative ability of the surface of the catalyst for CO, while the nature of the active sites of the yttrium oxide, which adsorbs CO in three forms, remains unchanged.

Vydrin, S.N.; Bobolev, A.V.; Loginov, A.Yu.

1987-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

103

Infrared spectroscopic study of the adsorption of carbon monoxide on silica-supported copper oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of carbon monoxide at room temperature (0.1 to 50 Torr) on silica-supported copper oxide was studied by infrared spectroscopy. Catalysts were prepared by deposition-precipitation or impregnation. After calcination two types of adsorbed CO were identified showing absorption bands at 2136 +- 3 and 2204 +- 1 cm/sup -1/, which are ascribed to CO adsorbed on copper(II) oxide and on isolated copper(II) ions in the silica surface, respectively. Reduction and reoxidation removed the band at 2204 cm/sup -1/ with all samples and raised the intensity of the 2136-cm/sup -1/ band with the precipitated catalysts but not with the impregnation catalyst. Evidence is brought forward that the isolated copper ions are mobilized during reduction and generate new copper (oxide) surface. The change in background transmission of the samples could be used to obtain further information about the interaction of O/sub 2/ and CO with copper oxide.

De Jong, K.P.; Geus, J.W.; Joziasse, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Modification of copper-chromium catalyst for steam conversion of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of model tests that show that the copperchromium sample is superior in stability and activity to the industrial NTK-5 catalyst. Under unfavorable conditions with the use of industrial converted gas containing more than 20 vol.% of carbon monoxide, and with sulfur compounds, chlorine, and ammonia as impurities, after 3 months of continuous operation in the temperature range 190-260 degrees the catalyst lost less than 10% of inactivity (with respect to the degree of CO conversion), whereas the activity of the industrial NTK-4 catalyst fell by 15% under the same conditions. It is shown that a catalyst not inferior in properties to the industrial NTK-4 catalyst can be obtained by modifying the copper-chromium catalyst with aluminum compounds.

Khabibullin, R.R.; Torocheshnikov, N.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Carbon monoxide adsorption/desorption processes over NaX zeolite and supported ruthenium catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The binding states of CO on NaX zeolite and RuNaX were investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy. Desorption peaks centered at around 390, 430, 490, and 520 K were observed from NaX following room-temperature adsorption of CO. The activation energy values corresponding to these peaks were calculated to be 41.4, 45.7, 53.8, and 57.7 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These peaks were also observed in desorption profiles from RuNaX although their temperatures were higher by 10 to 20 K. In addition, the desorption spectra from RuNaX also comprise two high-temperature peaks at around 575 and 640 K. With both the RuNaX and the NaX samples the temperature and relative intensities of the desorption peaks depended on pretreatment conditions and on the lapsed time between CO exposure to the sample and the commencement of programmed heating. Mass spectral analysis revealed that the gas desorbed at 300-500 K consisted mainly of CO while at higher temperatures CO{sub 2} was the main component. The desorption peaks below 500 K are attributed to the release of carbon monoxide from structural and intragranular or intergranular zeolitic pores. Lewis sites on the zeolite surface are found to facilitate activation of CO, resulting in its transformation to CO{sub 2}. The initial adsorption of carbon monoxide in zeolite pores and subsequent diffusion to metal sites leading to its disproportionation/oxidation is found to play an important role in the CO adsorption/desorption process on RuNaX.

Kamble, V.S.; Gupta, N.M.; Iyer, R.M. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

Schwarz, J.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Infrared spectra of carbon monoxide adsorbed on SiO sub 2 -supported lanthanide-Ni bimetallic catalysts and their catalytic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the surface properties of the lanthanide (rare earth) - transition metal intermetallics and lanthanide metal overlayers have attracted a growing interest from the point of view of technical applications in catalyst and hydrogen storage. However, despite the intrinsic interest and considerable potential of these novel materials, very little detailed work has been carried out with a view to unveiling the specific properties upon interactions of lanthanides with transition metals. It has been shown that Eu and Yb metals dissolve in liquid ammonia to yield homogeneous solutions containing the ammoniated electrons. When the transition metal powders are added to this solution, the metal powders react with the dissolved lanthanide metals in liquid ammonia to form novel bimetallic catalysts. Such a system can be used as a catalyst probe for studying the catalytic actions induced by interactions between the lanthanide and transition metals. The present investigation was extended to include a SiO{sub 2}-supported bimetallic systems obtained when Eu or Yb dissolved in liquid ammonia reacts with silica-supported Ni. Using Fourier transform (FT)-IR studies of adsorbed carbon monoxide the authors provided information about the way the surface components were disposed in this bimetallic system. Adsorbed carbon monoxide was used as a molecular probe for the nature of bimetallic surface since the IR spectra of adsorbed probe molecules directly reflected variations in the surface.

Imamura, Hayao; Sugimoto, Hiromi; Sakata, Yoshihisa; Tsuchiya, Susumu (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Triboemission and wear of hydrogenated carbon films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is suggested that perfluoropolyether lubricating oil coatings applied to the carbon overcoat film of magnetic recording layers become decomposed by electrons emitted from frictional surfaces. However, no work has as yet been reported as to triboemission of electrons from frictional carbon films. This paper describes the behavior of triboemission of electrons and the friction coefficient during wear of sputtered hydrogenated carbon films (with various hydrogen contents on the glass substrate). The triboemission of electrons, together with friction coefficient, was measured in a frictional system of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sliding on carbon films in a reduced dry air atmosphere. The worn surfaces of the carbon films were then observed using both a SEM and an AFM. The results showed that intense triboemission of electrons were observed during wear of hydrogenated carbon films. The electron emission intensity and friction coefficient transit from low to high with hydrogen content in the film. These results are discussed including physical properties of the carbon films such as internal stress and surface wettability.

Nakayama, Keiji [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

On the control of carbon nanostructures for hydrogen storage applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the control of carbon nanostructures for hydrogen storage applications Patrice Guay a , Barry L April 2004 Available online 25 May 2004 Abstract The storage of hydrogen in different carbon nanofibers, Doped carbon; C. Molecular simulation; D. Gas storage 1. Introduction Hydrogen storage in carbon

Rochefort, Alain

110

SURVEY OF THE LITERATURE ON THE CARBON-HYDROGEN SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Carbon and Hydrogen," AERE-C/M-248 (1955). C.W. Zielke,Hydrogen and Graphite," AERE-C/R- R. Lowrie, "Research on

Krakowski, R.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Studies on the sulfur poisoning of Ru-RuO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst for the adsorption and methanation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of sulfur poisoning on the chemisorption and on the methanation of carbon monoxide over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalyst were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and volumetric gas adsorption measurements. The CS{sub 2} molecules are {eta}` bonded to Ru sites through one of the sulfur atoms and decompose to the constituent elements on thermal activation. Each S atom may deactivate 3 to 10 metal sites even at low coverages, the effect being more pronounced on the chemisorption of hydrogen. The deposited sulfur (and possibly carbon also) sterically hinders the formation of certain multicarbonyl and monocarbonyl species (vCO in 2055-2140 cm{sup -1} region), which otherwise transform to methane via surface methylene groups in the presence of chemisorbed hydrogen and are found to play an important role in the low-temperature methanation activity of the studied catalyst. The Ru-CO species giving rise to lower frequency vibrational bands are affected to a lesser extent. The presence of sulfur also results in the development of some new CO binding states which are weak and are identified with the CO and S coadsorbed at Ru sites of different oxidation states or of varying crystallographic nature. The CO adsorbed in these states is not reactive to hydrogen. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Kamble, V.S.; Londhe, V.P.; Gupta, N.M. [Bhambha Atomic Research centre, Bombay (India)] [and others] [Bhambha Atomic Research centre, Bombay (India); and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons on platinum and palladium catalysts in the presence of sulfur dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on a study of the effect of sulfur dioxide on the activity of platinum and palladium catalysts with respect to oxidation of the principal toxic components in the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines: carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons (propylene (C/sub 3/H/sub 6/) and propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/)). The experiments were carried out in a flow system equipped with Beckman infrared analyzers to monitor the concentrations of CO and hydrocarbons and of sulfur dioxide. A series of thermal desorption experiments was carried out in a low-pressure flow system with mass spectrometric analysis of the gas phase. The results indicate that the low-temperature adsorption of sulfur dioxide on platinum (and also palladium) catalysts inhibits the oxidation of carbon monoxide and propylene. The poisoning effect of O/sub 2/ is due to blockage of the platinum centers for adsorption of the oxidizable compounds and oxygen.

Panchishnyi, V.I.; Bondareva, N.K.; Sklyarov, A.V.; Rozanov, V.V.; Chadina, G.P.

1988-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Using the HP-41CV calculator as a data acquisition system for personal carbon monoxide exposure monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of small, personal monitors as instruments for air pollution data acquisition, storage, and retrieval presents a new set of monitoring considerations. Portability, ruggedness, power supplies, and data capture are functions to be addressed in designing personal monitoring systems. The emphasis herein is on the data capture function. This paper describes experiences using the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV system as a data management system interfaced with personal carbon monoxide monitors (General Electric Carbon Monoxide Detector, Model 15EC53CO3). In general, the HP-41CV proved to be reliable, adaptable, and easy to use. Problems with the monitor power source (battery failure) were more frequent than with the HP-41CV itself. Using the HP-41CV for the specific data collection requirements of the Washington Microenvironment Study is a focal point of this presentation.

Fitz-Simons, T.; Sauls, H.B.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Atomistic Modeling of Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Carbons.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nanoporous carbons are among the widely studied and promising materials on hydrogen storage for on-board vehicles. However, the nature of nanoporous carbon structures, as well… (more)

Peng, Lujian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane over transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalysts. I. Catalyst composition and activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane was prepared by combining fluorite oxides with active transition metals. The fluorite oxides, such as ceria and zirconia, are oxygen-ion-conducting materials having catalytic properties usually at high temperatures. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of these oxides. The contact of the two types of materials gave rise to a high active oxidation catalyst. At a space velocity of about 42,000 h{sup {minus}1}, complete carbon monoxide oxidation in air occurred at room temperature on the Au{sub 0.05}[Ce(La)]{sub 0.95}L{sub x} catalyst and at ca. 100{degrees}C on Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts. At the same space velocity, total oxidation of methane on the Cu-Ce-O catalyst doped with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SrO took place at ca. 550{degrees}C. The specific carbon monoxide oxidation activity of the Cu-Ce-O catalyst was several orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional copper-based catalysts and comparable or superior to platinum catalysts. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water vapor poisoning. The enhanced catalyst activity and stability resulted from strong interaction of the transition metal and fluorite oxide materials. 44 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, F. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)] [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on a smooth palladium electrode: an in-situ infrared spectroscopic study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on a smooth palladium electrode in 1 M HClO/sub 4/ saturated with CO was studied by two in-situ IR reflectance spectroscopic methods: EMIRS (electrochemically modulated infrared reflectance spectroscopy) and LPSIRS (linear potential sweep infrared reflectance spectroscopy). Two types of adsorbed CO, linear and bridged, were identified from the observed IR spectra, the latter being the predominant surface species. The C-O stretching frequency of the linear CO shifts to higher frequencies at more positive potentials with a slope of 48 cm/sup -1//V. The frequency of the bridged CO increases by 63 cm/sup -1/ between -0.5 and 0.9 V(NHE) and its integrated band intensity decreases continuously in the same potential region while the intensity of the linear CO is almost constant up to 0.1 V and then decreases gradually with increasing positive potential. The surface selection rule of the IR reflection absorption spectroscopy was tested for the present system by using the p- and s-polarized light. It was found that only p-polarized light gave the IR spectra of CO adsorbed on the palladium electrode thus proving the selection rule at the electrode/solution interface.

Kunimatsu, K.

1984-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cysteine 295 indirectly affects Ni coordination of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-II C-cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •CODH-II harbors a unique [Ni-Fe-S] cluster. •We substituted the ligand residues of Cys{sup 295} and His{sup 261}. •Dramatic decreases in Ni content upon substitutions were observed. •All substitutions did not affect Fe-S clusters assembly. •CO oxidation activity was decreased by the substitutions. -- Abstract: A unique [Ni–Fe–S] cluster (C-cluster) constitutes the active center of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs). His{sup 261}, which coordinates one of the Fe atoms with Cys{sup 295}, is suggested to be the only residue required for Ni coordination in the C-cluster. To evaluate the role of Cys{sup 295}, we constructed CODH-II variants. Ala substitution for the Cys{sup 295} substitution resulted in the decrease of Ni content and didn’t result in major change of Fe content. In addition, the substitution had no effect on the ability to assemble a full complement of [Fe–S] clusters. This strongly suggests Cys{sup 295} indirectly and His{sup 261} together affect Ni-coordination in the C-cluster.

Inoue, Takahiro; Takao, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Takashi [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Wada, Kei [Organization for Promotion of Tenure Track, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)] [Organization for Promotion of Tenure Track, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Daifuku, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuko [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Fukuyama, Keiichi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)] [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sako, Yoshihiko, E-mail: sako@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

118

Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

Lueking, Angela (State College, PA); Narayanan, Deepa (Redmond, WA)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

119

Carbon monoxide in the solar atmosphere I. Numerical method and two-dimensional models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radiation hydrodynamic code CO5BOLD has been supplemented with the time-dependent treatment of chemical reaction networks. Advection of particle densities due to the hydrodynamic flow field is also included. The radiative transfer is treated frequency-independently, i.e. grey, so far. The upgraded code has been applied to two-dimensional simulations of carbon monoxide (CO) in the non-magnetic solar photosphere and low chromosphere. For this purpose a reaction network has been constructed, taking into account the reactions which are most important for the formation and dissociation of CO under the physical conditions of the solar atmosphere. The network has been strongly reduced to 27 reactions, involving the chemical species H, H2, C, O, CO, CH, OH, and a representative metal. The resulting CO number density is highest in the cool regions of the reversed granulation pattern at mid-photospheric heights and decreases strongly above. There, the CO abundance stays close to a value of 8.3 on the usual logarithmic abundance scale with [H]=12 but is reduced in hot shock waves which are a ubiquitous phenomenon of the model atmosphere. For comparison, the corresponding equilibrium densities have been calculated, based on the reaction network but also under assumption of instantaneous chemical equilibrium by applying the Rybicki & Hummer (RH) code by Uitenbroek (2001). Owing to the short chemical timescales, the assumption holds for a large fraction of the atmosphere, in particular the photosphere. In contrast, the CO number density deviates strongly from the corresponding equilibrium value in the vicinity of chromospheric shock waves. Simulations with altered reaction network clearly show that the formation channel via hydroxide (OH) is the most important one under the conditions of the solar atmosphere.

S. Wedemeyer-Boehm; I. Kamp; J. Bruls; B. Freytag

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

Israel Cabasso; Youxin Yuan

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation S.J.V. Frankland *, D hydrogen in individual single-shell carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes using a semiclassical model. The calculations predict that isolated hydrogen molecules inside of nanotubes have a Raman frequency that increases

Brenner, Donald W.

122

Doped Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage Ragaiy Zidan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doped Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage Ragaiy Zidan Savannah River Technology Center Savannah-capacity hydrogen storage material. The final product should have favorable thermodynamics and kinetics- board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. One of the candidates for solid hydrogen storage

123

Single Membrane Reactor Configuration for Separation of Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to develop a novel complementary membrane reactor process that can consolidate two or more downstream unit operations of a coal gasification system into a single module for production of a pure stream of hydrogen and a pure stream of carbon dioxide. The overall goals were to achieve higher hydrogen production efficiencies, lower capital costs and a smaller overall footprint than what could be achieved by utilizing separate components for each required unit process/operation in conventional coal-to-hydrogen systems. Specifically, this project was to develop a novel membrane reactor process that combines hydrogen sulfide removal, hydrogen separation, carbon dioxide separation and water-gas shift reaction into a single membrane configuration. The carbon monoxide conversion of the water-gas-shift reaction from the coal-derived syngas stream is enhanced by the complementary use of two membranes within a single reactor to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Consequently, hydrogen production efficiency is increased. The single membrane reactor configuration produces a pure H{sub 2} product and a pure CO{sub 2} permeate stream that is ready for sequestration. This project focused on developing a new class of CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for this new process concept. Several approaches to make CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for high-temperature applications have been tested. Membrane disks using the technique of powder pressing and high temperature sintering were successfully fabricated. The powders were either metal oxide or metal carbonate materials. Experiments on CO{sub 2} permeation testing were also performed in the temperature range of 790 to 940 C for the metal carbonate membrane disks. However, no CO{sub 2} permeation rate could be measured, probably due to very slow CO{sub 2} diffusion in the solid state carbonates. To improve the permeation of CO{sub 2}, one approach is to make membranes containing liquid or molten carbonates. Several different types of dual-phase membranes were fabricated and tested for their CO{sub 2} permeation in reducing conditions without the presence of oxygen. Although the flux was quite low, on the order of 0.01-0.001 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min, the selectivity of CO{sub 2}/He was almost infinite at temperatures of about 800 C. A different type of dual-phase membrane prepared by Arizona State University (ASU) was also tested at GTI for CO{sub 2} permeation. The measured CO{sub 2} fluxes were 0.015 and 0.02 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min at 750 and 830 C, respectively. These fluxes were higher than the previous flux obtained ({approx}0.01 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min) using the dual-phase membranes prepared by GTI. Further development in membrane development should be conducted to improve the CO{sub 2} flux. ASU has also focused on high temperature permeation/separation experiments to confirm the carbon dioxide separation capabilities of the dual-phase membranes with La{sup 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF6482) supports infiltrated with a Li/Na/K molten carbonate mixture (42.5/32.5/25.0 mole %). The permeation experiments indicated that the addition of O{sub 2} does improve the permeance of CO{sub 2} through the membrane. A simplified membrane reactor model was developed to evaluate the performance of the process. However, the simplified model did not allow the estimation of membrane transport area, an important parameter for evaluating the feasibility of the proposed membrane reactor technology. As a result, an improved model was developed. Results of the improved membrane reactor model show that the membrane shift reaction has promise as a means to simplify the production of a clean stream of hydrogen and a clean stream of carbon dioxide. The focus of additional development work should address the large area required for the CO{sub 2} membrane as identified in the modeling calculations. Also, a more detailed process flow diagram should be developed that includes integration of cooling and preheating feed streams as well as particulate removal so that stea

Micheal Roberts; Robert Zabransky; Shain Doong; Jerry Lin

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Novel Carbon Monoxide Sensor for PEM Fuel Cell Systems C.T. Holt, A.-M. Azad, S.L. Swartz, W.J. Dawson, and P.K. Dutta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Carbon Monoxide Sensor for PEM Fuel Cell Systems C.T. Holt, A.-M. Azad, S.L. Swartz, W The importance of carbon monoxide sensors for automotive PEM fuel cell systems is illustrated by a schematic will protect the PEM fuel cell stack; detection of CO is extremely important because too much CO will poison

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

125

Carbon promoted water electrolysis to produce hydrogen at room temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of the work was to conduct water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production. The electrochemical gasification of carbons… (more)

Ranganathan, Sukanya.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents such as hybrid carbon nanotubes, aerogels, and nanofibers, as well as metal-organic frameworks and conducting polymers. A...

127

Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

Lassila, David H. (Aptos, CA); Bonner, Brian P. (Livermore, CA)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

The ebullition of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide and total gaseous mercury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gaseous species depends of their solubility in the water. Since CH4 is relatively insoluble, ebullition-product of the respiration and is highly soluble in the water, leading ofte h- 1 . Measurements of H2, CO, CH4 and CO2 trapped gas concentrations and fluxes were used

O'Driscoll, Nelson

129

Interaction of copper oxides with reaction medium in heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen. IV. IR spectroscopic study of carbon monoxide interaction with copper oxide surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An IR spectroscopic study has been made of the interaction of CO with CuO prepared in different ways, and the interaction of O/sub 2/ with carbon monoxide preadsorbed on CuO. A number of Cu/sup +/CO surface complexes have been detected (2114-2148 cm/sup -1/) with a heat of adsorption about 79.5-180 kJ/mole. From an analysis of the nature of these complexes, we have evaluated the processes taking place on the CuO surface when it interacts with CO and have compared the properties of massive CuO with those of CuO on oxide supports. The data are interpreted on the assumption that extended defects - dislocations - exist and play an important role, determining to a considerable degree the properties of the massive CuO in the reaction of CO oxidation.

Lokhov, Y.A.; Popovskii, V.V.; Sadykov, V.A.; Tikhov, S.F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hydrogen storage in aligned carbon nanotubes and David T. Shaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen storage in aligned carbon nanotubes Yan Chena) and David T. Shaw Department of Electrical and thermogravimetric analysis show a hydrogen storage capacity of 5­7 wt% was achieved reproducibly at room temperature the samples to 300 °C and removing of the catalyst tips, can increase the hydrogen storage capacity up to 13

Chung, Deborah D.L.

131

J. Phys. Chem. 1994, 98, 11213-11219 11213 Vibrational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide at the Active Site of Myoglobin: Picosecond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys. Chem. 1994, 98, 11213-11219 11213 Vibrational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide at the Active Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, Califomia 94305 Received: April 27, 1994: In Final Form at Urbana-Champaign. Deparlment of Chemistry, Sfanford University. Hansen ExperimentaJ Physics Laboratory

Fayer, Michael D.

132

DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

Angela D. Lueking; Qixiu Li; John V. Badding; Dania Fonseca; Humerto Gutierrez; Apurba Sakti; Kofi Adu; Michael Schimmel

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

A New Approach to Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... carbon monoxide plus hydrogen respectively, under the usual conditions of temperature and pressure applying in gasification practice, the rates of reaction measured by the number of gm. moles of product ...

J. D. BLACKWOOD; F. K. McTAGGART

1959-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

134

Resilience of gas-phase anharmonicity in the vibrational response of adsorbed carbon monoxide and breakdown under electrical conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In surface catalysis, the adsorption of carbon monoxide on transition-metal electrodes represents the prototype of strong chemisorption. Notwithstanding significant changes in the molecular orbitals of adsorbed CO, spectroscopic experiments highlight a close correlation between the adsorbate stretching frequency and equilibrium bond length for a wide range of adsorption geometries and substrate compositions. In this work, we study the origins of this correlation, commonly known as Badger's rule, by deconvoluting and examining contributions from the adsorption environment to the intramolecular potential using first-principles calculations. Noting that intramolecular anharmonicity is preserved upon CO chemisorption, we show that Badger's rule for adsorbed CO can be expressed solely in terms of the tabulated Herzberg spectroscopic constants of isolated CO. Moreover, although it had been previously established using finite-cluster models that Badger's rule is not affected by electrical conditions, we find here th...

Dabo, Ismaila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Adsorbate effects on a mixed-valence compound: Carbon monoxide chemisorption on CeIr/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of stoichiometry change and CO chemisorption on the surface electronic structure of the mixed-valence compound CeIr/sub 2/. We show that the surface iridium to cerium ratio can be varied by changing sample temperature while sputtering. Carbon monoxide is found to adsorb 80% molecularly on the surface and cause a mild surface oxidation which induces a shift of electron density into available cerium f orbitals. Peaks due to the 4sigma, 1..pi.., and 5sigma CO molecular orbitals appear at different binding energies than those due to molecular CO on the pure iridium surface. This binding-energy shift as well as the high percentage of molecular CO on the surface (CO adsorption on pure cerium is completely dissociative) points toward a surface which has lost much of the elemental character of its two constituents upon compound formation.

Lindquist, J.M.; Hemminger, J.C.; Lawrence, J.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Auger electron spectroscopy, electron loss spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction of oxygen and carbon monoxide adsorption of Pd films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption of oxygen and carbon monoxide at room temperature on polycrystalline and (111) monocrystalline thin films of Pd vapor deposited on mice was investigated by AES, ELS, and LEED. The results show that adsorbate coverage depends strongly on surface microstructure, composition, and topography. Polycrystalline or Cl contaminated surfaces adsorb large amounts of the gases, while flat, monocrystalline surfaces will adsorb almost none. These results are quite different from those observed earlier using sputter etched and annealed bulk single cyrstals where adsorbate superlattices formed after rather low gaseous exposures. In the present work no superlattices were observed after exposures ranging up to several thousand langmuirs. The contradictory results obtained in the two cases are attributed to probable differences in surface microtopography and microstructure.

Vook, R.W.; De Cooman, B.C.; Vankar, V.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Remarkable catalytic activity of cobalt tetraphenylporphyrin modified on a titania for the oxidation of carbon monoxide below room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CoTPP on TiO/sub 2/-120s modified at 250 /sup 0/C under vacuum catalytically oxidized carbon monoxide rapidly with oxygen even at -79/sup 0/C. Its catalytic activity was incomparably higher than that of commercial Hopcalite. Comparison of its catalytic performance with those of the same catalyst or different TiO/sub 2/ supporting catalyst both evacuated at 200 /sup 0/C revealed unique features of the present catalyst in terms of its oxygen adsorption, the poisoning of adsorbed oxygen, and the insolubility of the complex in benzene. Both significant structural modification of the complex and its strong interaction with properly dehydrated TiO/sub 2/-120s brought about by evacuation at 250 /sup 0/C may induce such extraordinary activity. 14 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

Mochida, I.; Iwai, Y.; Kamo, T.; Fujitsu, H.

1985-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Adsorbate effects on a mixed-valence compound: carbon monoxide chemisorption on CeIr/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors studied the effects of stoichiometry change and CO chemisorption on the surface electronic structure of the mixed-valence compound CeIr/sub 2/. It is shown that the surface iridium to cerium ratio can be varied by changing sample temperature while sputtering. Carbon monoxide is found to adsorb 80% molecularly on the surface and cause a mild surface oxidation which induces a shift of electron density into available cerium f orbitals. Peaks due to the 4 sigma, 1 pi, and 5 sigma CO molecular orbitals appear at different binding energies than those due to molecular CO on the pure iridium surface. This binding-energy shift as well as the high percentage of molecular CO on the surface (CO adsorption on pure cerium is completely dissociative) points toward a surface which has lost much of the elemental character of its two constituents upon compound formation.

Lindquist, J.M.; Hemminger, J.C.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effects of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotubes: Metallic hydrogen decoration O. Gulseren,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of hydrogen adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotubes: Metallic hydrogen decoration O. Gu of carbon nanotubes undergo dramatic changes with hydrogen chemisorption from first principle calculations other isomers can be insulating. For both zigzag and armchair nanotubes, hydrogenation of each carbon

Yildirim, Taner

140

Effective hydrogen storage in single-wall carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen-storage behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes was studied using molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic calculations. Hydrogen atoms with kinetic energy of 16–25 eV were observed to penetrate into and be trapped inside the tube. Consecutively injected H atoms form hydrogen molecules, and gradually condense to become liquid hydrogen in the tube. The density of injected hydrogen in the tube and the pressure on the wall of the nanotube induced by the stored hydrogen molecules were evaluated at room temperature.

Yuchen Ma; Yueyuan Xia; Mingwen Zhao; Ruijin Wang; Liangmo Mei

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Simultaneous adsorption of carbon and hydrogen on Ni(100). Nature of new forms of hydrogen absorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have analyzed the form of hydrogen adsorption on Ni(100) upon simultaneous adsorption of carbon and hydrogen in the cluster approximation using the nonempirical Hartree-Fock method with subsequent allowance for electron correlation energy. The effect of carbon on the adsorbed hydrogen layer is indirect, through the surface metal atoms; and this perturbation is so great that it leads to substantial change in the type of bonding of the hydrogen to the surface. The calculations predict two types of adsorbed hydrogen on Ni(100). In the symmetric state /sup 2/A', the hydrogen has a modified four-coordinate bond with surface nickel atoms (the B/sub 4/ state) at a short distance to the surface (R/sub perpendicular to/ approx. 0.05 A). In this state, the adsorbed hydrogen tends to penetrate into the volume. In the other antisymmetry state /sup 2/A'', the hydrogen has a bridge bond (the B/sub 2/ state). The calculations predict that in this state the strength of the bond between hydrogen and the surface is greater than in the B/sub 4/ state. The bridge structure for hydrogen is not subject to a strong effect from adsorbed carbon. On the basis of an analysis of the calculated vibrational frequencies of the hydrogen-surface bond and other electronic parameters, they propose possible surface structures for hydrogen and carbon when they are simultaneously adsorbed on Ni(100)

Avdeev, V.I.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Carbon dioxide recovery from an integrated coal gasifier, combined cycle plant using membrane separation and a CO2 gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scheme is described for electricity production based on coal gasification with recovery of carbon dioxide. In this scheme, coal is gasified into a coal gas, consisting mainly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A ...

Chris Hendriks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Report on the evening discussion: “Hydrogen storage in carbon materials”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen may be the most important energy carrier of the future as soon as the problem of hydrogen storage is solved. Storing of hydrogen under high pressure or as liquid costs much energy. Furthermore a high pressure or liquid hydrogen tank in a fuel cell driven vehicle would be much larger and heavier compared to a typical gasoline tank. In metal hydride tanks the stored hydrogen density is higher but the tank would be much too heavy (for a comparison see Fig. 1). Since the first promising results of Heben et al. in 1997 on hydrogen storage in single walled carbon nanotubes and the spectacularly large storage capacities in carbon nanofibers from the Baker and Rodriguez group in 1998 considerable research activity has been started all over the world to investigate hydrogen storage in carbon materials. Especially car industry is very interested and is waiting for a material with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity above 6.5 wt%. In this report the evening discussion on “Hydrogen storage in carbon materials” is summarized.

Andrea Quintel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

HYDROGEN STORAGE IN CARBON NANOTUBES JOHN E. FISCHER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN STORAGE IN CARBON NANOTUBES JOHN E. FISCHER UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA * SOME BASIC NOTIONS * BINDING SITES AND ENERGIES * PROCESSING TO ENHANCE CAPACITY: EX: ELECTROCHEMICAL Li INSERTION of Li+. AND: van der Waals interaction NANOTUBES CAPILLARITY: metals

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidental carbon monoxide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health Collection: Biology and Medicine 33 Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala Summary: pollution exposures to carbon...

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerates carbon monoxide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health Collection: Biology and Medicine 31 Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala Summary: pollution exposures to carbon...

148

Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotube with vacant defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is important for its engineering applications and hydrogen energy storage. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on a SWCNT with a vacant defect, focusing on the effect of the vacant defect size and external parameters such as temperature and pressure. We find that hydrogen can be physisorbed inside a SWCNT through a vacant defect when the defect size is above a threshold. By controlling the size of the defects, we are able to extract hydrogen molecules from a gas mixture and store them inside the SWCNT. We also find that external parameters, such as low temperature and high pressure, enhance the physisorption of hydrogen molecules inside the SWCNT. In addition, the storage efficiency can be improved by introducing more defects, i.e., reducing the number of carbon atoms on the SWCNT.

Sun, Gang; Shen, Huaze; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei, E-mail: limei.xu@pku.edu.cn [International Center for Quantum Materials and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Tangpanitanon, Jirawat [University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire CB2 1TP (United Kingdom); Wen, Bo [International Center for Quantum Materials and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Heqing Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Xue, Jianming [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydrogen storage in carbon materials—preliminary results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent developments aiming at the accelerated commercialization of fuel cells for automotive applications have triggered an intensive research on fuel storage concepts for fuel cell cars. The fuel cell technology currently lacks technically and economically viable hydrogen storage technologies. On-board reforming of gasoline or methanol into hydrogen can only be regarded as an intermediate solution due to the inherently poor energy efficiency of such processes. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanofibers may lead to an efficient solution to the above described problems.

Ludwig Jörissen; Holger Klos; Peter Lamp; Gudrun Reichenauer; Victor Trapp

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide within a reformer 10 is disclosed. According to the method, a stream including an oxygen-containing gas is directed adjacent to a first vessel 18 and the oxygen-containing gas is heated. A stream including unburned fuel is introduced into the oxygen-containing gas stream to form a mixture including oxygen-containing gas and fuel. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and unburned fuel is directed tangentially into a partial oxidation reaction zone 24 within the first vessel 18. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fuel is further directed through the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 to produce a heated reformate stream including hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Steam may also be mixed with the oxygen-containing gas and fuel, and the reformate stream from the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 directed into a steam reforming zone 26. High- and low-temperature shift reaction zones 64,76 may be employed for further fuel processing.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (Cambridge, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

States of cobalt and iron in catalysts supported in TiO{sub 2} from data of diffuse reflectance IR spectra of adsorbed carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The variations in the oxidation states of cobalt and iron atoms in pure and mixed Co- and Fe-containing catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2} as a function of the conditions in which the catalysts were prepared and preliminarily treated were studied by analysis of the IR spectra of carbon monoxide adsorbed on these catalysts. A mutual influence of the components was discovered; iron was found to promote reduction of cobalt.

Davydov, A.A. [G.K. Boreskov Inst. of Catalysis, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Coville, N. [Univ. of the Wiswatersrand Wits, Johannesburg (South Africa)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Relation between surface adsorption states and emf in a solid electrolyte concentration cell during carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum studied by local current measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of measuring adsorption during surface catalysis has been emphasized often. This is true for the oxidation of carbon monoxide on a platinum surface. Surface adsorption states during the reaction under steady states can be learned from electromotive force (emf) measurement with appropriate assumptions. Two mechanisms for emf generation have been proposed, one is that only oxygen activity generates emf, the other is that both oxygen and CO adsorption generates emf.

Okamoto, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kudo, T.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

praxair.com praxair.com Copyright © 2003, Praxair Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion BY Robert Zawierucha, Kang Xu and Gary Koeppel PRAXAIR TECHNOLOGY CENTER TONAWANDA, NEW YORK DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Workshop Augusta, GA August 2005 2 Introduction Regulatory and technical groups that impact hydrogen and hydrogen systems ASME, DOE, DOT etc, Compressed Gas Association activities ASTM TG G1.06.08 Hydrogen pipelines and CGA-5.6 Selected experience and guidance Summary and recommendations 3 CGA Publications Pertinent to Hydrogen G-5: Hydrogen G-5.3: Commodity Specification for Hydrogen G-5.4: Standard for Hydrogen Piping at Consumer Locations G-5.5: Hydrogen Vent Systems G-5.6: Hydrogen Pipeline Systems (IGC Doc 121/04/E) G-5.7: Carbon Monoxide and Syngas

154

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5003: Carbon Displacement Using Net-Zero Carbon Sources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Date: January 4, 2006 3 Date: January 4, 2006 Title: Carbon Displacement Using Net-Zero Carbon Sources Originator: Elvin Yuzugullu Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: April 4, 2006 Item: "... if 175 billion kWh of grid electricity (10% of the growth of the electric generation market in 2025) is replaced by fuel cells operating on hydrogen at 50% LHV efficiency, about 10.5 million tons of hydrogen would be needed. If this hydrogen were made from a non-carbon (e.g. nuclear) or net-zero carbon (e.g. biomass, coal with carbon sequestration) source, then it could potentially displace about 27.5 million tons of carbon." Calculations/References: Analysis by TIAX for DOE, August 24, 2005: * "10.5 million tons of hydrogen" Required H 2 = 175 billion kWhe

155

Support and crystallite effects in CO hydrogenation on nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen were studied on seven alumina-supported catalysts containing 0.5-23% nickel, four silica-supported catalysts containing 2.7-15% nickel, and 2.8 and 15% nickel on titanium oxide. On the silica and alumina-supported catalysts, hydrogen adsorption, per cent reduction of metal, carbon monoxide/hydrogen adsorption ratio, and methane yield increased with increasing metal dispersion, the methane turnover number decreased with increasing metal dispersion, and the carbon monoxide turnover number was not affected by dispersion. Hydrogen adsorption was suppressed by the titanium dioxide support. The suppression of hydrogen adsorption and the activity for carbon monoxide hydrogenation decreased as a function of support in the order TiO/sub 2/ > Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ > SiO/sub 2/ and apparently depended on the strength of the electronic interaction of support and metal. The selectivity shifted to higher hydrocarbons as the metal dispersion increased and as the carbon monoxide/hydrogen adsorption ratio increased. Effects of preparation method are also reported.

Bartholomew, C.H.; Pannell, R.B.; Butler, J.L.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Kinetics and mechanisms of interactions of nitrogen and carbon monoxide with liquid niobium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics and mechanisms of interactions of N{sub 2} and CO with liquid niobium were investigated in the temperature range of 2,700 to 3,000 K in samples levitated in N{sub 2}/Ar and CO/Ar streams. The nitrogen absorption and desorption processes were found to be second-order with respect to nitrogen concentration, indicating that the rate controlling step is either the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the liquid surface or dissociation of absorbed nitrogen molecules into adsorbed atoms. The carbon and oxygen dissolution in liquid niobium from CO gas is an exothermic process and the solubilities of carbon and oxygen (C{sub Ce}, C{sub Oe} in at%) are related to the temperature and the partial pressure of CO. The reaction CO {yields} (C) + (O) along with the evaporation of niobium oxide takes place during C and O dissolution, whereas C and O desorption occurs via CO evolution only.

Park, H.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Free-radical reactions in glow and explosion of carbon monoxide-oxygen mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of published compilations of rate coefficients of free-radical reactions yields reactions that are associated with chain branching in mixtures of CO and O/sub 2/ and small quantities of hydrogen or water vapor. The complete mechanism included diffusion of HO/sub 2/ radicals to the vessel wall and their adsorption and reaction at the surface. This mechanism is applied to the data of E.J. Buckler and R.G.W. Norrish on the branched-chain explosion of CO-O/sub 2/ mixtures containing H/sub 2/ in the order of 1 mm Hg. Substantial agreement is found between theory and experiment. Further, the mechanism is applied to experiments of Bond, Gray, and Griffiths with an H/sub 2/ content of 0.01-0.05 mm Hg. By specifying details of the adsorption and surface reaction of HO/sub 2/ on the basis of Langmuir's adsorption the phenomenon of flow is explained and the regions of slow reaction, glow, and explosion are described in accord with the experimental data. It is confirmed that the reaction between CO and O/sub 2/ requires the presence of a hydrogenous compound such as H/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, CH/sub 4/, etc., and that ''dry'' homogenous reaction is not possible except at very high temperatures.

Von Elbe, G.; Lewis, B.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n+1).gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n.gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Goldberg, Robert I. (Selden, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on ZSM-5 zeolites. Infrared spectroscopic study and quantum-chemical calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low temperature adsorption of CO was studied on H-ZSM-5 zeolites modified by dehydroxylation, ionic exchange with Al/sup 3 +/, and impregnation with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and on Na-ZSM-5 and CaH-ZSM-5 zeolites. It was found that interaction of CO with framework OH groups results in the formation of a hydrogen-bonded CO complex whose OH bond frequency is decreased by 310-320 cm/sup -1/ compared with that of free hydroxyls. For the less acidic framework hydroxyls in large cavities of H/sub 70/Na/sub 30/-Y zeolite the observed shift is 275 cm/sup -1/. With ZSM-5 zeolites, at least six types of electron-accepting sites are observed originating from nonframework Al species (band of CO in the interaction complex: 2132, 2222, 2202, 2195, and 2198 cm/sup -1/) and the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ microcrystalline phase (CO band at 2153 cm/sup -1/). The CO bond orders calculated by the CNDO/2 method for the CO interaction complexes with models of surface sites increase in the following order: > O-CO < > OH-CO approx. ..-->.. Al-CO approx. = Na-CO < alumina-CO approx. = Ca-CO < ..-->.. Si-CO < Al(cationic)-CO. A correlation between the calculated bond orders of CO and the observed vibrational frequencies of CO-forming interaction complexes is drawn.

Kustov, L.M.; Kazansky, V.B.; Beran, S.; Kubelkova, L.; Jiru, P.

1987-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Carbon monoxide line emission as a CMB foreground: tomography of the star-forming universe with different spectral resolutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rotational lines of carbon monoxide and the fine structure lines of CII and of the most abundant metals, emitted during the epoch of enhanced star formation in the universe, are redshifted in the frequency channels where the present-day and future CMB experiments are sensitive. We estimate the contribution to the CMB angular power spectrum by the emission in such lines in merging star-forming galaxies. We used the Lacey-Cole approach to characterize the distribution of the merging halos, together with a parametrization for the star formation rate in each of them. Using observational data from a sample of local, low-redshift, and high-redshift objects, we calibrated the luminosity in each line as a function of the star formation rate. We show that the correlation term arising from CO line emission is a significant source of foreground for CMB in a broad range of frequencies (in particular in the 20-60 GHz band) and for 1000

Mattia Righi; Carlos Hernandez-Monteagudo; Rashid Sunyaev

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Synthesis of higher alcohols from carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a slurry reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Higher, i.e. C{sub 2{sup +}}, alcohols are desired as gasoline additives, feedstocks for producing ethers and as alternative fuels for automobiles. In all cases, the backbone branching of an alcohol improves octane rating, which is essential for good engine performance. These types of branched, higher alcohols are the desired products for a process converting synthesis gas, a CO and H{sub 2} mixture, often generated from coal gasification. Based on this premise, promoted ZnCr oxide catalysts appear to be as one of the best avenues for further investigation. Once this investigation is complete, a natural extension is to replace the Cr in the ZnCr oxide catalyst with Mo and W, both in the same elemental triad with Cr. Mo has already been shown as an active HAS catalyst, both on a SiO{sub 2} support and in the MoS{sub 2} form. The three catalyst combinations, ZnMo, ZnW, and MnCr oxides will be tested in the stirred autoclave system. However, if none of the three indicate any comparable activity and/or selectivity toward higher alcohols as compared with other HAS catalysts, then an investigation of the effects of Cs promotion on the ZnCr oxide methanol catalysts will be executed.

McCutchen, M.S.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide hydrogen-steam mixtures, unusual product distributions and mechanistic implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over recent years, considerable interest has developed in hydrocarbon synthesis via direct processing of H/sub 2/-lean synthesis gases which are produced by the ''second generation'' of thermally efficient coal gasifiers. To directly process gases with a H/sub 2//CO ratio less than 0.5, requires that water be mixed with the reactor feed gas so that additional H/sub 2/ is generated in-situ via the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction. This obviously requires the use of catalysts which are active for both the synthesis and WGS reactions. The fact that most Group VIII metals are active for both reactions is well demonstrated by the development of the Kolbel-Engelhardt (KE) synthesis in which all the H/sub 2/ is formed in-situ. The authors previously examined the effect of H/sub 2//CO/H/sub 2/2O feed ratios on CO conversion rates (4); the present report concerns its effect upon hydrocarbon product distributions. In the experiments described, as the H/sub 2//CO ratio was reduced from 2.0 (Typical Fischer-Tropsch (FT) conditions), sufficient H/sub 2/O was added to compensate for the H/sub 2/ deficiency based on the assumption that all added H/sub 2/O was converted to H/sub 2/ via the WGS reaction.

Chaffee, A.L.; Ekstrom; Lapszewica, J.; Loeh, H.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage 5 Cristian I surface area carbon materials for hydrogen storage continues to attract interest because predicted high potential for hydrogen storage on metal-decorated carbon supports, the experimental

Pennycook, Steve

166

Infrared spectroscopic studies of carbon monoxide adsorbed on a series of silica-supported copper catalysts in different oxidation states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the adsorption of carbon monoxide (358-493 K, 0.1-20 kPa) on four copper-on-silica (2-10 wt% Cu) catalysts prepared by the ion-exchange technique. The measurements are made for each sample in three different states: unreduced (predominantly Cu{sup 2+}), and reduced (Cu{sup 0}), and partially reoxidized in nitrous oxide (Cu{sup +}). On unreduced samples, a major absorption band between 2127 and 2132 cm{sup {minus}1} due to CO adsorbed on small CuO particles and a weak band at 2199 cm{sup {minus}1} due to CO on isolated Cu{sup 2+} ions incorporated in the silica surface have been identified. The former adsorption obeys a Langmuir isotherm with a heat of adsorption of 29 kJ/mol independent of CuO particle size and surface coverage. After catalyst reduction, the major absorption band lies between 2090 and 2113 cm{sup {minus}1} and arises from CO linearly bound to very small (1- to 5-nm) copper metal clusters. The observed frequency shifts indicate the presence of steps and terraces similar to low index Cu planes in very small particles (1- to 2-nm), and the presence of similar higher index Cu planes on larger clusters (2- to 5-nm). The absorption is described by a Freundlich isotherm with the heat of CO adsorption decreasing with coverage from 50 to 22 kJ/mol on bigger particles but more constant (27 to 22 kJ/mol) on small particles. A surface copper/CO atomic ratio increasing from 5 to 12 is established at equilibrium saturation between 358 and 493 K using extinction coefficients determined in this study. In the reduced catalysts, a weakly adsorbed ({Delta}H{sub a} = {minus}20 kJ/mol) species assigned to CO bound to isolated Cu{sup +} ions is also found and absorbs at 2175 cm{sup {minus}1}. The frequency of this band does not vary with catalyst loading and is not affected by reoxidation of the catalyst in nitrous oxide.

Kohler, M.A.; Wainwright, M.S.; Trimm, D.L.; Cant, N.W. (Macquarie Univ., New South Wales (Australia) Univ. of South Wales (Australia))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Increased combustion rate of chlorobenzene on Pt/?-Al2O3 in binary mixtures with hydrocarbons and with carbon monoxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic combustion of chlorobenzene on a 2 wt.% Pt/?-Al2O3 catalyst in binary mixtures with various hydrocarbons (toluene, benzene, cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, 2-butene, and ethene) and with carbon monoxide has been explored. For all binary mixtures used the (excess of) added hydrocarbon increased the rate of conversion of chlorobenzene. With 2-butene, T50% and T100% for chlorobenzene were reduced by 100 and 200°C, respectively. Toluene and ethene were almost equally efficient as 2-butene. Co-feeding benzene or carbon monoxide resulted in a much smaller decrease of the T50%. The additional heat and water production in hydrocarbon combustion may contribute to some extent to the observed rate acceleration, but removal of Cl from the surface due to the hydrocarbon appears to be the major factor. The co-feeding of hydrocarbons invariably reduced the output of polychlorinated benzenes, which are formed as byproducts in the combustion of chlorobenzene on Pt/?-Al2O3. Again, especially toluene, ethene, and 2-butene were very efficient. Benzene — as well as cyclohexane, cyclohexene, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene, which were converted in situ into benzene — was much less effective, due to chlorination of the aromatic nucleus. In chlorobenzene–CO mixtures the levels of polychlorinated benzenes were almost as high as with chlorobenzene per se. Removal of Cl from the surface (mainly in the form of HCl) by (non-aromatic) hydrocarbons is responsible for reducing the formation of byproducts.

R.W. van den Brink; R. Louw; P. Mulder

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Engineering for Sustainability http://engineering.tufts.edu/ Nanoscale Gold Catalysts for the Upgrade of Hydrogen used in Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Upgrade of Hydrogen used in Fuel Cells What is the problem? Fuel processing by steam reforming or partial oxidation is presently used to produce a hydrogen-rich gas stream to feed the low- temperature PEM fuel cells. Impurities, such as carbon monoxide and sulfur, must be removed from the hydrogen stream

Tufts University

169

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo MARUYAMA1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes * Shigeo-8656 The hydrogen storage mechanism of SWNTs was studied through molecular dynamics simulations. Assuming the simple : Molecular Dynamics Method, Hydrogen Storage, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Lennard-Jones, Adsorption

Maruyama, Shigeo

170

Mechanics of hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes Y.L. Chen a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanics of hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes Y.L. Chen a , B. Liu a,Ă?, J. Wu a , Y. Huang b 17 July 2008 Keywords: Hydrogen storage Carbon nanotube Continuum model Analytical solution Atomistic simulations a b s t r a c t A continuum mechanics model is established for hydrogen storage in single

Jiang, Hanqing

171

Atomic hydrogen interactions with amorphous carbon thin films Bhavin N. Jariwala,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic hydrogen interactions with amorphous carbon thin films Bhavin N. Jariwala,1 Cristian V-scale interactions of H atoms with hydrogenated amorphous carbon a-C:H films were identified using molecular dynamics through a detailed analysis of the MD trajectories. The MD simulations showed that hydrogenation occurs

Ciobanu, Cristian

172

Structure of middle distillate fuels on the atomic carbon and hydrogen to carbon ratio at alpha position to aromatic rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alkyl, naphthenic, or total carbon atoms of the functional groups at alpha position to aromatic rings and their hydrogen to carbon ratio are some of the important parameters for structural analysis of fossil fuel products. In this paper, the authors present a number of novel formula-structure relationships for precise determination of different carbon atom types at alpha position to aromatic rings and the average number of hydrogens per alpha-carbon.

Glavincevski, B.; Gulder, O.L.; Gardner, L

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

California Regulations on Renewble Hydrogen and Low Carbon Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

California Regulations on California Regulations on Renewable Hydrogen and Low Carbon Technologies Gerhard Achtelik California Air Resources Board Delivering Renewable Hydrogen A focus on near term applications November 16, 2009 C C al al i i f f o o r r n n i i a a E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m en en t t a a l l P P r r o o t t e e ct ct i i o o n n A A g g en en c c y y A A i i r r R R e e s s our our c c e e s s B B o o a a r r d d Overview * Background * ZEV / ZEB Regulation * H2 Network * SB 1505 * Clean Fuels Outlet * Low Carbon Fuel Standard CaH2Net Background * January 6, 2004 Governor's State of the Union Address - "I am going to encourage the building of a hydrogen highway to take us to the environmental Future...I intend to show the world that economic growth and the environment can coexist". - April 20, 2004 signed Executive Order, S-7-04 - development

174

Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and carbon dioxide. Introduction Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide per capita are released annually into the atmosphere.1a,b CarbonStorage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks

Yaghi, Omar M.

175

Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research and Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's research and development on sorbents and carbon-based materials for hydrogen storage targets breakthrough concepts for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents...

176

Synthesis, characterization, and modeling of hydrogen storage in carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (600-800 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. These materials are usually synthesized from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde or phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical extraction of the solvent and pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. The resultant aerogel has a nanocrystalline structure with micropores (<2 nm diameter) located within the solid matrix. Carbon aerogel monoliths can be prepared at densities ranging from 0.05-1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, leading to volumetric surface areas (> 500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}) that are much larger than commercially available materials. This research program is directed at optimization of the aerogel structure for maximum hydrogen adsorption over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. Computer modeling of hydrogen adsorption at carbon surfaces was also examined.

Pekala, R.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Calef, D.F.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Quantum-chemical investigation of the interaction of nitrogen and carbon monoxide molecules with the Lewis acid sites of aluminium oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the framework of the cluster approximation, using covalent and ionic models of Lewis acid sites of aluminumoxide, their electronic structure, as well as that of complexes of nitrogen and carbon monoxide molecules with them, was calculated. It was shown that the Lewis acid sites, representing a truncated tetrahedron, exhibit stronger electron-acceptor properties than the corresponding sites in the form of a truncated octahedron. For both molecules, the linear form of adsorption is energetically more profitable than the T-shaped form. The results obtained by the nonempirical SCF MO LCAO method in the STO-3GF basis and by semiempirical methods in CNDO/2 and INDO approximatations, are qualitatively the same.

Senchenya, I.N.; Chuvylkin, N.D.; Kazanskii, V.B.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hydrogen storage capacity in single-walled carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular-dynamics simulations were used to investigate the storage capacity of hydrogen in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT’s) and the strain of nanotube under the interactions between the stored hydrogen molecules and the SWNT. The storage capacities inside SWNT’s increase with the increase of tube diameters. For a SWNT with diameter less than 20 Ć, the storage capacity depends strongly on the helicity of a the SWNT. The maximal radial strain of SWNT is in the range of 11%–18%, and depends on the helicity of the SWNT. The maximal strain of armchair SWNT’s is less than that of zigzag SWNT’s. The tensile strengths of SWNT’s decrease with increasing diameters, and approach that of graphite (20 GPa) for larger-diameter tubes.

Yuchen Ma; Yueyuan Xia; Mingwen Zhao; Minju Ying

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Go No-Go Decision: Pure, Undoped, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This document provides information about the go/no-go decision on pure, undoped single walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.

180

Hydrogen production via carbon-assisted water electrolysis at room temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of the work was to conduct carbon-assisted water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production and to improve upon… (more)

Bollineni, Shilpa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Membrane-based systems for carbon capture and hydrogen purification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the activities being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop carbon capture technologies for power systems. This work is aimed at continued development and demonstration of a membrane based pre- and post-combustion carbon capture technology and separation schemes. Our primary work entails the development and demonstration of an innovative membrane technology for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide that operates over a broad range of conditions relevant to the power industry while meeting the US DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program goals of 90% CO{sub 2} capture at less than a 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Separating and capturing carbon dioxide from mixed gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic temperatures and pressures as well as be compatible with large gas volumes. Our project team is developing polymer membranes based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) chemistries that can purify hydrogen and capture CO{sub 2} at industrially relevant temperatures. Our primary objectives are to develop and demonstrate polymer-based membrane chemistries, structures, deployment platforms, and sealing technologies that achieve the critical combination of high selectivity, high permeability, chemical stability, and mechanical stability all at elevated temperatures (> 150 C) and packaged in a scalable, economically viable, high area density system amenable to incorporation into an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) plant for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. Stability requirements are focused on tolerance to the primary synthesis gas components and impurities at various locations in the IGCC process. Since the process stream compositions and conditions (temperature and pressure) vary throughout the IGCC process, the project is focused on the optimization of a technology that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR.

Berchtold, Kathryn A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

HYBRID HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGENATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HYBRID HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGENATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE Lucia M. Petkovic, Harry W. Rollins, Daniel M. Ginosar, and Kyle C. Burch Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 Introduction Anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide, a gas often associated with global warming, have increased considerably since the beginning of the industrial age.1 In the U.S., stationary CO2 sources, such as electricity generation plants, produce about one-third of the anthropogenic CO2 generation. Reports2 indicate that the power required to recover 90% of the CO2 from an integrated coal-fired power-plant is about 10% of the power-plant capacity. This energy requirement can be reduced to less than 1% if the recovered CO2 is applied to the production of synthetic fuels. However, the lack of efficient catalysts along with the costs of energy and hydrogen has prevented the development of technologies for direct hydrogenation of CO2.3 Although the cost of hydrogen for hydrogenating CO2 is not economically attractive at present, the future production of hydrogen by nuclear power sources could completely change this scenario.2 Still, an efficient catalyst will be essential for commercial application of those processes. The objective of the work presented here was the development of hybrid catalysts for one-step carbon dioxide hydrogenation to liquid fuels. The hybrid catalysts, which were prepared by two novel techniques, included a copper/zinc oxide catalytic function distributed within an acidic zeolitic matrix. Results of catalyst activity and selectivity studies at atmospheric pressure are presented in this contribution. Experimental Catalysts were prepared by two novel techniques and under several different conditions to produce copper/zinc oxide/zeolite materials. Once synthesized, samples were pelletized and the fraction between 40-60 mesh was utilized for the experiments. Two hundred milligrams of catalyst were loaded in a U-tube stainless steel reactor and a flow of 100 cm3/min of a 10:90 H2:Ar mixture was passed through the catalyst bed while the temperature was increased from room temperature to 513 K at 1.8 K/min and held at 513 K for 15 h. A reactant gas mixture composed by 10 cm3/min of CO2 and 30 cm3/min of H2 was then passed through the catalyst bed and the reaction products monitored by on-line gas chromatographic analyses using an SRI Multiple Gas Analyzer #2 equipped with 3 columns (MoleSieve 13X, Hayesep-D, and MXT-1) and 3 detectors (TCD, FID, and FID-methanizer). This GC system allowed for quantification of inert gases, CO, CO2, methanol, dimethylether, higher alcohols, water, and hydrocarbons up to C20. One hundred milligrams of a commercial syngas-to-methanol catalyst along with the same amount of a commercial zeolite catalyst was utilized under the same reaction conditions for comparison purposes. These catalysts were utilized either in two-layers (Com1) or mixed together (Com2). Results and Discussion Under the conditions applied in this study, the main reaction products were CO, CH3OH, CH3OCH3, and H2O. Methanol and dimethylether production rates and selectivities with respect to CO formation are presented in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. Although the activity of the synthesized catalysts did not surpass the commercial catalysts, the selectivity to oxygenates with respect to CO on most of the synthesized catalysts were better than on the commercial catalysts. For example, cat

Licia M. Petkovic; Harry W. Rollins; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide by a Nickel N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Isoquinoline Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni(Prbimiq1)]2+ (1c, where Prbimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (Ecat = 1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s1, respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

Thoi, VanSara; Kornienko, Nick; Margarit, C; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

Muradov, Nazim Z. (Melbourne, FL)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

FTIR study of carbon monoxide oxidation and scrambling at room temperature over copper supported on ZnO and TiO{sub 2} No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An FTIR and quadrupole mass spectroscopic study of CO adsorption and oxidation with {sup 16}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O{sub 2} on copper supported on ZnO and TiO{sub 2} is presented. The experimental results indicate that CO is adsorbed on the metallic particles dispersed on both oxides on two kinds of sites, on the normal terrace sites and on sites at the borderline of the particles. Moreover, on titania, a band at 2126 cm{sup -1}, assigned to CO adsorbed on isolated Cu atoms and/or on two-dimensional small clusters, is detected. A frequency shift of the bands of CO adsorbed on the metallic particles observed in the CO-O{sub 2} coadsorption experiments and the occurrence of a scrambling reaction between CO and {sup 18}O{sub 2} reveal that on all these samples, there are metallic sites which are able to adsorb at the same time oxygen atoms and carbon monoxide. Carbon dioxide and carbonate-like species are formed: the asymmetric stretching frequencies of CO{sub 2} and the quadrupole mass spectroscopic analysis reveal that with {sup 18}O{sub 2}, different isotopic molecular CO{sub 2}`s are formed, while the carbonate-like species have the same frequencies of those produced in {sup 16}O{sub 2}. Moreover, these species are completely lacking in the absence of oxygen in the gas phase. The experimental results indicate the there are, on these samples, two independent pathways for the CO oxidation, a direct oxidation of CO at the surface of the metallic particles and an induced oxidation with the surface lattice oxygen species of the supports. 46 refs., 8 figs.

Baccuzzi, F.; Chiorino, A. [Universita di Torino (Italy)] [Universita di Torino (Italy)

1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Metal-assisted hydrogen storage on Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanohorns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal-assisted hydrogen storage on Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanohorns Yun Liu a,b,*, Craig nanoparticles can assist in enhanced hydrogen storage on high-surface area supports are still under debate. Experimental mea- surements of metal-assisted hydrogen storage have been hampered by inaccurate estima- tion

Geohegan, David B.

188

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrogen Storage with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo MARUYAMA #12;The hydrogen storage mechanism of SWNTs was studied through molecular dynamics simulations,12) Fig. 6 Hydrogen storage inside each SWNT #12;Table 1 Potential parameters between SWNTs Tube d0 [Ă?

Maruyama, Shigeo

189

Spatial development of hydrogen economy in a low-carbon UK energy system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen technologies and infrastructures might play a significant role in meeting ambitious climate and energy policy goals of the UK Government. Nonetheless, studies on hydrogen are either limited in scope in that they do not take into account the relationships with the wider energy system drivers and constraints or do not consider how a hydrogen network might develop geographically. This paper presents a framework where a spatially explicit hydrogen module is embedded in the UK MARKAL Energy System model to explore energy system trade-offs for the production, delivery and use of hydrogen at the sub-national level. A set of illustrative scenarios highlight the competitiveness of hydrogen related infrastructures and technologies as well as imported liquid hydrogen against a stringent emissions reduction target; the effect of emissions reduction trajectory on the development of hydrogen network; the intense resource competition between low carbon hydrogen production and electricity generation, and the importance of economies of scale in hydrogen supply and distribution.

Nazmiye Balta-Ozkan; Elizabeth Baldwin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Hydrogen storage using carbon adsorbents: past, present and future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interest in hydrogen as a fuel has grown dramatically since 1990, and many advances in hydrogen production and utilization technologies have been made. However, hydrogen storage technologies must be significantly...

A.C. Dillon; M.J. Heben

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Wednesday, 28 June 2006 00:00 Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

192

Effects of palladium coating on field-emission properties of carbon nanofibers in a hydrogen plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of palladium coating on field-emission properties of carbon nanofibers in a hydrogen plasma Carbon nanofibers Metal coating Results from electron field-emission studies using arrays of patterned carbon nanofiber bundles are reported. We find that the desired field-emission characteristics were

Javey, Ali

193

Carbonaceous material for production of hydrogen from low heating value fuel gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the catalytic production of hydrogen, from a wide variety of low heating value fuel gases containing carbon monoxide, comprises circulating a carbonaceous material between two reactors--a carbon deposition reactor and a steaming reactor. In the carbon deposition reactor, carbon monoxide is removed from a fuel gas and is deposited on the carbonaceous material as an active carbon. In the steaming reactor, the reactive carbon reacts with steam to give hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The carbonaceous material contains a metal component comprising from about 75% to about 95% cobalt, from about 5% to about 15% iron, and up to about 10% chromium, and is effective in suppressing the production of methane in the steaming reactor.

Koutsoukos, Elias P. (Los Angeles, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based sodalite-type metal-organic framework (Fe-BTT) discovered via high-throughput methods Previous Next List Kenji Sumida,...

195

Synthesis and characterization of metal hydride/carbon aerogel composites for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two materials currently of interest for onboard lightweight hydrogen storage applications are sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH4), a complex metal hydride, and carbon aerogels (CAs), a light porous material connected by several spherical nanoparticles. ...

Kuen-Song Lin; Yao-Jen Mai; Su-Wei Chiu; Jing-How Yang; Sammy L. I. Chan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Storage of hydrogen in floating catalytic carbon nanotubes after graphitizing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage under moderate pressure (?10 MPa) and ... catalyst method is investigated. The capacity of hydrogen adsorption is evaluated based on both the ... diameter and morphology. Indirect evidence indica...

Hongwei Zhu; Xuesong Li; Lijie CI; Cailu Xu…

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Conversion of carbon monoxide on membrane catalysts of palladium alloys. I. Reaction between CO and H/sub 2/ on binary palladium alloys with ruthenium and nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of saturated and unsaturated C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and water is observed during reaction CO and H/sub 2/ on binary palladium alloys with 10 wt. % of Ru and 5.5 wt. % Ni at atmospheric pressure and 523-683 K. The introduction of hydrogen into the reaction zone by different methods, bu diffusion through a membrane catalyst or in a mixture with CO, influences the activity and selectivity of the catalysts investigated.

Gur'yanova, O.S.; Serov, Yu.M.; Gyl'yanova, S.G.; Gryaznov, V.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Quantum rotation of hydrogen in single-wall carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be widely used as an energy carrier. Current hydrogen storage technologies, in partic- ular, are inadequate Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Department the ortho±para conversion of physisorbed hydrogen in a nanotube containing soot loaded with hydrogen. From

Yildirim, Taner

199

Methane Decomposition: Production of Hydrogen and Carbon Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for hydrogen is to power fuel cells. Major automobile manufac- turers are currently working towards developing ppm in the preferential oxidation reactor (PROX). The hydrogen can be introduced in the fuel cell only for the performance of PEM fuel cells.6 Other conventional process of hydrogen production such as partial oxidation

Goodman, Wayne

200

Hydrogen storage capacities of nanoporous carbon calculated by density functional and Műller-Plesset methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen storage capacities of nanoporous carbons, simulated as flat graphene slit pores, have been calculated using a quantum-thermodynamical model. The model is applied for several interaction potentials between the hydrogen molecules and the graphitic walls that have been generated from density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Műller-Plesset (MP2) calculations. The hydrogen storage properties of the pores can be correlated with the features of the potential. It is shown that the storage capacity increases with the depth of the potential, De. Moreover, the optimal pore widths, yielding the maximum hydrogen storage capacities, are close to twice the equilibrium distance of the hydrogen molecule to one graphene layer. The experimental hydrogen storage capacities of several nanoporous carbons such as activated carbons (ACs) and carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) are well reproduced within the slit pore model considering pore widths of about 4.9–5.1?Ć for the DFT potential and slightly larger pore widths (5.3–5.9?Ć) for the MP2 potentials. The calculations predict that nanoporous carbons made of slit pores with average widths of 5.8–6.5?Ć would yield the highest hydrogen storage capacities at 300 K and 10 MPa.

I. Cabria; M. J. López; J. A. Alonso

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

202

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

203

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

204

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

205

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

206

Extending surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to transition-metal surfaces: carbon monoxide adsorption and electrooxidation on platinum- and palladium-coated gold electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin (ca. one to three monolayers) films of platinum and palladium electrodeposited on electrochemically roughened gold are observed to yield surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra for adsorbed carbon monoxide. The major vibrational band(s) on these surfaces are diagnosed from their frequencies as arising from C-O stretching vibrations, nu/sub CO/ bound to the transition-metal overlayers rather than to residual gold sites. The observed SFR nu/sub CO/ frequencies are closely similar to (within ca. 10 cm/sup -1/ of) those obtained for these systems from potential-difference infrared (PDIR) spectra. The major SERS and PDIR nu/sub CO/ features for the platinum and palladium surfaces appear at 2060-2090 and 1965-1985 cm/sup -1/, respectively, consistent with the presence of terminal and bridging CO on these two electrodes. The infrared as well as electrochemical properties of these systems are closely similar to those for the corresponding polycrystalline bulk electrodes. A difference between the SER- and IR-active adsorbed CO, however, is that the former undergoes electrooxidation on both surfaces at 0.2-0.3 V higher overpotentials than the latter form. Examination of the potential-dependent SERS bands for metal oxide vibrations, nu/sub PtO/, on the platinum surface shows that the electrooxidation potential for the SERS-active adsorbed CO coincides with that for the appearance of the nu/sub PtO/ band. Some broader implications to the utilization of SERS for examining transition-metal surfaces are pointed out.

Leung, L.W.H.; Weaver, M.J.

1987-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Chemisorption and catalysis by metal clusters. II. Chemisorption of carbon monoxide and of oxygen by supported osmium clusters derived from Os/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ and from Os/sub 6/(CO)/sub 18/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide and oxygen have been chemisorbed at 293 K on the high-nuclearity carbonyl-protected clusters (the various species A) obtained by heating in vacuo to 523 K Os/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ or Os/sub 6/(CO)/sub 18/ impregnated on silica, alumina, or titania. The adsorption isotherms have a conventional appearance, but most are composed of a primary and a secondary region. Material adsorbed in the secondary region is removed by evacuation at room temperature whereas that adsorbed in the primary region is removed by evacuation at elevated temperatures. For species A/alumina and the species A/titania the primary region is complete and the secondary region commences when the pressure over the adsorbent is 0.2 Torr. Species A/silica gave no secondary region in oxygen adsorption. Adsorption and subsequent temperature-programmed desorption of (/sup 18/O)CO occurred without any dilution by (/sup 16/O)CO, indicating that ligand-(/sup 16/O)CO and adsorbed-(/sup 18/O)CO do not exchange even at elevated temperatures. The two species A/aluminas catalyzed oxygen isotope exchange at 293 K. From the experimental evidence it is deduced that carbon monoxide and oxygen each adsorbs molecularly in both the primary and the secondary regions. In the primary region carbon monoxide adsorption occurs at osmium sites on the cluster framework, whereas in the secondary region it occurs at ligand-carbon bonded to osmium. For oxygen, adsorption in the primary region is again at osmium sites on the cluster framework but that in the secondary region is at osmium sites of the cluster framework suitably modified as a result of the support-cluster interaction.

Hunt, D.J.; Jackson, S.D.; Moyes, R.B.; Wells, P.B.; Whyman, R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis IX. Photosynthesis, Photoreduction, and the Hydrogen-Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Dark Reaction  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

A comparison of the rates of fixation of Carbon 14 dioxide in algae for the processes of photosynthesis, photoreduction and the hydrogen-oxygen-carbon dioxide dark reaction has been made. For the same series of experiments, rates of incorporation of tracer carbon into the separate soluble components using the radiogram method have been determined. The mechanism of carbon dioxide uptake has been shown to occur via two distinct paths. In all cases studied, essentially the same compounds appear radioactive. The distribution with time, however, differs markedly.

Badin, E. J.; Calvin, M.

1950-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Microbial utilization of abiogenic carbon and hydrogen in a serpentinite-hosted system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial utilization of abiogenic carbon and hydrogen in a serpentinite-hosted system Susan Q-hosted hydrothermal activity is exemplified by the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) where fluid demonstrate that in active carbonate chimneys where microbial sulfate reduction is important, up to 50

Gilli, Adrian

211

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Project Summary Full Title: Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity Project ID: 195 Principal Investigator: David McCollum Brief Description: This project addresses several components of carbon capture and storage (CCS) costs, provides technical models for determining the engineering and infrastructure requirements of CCS, and describes some correlations for estimating CO2 density and viscosity. Keywords: Pipeline, transportation, greenhouse gases (GHG), costs, technoeconomic analysis Purpose Estimate costs of carbon dioxide capture, compression, transport, storage, etc., and provide some technical models for determining the engineering and

212

GALLIUM NITRIDE INTEGRATED GAS/TEMPERATURE SENSORS FOR FUEL CELL SYSTEM MONITORING FOR HYDROGEN AND CARBON MONOXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on field effect devices using catalytic metal gates on silicon carbide substrates has been reviewed (Spetz-10%) of transition metals such as copper, silver, and chromium (Feinstein et al 1997 and Pyke 1993). High temperature. Introduction Gas sensing and analysis based on gas adsorption on a catalytic metal surface has been extensively

213

Hydrogen Diffusion and Trapping Effects in Low and Medium Carbon Steels for Subsurface Reinforcement in the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electrochemical hydrogen permeation method was used to investigate hydrogen transport, trapping characteristics of low (0.08 pct C) and medium carbon (0.44 pct C) steels proposed for the Yucca Mountain (YM) r...

Joshua Lamb; Venugopal Arjunan…

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is committed to improving methods for co-producing power and chemicals, fuels, and hydrogen (H2). Gasification is a process by which fuels such as coal can be used to produce synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of H2, carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon

215

Effect of palladium loaded activated carbons on hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pd-loaded high surface area activated carbon (BAC-Pd) was produced from bamboo by carbonization and activation using potassium hydroxide with subsequent loading of palladium. The palladium loaded onto BACs appear...

Masaki Ohno; Nami Okamura; Tomohiro Kose; Takashi Asada…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The feasibility of a unitised regenerative fuel cell with a reversible carbon-based hydrogen storage electrode.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis seeks to experimentally demonstrate the possibility of reversible storage of hydrogen directly into a carbon-based electrode of a PEM unitised regenerative fuel cell.… (more)

Jazaeri, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Studies of the coadsorption of deuterium and carbon monoxide with silver on rhodium and the adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene on clean and carbon covered platinum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ag adsorbed on Rh(100) is presented as a model of the corresponding bimetallic catalyst. Ag overlayer growth follows the Frank-Van der Merwe growth mechanism at 300 K and the Stranski-Krastanov growth mechanism at 640 K. Ag(3d) binding energies are found to track the vacuum level rather than the Fermi level. The results of D/sub 2/ and CO adsorption studies on Ag/Rh(100) show that adsorbed Ag does not significantly alter the properties of adjacent D/sub 2/ or CO adsorption sites on the Rh(100) surface. The desorption and decomposition of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on clean and carbon covered Pt(111) is also reported. No evidence for TNT decomposition on the carbon covered surface is found. Molecular TNT desorption kinetics at low coverage are first order, yielding an activation energy of 16.7 +/- 1 Kcal/mol and a preexponential factor of 2.3 x 10/sup 11/ (x e/sup - + 0.5/) sec/sup -1/. TNT adsorbed on the clean Pt(111) surface at submonolayer coverages undergoes almost complete decomposition during heating. The major decomposition products are H/sub 2/O, NO, CO/sub 2/, CO, HCN, and a carbon residue left on the surface. TNT adsorbed in the second and higher monolayers desorbs molecularly. The significance of these results in understanding the performance of a commercial explosive vapor preconcentrator is discussed.

Peebles, H.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Carbon Dioxide Hydrate Process for Gas Separation from a Shifted Synthesis Gas Stream  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Sequestration and Gasification Technologies Carbon DioxiDe HyDrate ProCess for Gas seParation from a sHifteD syntHesis Gas stream Background One approach to de-carbonizing coal is to gasify it to form fuel gas consisting predominately of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. This fuel gas is sent to a shift conversion reactor where carbon monoxide reacts with steam to produce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and hydrogen. After scrubbing the CO 2 from the fuel, a stream of almost pure hydrogen stream remains, which can be burned in a gas turbine or used to power a fuel cell with essentially zero emissions. However, for this approach to be practical, it will require an economical means of separating CO 2 from mixed gas streams. Since viable options for sequestration or reuse of CO

219

Assessment of Hydrogen Production Systems based on Natural Gas Conversion with Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Introduction of hydrogen in the energy system, as a new energy carrier complementary to electricity, is exciting much interest not only for heat and power generation applications, but also for transport and petro-chemical sectors. In transition to a low carbon economy, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies represent another way to reduce CO2 emissions. Hydrogen can be produced from various feedstocks, the most important being based on fossil fuels (natural gas and coal). This paper investigates the techno-economic and environmental aspects of hydrogen production based on natural gas reforming conversion with and without carbon capture. As CO2 capture options, gas - liquid absorption and chemical looping were evaluated. The evaluated plant concepts generate 300 MWth hydrogen (based on hydrogen LHV) with purity higher than 99.95 % (vol.), suitable to be used both in petro-chemical applications as well as for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for mobile applications. For the designs with CCS, the carbon capture rate is about 70 % for absorption-based scheme while for chemical looping-based system is >99 %. Special emphasis is put in the paper on the assessment of various plant configurations and process integration issues using CAPE techniques. The mass and energy balances have been used furthermore for techno-economic and environmental impact assessments.

Calin-Cristian Cormos; Letitia Petrescu; Ana-Maria Cormos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Synthesis of superlow friction carbon films from highly hydrogenated methane plasmas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of diamondlike carbon films (DLC) derived from increasingly hydrogenated methane plasmas. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. Tests results revealed a close correlation between the hydrogen in source gas plasma and the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films. Specifically, films grown in plasmas with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than did films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.003) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen, while a coefficient of 0.015 was found for films derived from pure methane. Similar correlations were observed for wear rates. Films derived from hydrogen-rich plasmas had the least wear, while films derived from pure methane suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of surface analytical methods to characterize the structure and chemistry of the DLC films and worn surfaces.

Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Nilufer, I. B.; Fenske, G. R.

2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have demonstrated the predicted increase in binding energy experimentally, currently at ~10 kJ/mol. The synthetic route for incorporation of boron at the outset is to create appropriately designed copoly- mers, with a boron-free and a boron-carrying monomer, followed by pyrolysis of the polymer, yielding a bo- ron-substituted carbon scaffold in which boron atoms are bonded to carbon atoms by synthesis. This is in contrast to a second route (funded by DE-FG36-08GO18142) in which first high-surface area carbon is cre- ated and doped by surface vapor deposition of boron, with incorporation of the boron into the lattice the final step of the fabrication. The challenge in the first route is to create high surface areas without compromising sp2 boron-carbon bonds. The challenge in the second route is to create sp2 boron-carbon bonds without com- promising high surface areas.

Pfeifer, Peter [University of Missouri; Wexler, Carlos [University of Missouri; Hawthorne, M. Frederick [University of Missouri; Lee, Mark W. [University of Missouri; Jalistegi, Satish S. [University of Missouri

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hydrogen Generation During the Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review of the corrosion mechanism for carbon steel in oxalic acid was performed to determine the ratio of moles of iron corroded to moles of hydrogen evolved during the corrosion of iron in oxalic acid. The theory of corrosion of carbon steel in oxalic acid and experimental work were reviewed. It was concluded that the maximum ratio of moles of hydrogen evolved to moles of iron corroded is 1:1. This ratio would be observed in a de-aerated environment. If oxygen or other oxidizing species are present, the ratio could be much less than 1:1. Testing would be necessary to determine how much less than 1:1 the ratio might be. Although the ratio of hydrogen evolution to iron corroded will not exceed 1:1, the total amount of hydrogen evolved can be influenced by such things as a decrease in the exposed surface area, suppression of hydrogen generation by gamma radiation, the presence of corrosion products on steel surface, etc. These and other variables present during chemical cleaning operations of the waste tank have not been examined by the tests reported in the literature i.e., the tests have focused on clean corrosion coupons in oxalic acid solutions. It is expected that most of these variables would reduce the total amount of hydrogen evolved. Further testing would need to be performed to quantify the reduction in hydrogen generation rate associated with these variables.

WIERSMA, BRUCEJ.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Renewable Hydrogen Carrier Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The hydrogen economy presents an appealing energy future but its implementation must solve numerous problems ranging from low-cost sustainable production, high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density hydrogen carrier and energy source for hydrogen production is possible due to emerging cell-free synthetic biology technology called cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB). Assembly of numerous enzymes and co-enzymes in vitro can create complicated set of biological reactions or pathways that microorganisms cannot complete, for example, C6H10O5 (aq) + 7 H2O (l) 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g) (PLoS One 2007, 2:e456). Thanks to 100% selectivity of enzymes, modest reaction conditions, and high-purity of generated hydrogen, carbohydrate is a promising hydrogen carrier for end users. Gravimetric density of carbohydrate is 14.8 H2 mass% if water can be recycled from PEM fuel cells or 8.33% H2 mass% without water recycling. Renewable carbohydrate can be isolated from plant biomass or would be produced from a combination of solar electricity/hydrogen and carbon dioxide fixation mediated by high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis mediated by SyPaB. The construction of this carbon-neutral carbohydrate economy would address numerous sustainability challenges, such as electricity and hydrogen storage, CO2 fixation and long-term storage, water conservation, transportation fuel production, plus feed and food production.

Zhang, Y.-H. Percival [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Pt NANOCLUSTERS ON CARBON NANOMATERIALS FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The detailed study of carbon nanomaterials constitution with allowance for of reduction conversions Pt (II, IV) allows to realize directional looking up of methods of preparation of platinum catalysts for redo...

N.S. KUYUNKO; S.D. KUSHCH; V.E. MURADYAN…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

System and method for controlling hydrogen elimination during carbon nanotube synthesis from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for producing carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition includes a catalyst support having first and second surfaces. The catalyst support is capable of hydrogen transport from the first to the second surface. A catalyst is provided on the first surface of the catalyst support. The catalyst is selected to catalyze the chemical vapor deposition formation of carbon nanotubes. A fuel source is provided for supplying fuel to the catalyst.

Reilly, Peter T. A. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

A New Solar Carbon Capture Process: Solar Thermal Electrochemical Photo (STEP) Carbon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A New Solar Carbon Capture Process: Solar Thermal Electrochemical Photo (STEP) Carbon Capture ... CO2 can be captured from 34% to over 50% solar energy efficiency (depending on the level of solar heat inclusion), as solid carbon and stored, or used as carbon monoxide to be available for a feedstock to synthesize (with STEP generated hydrogen) solar diesel fuel, synthetic jet fuel, or chemical production. ... STEP Iron, a Chemistry of Iron Formation without CO2 Emission: Molten Carbonate Solubility and Electrochemistry of Iron Ore Impurities ...

Stuart Licht; Baohui Wang; Susanta Ghosh; Hina Ayub; Dianlu Jiang; Jason Ganley

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

The structure of adsorbed sulfur and carbon on molybdenum and rhenium single crystal surfaces, and their influence on carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon chemisorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultra-high vacuum (10/sup -10/ Torr) study was performed on the chemisorption and structures of S and C adsorbates on Mo(100), Re(0001), and Re(1010) single crystal surfaces. Both S and C adsorb strongly on Mo(100), Re(0001), and Re(1010), with adsorption energies >70 kcal/mol for coverages less than saturation. S was proposed to adsorb in the highest symmetry sites on all surfaces except for theta/sub s/ > 0.75 on Mo(100), where studies suggest two different adsorption sites. C adsorbs in a ''carbidic'' or active phase on Mo(100), where it is also proposed to adsorb in the highest symmetry sites. However, C adsorbs in a ''graphitic'' or inactive phase on Re(0001) and Re(1010). CO chemisorption on the S and C overlayers was found to be blocked (except for C on Mo(100)), with S blocking adsorption more efficiently than C. Changes in adsorption energy were determined to be caused by local crowding of CO molecules by S or C, rather than a long-range electronic interaction. Unsaturated hydrocarbons decomposed completely on Mo(100), Re(0001), and Re(1010). Similar to the results for CO chemisorption, strong adsorption of unsaturated hydrocarbons (leading to decomposition) was blocked by pre-adsorbed S, allowing only physisorption to occur (adsorption energies < 11 kcal/mol). The effect of pre-adsorbed ''graphitic'' C on Re(0001) and Re(1010) on unsaturated hydrocarbon chemisorption was the same; strong adsorption (leading to decomposition) was blocked allowing only physisorption. However, Mo(100) with pre-adsorbed ''carbidic'' carbon blocks only decomposition while allowing strong reversible molecular chemisorption (12 to 23 kcal/mol). Differences in inhibition efficiency of S and C are proposed to be caused by differences in bond distances of the adsorbates to the surface. Greater distance from the metal surface causes more interaction with neighboring metal atoms. These differences also suggest explanations for catalytic hydrodesulfurization of thiophene.

Kelly, D.G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power generation cycles are: (1) increased efficiency by a factor of up to 2 over many conventional fossil fuel steam plants, (2) reduced power generation cost, especially for increasing fossil fuel cost, (3) reduced CO2 emission per kWh, and (4) direct sequestration or reuse (e.g., in enhanced oil or NG recovery) of the CO{sub 2} product.

Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

229

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

230

Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China); Cao, Juexian, E-mail: jxcao@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for the construction and operation of Hydrogen Energy California's LLC project, which would produce and sell electricity, carbon dioxide and fertilizer. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative program.

232

ENHANCED HYDROGEN ECONOMICS VIA COPRODUCTION OF FUELS AND CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research effort to develop environmentally cleaner projects as a spin-off of the FutureGen project, which seeks to reduce or eliminate emissions from plants that utilize coal for power or hydrogen production. New clean coal conversion processes were designed and tested for coproducing clean pitches and cokes used in the metals industry as well as a heavy crude oil. These new processes were based on direct liquefaction and pyrolysis techniques that liberate volatile liquids from coal without the need for high pressure or on-site gaseous hydrogen. As a result of the research, a commercial scale plant for the production of synthetic foundry coke has broken ground near Wise, Virginia under the auspices of Carbonite Inc. This plant will produce foundry coke by pyrolyzing a blend of steam coal feedstocks. A second plant is planned by Quantex Energy Inc (in Texas) which will use solvent extraction to coproduce a coke residue as well as crude oil. A third plant is being actively considered for Kingsport, Tennessee, pending a favorable resolution of regulatory issues.

Kennel, Elliot B; Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Dadyburjor, Dady; Dixit, Santhoshi; Garlapalli, Ravinder; Magean, Liviu; Mukkha, Mayuri; Olajide, Olufemi A; Stiller, Alfred H; Yurchick, Christopher L

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Exhaust-catalyst development for methanol-fueled vehicles. II. Synergism between palladium and silver in methanol and carbon monoxide oxidation over an alumina-supported palladium-silver catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methanol and carbon monoxide oxidation were examined over 0.01 Pd, 5% Ag, and 0.01% Pd/5% Ag catalysts - all supported on ..gamma..-alumina. The bimetallic catalyst showed greater CO and CH/sub 3/OH oxidation activity than either of the single-component catalysts; moreover, the Pd and Ag interacted synergistically in the bimetallic catalyst to produce greater CO and CH/sub 3/OH oxidation rates and lower yields of methanol partial oxidation products than expected from a mixture of the single-component catalysts. Temperature-programmed oxidation experiments and reactivity experiments involving changes in O/sub 2/ partial pressure both provided evidence that the Pd-Ag synergism results from Pd promoting the rate of O/sub 2/ adsorption and reaction with CO and CH/sub 3/OH on Ag. The data also indicate that virtually all of the Pd in the bimetallic catalyst is present in Pd-Ag crystallites.

McCabe, R.W.; Mitchell, P.J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Carbon capture by sorption-enhanced water-gas shift reaction process using hydrotalcite-based material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel route for precombustion decarbonization is the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process. In this process carbon dioxide is removed from a synthesis gas at elevated temperature by adsorption. Simultaneously, carbon monoxide is converted to carbon dioxide by the water-gas shift reaction. The periodic adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide is induced by a pressure swing cycle, and the cyclic capacity can be amplified by purging with steam. From previous studies is it known that for SEWGS applications, hydrotalcite-based materials are particularly attractive as sorbent, and commercial high-temperature shift catalysts can be used for the conversion of carbon monoxide. Tablets of a potassium promoted hydrotalcite-based material are characterized in both breakthrough and cyclic experiments in a 2 m tall fixed-bed reactor. When exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, steam, and nitrogen at 400{sup o}C, the material shows a breakthrough capacity of 1.4 mmol/g. In subsequent experiments the material was mixed with tablets of promoted iron-chromium shift catalyst and exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, steam, hydrogen, and nitrogen. It is demonstrated that carbon monoxide conversion can be enhanced to 100% in the presence of a carbon dioxide sorbent. At breakthrough, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide simultaneously appear at the end of the bed. During more than 300 cycles of adsorption/reaction and desorption, the capture rate, and carbon monoxide conversion are confirmed to be stable. Two different cycle types are investigated: one cycle with a CO{sub 2} rinse step and one cycle with a steam rinse step. The performance of both SEWGS cycles are discussed.

van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Hufton, J.R.; van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

The role of hydrogen in methane formation from carbon and water over metal catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in air at 300 C for 2 h and at 400 C for 2 h. Calcination was followed by reduction under hydrogen at 300oC for 2 h, then at 425oC for 2 h. Before the catalyst was used, it was crushed using a mortar and pestle, and sieved to between 10 and 20 mesh... OR Figure 1. Diagram of On-line Gas Chromatograph 11 Rt the termination of an analysis, both hydrogen and carbon containing products of each reaction were compared to assure reproducibility. The detector unit for the on-line gas chromatograph...

Moore, Stanley Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Adsorption and methanation of carbon dioxide on a nickel/silica catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature-programed desorption and reaction studies showed that increasing amounts of CO/sub 2/ adsorbed on silica-supported 6.9% nickel with increasing temperature to a maximum adsorption at approx. 443/sup 0/K, i.e., that the adsorption was activated; that CO/sub 2/ desorbed partly as CO/sub 2/ with the peak at 543/sup 0/K, and partly as CO with several peaks; that in the presence of hydrogen, nearly all adsorbed CO/sub 2/ desorbed as methane, and a small amount as CO; and that the methane desorption peaks from adsorbed CO and CO/sub 2/ both occurred at 473/sup 0/K. These results suggested that carbon dioxide adsorbed dissociatively as a carbon monoxide and an oxygen species. An observed absence of higher hydrocarbons in the methanation products of carbon dioxide was attributed to a high hydrogen/carbon monoxide surface ratio caused by the activated carbon dioxide adsorption.

Falconer, J.L.; Zagli, A.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Effect of p-type multi-walled carbon nanotubes for improving hydrogen storage behaviors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the hydrogen storage behaviors of p-type multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated through the surface modification of MWNTs by immersing them in sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at various ratios. The presence of acceptor-functional groups on the p-type MWNT surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Measurement of the zeta-potential determined the surface charge transfer and dispersion of the p-type MWMTs, and the hydrogen storage capacity was evaluated at 77 K and 1 bar. From the results obtained, it was found that acceptor-functional groups were introduced onto the MWNT surfaces, and the dispersion of MWNTs could be improved depending on the acid-mixed treatment conditions. The hydrogen storage was increased by acid-mixed treatments of up to 0.36 wt% in the p-type MWNTs, compared with 0.18 wt% in the As-received MWNTs. Consequently, the hydrogen storage capacities were greatly influenced by the acceptor-functional groups of p-type MWNT surfaces, resulting in increased electron acceptor–donor interaction at the interfaces. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen storage behaviors of the p-type MWNTs with the acid-mixed treatments are described. Display Omitted Display Omitted.

Lee, Seul-Yi [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Yop Rhee, Kyong [Industrial Liaison Research Institute, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 446-701 Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Seung-Hoon [Center for New and Renewable Energy Measurement, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Lanthanum-hexaboride carbon composition for use in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a structural composition useful in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments at temperatures in excess of 1400/sup 0/K. The composition is formed of a isostatically pressed and sintered or a hot-pressed mixture of lanthanum hexaboride particles and about 10 to 30 vol% carbon. The lanthanum-hexaboride reacts with the high-temperature fluorine-containing gases to form an adherent layer of corrosion-inhibiting lanthanum trifluoride on exposed surfaces of the composition. The carbon in the composite significantly strengthens the composite, enhances thermal shock resistance, and significantly facilitates the machining of the composition.

Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.; Taylor, A.J.

1980-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FutureGen FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production Office of Fossil Energy U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC June 2, 2003 Lowell Miller, Director, Office of Coal & Power Systems 24-Jun-03 Slide 2 Office of Fossil Energy Presentation Agenda * FE Hydrogen Program * FutureGen * Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) 24-Jun-03 Slide 3 Office of Fossil Energy Key Drivers * Decreasing domestic supply will lead to increased imports from less stable regions * Conventional petroleum is finite; production will peak and irreversibly decline due to continually increasing demand * Improving environmental quality - Meeting air emission regulations - Greenhouse gas emissions 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

240

Influence of the pore size in multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the hydrogen storage behaviors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWCNTs) were prepared using a chemical activation method to obtain well-developed pore structures for use as hydrogen storage materials. The microstructure and crystallinity of the A-MWCNTs were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The textural properties of the A-MWCNTs were investigated by nitrogen gas sorption analysis at 77 K. The hydrogen storage capacity of the A-MWCNTs was evaluated at 77 K and 1 bar. The results showed that the specific surface area of the MWCNTs increased from 327 to 495 m{sup 2}/g as the activation temperature was increased. The highest hydrogen storage capacity was observed in the A-MWCNTs sample activated at 900 Degree-Sign C (0.54 wt%). This was attributed to it having the narrowest microporosity, which is a factor closely related to the hydrogen storage capacity. This shows that the hydrogen storage behaviors depend on the pore volume. Although a high pore volume is desirable for hydrogen storage, it is also severely affected if the pore size in the A-MWCNTs for the hydrogen molecules is suitable for creating the activation process. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AT-800 and AT-900 samples were prepared by a chemical activation method at activation temperature of 800 and 900 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AT-900 sample has the narrowest peak in comparison with the AT-800 sample, resulting from the overlap of the two peaks (Peak I and Peak II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This overlapping effect is due to the newly created micropores or shrinkages of pores in Peak II. So, these determining characteristics are essential for designing materials that are suitable for molecular hydrogen storage.

Lee, Seul-Yi [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Characterization of temperature-induced changes in amorphous hydrogenated carbon thin films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hard hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films were heated in vacuum to different temperatures and held at these for at least 30 min. Afterwards, the cooled-down samples were analyzed by various techniques. Strict and reproducible correlations were found between all the determined parameters and the annealing temperature. Single-wavelength ellipsometry shows that the real part of the refractive index of the films at 633 nm wavelength decreases with temperature while the extinction coefficient increases. It also shows swelling of the films with a thickness increase of about 50% for films heated to ? 1000 K. The associated decrease of mass density is proportional to the decrease in refractive index. Ion beam analysis shows that hydrogen is released from the films during heating with only about 5% of the initial H remaining after annealing at 1300 K while no significant loss of carbon can be detected. The losses of hydrogen during heating are monitored by temperature programmed desorption and they are in good agreement with the ion-beam-analysis results. Raman spectroscopy delivers evidence of aromatization of the films under heat treatment. Indication of first structural changes is found already at 600 K while the quickest changes of the refractive index, thickness, and hydrogen content with temperature occur around 850 K.

Christian Hopf; Thierry Angot; Etienne Aréou; Thomas Dürbeck; Wolfgang Jacob; Céline Martin; Cédric Pardanaud; Pascale Roubin; Thomas Schwarz-Selinger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Sealing off a carbon nanotube with a self-assembled aqueous valve for the storage of hydrogen in GPa pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The end section of a carbon nanotube, cut by acid treatment, contains hydrophillic oxygen groups. Water molecules can self-assemble around these groups to seal off a carbon nanotube and form an "aqueous valve". Molecular dynamics simulations on single-wall (12,12) and (15,15) tubes with dangling carboxyl groups show that the formation of aqueous valves can be achieved both in the absence of and in the presence of high pressure hydrogen. Furthermore, significant diffusion barriers through aqueous valves are identified. It indicates that such valves could hold hydrogen inside the tube with GPa pressure. Releasing hydrogen is easily achieved by melting the "aqueous valve". Such a design provides a recyclable and non- destructive way to store hydrogen in GPa pressure. Under the storage conditions dictated by sealing off the container in liquid water, the hydrogen density inside the container is higher than that for solid hydrogen, which promises excellent weight storage efficiency.

Chen, H Y; Gong, X G; Liu, Zhi-Feng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2A Case Study: Future Central Natural  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Reforming without Sequestration Natural Gas Reforming without Sequestration Project Summary Full Title: H2A Case Study: Longer-Term (2020-2030) Hydrogen from Natural Gas without CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project ID: 240 Principal Investigator: Darlene Steward Keywords: Hydrogen production; steam methane reforming; natural gas Purpose Steam reforming of hydrocarbons continues to be the most efficient, economical, and widely used process for production of hydrogen and hydrogen/carbon monoxide mixtures. The process involves a catalytic conversion of the hydrocarbon and steam to hydrogen and carbon oxides. Since the process works only with light hydrocarbons that can be vaporized completely without carbon formation, the feedstocks used range from methane (natural gas) to naphtha to No. 2 fuel oil.

244

Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen energy is a clean or inexhaustible energy like renewable energy and nuclear energy. Today’s energy supply has a considerable impact on the environment. Hydrogen energy is a promising alternative solut...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels Pt cluster size and its valence state etc) and the different coating parameters (PTFE to Pt-CA ratio and Pt loading on Dixon ring) on volume transfer rate (Ky.a) for H/D reaction. Ky.a values of ?0.8 m3 (STP).s?1. m?3 were obtained for Pt loading of 7% and Pt cluster size of 3 nm at atmospheric pressure.

P. K. Gupta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Dissolution of Irradiated Commercial UO2 Fuels in Ammonium Carbonate and Hydrogen Peroxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose and test a disposition path for irradiated nuclear fuel using ammonium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide media. We demonstrate on a 13 g scale that >98% of the irradiated fuel dissolves. Subsequent expulsion of carbonate from the dissolver solution precipitates >95% of the plutonium, americium, curium, and substantial amounts of fission products, effectively partitioning the fuel at the dissolution step. Uranium can be easily recovered from solution by any of several means, such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, or direct precipitation. Ammonium carbonate can be evaporated from solution and recovered for re-use, leaving an extremely compact volume of fission products, transactinides, and uranium. Stack emissions are predicted to be less toxic, less radioactive, chemically simpler, and simpler to treat than those from the conventional PUREX process.

Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Hanson, Brady D.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Carson, Katharine J.; Peper, Shane M.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

Hydrogen storage in carbon nitride nanobells X. D. Bai, Dingyong Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, X. C. Ma, Shuang Liu, and E. G. Wanga)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen storage in carbon nitride nanobells X. D. Bai, Dingyong Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, X. C. Ma as hydrogen adsorbent. A hydrogen storage capacity up to 8 wt % was achieved reproducibly under ambient pressure and at temperature of 300 °C. The high hydrogen storage capacity under the moderate conditions

Zhang, Guangyu

248

Solar-Powered Production of Molecular Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the present time, the majority of industrial-scale hydrogen is produced by steam?methane reformation (SMR), even though the high-temperature conversion of methane to hydrogen results in the concomitant production of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. ... 7-9 The PV arrays are used to convert solar light to electricity in order to power alkaline (e.g., 27% KOH at pH 14.7) electrolyzers for producing hydrogen gas. ... Narayanan et al. describe a DC-powered hybrid system that drives a methanol fuel cell in reverse,10 while Soler et al. report on a solar-powered photo-Fenton process that produces hydrogen noncatalytically under severe conditions with a limited number of organic substrates. ...

Hyunwoong Park; Chad D. Vecitis; Wonyong Choi; Oleh Weres; Michael R. Hoffmann

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Decorating multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickel nanoparticles for selective hydrogenation of citral  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nanocomposites of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) decorated with nickel nanoparticles were conveniently prepared by a chemical reduction of nickel salt in the present of poly(acrylic acid) grafted MWNTs (PAA-g-MWNTs). Due to the strong interaction between Ni{sup 2+} and -COOH, PAA-g-MWNTs became an excellent supporting material for Ni nanoparticles. The morphology and distribution of Ni nanoparticles on the surface of MWNTs were greatly influenced by the reduction temperatures, the experimental results also showed that the distribution of Ni nanoparticles was greatly improved while the MWNTs were modified by poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The hydrogenation activity and selectivity of MWNTs decorated with Ni nanoparticles (Ni-MWNTs) for alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehyde (citral) were also studied, and the experimental results showed that the citronellal, an important raw material for flavoring and perfumery industries, is the favorable product with a percentage as high as 86.9%, which is 7 times higher than that of catalyst by Ni-supported active carbon (Ni-AC). - Abstract: Nickel nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWNTs) nanocomposites were conveniently prepared by a chemical reduction of nickel salt in the present of poly(acrylic acid) grafted MWNTs (PAA-g-MWNTs). These nanocomposites possessed excellent catalytic activity and selectivity for hydrogenation of citral.

Tang Yuechao; Yang Dong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers (Ministry of Education), Department of Macromolecular Science and Advanced Materials Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Qin Feng [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Hu Jianhua [Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers (Ministry of Education), Department of Macromolecular Science and Advanced Materials Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang Changchun, E-mail: ccwang@fudan.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers (Ministry of Education), Department of Macromolecular Science and Advanced Materials Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xu Hualong [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Production and use of electrolytic hydrogen in Ecuador towards a low carbon economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a pre-feasibility study of producing and using electrolytic hydrogen in Ecuador as part of a strategy towards a low carbon economy. Hydrogen could be produced using hydropower either alone or combined with other renewable energy sources. For this study, we analyzed two scenarios of energy availability based on data from the largest hydroelectric power plant in the country. The first scenario assumes that an amount of water equivalent to 30% of that spilled in 2011 could be used to generate additional electricity. Thus, an additional amount of energy equivalent to 5% of the energy produced in 2011 could be available. The second scenario doubles this amount of energy. Economic analysis showed that to obtain low-cost hydrogen (3.00 US$/kg) it is necessary to operate the electrolysis plants 24 h/day, using low-cost electricity (30 US$/MWh). A continuous supply of energy could be possible when new hydroelectric utilities start operating or by integrating hydropower with solar and wind. Three possibilities for using hydrogen are discussed: 1) production of ammonia as a raw material for nitrogenous fertilizers, 2) hydro-treating heavy oils and bio-oils in oil refineries, and 3) as an energy storage medium to offset natural instability and unpredictability of renewables.

Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Gustavo Riveros-Godoy; Santiago Torres-Contreras; Tsai Garcia-Perez; Esteban Albornoz-Vintimilla

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A DFT Study of Interaction of Carbon Monoxide with Carbonaceous Materials Juan F. Espinal, Alejandro Montoya, Fanor Mondragon,*, and Thanh N. Truong*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an important process in the gasification of carbon materials such as char, coke, soot, as well as in the growth it is a clean and efficient alternative to the use of coal instead of combustion. The gasification process

Truong, Thanh N.

252

Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Cells, Turbines, and Carbon Capture & Sequestration #12;Production Goal for Hydrogen from Coal Central Separation System PSA Membrane Membrane Carbon Sequestration Yes (87%) Yes (100%) Yes (100%) Hydrogen

253

The preferred route for upgrading high metals residua: Hydrogen addition or carbon rejection?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted for Petroleos Mexicanos {open_quotes}PEMEX,{close_quotes} which evaluated commercially proven technologies for conversion and upgrading of high metals Mexican residua. The study results are also applicable to other heavy, high metals residua, such as those from Venezuela. Specifically, the ebullated-bed H-Oil{reg_sign} Process (hydrogen addition), licensed by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) and Texaco Development Corporation (TDC), was compared to Delayed Coking (carbon rejection). Both technologies have commercial installations in Mexico processing high metals residua. Commercial data on process yields, investment, and operating costs were used in the analysis to determine what factors govern the selection of one technology over the other.

Peer, E.D.; Wisdom, L.I. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Use of carbon monoxide and third-derivative EPR spectra to probe the coordination of surface V/sup 4 +/ ions on reduced V/sub 2/O/sub 5//SiO/sub 2/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coordination properties of surface V/sup 4 +/ ions of reduced V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ supported on silica have been studied by EPR using the adsorption of various probe molecules. The spectrum resolution, greatly enhanced with the third-derivative presentation, indicates an orthorhombic symmetry for the V/sup 4 +/ ions after CO adsorption (g/sub 1/ approx. g/sub 2/ = 1.985, g/sub 3/ = 1.931, A/sub 1/ approx. A/sub 2/ 71.4 G, A/sub 3/ = 191.4 G). The use of /sup 13/C-enriched carbon monoxide allows us to observe that the V/sup 4 +/ surface ions can coordinate two CO molecules from the gas phase to form, together with four lattice oxide ions, a distorted octahedron with one pronounced vanadyl character bond. The /sup 13/C superhyperfine coupling constant is found to be about 7 G. The influence of the adsorbed molecules (CO, H/sub 2/O, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/) on the properties of the V/sup 4 +/ ions at the surface is further discussed. 33 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Che, M.; Canosa, B.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

1986-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Neutron Scattering Methodology for Absolute Measurement of Room-Temperature Hydrogen Storage Capacity and Evidence for Spillover Effect in a Pt-Doped Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron Scattering Methodology for Absolute Measurement of Room-Temperature Hydrogen Storage Capacity and Evidence for Spillover Effect in a Pt-Doped Activated Carbon ... A neutron scattering methodology is proposed to simultaneously determine the total hydrogen adsorption, the excess hydrogen adsorption, and hydrogen gas confined in the porous sample. ... It can be combined with an in situ small-angle neutron scattering to study the hydrogen spillover effect in the kinetic adsorption process. ...

Cheng-Si Tsao; Yun Liu; Mingda Li; Yang Zhang; Juscelino B. Leao; Hua-Wen Chang; Ming-Sheng Yu; Sow-Hsin Chen

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

Promotive SMSI effect for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to methanol on a Pd/CeO{sub 2} catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports strong metal support interaction (SMSI) appearing in supported palladium catalysts which improves greatly the selectivity and lifetime of the catalysts for methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon dioxide into valuable chemicals and fuels such as methanol has recently been recognized as one of the promising recycling technologies for emitted CO{sub 2}. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydrogen and electricity from coal with carbon dioxide separation using chemical looping reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern about global climate change has led to research on low CO{sub 2} emission in the process of the energy conversion of fossil fuel. One of the solutions is the conversion of fossil fuel into carbon-free energy carriers, hydrogen, and electricity with CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper, the main purpose is to investigate the thermodynamics performance of converting coal to a hydrogen and electricity system with chemical-looping reactors and to explore the influences of operating parameters on the system performance. Using FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} as an oxygen carrier, we propose a carbon-free coproduction system of hydrogen and electricity with chemical-looping reactors. The performance of the new system is simulated using ASPEN PLUS software tool. The influences of the chemical-looping reactor's temperature, steam conversion rate, and O{sub 2}/coal quality ratio on the system performance, and the exergy performance are discussed. The results show that a high-purity of H{sub 2} (99.9%) is reached and that CO{sub 2} can be separated. The system efficiency is 57.85% assuming steam reactor at 815 C and the steam conversion rate 37%. The system efficiency is affected by the steam conversion rate, rising from 53.17 to 58.33% with the increase of the steam conversion rate from 28 to 41%. The exergy efficiency is 54.25% and the losses are mainly in the process of gasification and HRSG. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Xiang Wenguo; Chen Yingying [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Interaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen in the adsorbed layer on Pd, Ce, Pd-Ce catalysts supported on /gamma/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption of CO and the interaction of CO/sub ads/ with O/sub 2/ on Pd, Ce, and Pd-Ce//gamma/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (0.5 wt. % Pd, 2.0 wt. % Ce) has been studied using the methods of IR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The identity of the adsorbed CO complexes, the temperature ranges over which they desorb, and their reactivity with O/sub 2/ have been established. The interaction of bridging and carbonate - carboxylate CO complexes and carbon (disproportionation and dissociation products) with O/sub 2/ on Pd and Pd-Ce catalysts is preceded by the coadsorption of oxygen and the evolution of heat. During the oxidation of CO, autooscillation, heat evolution, and the concentration of oxygen in the flow are observed.

Savel'eva, G.A.; Sass, A.S.; Speranskaya, G.V.; Tenchev, K.K.; Petrov, L.A.; Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Galeev, T.K.; Popova, N.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydrogen storage enhanced in Li-doped carbon replica of zeolites: A possible route to achieve fuel cell demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We first report the atomistic grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the synthesis of two realistic ordered microporous carbon replica in two siliceous forms of faujasite zeolite (cubic Y-FAU and hexagonal EMT). Atomistic simulations of hydrogen adsorption isotherms in these two carbon structures and their Li-doped composites were carried out to determine their storage capacities at 77 and 298 K. We found that these new forms of carbon solids and their Li-doped versions show very attractive hydrogen storage capacities at 77 and 298 K respectively. However for a filling pressure of 300 bars and at room temperature bare carbons do not show advantageous performances compared to a classical gas cylinder despite of their crystalline micropore network. In comparison Li-doped nanostructures provide reversible gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities twice larger ( 3.75 ? wt ? % and 33.7 ? kg / m 3 ). The extreme lattice stiffness of their skeleton will prevent them from collapsing under large external applied pressure an interesting skill compared to bundle of carbon nanotubes and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). These new ordered composites are thus very promising materials for hydrogen storage issues by contrast with MOFs.

Thomas Roussel; Christophe Bichara; Keith E. Gubbins; Roland J.-M. Pellenq

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Surface structure of coadsorbed benzene and carbon monoxide on the rhodium(111) single crystal analyzed with low-energy electron diffraction intensities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first structural analysis of a molecular coadsorbate system is presented. Mutual reordering and site shifting are found to occur for benzene and CO coadsorbed in a (/sub 13//sup 31/) lattice on Rh(111). This low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) intensity analysis yields the first confirmed hollow-site adsorption of CO on a single-crystal metal surface, with a C-O bond length expanded by 0.06 +/- 0.05 A from the gas phase. The flat-lying benzene is found centered over hcp-type hollow sites with a strong Kekule-type distortion: C-C bond lengths alternate between 1.33 +/- 0.15 A (hydrogen positions were not determined). This suggests the possibility of a 1,3,5-cyclohexatriene species being formed. The Rh-C bond length is 2.35 +/- 0.05 A for benzene and 2.16 +/- 0.04 A for CO.

Van Hove, M.A.; Lin, R.F.; Somorjai, G.A.

1986-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hydrogen-Bonding Structure and Dynamics of Aqueous Carbonate Species from Car?Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive Car?Parrinello molecular dynamics (CP-MD) study of aqueous solutions of carbonic acid (H2CO3), bicarbonate (HCO3?), carbonate (CO32?), and carbon dioxide (CO2) provides new quantitative insight into the structural and dynamic aspects of the hydrogen-bonding environments for these important aqueous species and their effects on the structure, H-bonding, and dynamical behavior of the surrounding water molecules. ... The power spectra of the carbonate species were calculated as Fourier transforms of their velocity autocorrelation functions over the 14 ps production trajectories of the CP-MD simulations. ... The first solvation shell of the anion was found to contain between five and six hydrogen bonded water mols., compared to the six to seven waters found in analogous classical studies based on empirical potentials. ...

P. Padma Kumar; Andrey G. Kalinichev; R. James Kirkpatrick

2008-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hydrogenation of CO on Pd-Fe/. gamma. -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of CO hydrogenation on 5% Pd-Fe/..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts with various contents of iron. It has been shown that the introduction of iron into the composition of the palladium catalyst reduces the quantity of chemisorbed hydrogen and carbon monoxide and lowers the activity in CO hydrogenation. The observed effects are related to the formation of cationic states of the metals and heteronuclear Pd-Fe clusters, which have little activity in processes of adsorption and catalysis.

Zakumbaeva, G.D.; Dagirov, T.S.; Dostiyarov, A.M.; Kuanyshev, A.Sh.; Naidin, V.A.; Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nanopores of carbon nanotubes as practical hydrogen storage media Sang Soo Han, Hyun Seok Kim, Kyu Sung Han, Jai Young Lee,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanopores of carbon nanotubes as practical hydrogen storage media Sang Soo Han, Hyun Seok Kim, Kyu walls that do not provide sites for hydrogen storage under ambient conditions. However, after treating nanopores in MWCNTs offer a promising route to hydrogen storage media for onboard practical applications

Goddard III, William A.

264

Renewable Hydrogen Carrier „ Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energies 2011, 4, 254-275; doi:10.3390/en4020254 Energies 2011, 4, 254-275; doi:10.3390/en4020254 energies ISSN 1996-1073 www.mdpi.com/journal/energies Review Renewable Hydrogen Carrier - Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,3,4, * and Jonathan R. Mielenz 3,5 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, 210-A Seitz Hall, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS) Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 3 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA; E-Mail: mielenzjr@ornl.gov 4 Gate Fuels Inc. 3107 Alice Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA 5 Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA

265

The Impact of Increased Use of Hydrogen on Petroleum Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SR/OIAF-CNEAF/2008-04 SR/OIAF-CNEAF/2008-04 The Impact of Increased Use of Hydrogen on Petroleum Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. Unless referenced otherwise, the information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special

266

Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Channing C. Ahn, John J. Vajoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Channing C. Ahn, John J. Vajoa structure of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The intercalation of SWNTs opens up the possibility of the rope structure. Our previous work on SWNTs has also shown that the cohesive energy responsible for rope

268

The role of hydrogen in the growth of carbon nanotubes : a study of the catalyst state and morphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of hydrogen in chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) of C2H4 for growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was investigated. Fe/A1203 (1/10 nm) catalyst layers were used for growth on Si substrates and the times at which H2 ...

Kim, Jin Suk Calvin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane as a True One Box Unit for Large Scale Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IGCC coal-fired power plants show promise for environmentally-benign power generation. In these plants coal is gasified to syngas then processed in a water gas-shift (WGS) reactor to maximize the hydrogen/CO{sub 2} content. The gas stream can then be separated into a hydrogen rich stream for power generation and/or further purified for sale as a chemical and a CO{sub 2} rich stream for the purpose of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Today, the separation is accomplished using conventional absorption/desorption processes with post CO{sub 2} compression. However, significant process complexity and energy penalties accrue with this approach, accounting for ~20% of the capital cost and ~27% parasitic energy consumption. Ideally, a â??one-boxâ? process is preferred in which the syngas is fed directly to the WGS reactor without gas pre-treatment, converting the CO to hydrogen in the presence of H{sub 2}S and other impurities and delivering a clean hydrogen product for power generation or other uses. The development of such a process is the primary goal of this project. Our proposed "one-box" process includes a catalytic membrane reactor (MR) that makes use of a hydrogen-selective, carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane, and a sulfur-tolerant Co/Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The membrane reactorâ??s behavior has been investigated with a bench top unit for different experimental conditions and compared with the modeling results. The model is used to further investigate the design features of the proposed process. CO conversion >99% and hydrogen recovery >90% are feasible under the operating pressures available from IGCC. More importantly, the CMS membrane has demonstrated excellent selectivity for hydrogen over H{sub 2}S (>100), and shown no flux loss in the presence of a synthetic "tar"-like material, i.e., naphthalene. In summary, the proposed "one-box" process has been successfully demonstrated with the bench-top reactor. In parallel we have successfully designed and fabricated a full-scale CMS membrane and module for the proposed application. This full-scale membrane element is a 3" diameter with 30"L, composed of ~85 single CMS membrane tubes. The membrane tubes and bundles have demonstrated satisfactory thermal, hydrothermal, thermal cycling and chemical stabilities under an environment simulating the temperature, pressure and contaminant levels encountered in our proposed process. More importantly, the membrane module packed with the CMS bundle was tested for over 30 pressure cycles between ambient pressure and >300 -600 psi at 200 to 300°C without mechanical degradation. Finally, internal baffles have been designed and installed to improve flow distribution within the module, which delivered â?„90% separation efficiency in comparison with the efficiency achieved with single membrane tubes. In summary, the full-scale CMS membrane element and module have been successfully developed and tested satisfactorily for our proposed one-box application; a test quantity of elements/modules have been fabricated for field testing. Multiple field tests have been performed under this project at National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The separation efficiency and performance stability of our full-scale membrane elements have been verified in testing conducted for times ranging from 100 to >250 hours of continuous exposure to coal/biomass gasifier off-gas for hydrogen enrichment with no gas pre-treatment for contaminants removal. In particular, "tar-like" contaminants were effectively rejected by the membrane with no evidence of fouling. In addition, testing was conducted using a hybrid membrane system, i.e., the CMS membrane in conjunction with the palladium membrane, to demonstrate that 99+% H{sub 2} purity and a high degree of CO{sub 2} capture could be achieved. In summary, the stability and performance of the full-scale hydrogen selective CMS membrane/module has been verified in multiple field tests in the presence of coal/biomass gasifier off-gas under this project. A promi

Paul Liu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Integration of a Structural Water-Gas-Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 The InTegraTIon of a STrucTural WaTer- gaS-ShIfT caTalyST WITh a VanadIum alloy hydrogen TranSporT deVIce Description The purpose of this project is to produce a scalable device that simultaneously performs both water-gas-shift (WGS) and hydrogen separation from a coal-derived synthesis gas stream. The justification of such a system is the improved efficiency for the overall production of hydrogen. Removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas (syngas) stream allows the WGS reaction to convert more carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and maximizes the total hydrogen produced. An additional benefit is the reduction in capital cost of plant construction due to the removal of one step in the process by integrating WGS with the membrane separation device.

271

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of an electrochemical hydrogen separator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EHS is an electrochemical hydrogen separator based on the uniquely reversible nature of hydrogen oxidation-reduction reactions in electrochemical systems. The principle and the hardware concept are shown in Figure 1. Hydrogen from the mixed gas stream is oxidized to H{sup +} ions, transported through a cation transport electrolyte membrane (matrix) under an applied electric field and discharged in a pure hydrogen state on the cathode. The cation transfer electrolyte membrane provides a barrier between the feed and product gases. The EHS design is an offshoot of phosphoric acid fuel cell development. Although any proton transfer electrolyte can be used, the phosphoric acid based system offers a unique advantage because its operating temperature of {approximately}200{degree}C makes it tolerant to trace CO and also closely matches the water-shift reactor exit gas temperature ({approximately}250{degree}C). Hydrogen-containing streams in coal gasification systems have large carbon monoxide contents. For efficient hydrogen recovery, most of the CO must be converted to hydrogen by the low temperature water-shift reaction (Figure 2). Advanced coal gasification and gas separation technologies offer an important pathway to the clean utilization of coal resources.

Abens, S.; Fruchtman, J.; Kush, A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

HYDROGEN STORAGE IN CARBON SINGLE-WALL NANOTUBES A.C. Dillon, K.E.H. Gilbert, P.A. Parilla, J.L. Alleman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN STORAGE IN CARBON SINGLE-WALL NANOTUBES A.C. Dillon, K.E.H. Gilbert, P.A. Parilla, J.L. Alleman, G.L. Hornyak, K.M. Jones, and M.J. Heben National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO 80401-3393 Abstract Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and other nanostructured carbon materials have attracted

274

Multiply Surface-Functionalized Nanoporous Carbon for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report P. Pfeifer (Primary Contact), C. Wexler, P. Yu, G. Suppes, F. Hawthorne, S. Jalisatgi, M. Lee, D. Robertson University of Missouri 223 Physics Building Columbia, MO 65211 Phone: (573) 882-2335 Email: pfeiferp@missouri.edu DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18142 Subcontractors: Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, MO Project Start Date: September 1, 2008 Project End Date: November 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Fabricate high-surface-area, multiply surface- * functionalized carbon ("substituted materials") for reversible hydrogen storage with superior storage

275

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2A Case Study: Current Central Natural  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Reforming without Sequestration Natural Gas Reforming without Sequestration Project Summary Full Title: H2A Case Study: Current (2005) Central Hydrogen from Natural Gas without CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project ID: 233 Principal Investigator: Darlene Steward Keywords: Hydrogen production; steam methane reforming; natural gas Purpose Steam reforming of hydrocarbons continues to be the most efficient, economical, and widely used process for production of hydrogen and hydrogen/carbon monoxide mixtures. The purpose of this analysis is to assess the economic production of hydrogen from the steam reforming of natural gas. Performer Principal Investigator: Darlene Steward Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3393 Telephone: 303-275-3837

276

Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (the CAMERE process)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CAMERE process (carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction) was developed and evaluated. The reverse-water-gas-shift reactor and the methanol synthesis reactor were serially aligned to form methanol from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. Carbon dioxide was converted to CO and water by the reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (RWReaction) to remove water before methanol was synthesized. With the elimination of water by RWReaction, the purge gas volume was minimized as the recycle gas volume decreased. Because of the minimum purge gas loss by the pretreatment of RWReactor, the overall methanol yield increased up to 89% from 69%. An active and stable catalyst with the composition of Cu/ZnO/ZrO{sub 2}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5:3:1:1) was developed. The system was optimized and compared with the commercial methanol synthesis processes from natural gas and coal.

Joo, O.S.; Jung, K.D.; Han, S.H.; Uhm, S.J. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.] [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.; Moon, I. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rozovskii, A.Y.; Lin, G.I. [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Method and apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and a method are disclosed for converting hydrocarbon fuel or an alcohol into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide. The apparatus includes a first vessel having a partial oxidation reaction zone and a separate steam reforming reaction zone that is distinct from the partial oxidation reaction zone. The first vessel has a first vessel inlet at the partial oxidation reaction zone and a first vessel outlet at the steam reforming zone. The reformer also includes a helical tube extending about the first vessel. The helical tube has a first end connected to an oxygen-containing source and a second end connected to the first vessel at the partial oxidation reaction zone. Oxygen gas from an oxygen-containing source can be directed through the helical tube to the first vessel. A second vessel having a second vessel inlet and second vessel outlet is annularly disposed about the first vessel. The helical tube is disposed between the first vessel and the second vessel and gases from the first vessel can be directed through second vessel.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H.J. (Cambridge, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Electronic Structure and Field Emission Properties of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized by Hydrogen Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Structure and Field Emission Properties of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized by Hydrogen Arc Discharge ... 36-38 By the way, as shown in Figure 6a, the current density of DWCNTs shows much lower level than that of SWCNTs in a low electric field region below 4 V/?m, but it reaches a slightly higher level in a medium electric field region of 4?6 V/?m. ...

Byeongchul Ha; Dong Hoon Shin; Jeunghee Park; Cheol Jin Lee

2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hydrogenation of the nanopowders that form in a carbon-helium plasma stream during the introduction of Ni and Mg  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composite nanoparticles consisting of magnesium, nickel, and carbon atoms are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The calculations performed in terms of the density functional theory show that the jump frequency of hydrogen atoms in nickel-containing magnesium hydride increases substantially near impurity nickel atoms; as a result, the rate of hydrogen absorption by magnesium also increases. Nickel on the magnesium surface is shown to be absorbed via an island growth mechanism. Composite Mg-C, Ni-C, and Mg-Ni-C powders are produced by plasmachemical synthesis in a carbon-helium plasma stream. Hydrogen is introduced into a chamber during synthesis. It is found by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis that, among these three composites, only Mg-Ni-C contains magnesium fixed in the MgH{sub 2} compound. The process of such 'ultrarapid' hydrogenation of magnesium, which occurs in the time of formation of composite nanoparticles, can be explained by the catalytic action of nickel, which is enhanced by a high temperature. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs demonstrate the dynamics of the dehydrogenation of Mg-Ni-C composite nanoparticles in heating by an electron beam.

Churilov, G. N., E-mail: churilov@iph.krasn.ru; Osipova, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Tomashevich, Ye. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Glushchenko, G. A.; Fedorov, A. S.; Popov, Z. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Bulina, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry (Russian Federation); Vereshchagin, S. N.; Zhizhaev, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Cherepakhin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

New Alkali Doped Pillared Carbon Materials Designed to Achieve Practical Reversible Hydrogen Storage for Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and room temperature. This satisfies the DOE (Department of Energy) target of hydrogen-storage materials single-wall nanotubes can lead to a hydrogen-storage capacity of 6.0 mass% and 61:7 kg=m3 at 50 bars of roughly 1­20 bars and ambient temperature. Chen et al. reported remarkable hydrogen-storage capacities

Goddard III, William A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Redirecting Reductant Flux into Hydrogen Production via Metabolic Engineering of Fermentative Carbon Metabolism in a Cyanobacterium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...observed to evolve hydrogen in the dark at maximum rates approaching...activity. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 33: 2014-2022. 4 Carrieri...by biological processes: a survey of literature. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 26: 13-28. 9 Datta, R...

Kelsey McNeely; Yu Xu; Nick Bennette; Donald A. Bryant; G. Charles Dismukes

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gas separation by pressure swing adsorption for producing hydrogen from coal: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project demonstrated the feasibility of producing high purity hydrogen from a coal gasification product gas mixture by Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) using a commercial 5A zeolite as the adsorbent. The major advantage of PSA over conventional hydrogen upgrading processes is associated with lower overall production costs. This is mainly due to the integration of PSA into H/sub 2/ production plants as a single unit operation by replacing the low temperature carbon monoxide shift, carbon dioxide wash and methanation steps. In this way, hydrogen production costs are typically reduced from 7 to 40%. A single bed PSA process was designed to simulate the various steps of commercial multibed PSA plants. A new and very important step, ''Vacuum Purge'', was also investigated. 45 refs., 38 figs., 50 tabs.

Kapoor, A.; Ritter, J.A.; Yang, R.T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Identifying and counting point defects in carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of single-walled carbon nanotubes. J. Phys. Chem. B 103,single-walled carbon nanotubes on patterned silicon wafers.of single-walled carbon nanotubes from carbon monoxide.

Fan, Y W; Goldsmith, B R; Collins, Philip G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Identifying and Counting Point Defects in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

single-walled carbon nanotubes on patterned silicon wafers.of single-walled carbon nanotubes from carbon monoxide.single-walled carbon nanotubes. Science 306, 1362–1364 (

Collins, Philip G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Investigation of Multistage Circulating Fast Fluidized Bed Membrane Reformers for Production of Ultraclean Hydrogen and Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Multistage Circulating Fast Fluidized Bed Membrane Reformers for Production of Ultraclean Hydrogen and Syngas ... In order to distinguish between the two catalysts employed in this study, the catalyst over which the CSRM and CPOM reactions take place is considered catalyst 1 and that over which the CDRM reaction takes place is considered catalyst 2. The physical significance of catalyst 1 is that both reaction schemes of the CSRM and CPOM are catalyzed by this catalyst to produce hydrogen and syngas and to supply the necessary energy for the heat integration, though catalyst 2 plays an important role to steer the quality of the syngas and to enhance the hydrogen yield. ... In order to check the quality of the corresponding syngas produced in the reaction side, the hydrogen to carbon monoxide feed ratio (H2/CO) profile is presented in Figure 15. ...

Mohamed E. E. Abashar; Said S. E. H. Elnashaie

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium hydrogen carbonate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-Partial list Chemical Incompatibilities Summary: hypochlorite, all oxidizing agents Carbon tetrachloride Sodium Chlorates Ammonium salts, acids, powdered metals... Ammonium...

288

New Carbon-Based Porous Materials with Increased Heats of Adsorption for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are a promising alternative to internal combustion engines that burn gasoline. A significant challenge in developing fuel cell vehicles is to store enough hydrogen on-board to allow the same driving range as current vehicles. One option for storing hydrogen on vehicles is to use tanks filled with porous materials that act as “sponges” to take up large quantities of hydrogen without the need for extremely high pressures. The materials must meet many requirements to make this possible. This project aimed to develop two related classes of porous materials to meet these requirements. All materials were synthesized from molecular constituents in a building-block approach, which allows for the creation of an incredibly wide variety of materials in a tailorable fashion. The materials have extremely high surface areas, to provide many locations for hydrogen to adsorb. In addition, they were designed to contain cations that create large electric fields to bind hydrogen strongly but not too strongly. Molecular modeling played a key role as a guide to experiment throughout the project. A major accomplishment of the project was the development of a material with record hydrogen uptake at cryogenic temperatures. Although the ultimate goal was materials that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen at room temperature, this achievement at cryogenic temperatures is an important step in the right direction. In addition, there is significant interest in applications at these temperatures. The hydrogen uptake, measured independently at NREL was 8.0 wt %. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest validated excess hydrogen uptake reported to date at 77 K. This material was originally sketched on paper based on a hypothesis that extended framework struts would yield materials with excellent hydrogen storage properties. However, before starting the synthesis, we used molecular modeling to assess the performance of the material for hydrogen uptake. Only after modeling suggested record-breaking hydrogen uptake at 77 K did we proceed to synthesize, characterize, and test the material, ultimately yielding experimental results that agreed closely with predictions that were made before the material was synthesized. We also synthesized, characterized, and computationally simulated the behavior of two new materials displaying the highest experimental Brunauer?Emmett?Teller (BET) surface areas of any porous materials reported to date (?7000 m2/g). Key to evacuating the initially solvent-filled materials without pore collapse, and thereby accessing the ultrahigh areas, was the use of a supercritical CO2 activation technique developed by our team. In our efforts to increase the hydrogen binding energy, we developed the first examples of “zwitterionic” metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The two structures feature zwitterionic characteristics arising from N-heterocyclic azolium groups in the linkers and negatively charged Zn2(CO2)5 nodes. These groups interact strongly with the H2 quadrupole. High initial isosteric heats of adsorption for hydrogen were measured at low H2 loading. Simulations were used to determine the H2 binding sites, and results were compared with inelastic neutron scattering. In addition to MOFs, the project produced a variety of related materials known as porous organic frameworks (POFs), including robust catechol-functionalized POFs with tunable porosities and degrees of functionalization. Post-synthesis metalation was readily carried out with a wide range of metal precursors (CuII, MgII, and MnII salts and complexes), resulting in metalated POFs with enhanced heats of hydrogen adsorption compared to the starting nonmetalated materials. Isosteric heats of adsorption as high as 9.6 kJ/mol were observed, compared to typical values around 5 kJ/mol in unfunctionalized MOFs and POFs. Modeling played an important role throughout the project. For example, we used molecular simulations to determine that the optimal isosteric heat of adsorption (Qst) for maximum hydrogen delivery using MOFs is appro

Snurr, Randall Q.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrogen storage of multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated with Pd-Ni nanoparticles under moderate conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A type of novel material with a high hydrogen storage capacity was prepared by supporting PdNi18 alloy nanoparticles, which were synthesized by using a new colloid method, on the surface of pretreated multiwalled...

Jianwei Ren; Shijun Liao; Junmin Liu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

292

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application this new development. We designed and built a membrane reactor to study the reforming reaction. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was developed to study the performance of the membrane reactor parametrically. The important results are presented in this report.

Shamsuddin Illias

2002-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol. 3 figs.

Steinberg, M.; Grohse, E.W.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Grohse, Edward W. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research Pre-combustion capture refers to removing CO2 from fossil fuels before combustion is completed. For example, in gasification processes a feedstock (such as coal) is partially oxidized in steam and oxygen/air under high temperature and pressure to form synthesis gas. This synthesis gas, or syngas, is a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, CO2, and smaller amounts of other gaseous components, such as methane. The syngas can then undergo the water-gas shift reaction to convert CO and water (H2O) to H2 and CO2, producing a H2 and CO2-rich gas mixture. The concentration of CO2 in this mixture can range from 15-50%. The CO2 can then be captured and separated, transported, and ultimately sequestered, and the H2-rich fuel combusted.

296

Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

297

Hydrogen Generation Via Fuel Reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reforming is the conversion of a hydrocarbon based fuel to a gas mixture that contains hydrogen. The H2 that is produced by reforming can then be used to produce electricity via fuel cells. The realization of H2?based power generation via reforming is facilitated by the existence of the liquid fuel and natural gas distribution infrastructures. Coupling these same infrastructures with more portable reforming technology facilitates the realization of fuel cell powered vehicles. The reformer is the first component in a fuel processor. Contaminants in the H2?enriched product stream such as carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can significantly degrade the performance of current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s). Removal of such contaminants requires extensive processing of the H2?rich product stream prior to utilization by the fuel cell to generate electricity. The remaining components of the fuel processor remove the contaminants in the H2 product stream. For transportation applications the entire fuel processing system must be as small and lightweight as possible to achieve desirable performance requirements. Current efforts at Argonne National Laboratory are focused on catalyst development and reactor engineering of the autothermal processing train for transportation applications.

John F. Krebs

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The production of pure hydrogen with simultaneous capture of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The need to stabilise or even reduce the production of anthropogenic CO2 makes the capture of CO2 during energy generation from carbonaceous fuels, e.g. coal or biomass, necessary for the future. For hydrogen, an environmentally-benign energy vector...

Bohn, Christopher

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17571765 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

directly, as in a traditional H , 23.1% CO, 5.8% CO , 6.6% H O, 0.5% H S, and2 2 2 2 coal-fired power plant types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H S from a simulated coal temperature was examined as a2 function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal

Cal, Mark P.

300

Review problems on photosynthesis, carbon cycle. Julie Wright, HAS222d/253e 2007 1) Photosynthesis resembles the hydrogen fuel cell we studied in the lab. The following reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resembles the hydrogen fuel cell we studied in the lab. The following reactions were taken from the review) the overall reaction of photosynthesis is: H2O + CO2 ---> O2 + CH2O E'o = -1.24 Hydrogen fuel cell: 2H2O does hydrogen combustion differ from sugar/alcohol/biofuels combustion ecologically? 2) Why is carbon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project is a collaboration between the Sinskey laboratory at MIT and the Worden laboratory at Michigan State University. The goal of the project is to produce Isobutanol (IBT), a branched-chain alcohol that can serve as a drop-in transportation fuel, through the engineered microbial biosynthesis of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen using a novel bioreactor. This final technical report presents the findings of both the biological engineering work at MIT that extended the native branched-chain amino acid pathway of the wild type Ralstonia eutropha H16 to perform this biosynthesis, as well as the unique design, modeling, and construction of a bioreactor for incompatible gasses at Michigan State that enabled the operational testing of the complete system. This 105 page technical report summarizing the three years of research includes 72 figures and 11 tables of findings. Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) is a Gram-negative, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It has been the principle organism used for the study of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymer biosynthesis. The wild-type Ralstonia eutropha H16 produces PHB as an intracellular carbon storage material while under nutrient stress in the presence of excess carbon. Under this stress, it can accumulate approximately 80 % of its cell dry weight (CDW) as this intracellular polymer. With the restoration of the required nutrients, the cells are then able to catabolize this polymer. If extracted from the cell, this PHB polymer can be processed into biodegradable and biocompatible plastics, however for this research, it is the efficient metabolic pathway channeling the captured carbon that is of interest. R. eutropha is further unique in that it contains two carbon-fixation Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle operons, two oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases, and several formate dehydrogenases. It has also been much studied for its ability in the presence of oxygen, to fix carbon dioxide into complex cellular molecules using the energy from hydrogen. In this research project, engineered strains of R. eutropha redirected the excess carbon from PHB storage into the production of isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (branched-chain higher alcohols). These branched-chain higher alcohols can be used directly as substitutes for fossil-based fuels and are seen as alternative biofuels to ethanol and biodiesel. Importantly, these alcohols have approximately 98 % of the energy content of gasoline, 17 % higher than the current gasoline additive ethanol, without impacting corn market production for feed or food. Unlike ethanol, these branched-chain alcohols have low vapor pressure, hygroscopicity, and water solubility, which make them readily compatible with the existing pipelines, gasoline pumps, and engines in our transportation infrastructure. While the use of alternative energies from solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric has spread for stationary power applications, these energy sources cannot be effectively or efficiently employed in current or future transportation systems. With the ongoing concerns of fossil fuel availability and price stability over the long term, alternative biofuels like branched-chain higher alcohols hold promise as a suitable transportation fuel in the future. We showed in our research that various mutant strains of R. eutropha with isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase activity, in combination with the overexpression of plasmid-borne, native branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway genes and the overexpression of heterologous ketoisovalerate decarboxylase gene, would produce isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol when initiated during nitrogen or phosphorus limitation. Early on, we isolated one mutant R. eutropha strain which produced over 180 mg/L branched-chain alcohols in flask culture while being more tolerant of isobutanol toxicity. After the targeted elimination of genes encoding several potential carbon sinks (ilvE, bkdAB, and aceE), the production titer of the improved to 270 mg/L isobutanol and 40 mg/L 3-methyl-1-butanol.

Sinskey, Anthony J. [MIT] [MIT; Worden, Robert Mark [Michigan State University MSU] [Michigan State University MSU; Brigham, Christopher [MIT] [MIT; Lu, Jingnan [MIT] [MIT; Quimby, John Westlake [MIT] [MIT; Gai, Claudia [MIT] [MIT; Speth, Daan [MIT] [MIT; Elliott, Sean [Boston University] [Boston University; Fei, John Qiang [MIT] [MIT; Bernardi, Amanda [MIT] [MIT; Li, Sophia [MIT] [MIT; Grunwald, Stephan [MIT] [MIT; Grousseau, Estelle [MIT] [MIT; Maiti, Soumen [MSU] [MSU; Liu, Chole [MSU] [MSU

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Why Hydrogen? Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

produce hydrogen in a centralized coal based operation for .79kg at the plant gate with carbon sequestration. Develop advanced OTM, HTM, technology, advanced reforming and shift...

303

Hydrogen storage capacity of Ti-doped boron-nitride and B?Be-substituted carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the hydrogen absorption capacity of two tubular structures, namely, B?Be-substituted single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and Ti covered single-wall boron nitride nanotube (SWBNT) using first-principles plane wave method. The interaction of H2 molecules with the outer surface of bare SWBNT, which is normally very weak, can be significantly enhanced upon functionalization by Ti atoms. Each Ti atom adsorbed on SWBNT can bind up to four H2 molecules with an average binding energy suitable for room temperature storage. While the substitution process of Be atom on SWNT is endothermic, the substituted Be strengthens the interaction between tube surface and H2 to hold one H2 molecule.

E. Durgun; Y.-R. Jang; S. Ciraci

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes A.C. Dillon, P.A. Parilla, K.E.H. Gilbert, J.L. Alleman, T. Gennett*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes A.C. Dillon, P.A. Parilla, K.E.H. Gilbert, J.L. Alleman, T. Gennett*, and M.J. Heben National Renewable Energy Laboratory *Rochester Institute of Technology 2003 DOE HFCIT Program Review Meeting DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE Office of Science

305

Conceptual Design of a Fossil Hydrogen Infrastructure with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION DOE/energy systems with carbon capture and sequestration. Insources. Fossil H 2 with carbon capture and sequestration (

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Optimal Design of a Fossil Fuel-Based Hydrogen Infrastructure with Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrastructure with Carbon Capture and Sequestration: CaseINFRASTRUCTURE WITH CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION: CASEhydrogen production with carbon capture and sequestration,

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ni, Jason; Johnson, Joshua; Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Production from Dimethyl Ether Steam Reforming and Hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the process of dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming were investigated as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0-4), temperature (100 C-600 C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species: acetylene, ethanol, methanol, ethylene, methyl-ethyl ether, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, n-propanol, ethane and isopropyl alcohol. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether with steam indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure was observed to shift the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 atm to 5 atm decreased the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5% to 76.2%. The order of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction was methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol--formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. The optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occurred at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.5, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 C. Modeling the thermodynamics of dimethyl ether hydrolysis (with methanol as the only product considered), the equilibrium conversion of dimethyl ether is limited. The equilibrium conversion was observed to increase with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio, resulting in a maximum dimethyl ether conversion of approximately 68% at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 4.5 and a processing temperature of 600 C. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with steam can produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds--with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. This substantiates dimethyl ether as a viable source of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells.

T.A. Semelsberger

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were solved by finite difference method. The solution of the model equations is complicated by the coupled reactions. At the inlet, if there is no hydrogen, rate expressions become singular. To overcome this problem, the first element of the reactor was treated as a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Several alternative numerical schemes were implemented in the solution algorithm to get a converged, stable solution. The model was also capable of handling steam-methane reforming reactions under non-membrane condition and equilibrium reaction conversions. Some of the numerical results were presented in the previous report. To test the membrane reactor model, we fabricated Pd-stainless steel membranes in tubular configuration using electroless plating method coupled with osmotic pressure. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Xray (EDX) were used to characterize the fabricated Pd-film composite membranes. Gas-permeation tests were performed to measure the permeability of hydrogen, nitrogen and helium using pure gas. Some of these results are discussed in this progress report.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

309

Method And Apparatus For Converting Hydrocarbon Fuel Into Hydrogen Gas And Carbon Dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrocarbon fuel reforming method is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. A first mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a first fuel is directed into a first tube 108 to produce a first reaction reformate. A second mixture of steam and a second fuel is directed into a second tube 116 annularly disposed about the first tube 108 to produce a second reaction reformate. The first and second reaction reformates are then directed into a reforming zone 144 and subject to a catalytic reforming reaction. In another aspect of the method, a first fuel is combusted with an oxygen-containing gas in a first zone 108 to produce a reformate stream, while a second fuel under steam reforming in a second zone 116. Heat energy from the first zone 108 is transferred to the second zone 116.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (Cambridge, MA)

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

Apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrocarbon fuel reformer 100 suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. A first tube 108 has a first tube inlet 110 and a first tube outlet 112. The first tube inlet 110 is adapted for receiving a first mixture including an oxygen-containing gas and a first fuel. A partially oxidized first reaction reformate is directed out of the first tube 108 into a mixing zone 114. A second tube 116 is annularly disposed about the first tube 108 and has a second tube inlet 118 and a second tube outlet 120. The second tube inlet 118 is adapted for receiving a second mixture including steam and a second fuel. A steam reformed second reaction reformate is directed out of the second tube 116 and into the mixing zone 114. From the mixing zone 114, the first and second reaction reformates may be directed into a catalytic reforming zone 144 containing a reforming catalyst 147.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (7 Rocky Brook Rd., Dover, MA 02030); Mitchell, William L. (111 Oakley Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (20 Landmark Rd., Westford, MA 01886); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (1 Richdale Ave.#2, Cambridge, MA 02140)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrocarbon fuel reformer (200) is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. The reformer (200) comprises first and second tubes (208,218). The first tube (208) includes a first catalyst (214) and receives a first mixture of steam and a first fuel. The second tube (218) is annularly disposed about the first tube (208) and receives a second mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a second fuel. In one embodiment, a third tube (224) is annularly disposed about the second tube (218) and receives a first reaction reformate from the first tube (208) and a second reaction reformate from the second tube (218). A catalyst reforming zone (260) annularly disposed about the third tube (224) may be provided to subject reformate constituents to a shift reaction. In another embodiment, a fractionator is provided to distill first and second fuels from a fuel supply source.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (Cambridge, MA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II: A hydrogen bonded water network switch is observed between pH 7.8 and 10.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron structure of wild type human carbonic anhydrase II at pH 7.8 has been determined to 2.0 resolution. Detailed analysis and comparison to the previous determined structure at pH 10.0 shows important differences in protonation of key catalytic residues in the active site as well as a rearrangement of the hydrogen bonded water network. For the first time, a completed hydrogen bonded network stretching from the Zn-bound solvent to the proton shuttling residue His64 has been directed observed.

Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Langan, Paul [ORNL; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to lower carbon dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing liquid fuels includes the steps of gasifying a starting material selected from a group consisting of coal, biomass, carbon nanotubes and mixtures thereof to produce a syngas, subjecting that syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to produce a hyrdrocarbon product stream, separating that hydrocarbon product stream into C1-C4 hydrocarbons and C5+ hydrocarbons to be used as liquid fuels and subjecting the C1-C4 hydrocarbons to catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen produced by CDH is recycled to be mixed with the syngas incident to the FTS reactor in order to raise the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the syngas to values of 2 or higher, which is required to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This is accomplished with little or no production of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The carbon is captured in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), while huge emissions of carbon dioxide are avoided and very large quantities of water employed for the water-gas shift in traditional FTS systems are saved.

Huffman, Gerald P

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

315

95 MeV neutron scattering on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, and oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three neutron-deuteron scattering experiments at 95 MeV have been performed recently at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Subsets of the results of these experiments have been reported in two short articles, showing clear evidence for three-nucleon force effects. In this paper, we present a more detailed description of the experimental methods as well as further discussion of the results. In addition to neutron-deuteron scattering data, neutron-proton and C12(n,n) elastic scattering data have been measured for normalization purposes, and O16(n,n) data have been obtained for the first time at this energy. It was possible to extract C12(n,n') and O16(n,n') inelastic scattering cross sections to excited states below 12 MeV excitation energy. The inelastic scattering data (for both carbon and oxygen) are shown to have a significant impact on the determination of nuclear recoil kerma coefficients.

P. Mermod; J. Blomgren; C. Johansson; A. Öhrn; M. Österlund; S. Pomp; B. Bergenwall; J. Klug; L. Nilsson; N. Olsson; U. Tippawan; P. Nadel-Turonski; O. Jonsson; A. Prokofiev; P.-U. Renberg; Y. Maeda; H. Sakai; A. Tamii; K. Amos; R. Crespo; A. Moro

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method And Apparatus For Converting Hydrocarbon Fuel Into Hydrogen Gas And Carbon Dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for synthesizing hydrogen gas from hydrocarbon fuel. A first mixture of steam and a first fuel is directed into a first tube 208 to subject the first mixture to a first steam reforming reaction in the presence of a first catalyst 214. A stream of oxygen-containing gas is pre-heated by transferring heat energy from product gases. A second mixture of the pre-heated oxygen-containing gas and a second fuel is directed into a second tube 218 disposed about the first tube 208 to subject the second mixture to a partial oxidation reaction and to provide heat energy for transfer to the first tube 208. A first reaction reformate from the first tube 208 and a second reaction reformate from the second tube 218 are directed into a third tube 224 disposed about the second tube 218 to subject the first and second reaction reformates to a second steam reforming reaction, wherein heat energy is transferred to the third tube 224 from the second tube 218.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (Cambridge, MA)

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium carbonates Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

air pollutants are defined in the Clean Air Act and include ozone, particulate matter, carbon monoxide... .g., americium-241, cesium- 137, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, uranium-...

318

The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) is produced instead of carbon dioxide and water as is in the combustion

He, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hydrogen production in ultrarich combustion of hydrocarbon fuels in porous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rich and ultrarich combustion of methane, ethane, and propane inside inert porous media is studied experimentally and numerically to examine the suitability of the concept for hydrogen production. Temperature, velocities, and chemical products of the combustion waves were recorded experimentally at a range of equivalence ratios from stoichiometry (? = 1.0) to ? = 2.5, for a filtration velocity of 12 cm/s. Two-temperature numerical model based on comprehensive heat transfer and chemical mechanisms is found to be in a good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Partial oxidation products of methane, ethane, and propane (H2, CO, and C2 hydrocarbons) are dominant for ultrarich superadiabatic combustion. The maximum hydrogen yield is close to 50% for all fuels, and carbon monoxide yield is close to 80%.

Mario Toledo; Valeri Bubnovich; Alexei Saveliev; Lawrence Kennedy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification Biomass Pyrolysis Electrolysis Hydrogen Storage Compressed Gas Liquefied Gas Metal Hydride Carbon Hydrogen Production Steam Methane Reforming Noncatalytic Partial Oxidation Coal Gasification Biomass

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon dioxide adsorption and methanation on ruthenium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and methanation of carbon dioxide on a ruthenium-silica catalyst were studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature-programmed reaction (TPR). Carbon dioxide adsorption was found to be activated; CO/sub 2/ adsorption increased significantly as the temperature increased from 298 to 435 K. During adsorption, some of the CO/sub 2/ dissociated to carbon monoxide and oxygen; upon hydrogen exposure at room temperature, the oxygen reacted to water. Methanation of adsorbed CO and of adsorbed CO/sub 2/, using TPR in flowing hydrogen, yielded a CH/sub 4/ peak with a peak temperature of 459 K for both adsorbates, indicating that both reactions follow the same mechanism after adsorption. This peak temperature did not change with initial surface coverage of CO, indicating that methanation is first order in CO coverage. The desorption and reaction spectra for Ru/SiO/sub 2/ were similar to those previously obtained for Ni/SiO/sub 2/, but both CO/sub 2/ formation and CH/sub 4/ formation proceeded faster on Ru. Also, the details of CO desorption and the changes in CO/sub 2/ and CO desorptions with initial coverage were different on the two metals. 5 figures, 3 tables.

Zagli, E.; Falconer, J.L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Hydrogen production by high-temperature steam gasification of biomass and coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature steam gasification of paper, yellow pine woodchips, and Pittsburgh bituminous coal was investigated in a batch-type flow reactor at temperatures in the range of 700 to 1,200{sup o}C at two different ratios of steam to feedstock molar ratios. Hydrogen yield of 54.7% for paper, 60.2% for woodchips, and 57.8% for coal was achieved on a dry basis, with a steam flow rate of 6.3 g/min at steam temperature of 1,200{sup o}C. Yield of both the hydrogen and carbon monoxide increased while carbon dioxide and methane decreased with the increase in gasification temperature. A 10-fold reduction in tar residue was obtained at high-temperature steam gasification, compared to low temperatures. Steam and gasification temperature affects the composition of the syngas produced. Higher steam-to-feedstock molar ratio had negligible effect on the amount of hydrogen produced in the syngas in the fixed-batch type of reactor. Gasification temperature can be used to control the amounts of hydrogen or methane produced from the gasification process. This also provides mean to control the ratio of hydrogen to CO in the syngas, which can then be processed to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel since the liquid fuel production requires an optimum ratio between hydrogen and CO. The syngas produced can be further processed to produce pure hydrogen. Biomass fuels are good source of renewable fuels to produce hydrogen or liquid fuels using controlled steam gasification.

Kriengsak, S.N.; Buczynski, R.; Gmurczyk, J.; Gupta, A.K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Polymer system for gettering hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

Shepodd, Timothy Jon (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Whinnery, LeRoy L. (4929 Julie St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

Shepodd, Timothy Jon (Livermore, CA); Whinnery, LeRoy L. (Livermore, CA)

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

325

ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water gas shift reaction (WGSR) plays a major role in increasing the hydrogen production from fossil fuels. However, the enhanced hydrogen production is limited by thermodynamic constrains posed by equilibrium limitations of WGSR. This project aims at using a mesoporous, tailored, highly reactive calcium based sorbent system for incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} product which drives the equilibrium limited WGSR forward. In addition, a pure sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced simultaneously. A detailed project vision with the description of integration of this concept with an existing coal gasification process for hydrogen production is presented. Conceptual reactor designs for investigating the simultaneous water gas shift and the CaO carbonation reactions are presented. In addition, the options for conducting in-situ sorbent regeneration under vacuum or steam are also reported. Preliminary, water gas shift reactions using high temperature shift catalyst and without any sorbent confirmed the equilibrium limitation beyond 600 C demonstrating a carbon monoxide conversion of about 80%. From detailed thermodynamic analyses performed for fuel gas streams from typical gasifiers the optimal operating temperature range to prevent CaO hydration and to effect its carbonation is between 575-830 C.

Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Preparation of highly stable bimetallic Ni–Cu catalyst for simultaneous production of hydrogen and fish-bone carbon nanofibers: Optimization, effect of catalyst preparation methods and deactivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the preparation of highly stable nano-porous Ni–Cu catalysts for simultaneous production of COx–free hydrogen and carbon nano-fibers. The main features of this work focuses on the optimization, methods of catalyst preparation and application of an experimental model for deactivation. The fresh catalysts and the deposited carbon were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. Whatever to be the preparation methods, performance tests showed that the presence of Cu as promoter in Ni–Cu–MgO catalysts, enhanced the catalytic activity, substantially at higher temperatures with the best result obtained for Ni–Cu–MgO catalyst prepared by one step sol- gel method, reaching a hydrogen concentration of 70 vol% (160.51 mol H2/mol Ni-1 h) and a smaller value of ID/IG (less imperfection) for produced carbon nano-fibers at 670 °C. Detailed rate-based model for deactivation of catalyst was found to be dependent on the time, reaction temperature and partial pressure of methane and indicated that the reaction of deactivation could be modeled by a simple hyperbolic model.

Nosrat Izadi; Ali Morad Rashidi; Ahmad Zeraatkar; Heshmatollah Varmazyar; Maryam Rashtchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation`s carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Meyers, S.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation's carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Meyers, S.J. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)); Hauserman, W.B. (North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Plasmachemical Synthesis of Carbon Suboxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nonthermal carbon monoxide plasma is known to produce a solid deposition which is thought to be a polymer of carbon suboxide (C3O2); however there are very few investigations of this deposition in the literature. This thesis contains an analysis...

Geiger, Robert

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hydrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

Mundschau, Michael (Longmont, CO); Xie, Xiaobing (Foster City, CA); Evenson, IV, Carl (Lafayette, CO); Grimmer, Paul (Longmont, CO); Wright, Harold (Longmont, CO)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Soft-linking energy systems and GIS models to investigate spatial hydrogen infrastructure development in a low-carbon UK energy system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes an innovative modelling approach focusing on linking spatial (GIS) modelling of hydrogen (H2) supply, demands and infrastructures, anchored within a economy-wide energy systems model (MARKAL). The UK government is legislating a groundbreaking climate change mitigation target for a 60% CO2 reduction by 2050, and has identified H2 infrastructures and technologies as potentially playing a major role, notably in the transport sector. An exploratory set of linked GIS–MARKAL model scenarios generate a range of nuanced insights including spatial matching of supply and demand for optimal zero-carbon H2 deployment, a crucial finding on successive clustering of demand centres to enable economies of scale in H2 supply and distribution, the competitiveness of imported liquid H2 and of liquid H2 distribution, and sectoral competition for coal with carbon sequestration between electricity and H2 production under economy-wide CO2 constraints.

Neil Strachan; Nazmiye Balta-Ozkan; David Joffe; Kate McGeevor; Nick Hughes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Elucidation of Hydrogen Interaction Mechanisms with Metal-Doped Carbon Nanostructures - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Ragaiy Zidan (Primary Contact), Joseph A.Teprovich Jr., Douglas A Knight, Robert Lascola, Lucile C. Teague Savannah River National Laboratory Building 999-2W, Aiken, SC 29808 Phone: (803) 646-8876 Email: ragaiy.zidan@srnl.doe.gov Collaborators: * Prof. Puru Jena - Department of Physics - Virginia Commonwealth University * Prof. Mark Conradi - Department of Physics - Washington University of St. Louis * Prof. Sonjong Hwang - Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division - California Institute of Technology

334

Adsorption and methanation of carbon dioxide on a nickel/silica catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and methanation of carbon dioxide on a nickel/silica catalyst were studied using temperature-programmed desorption and temperature-programmed reaction. Carbon dioxide adsorption on nickel was found to be activated; almost no adsorption occurred at room temperature, but large coverages were obtained between 383 and 473 K. The data indicate CO/sub 2/ dissociates upon adsorption at elevated temperatures to yield carbon monoxide and oxygen atoms. These oxygen atoms react with hydrogen at room temperature, so the methane and water observed during programmed heating in flowing hydrogen are identical for adsorbed CO and adsorbed CO/sub 2/. Single CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O peaks, each with a peak temperature at 473 K, were observed. This peak temperature did not change with initial coverage, indicating methanation is first order in CO surface coverage. The activated adsorption of CO/sub 2/ allowed these coverage variation experiments to be carried out. Thus, following adsorption, CO and CO/sub 2/ methanation proceed by the same mechanism. However, the activated adsorption of CO/sub 2/ may create a higher H/sub 2/:CO surface ratio during steady-state hydrogenation, causing CO/sub 2/ hydrogenation to favor methane over higher hydrocarbons. 5 figures.

Falconer, J.L.; Zagli, A.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon and metal surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon ­ and metal surfaces, 20080 San Sebastiån, Spain Abstract Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined of carbon­fiber inforced graphite used as first­wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data

Muiño, Ricardo Díez

336

Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon-and metal surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal surfaces, 20080 San SebastiĂĄn, Spain Abstract Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data

Muiño, Ricardo Díez

337

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc. and their team members are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, new cermet compositions were tested that demonstrated similar performance to previous materials. A 0.5-mm thick membrane achieved at H{sub 2} transport rate of 0.2 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C, which corresponded to an ambipolar conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Although these results were equivalent to those for other cermet compositions, this new composition might be useful if it demonstrates improved chemical or mechanical stability. Ceramic/ceramic composite membranes also were fabricated and tested; however, some reaction did occur between the proton- and electron-conducting phases, which likely compromised conductivity. This sample only achieved a H{sub 2} transport rate of {approx} 0.006 mL/min/cm{sup 2} and an ambipolar conductivity of {approx}4 x 10{sup -4} S/cm. Chemical stability tests were continued, and candidate ceramic membranes were found to react slightly with carbon monoxide under extreme testing conditions. A cermet compositions did not show any reaction with carbon monoxide, but a thick layer of carbon formed on the membrane surface. The most significant technical accomplishment this quarter was a new high-pressure seal composition. This material maintained a pressure differential across the membrane of {approx} 280 psi at 800 C, and is still in operation.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; M.K. Ferber; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coherent Carbon Cryogel-Ammonia Borane Nanocomposites for Improved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Cryogel-Ammonia Borane Nanocomposites for Improved Hydrogen Storage. Coherent Carbon Cryogel-Ammonia Borane Nanocomposites for Improved Hydrogen Storage. Abstract: Ammonia...

339

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uhlemann, M. , etals. , Hydrogen Storage in Different CarbonEckert, J. , etals. , Hydrogen Storage in Microporous Metal-16, 2003 40. Smalley,E. , Hydrogen Storage Eased, Technology

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Platinum supported on titanium–ruthenium oxide is a remarkably stable electrocatayst for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of Pt-based alloy catalysts for fuel cell applications...on carbon corrosion of PEMFC electrodes . J Electrochem...carbon monoxide on PEFC catalyst carbon support degradation...2006 ) PEM fuel cell cathode carbon corrosion due to...of carbon support in PEMFC at fuel starvation . ECS...

Javier Parrondo; Taehee Han; Ellazar Niangar; Chunmei Wang; Nilesh Dale; Kev Adjemian; Vijay Ramani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Studies of carbon monoxide diffusion in an urban area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 40 ( )-, 7) 50 I I ) 'I ' 0 (. ' i . l') 4! !, , /' / 600 700 TRAFFTC/15 N!. Ii Fig. 14. Carl~co moaoxicle come. atrat ion v, traffic for Sampler 2 fro' t 12 15PN7 00PYCI/To ? 'JU)v 20' 1969(r'057) 29 if] 8!. & vcti jr. ';"; /I 7... correlation co"fficient 0. 47% 16. 6% 2. 44% 0. 13% Table 10 sboms 95/ confislence limits for average values for the three days. T1-e...

Thomas, John Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Cell Extracts of Pseudomonas carboxydovorans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Winzer. 1932. Uber die Bildung von Essigsaure bei der biologischen Umsetzung von Kohlenoxyd und Kohlensaure mit Wasserstoff zu Methan. Biochem. Z. 245:2-12. 9. Fuchs, G., G. Andress, and R. K. Thauer. 1975. CO- oxidation by anaerobic...

Ortwin Meyer; Hans G. Schlegel

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

344

ILENR/RE-AQ-ON-ROAD CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROCARBON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. McVey, and Stuart P. Beaton Prepared for: Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources Office A. Witter Director State of Illinois Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources #12;NOTE This report has been reviewed by the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources (ENR) and approved

Denver, University of

345

Computer simulation of the dispersion of carbon monoxide from roadways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and that the transport of material in the x-direction is due mainly to the mean wind, one can reduce equation (1) to BB B BV B BB u ? = ? (K ? ) + ? (K ? ) Bx By y By Bz z Bz (4) with the following boundary conditions, 1) I ~ 0 as x -+ 2) V~ asx-+0 (5) 3... are illustrated in Figures 5 and 6. Using equations (24) and (25) with n = 1 and equation (21), the concentration equations (19) and (20) become Q 1 v 21 r&(x, y, z, h) 2rra a u exp P- ? (~) J L2 ~ z z-h) 1 z+h)2 a az 'z (28) t(x, z, h) = exp /2rr a u z...

Maldonado, Cesar

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Decomposition and Polymerization of Solid Carbon Monoxide under Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By performing constant-pressure deformable-cell ab initio molecular dynamics simulations we have studied the pressure-induced chemical instability of CO above 5 GPa. The simulation shows that, contrary to previous speculations, polymerization proceeds without CO bond dissociation. The resulting polymer consists of a disordered network of small polycarbonyl (CO)n chains connecting fivefold C4O cycles. The computed vibrational spectra and electronic gap agree very well with (and shed light on) very recent experimental data.

Stéphane Bernard; Guido L. Chiarotti; Sandro Scandolo; Erio Tosatti

1998-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program is the development of carbon capture technologies for power systems. Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from mixed-gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic

348

Hydrogen Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As hydrogen appears to be a potential solution for a carbon-free society, its production plays a critical role in showing how well it fulfills the criteria of being environmentally benign and sustainable. Of c...

Ibrahim Dincer; Anand S. Joshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuel, so the carbon dioxide released in the reformation process adds to the greenhouse effect. Hydrogen has very high energy for its weight, but very low energy for its...

350

Chemical-Looping Gasification of Biomass for Hydrogen-Enriched Gas Production with In-Process Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This may help to increase the carbon dioxide capture on one hand but, on other hand, also increases the size of the gasifier and regenerator and the heat requirement of the regenerator. ... Steam was used as the fluidizing medium. ...

Bishnu Acharya; Animesh Dutta; Prabir Basu

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

351

Large Surface Area Ordered Porous Carbons via Nanocasting Zeolite 10X and High Performance for Hydrogen Storage Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

† Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, People’s Republic of China ... Zeolites with well-defined nanopores are good candidates for preparing ordered carbons, and some excellent reviews available in literatures have fully reviewed the fields of template method for preparing ordered micro- or mesoporous carbons. ... It should be noted that this is not a comprehensive review article as such reviews are available in the literature. ...

Jinjun Cai; Liangjun Li; Xiaoxia Lv; Chunpeng Yang; Xuebo Zhao

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Bioreactor Development for Biological Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Huang National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 ed The biologically-mediated water-gas shift reaction, in which carbon monoxide is oxidized to car- bon dioxide while temperature and lack of equilibrium limitation make the biological shift reaction a promising alternative

353

Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H{sub 2}S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

Solehudin, Agus, E-mail: asolehudin@upi.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering Education, Indonesia University of Education (UPI), Bandung, West Java (Indonesia); Nurdin, Isdiriayani [Department of Chemical Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, West Java (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations. This report describes activities for the thirteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that they were having difficulty with refractory vendors meeting specifications for the lining of the pressure vessel. EnviRes is working to resolve this issue.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Metal catalyzed copolymerization processes involving carbon oxides as substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

backbone and electron donating tert-butyl groups in the phenolate rings. This catalyst was used to investigate the effect of altering the nature of the cocatalyst and its concentration. The coupling of carbon monoxide and aziridines has been shown...

Phelps, Andrea Lee

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitoring for nitrogen dioxide exposure: methodologyB.G. , Jr. (1983) Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137Personal Sampler for Nitrogen Dioxide. American Industrial

Apte, Michael G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fuel-cell technology: Running on natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... electrochemically oxidize a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, which is generated internally from the natural ...naturalgas ...

Brian C. H. Steele

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Biodiesel: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-10-408  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OPX Biotechnologies, Inc. (OPX), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Johnson Matthey will develop and optimize a novel, engineered microorganism that directly produces biodiesel from renewable hydrogen (H2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed process will fix CO2 utilizing H2 to generate an infrastructure-compatible, energy-dense fuel at costs of less than $2.50 per gallon, with water being produced as the primary byproduct. NREL will perform metabolic engineering on the bacterium Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha) and a techno-economic analysis to guide future scale-up work. H2 and CO2 uptakes rates will be genetically increased, production of free fatty acids will be enhanced and their degradation pathway blocked in order to meet the ultimate program goals.

Maness, P. C.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reactivity of Niobium?Carbon Cluster Ions with Hydrogen Molecules in Relation to Formation Mechanism of Met?Car Cluster Ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactivity of Niobium?Carbon Cluster Ions with Hydrogen Molecules in Relation to Formation Mechanism of Met?Car Cluster Ions ... After the multiple collisions of He and H2 in the collision cell, the cluster ions entered the vacuum chamber (typically ?8 Ś 10?4 Torr) and were introduced into the differentially pumped chamber through a skimmer, where the cluster ions were accelerated orthogonally by a pulsed electric field for the time-of-flight mass analysis. ... The nonreactivity of NbnCm+ with H2 indicates that the energy barrier for the H2 attachment is high enough or the H2 attachment is energetically unfavorable (or both), meaning that NbnCm+ has a negative H2 affinity. ...

Ken Miyajima; Naoya Fukushima; Fumitaka Mafuné

2008-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PHASE BEHAVIOR OF LIGHT GASES IN HYDROGEN AND AQUEOUS SOLVENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under previous support from the US Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present reporting period, the solubilities of hydrogen in n-hexane, carbon monoxide in cyclohexane, and nitrogen in phenanthrene and pyrene were measured using a static equilibrium cell over the temperature range from 344.3 to 433.2 K and pressures to 22.8 MPa. The uncertainty in these new solubility measurements is estimated to be less than 0.001 in mole fraction. The data were analyzed using the Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). In general, the PR EOS represents the experimental data well when a single interaction parameter (C{sub ij}) is used for each isotherm. In addition, the predictive capability of the modified Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) equation of state (EOS) was evaluated for selected carbon dioxide + normal paraffins, ethane + normal paraffins, and hydrogen + normal paraffins. A set of mixing rules was proposed for the modified EOS to extend its predictive capabilities to mixtures. The predicted bubble point pressures for the ethane + n-paraffin and carbon dioxide + n-paraffin binaries were compared to those of the Peng-Robinson (PR), simplified-perturbed-hard-chain theory (SPHCT) and original PGR equations. The predictive capability of the proposed equation is better or comparable to the PR, SPHCT and original PGR equations of state for the ethane binaries (%AAD of 1.9) and carbon dioxide binaries (%AAD of 2.0). For the hydrogen binaries, the modified PGR EOS showed much better performance (%AAD of 1.7) than the original PGR equation and comparable to the PR equation.

KHALED A.M. GASEM; ROBERT L. ROBINSON, JR.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gasification behavior of carbon residue in bed solids of black liquor gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam gasification of carbon residue in bed solids of a low-temperature black liquor gasifier was studied using a thermogravimetric system at 3 bar. Complete gasification of the carbon residue, which remained unreactive at 600 C, was achieved in about 10 min as the temperature increased to 800 C. The rate of gasification and its temperature dependence were evaluated from the non-isothermal experiment results. Effects of particle size and adding H{sub 2} and CO to the gasification agent were also studied. The rate of steam gasification could be taken as zero order in carbon until 80% of carbon was gasified, and for the rest of the gasification process the rate appeared to be first order in carbon. The maximum rate of carbon conversion was around 0.003/s and the activation energy was estimated to be in the range of 230-300 kJ/mol. The particle size did not show significant effect on the rate of gasification. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide appeared to retard the onset of the gasification process. (author)

Preto, Fernando; Zhang, Xiaojie (Frank); Wang, Jinsheng [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Adsorption and hydrogenation of ethylene, 1-hexene, and benzene and CO adsorption on Pt/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Pt-Sn/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption and hydrogenation of ethylene, 1-hexene, and benzene, and carbon monoxide adsorption on alumina-supported Pt and Pt-Sn catalysts were studied. Gravimetric experiments and infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy combined with chemisorption measurements were used for this purpose. Additionally fresh and coked catalysts were characterized by the IR spectra of CO and chemisorption data. Added tin causes a slight increase in benzene adsorption and a distinct decrease in ethylene and 1-hexene uptakes, whereas the hydrogenation activity is inhibited. Adsorption and catalytic data with benzene can be explained by a model of flat adsorption on Pt/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and tilted adsorption on Pt-Sn/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and are consistent with electronic modification of platinum by tin. Electronic interaction between platinum and tin is also indicated by the IR data. The most active sites for hydrocarbon decomposition on the platinum surface are the same as those on which carbon monoxide is multiply bonded. Deposited coke and tin block the same active sites on the platinum surface.

Palazov, A.; Bonev, C.; Shopov, D.; Lietz, G.; Sarkany, A.; Voelter, J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide Catalyzed by Ruthenium Trimethylphosphine Complexes: A Mechanistic Investigation using High-Pressure NMR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The previously reported complex, cis-(PMe3)4RuCl(OAc) (1) acts as a catalyst for CO2 hydrogenation into formic acid in the presence of a base and an alcohol co-catalyst. NMR spectroscopy has revealed that 1 exists in solution in equilibrium with fac-(PMe3)3RuCl(h2-OAc) (2), [(PMe3)4Ru(h2-OAc)]Cl (3a), and free PMe3. Complex 2 has been isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. 2 has been tested as a CO2 hydrogenation catalyst, however, it performed poorly under the conditions of catalysis used for 1. Complex 3a can be prepared by adding certain alcohols, such as MeOH, EtOH, or o-C6H5OH, to a solution of 1 in CDCl3. The chloride ion of 3a has been exchanged for the non-coordinating anions BPh4 or B(ArF )4 (B(ArF)4 = tetrakis(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)borate) to produce [(PMe3)4Ru(h2-OAc)]BPh4 (3b) and [(PMe3)4Ru(h2-OAc)]B(ArF)4 (3c). Both of these complexes have been isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, and in the case of 3b, X-ray crystallography. Complexes 3b and 3c perform just as well as 1 for CO2 hydrogenation to formic acid in the presence of an alcohol co-catalyst; however, 3b,c perform equally well without the added alcohol. High-pressure NMR has been used to investigate the mechanism of CO2 hydrogenation via 3a,b in the presence of base. Two of the intermediates involved have been identified as cis-(PMe3)4RuH2 (5) and cis-(PMe3)4Ru(H)O2CH (6), and the role of the base includes not only trapping of the formic acid product, but also initiation of the catalysis by aiding the conversion of 3b,c to 5.

Getty, April D.; Tai, Chih-Cheng; Linehan, John C.; Jessop, Philip G.; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Rheingold, Arnold

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reduction of titania by methane-hydrogen-argon gas mixture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of titania using methane-containing gas was investigated in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range 1,373 to 1,773 K. The reduction production product is titanium oxycarbide, which is a solid solution of TiC and TiO. At 1,373 K, the formation rate of TiC is very slow. The rate and extent of reaction increase with increasing temperature to 1,723 K. A further increase in temperature to 1,773 K does not affect the reaction rate and extent. An increase in methane concentration to 8 vol pct favors the reduction process. A further increase in methane concentration above 8 vol pct causes excessive carbon deposition, which has a negative effect on the reaction rate. Hydrogen partial pressure should be maintained above 35 vol pct to depress the cracking of methane. Addition of water vapor to the reducing gas strongly retards the reduction reaction, even at low concentrations of 1 to 2 vol pct. Carbon monoxide also depresses the reduction process, but its effect is significant only at higher concentrations, above 10 vol pct.

Zhang, G.; Ostrovski, O.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes activities for the third quarter of work performed under this agreement. Atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on June 5 through June 13, 2003. The test results were encouraging, however, the rate of carbon dissolution was below expectations. Additional atmospheric testing is scheduled for the first week of September 2003. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product stream. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Highlights | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

valuable H2, while the other removes an atom of carbon and oxygen and produces carbon monoxide. Typically carbon monoxide inhibits the removal of hydrogen, but the use of...

368

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adequate on-board hydrogen storage is essential, and remainsjustify their costs. Hydrogen storage remains an importantto 10,000 psi, liquid hydrogen storage, and other solid and

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Experimental study of combustion of hydrogen–syngas/methane fuel mixtures in a porous burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lean premixed combustion of hydrogen–syngas/methane fuel mixtures was investigated experimentally to demonstrate fuel flexibility of a two-section porous burner. The un-insulated burner was operated at atmospheric pressure. Combustion was stabilized at the interface of silicon-carbide coated carbon foam of 26 pores per centimeter (ppcm) and 4 ppcm. Methane (CH4) content in the fuel was decreased from 100% to 0% (by volume), with the remaining amount split equally between carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2), the two reactive components of the syngas. Experiments for different fuel mixtures were conducted at a fixed air flow rate, while the fuel flow rate was varied to obtain a range of adiabatic flame temperatures. The CO and nitric oxide ( NO x ) emissions were measured downstream of the porous burner, in the axial direction to identify the post-combustion zone and in the transverse direction to quantify combustion uniformity. For a given adiabatic flame temperature, increasing H2/CO content in the fuel mixture decreased both the CO and NO x emissions. Presence of H2/CO in the fuel mixture also decreased temperature near the lean blow-off limit, especially for higher percentages of CO and H2 in the fuel.

S.K. Alavandi; A.K. Agrawal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A comprehensive energy–exergy-based assessment and parametric study of a hydrogen production process using steam glycerol reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Various assessment tools are applied to comprehensively investigate a glycerol-to-hydrogen production system. These tools investigate the chemical reactions, design and simulate the entire hydrogen production process, study the energetic and exergetic performances and perform parametric analyses (using intuitive and design of experiment-based methods). Investigating the chemical reaction of steam glycerol reforming reveals that the optimal conditions, determined based on maximizing the hydrogen production while minimizing the methane and carbon monoxide contents and coke formation, can be achieved at a reforming temperature and a water-to-glycerol feed ratio (WGFR) of 950 K and 9, respectively. The thermal and exergetic efficiencies of the resulting process are 66.6% and 59.9%, respectively. These findings are lower than those cited in the literature and relative to other reformates (methane, ethanol and methanol). The parametric investigation indicates that the performance of the process (energetic and exergetic) could be ensured by using an appropriate and judiciously selected combination of the reactor temperature and WGFR. Based on the parametric energetic and exergetic investigation, WGFR = 6 and T = 1100 K appear to be the most accurate parameters for the entire glycerol-to-hydrogen process. For this recommend configuration, the thermal and exergetic efficiencies are 78.1% and 66.1%, respectively.

Noureddine Hajjaji; Amna Chahbani; Zouhour Khila; Marie-Noëlle Pons

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mathematical modeling for the performance and emission parameters of dual fuel diesel engine using hydrogen as secondary fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, mathematical models were developed to correlate the brake thermal efficiency, un-burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxides and oxides of nitrogen by varying engine parameters like Load and Gaseous (H2) fuel substitution. The developed models can be used to predict the important performance and emission parameters for diesel-hydrogen operation in various combinations at different loads within the experimental domain. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied for developing the models using the techniques of design of experiments and multi linear regression analysis. General factorial design was used to plan the experiments. Second order response surface models were found to be the most suitable in the present work. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the experimental results at 95% confidence level revealed that the developed models are significant. Comparison of experimental output with those predicted by the developed models showed close proximity having high correlation coefficients R2 for the various response variables.

A.E. Dhole; R.B. Yarasu; D.B. Lata; S.S. Baraskar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Improving gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine efficiency and emissions with hydrogen from exhaust gas fuel reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exhaust gas fuel reforming has been identified as a thermochemical energy recovery technology with potential to improve gasoline engine efficiency, and thereby reduce CO2 in addition to other gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions. The principle relies on achieving energy recovery from the hot exhaust stream by endothermic catalytic reforming of gasoline and a fraction of the engine exhaust gas. The hydrogen-rich reformate has higher enthalpy than the gasoline fed to the reformer and is recirculated to the intake manifold, i.e. reformed exhaust gas recirculation (REGR). The REGR system was simulated by supplying hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO) into a conventional EGR system. The hydrogen and CO concentrations in the REGR stream were selected to be achievable in practice at typical gasoline exhaust temperatures. Emphasis was placed on comparing REGR to the baseline gasoline engine, and also to conventional EGR. The results demonstrate the potential of REGR to simultaneously increase thermal efficiency, reduce gaseous emissions and decrease PM formation.

Daniel Fennell; Jose Herreros; Athanasios Tsolakis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Modeling the Prospects for Hydrogen Powered Transportation Through 2100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen fueled transportation has been proposed as a low carbon alternative to the current gasoline-powered

Sandoval, Reynaldo.

374

NETL Coal to Hydrogen Program National Energy Technology Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Hydrogen Production CCPI Technology Demonstrations (50/50) · Clear Skies · Reduced Carbon Intensity Clean Coal

375

California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

376

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Carbon Fiber Technology Facility 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

377

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Carbon Fiber Technology Facility 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

378

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Carbon Fiber Technology Facility 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

379

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage). The Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission

380

Hydrogen Delivery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mark Paster Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology Program Hydrogen Production and Delivery Team Hydrogen Delivery Goal Hydrogen Delivery Goal Liquid H 2 & Chem. Carriers Gaseous Pipeline Truck Hydrides Liquid H 2 - Truck - Rail Other Carriers Onsite reforming Develop Develop hydrogen fuel hydrogen fuel delivery delivery technologies that technologies that enable the introduction and enable the introduction and long long - - term viability of term viability of hydrogen as an energy hydrogen as an energy carrier for transportation carrier for transportation and stationary power. and stationary power. Delivery Options * End Game - Pipelines - Other as needed * Breakthrough Hydrogen Carriers * Truck: HP Gas & Liquid Hydrogen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermodynamic Analysis of the Possibility of Hydrogen Production by Oxidation of n-Butane, n-Pentane, and Carbon by Oxygen-Containing Nitrogen Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermodynamic analysis is performed to study the reactions of hydrogen production by oxidation of hydrocarbons of natural gas ... analysis suggests the possibility of developing a new hydrogen production method

A. M. Alekseev; Z. V. Komova; L. L. Klinova…

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Introduction to SAE Hydrogen Fueling Standardization Webinar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

carbon offsets and offer the possibility of high-efficiency fuel cells for energy conversion (propulsion). Hydrogen is therefore attractive for commercial applications too...

383

Materials towards carbon-free, emission-free and oil-free mobility: hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles—now and in the future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of private cars becomes the...generated by the fuel cell, with the...stored in the hydrogen tank. Although...For the hydrogen-storage-material...mobility and car. Figure 3...vehicle; FCHV, fuel-cell hybrid vehicle...Figure 6. Hydrogen vision. HV...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the Water Gas Shift Reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by concurrent water-gas shift (WGS) and carbonation reactions to enhance H{sub 2} production by incessantly driving the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward and in-situ removing the CO2 product from the gas mixture. The spent sorbent is then regenerated by calcining it to produce a pure stream of CO{sub 2} and CaO which can be reused. However while performing the cyclic carbonation and calcination it was observed that the CO{sub 2} released during the in-situ calcination causes the deactivation of the iron oxide WGS catalyst. Detailed understanding of the iron oxide phase diagram helped in developing a catalyst pretreatment procedure using a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system to convert the deactivated catalyst back to its active magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) form. The water gas shift reaction was studied at different temperatures, different steam to carbon monoxide ratios (S/C) 3:1, 2:1, 1:1 and different total pressures ranging from 0-300 psig. The combined water gas shift and carbonation reaction was investigated at temperatures ranging from 600-700C, S/C ratio of 3:1 to 1:1 and at different pressures of 0-300 psig and the calcium looping process was found to produce high purity hydrogen with in-situ CO{sub 2} capture.

Mahesh Iyer; Shwetha Ramkumar; Liang-Shih Fan

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hydrogen’s Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of future demand for non-fossil produced hydrogen and of its potential are oriented toward ... to the environment as the present fossil energy economy [10.4, 10.9].

J. Nitsch; C. Voigt

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Strain-induced band-gap engineering of graphene monoxide and its effect on graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using first-principles calculations we demonstrate the feasibility of band-gap engineering in two-dimensional crystalline graphene monoxide (GMO), a recently reported graphene-based material with a 1:1 carbon/oxygen ratio. The band gap of GMO, which can be switched between direct and indirect, is tunable over a large range (0–1.35 eV) for accessible strains. Electron and hole transport occurs predominantly along the zigzag and armchair directions (armchair for both) when GMO is a direct- (indirect-) gap semiconductor. A band gap of ?0.5 eV is also induced in graphene at the K? points for GMO/graphene hybrid systems.

H. H. Pu; S. H. Rhim; C. J. Hirschmugl; M. Gajdardziska-Josifovska; M. Weinert; J. H. Chen

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

Detection of iodine monoxide in the tropical free troposphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19, 2012) Atmospheric iodine monoxide (IO) is a radical that catalytically destroys heat trapping in the remote tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) (2­4). IO further affects the oxidative capacity iodine species over the remote ocean remain poorly understood (11, 14) but are currently thought

388

May 2014 Labnotes | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mercury from mixtures of the gases that make up syngas - nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Palladium performed well from the start at warm gas...

389

Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

Shepodd, Timothy J. (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Even, Jr., William R. (4254 Drake Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Error Error Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC * Increasing your portlet timeout setting. *...

392

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

393

The President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Workshop on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Implementation #12;Cost Reduction is a Primary R&D Driver Key Hydrogen R&D Challenges Identified Hydrogen Washington, DC July 13, 2005 JoAnn Milliken DOE Hydrogen Program #12;Planning #12;U.S. Energy Dependence with carbon sequestration Distributed Natural Gas* Nuclear Distributed Generation Hydro Wind Solar Geothermal

394

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Production The simplest and most common element, hydrogen is all around us, but always as a compound with other elements. To make it usable in fuel cells or otherwise provide energy, we must expend energy or modify another energy source to extract it from the fossil fuel, biomass, water, or other compound in which it is found. Nearly all hydrogen production in the United States today is by steam reformation of natural gas. This, however, releases carbon dioxide in the process and trades one relatively clean fuel for another, with associated energy loss, so it does little to meet national energy needs. Hydrogen can also be produced by electrolysis-passing an electrical current through water to break it into hydrogen and oxygen-but electrolysis is inefficient and is only as clean

395

NANOPOROUS NONOXIDIC MATERIALS FOR HYDROGEN PURIFICATION Mercouri G. Kanatzidis, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

promising alternative sources of energy is hydrogen fuel cells. However, hydrogen must be purified, or separated from other molecules, before it can be used as fuel. Current methods of refining hydrogen, hydrogen fuel technology. Separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide occurs as hydrogen (white) passes

Shull, Kenneth R.

396

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

397

Florida Hydrogen Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

Block, David L

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by rhenium and manganese polypyridyl catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are on the decline of the peak oil production curve, and thedue to the impending peak in oil production and the threatoil production curves for those countries that have passed peak

Smieja, Jonathan Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by rhenium and manganese polypyridyl catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graph displays not only the shift in energy from wood to fossil fuels but also shows that total energy usagegraph displays not only the shift in energy from wood to fossil fuels, but also shows that total energy usage

Smieja, Jonathan Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide concentrations in Santiago de Chile associated with traffic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO/CO2 ratios have been measured in different locations of Santiago de Chile city. Measurements were carried out in a tunnel (prevailing emissions from cars with catalytic converter) and close to heavy traffic st...

María A. Rubio; Irene Fuenzalida…

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Targets, barriers and...

402

Techno-economic assessment of hydrogen production from underground coal gasification (UCG) in Western Canada with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) for upgrading bitumen from oil sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the techno-economic viability of hydrogen production from underground coal gasification (UCG) in Western Canada, for the servicing of the oil sands bitumen upgrading industry. Hydrogen production for bitumen upgrading is predominantly achieved via steam methane reforming (SMR); which involves significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions along with considerable feedstock (natural gas) cost volatility. UCG is a formidable candidate for cost-competitive environmentally sustainable hydrogen production; given its negligible feedstock cost, the enormity of deep coal reserves in Western Canada and the favourable CO2 sequestration characteristics of potential UCG sites in the Western Canadian sedimentary basin (WCSB). Techno-economic models were developed for UCG and SMR with and without CCS, to estimate the cost of hydrogen production including delivery to a bitumen upgrader. In this paper, at base case conditions, a 5% internal rate of return (IRR) differential between UCG and SMR was considered so as to account for the increased investment risk associated with UCG. The cost of UCG hydrogen production without CCS is estimated to be $1.78/kg of H2. With CCS, this increases to range of $2.11–$2.70/kg of H2, depending on the distance of the site for CO2 sequestration from the UCG plant. The SMR hydrogen production cost without CCS is estimated to be $1.73/kg of H2. In similar fashion to UCG, this rises to a range of $2.14 to $2.41/kg of H2 with the consideration of CCS. Lastly, for hydrogen production without CCS, UCG has a superior cost competitiveness in comparison to SMR for an IRR differential less than 4.6%. This competitive threshold rises to 5.4% for hydrogen production with CCS.

Babatunde Olateju; Amit Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Short-term effects of air pollution: a panel study of blood markers in patients with chronic pulmonary disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monoxide [NO], nitrogen dioxide [NO 2 ], carbon monoxide [monoxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), carbon monoxide (dioxide; NO 2 , nitrogen dioxide; CO, carbon monoxide; NO,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June...

405

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

406

Hydrogen Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Hydrogen Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

407

Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE...

408

Hydrogen Safety  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

409

Hydrogen Cryomagnetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% cryogenics (inc. MRI) 29% pressurisation and purging 11%controlled atmospheres (inc. breathing) 6% 4     Figure 5. Simplified price-cost, supply-demand relationship that is central to the helium market model developed during the Helium Resources... of hydrogen large amounts of hydrogen must be available for liquefaction. This poses problems for the production of liquid hydrogen via intermittent wind energy and via microwave plasma reactors that are not scalable as a result of low hydrogen production...

Glowacki, B. A.; Hanely, E.; Nuttall, W. J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hydrogenation apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

411

ENERGY | Hydrogen Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The growing concerns about global climate change, local pollution, and availability and security of energy supply have drawn the larger public attention, well outside the frontiers of the research community. A large debate has been considering the potential benefits of a hydrogen economy with low- or carbon-free primary energy sources. The attractive potential of hydrogen is countered by uncertainties about the development and the economics of the implied key enabling technologies, such as renewable energy sources, advanced production processes, fuel cells (FCs), novel storage technologies, safety, and a brand new or a substantially modified infrastructure. A paradigm shift to a hydrogen economy will surely require substantial research and development (R&D) breakthroughs on critical technologies with a lengthy transitional approach.

M. Conte; M. Ronchetti

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production to optimize hydrogen production or carbon capture The prototype plant would be the world's 1st #12;24-Jun-03Gen? · The world's first plant [prototype] to: - Capture and permanently sequester carbon dioxide - Emit virtually

413

Nebraska Company Expands to Meet Demand for Hydrogen Fuel | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

posted a blog about Hexagon Lincoln, a company that creates carbon fiber composite fuel tanks used to transport hydrogen across the country. Read Nebraska Company Expands to Meet...

414

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

numerous domestic and renewable resources, makes hydrogen anto lower carbon and renewable resources such as biomass,non-dispatchable renewable resources, such as wind power,

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

inputs for zero carbon footprint - PEM technology can be integrated with solar and wind power Cost competitive with current commercial delivered hydrogen costs - Currently...

416

Effect of Surface Roughening of Substrate Steel on the Improvement of Delamination Strength and Tribological Behavior of Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Coating Under Lubricated Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adhesion strength of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is an obstacle in efforts to improve the reliability of coated products. It is generally believed that the roughening of the substrate surface improves ...

Masabumi Masuko; Takuya Kudo; Akihito Suzuki

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Materials towards carbon-free, emission-free and oil-free mobility: hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles—now and in the future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Energy.2008Targets for on-board hydrogen storage systems: current RD focus is on 2010 targetsSee http://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/storage/pdfs/targets_onboard_hydro_storage.pdf Vasiliev, L. L. , L. E...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

High temperature electrolysis for syngas production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Syngas components hydrogen and carbon monoxide may be formed by the decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by a solid-oxide electrolysis cell to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen, a portion of which may be reacted with carbon dioxide to form carbon monoxide. One or more of the components for the process, such as steam, energy, or electricity, may be provided using a nuclear power source.

Stoots, Carl M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, James Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hawkes, Grant L. (Sugar City, ID); Hartvigsen, Joseph J. (Kaysville, UT)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Background Although alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), and solvent blends have been developed as commercially-viable options for the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from waste gases, natural gas, and hydrogen streams, further process improvements are required to cost-effectively capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. The promotion of potassium carbonate (K

420

Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

Danko, E.

2011-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hydrogen in Type Ic Supernovae?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By definition, a Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) does not have conspicuous lines of hydrogen or helium in its optical spectrum. SNe Ic usually are modelled in terms of the gravitational collapse of bare carbon-oxygen cores. We consider the possibility that the spectra of ordinary (SN 1994I-like) SNe Ic have been misinterpreted, and that SNe Ic eject hydrogen. An absorption feature usually attributed to a blend of Si II 6355 and C II 6580 may be produced by H-alpha. If SN 1994I-like SNe Ic eject hydrogen, the possibility that hypernova (SN 1998bw-like) SNe Ic, some of which are associated with gamma-ray bursts, also eject hydrogen should be considered. The implications of hydrogen for SN Ic progenitors and explosion models are briefly discussed.

David Branch; David J. Jeffery; Timothy R. Young; E. Baron

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

15 - Hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter covers hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials, which is one of the options currently being considered for automotive or mobile applications. It first introduces the principles behind hydrogen adsorption by these materials and the methods used to characterise their hydrogen storage properties. It then provides an overview of the different material types that are available – including porous carbons, zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and microporous organic polymers – and their most important hydrogen storage properties. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the use of nanoporous materials in practical hydrogen storage units, the most important considerations for this purpose, and a discussion of future trends in the area.

D.P. Broom; D. Book

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Hydrogen-induced magnetization and tunable hydrogen storage in graphitic structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen interactions with undefective and defective graphitic structures were investigated by first-principles simulations. Structural vacancies were identified to promote the dissociation of molecular hydrogen with a reduced activation barrier of 0.63eV, compared to 2.38eV for a perfect graphene. However, the vacancies bind the hydrogen too strongly for spill-over mechanisms to be effective. An isolated vacancy in a graphene can bind four hydrogen atoms, but a metastable and magnetic structure binds six hydrogen atoms at the vacancy site at room temperature. The thermodynamics, magnetic properties, and hydrogen binding energies vary with graphene layer spacing. A metastable structure becomes energetically favorable for a layer spacing of 3.19Ć, while the binding of hydrogen becomes exothermic at a layer spacing of 2.72Ć. This phenomenon suggests the possibility of using hydrogen-rich carbon structures for reversible magnetic and hydrogen storage applications.

Yang Lei; Stephen A. Shevlin; Wenguang Zhu; Zheng Xiao Guo

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

424

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural residues, in the near-term time frame (~three years) and at a comparable cost to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power a bus in Albany, GA. Our strategy is to produce hydrogen from biomass pyrolysis oils in conjunction with high value co-products. Activated carbon can be made from agricultural residues in a two- stage process: (1) slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce charcoal, and (2) high temperature processing to form activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio-

425

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes activities for the sixteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that the vendor for the pressure vessel for above atmospheric testing now plans to deliver it by November 20, 2006 instead of October 20, 2006 as previously reported. MEFOS performed a hazardous operation review of pressurized testing. The current schedule anticipates above atmospheric pressure testing to begin during the week of April 16, 2007. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 3 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section VI. Safety and Codes & Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to H2 from 0-100% at 450o C in N2 background Future Directions · Fabricate 2nd generation sensors.A Safety VI.A.1 Gallium Nitride Integrated Gas/Temperature Sensors for Fuel Cell System Monitoring catalytic gate field effect transistor (FET) sensors to resolve and detect carbon monoxide (CO

427

Development of a Compressed Hydrogen Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kpsi "Saran Wrap" Tank Energy Density for Hydrogen Storage Systems " Advance the development of a cost · Satisfying hydrogen gas permeation requirements · Increasing energy density efficiency · Developing cost · Design » T700 carbon fiber overwrap with high interspersed winding pattern with design FOS of 2.45 » NGV

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced soluble hydroliquefaction Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nafion membranes Vijay A. Sethuraman1,2 , Saahir Khan3... online 3 July 2009 Keywords: Carbon monoxide Hydrogen sulfide Oxygen Diffusion Solubility Nafion... monitoring technique...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - av zn cu Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to promote efficiency of CuZnOAl2O3 catalysts, producing hydrogen with low carbon monoxide levels 13 Source: Mukasyan, Alexander - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular...

430

New Catalyst Converts CO2 to Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

offer better catalytic performance." The proportion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen in the syngas produced in the reaction can also be easily manipulated using the new catalyst,...

431

Mechanistical studies on the formation and destruction of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and carbon trioxide (CO3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in extraterrestrial, low temperature ices. Reactants and products were analyzed on line and in situ via absorption with a 1/r2 dependence, r being the distance from the sun, and thus becomes less important when the outer% H+ , 2% He2+ , and few heavier nuclei; the energy distribution maximum peaks at around 10 MeV where

Kaiser, Ralf I.

432

Analysis of Ontario's hydrogen economy demands from hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ‘Hydrogen Economy’ is a proposed system where hydrogen is produced from carbon dioxide free energy sources and is used as an alternative fuel for transportation. The utilization of hydrogen to power fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can significantly decrease air pollutants and greenhouse gases emission from the transportation sector. In order to build the future hydrogen economy, there must be a significant development in the hydrogen infrastructure, and huge investments will be needed for the development of hydrogen production, storage, and distribution technologies. This paper focuses on the analysis of hydrogen demand from hydrogen \\{FCVs\\} in Ontario, Canada, and the related cost of hydrogen. Three potential hydrogen demand scenarios over a long period of time were projected to estimate hydrogen \\{FCVs\\} market penetration, and the costs associated with the hydrogen production, storage and distribution were also calculated. A sensitivity analysis was implemented to investigate the uncertainties of some parameters on the design of the future hydrogen infrastructure. It was found that the cost of hydrogen is very sensitive to electricity price, but other factors such as water price, energy efficiency of electrolysis, and plant life have insignificant impact on the total cost of hydrogen produced.

Hui Liu; Ali Almansoori; Michael Fowler; Ali Elkamel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Novel Carbon(C)-Boron(B)-Nitrogen(N)-Containing H2 Storage Materials - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Shih-Yuan Liu University of Oregon Department of Chemistry 1253 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1253 Phone: (541) 346-5573 Email: lsy@uoregon.edu In colloaboration with: * Dr. Tom Autrey, Dr. Abhi Karkamkar, and Mr. Jamie Holladay Pacific Northwest National Laboratory * Dr. David Dixon The University of Alabama * Dr. Paul Osenar Protonex Technology Corporation DOE Managers HQ: Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov

434

Computer Control of a Syngas Complex at LaPorte, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Porte, producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and a hydrogen producing plant at Battleground, six miles away. The combined facilities have a capacity of over 8 MMSCF/D of carbon monoxide and over 34 MMSCF/D of hydrogen product. The products are supplied...

Chatterjee, N.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

CERIA-BASED WATER-GAS-SHIFT CATALYSTS S. Swartz, A-M. Azad, M. Seabaugh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on pure hydrogen or a hydrogen-rich gas with little or no carbon monoxide. In the near term, fuel cells used in fuel processors. This reaction increases the hydrogen content and reduces the carbon monoxide) to the reactor. The reactor section incorporates a bypass loop, which allows for baseline gas chromatograph

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

436

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Several different approaches are being pursued to develop on-board hydrogen storage systems for light-duty vehicle applications. The different approaches have different characteristics, such as: the thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved requirements for the materials and energy interfaces between the storage system and the fuel supply system on one hand, and the fuel user on the other Other storage system design and operating parameters influence the projected system costs as well. Argonne researchers are developing thermodynamic, kinetic, and engineering models of the various hydrogen storage systems to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on these approaches and to evaluate their potential to meet the DOE targets for on-board applications. The DOE targets for 2015 include a system gravimetric capacity of 1.8 kWh/kg (5.5 wt%) and a system volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L (40 g/L). We then use these models to identify significant component and performance issues, and evaluate alternative system configurations and design and operating parameters.

437

Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor EHC was evaluated against DOE applications for compressing hydrogen at automobile filling stations, in future hydrogen pipelines and as a commercial replacement for conventional diaphragm hydrogen compressors. It was also evaluated as a modular replacement for the compressors used in petrochemical refineries. If the EHC can be made inexpensive, reliable and long lived then it can satisfy all these applications save pipelines where the requirements for platinum catalyst exceeds the annual world production. The research performed did not completely investigate Molybdenum as a hydrogen anode or cathode, it did show that photoetched 316 stainless steel is inadequate for an EHC. It also showed that: molybdenum bipolar plates, photochemical etching processes, and Gortex Teflon seals are too costly for a commercial EHC. The use of carbon paper in combination with a perforated thin metal electrode demonstrated adequate anode support strength, but is suspect in promoting galvanic corrosion. The nature of the corrosion mechanisms are not well understood, but locally high potentials within the unit cell package are probably involved. The program produced a design with an extraordinary high cell pitch, and a very low part count. This is one of the promising aspects of the redesigned EHC. The development and successful demonstration of the hydraulic cathode is also important. The problem of corrosion resistant metal bipolar plates is vital to the development of an inexpensive, commercial PEM fuel cell. Our research suggests that there is more to the corrosion process in fuel cells and electrochemical compressors than simple, steady state, galvanic stability. It is an important area for scientific investigation. The experiments and analysis conducted lead to several recommended future research directions. First, we need a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms involved. The diagnosis of experimental cells with titration to determine the loss of membrane active sites is recommended. We suspect that the corrosion includes more than simple galvanic mechanisms. The mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are poorly understood. Shunt currents at hydraulic cathode ports were problematic, but are not difficult to cure. In addition to corrosion there is evidence of high component resistivity. This may be due to the deposition of organic compounds, which may be produced electrochemically on the surface of the metal support screens that contact carbon gas diffusion layers (GDLs) or catalyst supports. An investigation of possible electro-organic sythesis mechanisms with emphasis on oxalates formation is warranted. The contaminated cell parts can be placed in an oxidizing atmosphere at high temperature and the weight loss can be observed. This would reveal the existence of organic compounds. Investigation into the effects of conductivity enhancers such as carbon microlayers on supporting carbon paper is also needed. Corrosion solutions should be investigated such as surface passivation of 316 SS parts using nitric acid. Ultra thin silane/siloxane polymer coatings should be tried. These may be especially useful in conjunction with metal felt replacement of carbon paper. A simple cure for the very high, localized corrosion of the anode might be to diffusion bond the metal electrode support screen to bipolar plate. This will insure uniform resistance perpendicular to the plane of the cell and eliminate some of the dependence of the resistance on high stack compression. Alternative materials should be explored. Alternatives to carbon in the cell may be helpful in any context. In particular, alternatives to carbon paper GDLs such as metal felts and alternatives to carbon supports for Pt such as TiC and TiB2 might also be worthwhile and would be helpful to fuel cells as well. Some alternative to the metals we used in the cell, Mo and 316 SS, are potentially useful. These include Al/Mg/Si alloys. Corrosion resistant materials such as Nb and Mo might prove useful as cladding materials that can be hot stamp

David P. Bloomfield; Brian S. MacKenzie

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal---oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxidesssuch as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxideswas investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H2S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H2S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H2S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H2S for all four metal oxides.

Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal-oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxides - such as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxide - was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H{sub 2}S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H{sub 2}S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H{sub 2}S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H{sub 2}S for all four metal oxides.

Tian, H.J.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R. [US DOE, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification 1: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, California Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for the construction and operation of Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA's) project, which would produce and sell electricity, carbon dioxide and fertilizer. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative program. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 5, 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Production Photo of hydrogen researcher. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal (with carbon sequestration); nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost reduction. For cost-competitive transportation, a key driver for energy independence, hydrogen must be comparable to conventional fuels and technologies on a per-mile basis in order to succeed in the commercial marketplace. Learn more about DOE's hydrogen cost goal and the analysis used in projecting the future cost of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy supports the research and development of a wide range of technologies to produce hydrogen economically and in environmentally friendly ways.

443

Hydrogen Liquefaction  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Liquid Hydrogen is 0.2% Ortho, 99.8% Para 3 Liquid Supply North America 250+ TPD Capacity Diverse Feedstocks Chlor-Alkali SMR Petro-chem Market...

444

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is an important energy carrier, and when used as a fuel, can be considered as an alternate to the major fossil fuels, coal, crude oil, and natural gas, and their derivatives. It has the potential to b...

Prof. Dr. Robert A. Huggins

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hydrogen energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...use of hydrogen as an energy carrier will depend significantly...its utilization and conversion to electricity/heat...becomes an alternative energy carrier. However, various...effectively with conventional energy conversion technologies. The...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

447

Amorphous silicon-carbon alloys and amorphous carbon from direct methane and ethylene activation by ECR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys are prepared using electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen is introduced into the source resonance cavity as an excitation gas. Silane is introduced in the main chamber in the vicinity of the plasma stream, whereas the carbon source gases, methane or ethylene, are introduced either with the silane or with the hydrogen as excitation gases. The effect of the type of carbon-source gas, excitation gas mixture and silane-to-carbon source gas flow ratio on the deposition rate, bandgap, subgap density of states, spin density and hydrogen evolution are studied.

Conde, J.P.; Chu, V.; Giorgis, F.; Pirri, C.F.; Arekat, S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the LM Materials Program Overview 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

449

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen & Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Fuel cells produce electricity from a number of domestic fuels, including hydrogen and renewables, and can provide power for virtually any application -- from cars and buses to commercial buildings. This technology, which is similar to a battery, has the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation while reducing carbon pollution and oil consumption.

450

Carbon Based Nano-Materials Research, Development and Applications in Optoelectronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pt/SWNTs as Catalysts Layer in Hydrogen Fuel Cells. Aus. J.Pt/SWNTs as Catalysts Layer in Hydrogen Fuel Cells. Aus. J.Hydrogen Fuel Cells with Ultralow Pt Loading Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Catalysts.

Wang, Feihu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Grid-Based Renewable Electricity and Hydrogen Integration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Renewable Electricity and Hydrogen Integration Carolyn Elam Senior Project Leader - Hydrogen Production Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory Goals for Electrolysis in Hydrogen Fuel Supply * Goal is to supply hydrogen fuel for 20% of the light- duty vehicle fleet - 12 million short tons of hydrogen annually - 450 TWh per year * Must be competitive - With gasoline, assuming FCV will have twice the efficiency of an ICE - With other hydrogen production methods * Net zero impact or reduction in GHG emissions - Compared to Gasoline ICE - 31% reduction in carbon emissions from the current electricity mix - Compared to Natural Gas-Derived Hydrogen - 65% reduction in carbon emissions from the current electricity mix Goals for Electrolysis (cont.)

452

Hydrogen program overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Active Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry hydrogen can be activated in an electric discharge if the pressure and voltage are carefully regulated. Active hydrogen reduces metallic sulphides whose heat of formation is 22 000 cal. or less. The active gas is decomposed by 3 cm of well packed glass wool. A quantitative method is given for the determination of active hydrogen. Less of the active gas is formed in a tube coated with stearic acid or phosphoric acid than when no coating is employed. The decay reaction was found to follow the expression for a unimolecular reaction. The rate of decay appears to be independent of the wall surface. The period of half?life at room temperature and 40 mm pressure is 0.2 sec. approximately. The energy of formation of active hydrogen is approximately 18 000 cal. The energy of activation for the decay of the active constituent is approximately 17 800 cal. The properties of active hydrogen are considered in relation to the properties predicted for H3.

A. C. Grubb; A. B. Van Cleave

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Hydrogen from Biomass - State of the Art and Research Challenges  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IEA/H2/TR-02/001 IEA/H2/TR-02/001 Hydrogen from Biomass State of the Art and Research Challenges Thomas A. Milne, Carolyn C. Elam and Robert J. Evans National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO USA A Report for the International Energy Agency Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen Task 16, Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials Table of Contents Preface.......................................................................................................... i Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 1 Routes to Hydrogen from Biomass....................................................................... 5 Introduction................................................................................................ 5

455

Catalysis of hydrocarbon synthesis from CO and H{sub 2} on carbon membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the preparation of carbon membrane supports from polyacrylonitrile. The membranes were utilized for the preparation of cobalt catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by impregnating the membranes with a cobalt nitrate solution followed by drying on a water bath. The cobalt was sometimes introduced directly into the molding solution before the activation stage. The cobalt catalysts were utilized in the methanation of carbon monoxide. The products were dependent on the conditions utilized to obtain the carbon supports.

Lapidus, A.l.; Krylova, A.Yu.; Strupov, A.N.; Linkov, V.M.; Sanderson, R.D. [Rossiiskaya Akademiya, Nauk (Russian Federation)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Hydrogen Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A A H2A: Hydrogen Analysis Margaret K. Mann DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. H2A Charter * H2A mission: Improve the transparency and consistency of approach to analysis, improve the understanding of the differences among analyses, and seek better validation from industry. * H2A was supported by the HFCIT Program H2A History * First H2A meeting February 2003 * Primary goal: bring consistency & transparency to hydrogen analysis * Current effort is not designed to pick winners - R&D portfolio analysis - Tool for providing R&D direction * Current stage: production & delivery analysis - consistent cost methodology & critical cost analyses * Possible subsequent stages: transition analysis, end-point

457

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector List of Hydrogen Incentives Hydrogen Energy Data Book Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHydrogen&oldid271963...

459

The Hype About Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economy based on the hydrogen fuel cell, but this cannot beus to look toward hydrogen. Fuel cell basics, simplifiedthe path to fuel cell commercialization. Hydrogen production

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 , 2006 6 , 2006 DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal Projects Selected to Address Technological Challenges of Hydrogen Production in Large-Scale Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development projects that will promote the production of hydrogen from coal at large-scale facilities. This central approach will combat climate change by allowing for the capture - and subsequent sequestration - of carbon dioxide generated during hydrogen production. The selections support President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, which provides funding for research and technology development to realize a future hydrogen economy that minimizes America's dependence on foreign oil and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen carbon monoxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Stability characteristics of non-premixed turbulent jet flames of hydrogen and syngas blends with coaxial air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stability characteristics of attached hydrogen (H2) and syngas (H2/CO) turbulent jet flames with coaxial air were studied experimentally. The flame stability was investigated by varying the fuel and air stream velocities. Effects of the coaxial nozzle diameter, fuel nozzle lip thickness and syngas fuel composition are addressed in detail. The detachment stability limit of the syngas single jet flame was found to decrease with increasing amount of carbon monoxide in the fuel. For jet flames with coaxial air, the critical coaxial air velocity leading to flame detachment first increases with increasing fuel jet velocity and subsequently decreases. This non-monotonic trend appears for all syngas composition herein investigated (50/50 ? 100/0% H2/CO). OH? chemiluminescence imaging was performed to qualitatively identify the mechanisms responsible for the flame detachment. For all fuel compositions, local extinction close to the burner rim is observed at lower fuel velocities (ascending stability limit), while local flame extinction downstream of the burner rim is observed at higher fuel velocities (descending stability limit). Extrema of the non-monotonic trends appear to be identical when the nozzle fuel velocity is normalized by the critical fuel velocity obtained for the single jet cases.

Jeongjae Hwang; Nicolas Bouvet; Kitae Sohn; Youngbin Yoon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Solar hydrogen for urban trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Now (CAN) Solar Hydrogen Project, located at Xerox Corp., El Segundo, California, includes solar photovoltaic powered hydrogen generation, compression, storage and end use. Three modified Ford Ranger trucks use the hydrogen fuel. The stand-alone electrolyzer and hydrogen dispensing system are solely powered by a photovoltaic array. A variable frequency DC-AC converter steps up the voltage to drive the 15 horsepower compressor motor. On site storage is available for up to 14,000 standard cubic feet (SCF) of solar hydrogen, and up to 80,000 SCF of commercial hydrogen. The project is 3 miles from Los Angeles International airport. The engine conversions are bored to 2.9 liter displacement and are supercharged. Performance is similar to that of the Ranger gasoline powered truck. Fuel is stored in carbon composite tanks (just behind the driver`s cab) at pressures up to 3600 psi. Truck range is 144 miles, given 3600 psi of hydrogen. The engine operates in lean burn mode, with nil CO and HC emissions. NO{sub x} emissions vary with load and rpm in the range from 10 to 100 ppm, yielding total emissions at a small fraction of the ULEV standard. Two trucks have been converted for the Xerox fleet, and one for the City of West Hollywood. A public outreach program, done in conjunction with the local public schools and the Department of Energy, introduces the local public to the advantages of hydrogen fuel technologies. The Clean Air Now program demonstrates that hydrogen powered fleet development is an appropriate, safe, and effective strategy for improvement of urban air quality, energy security and avoidance of global warming impact. Continued technology development and cost reduction promises to make such implementation market competitive.

Provenzano, J.: Scott, P.B.; Zweig, R. [Clean Air Now, Northridge, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Getting the carbon out Alex Farrell, Daniel Sperling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-in hybrids and hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles. Eventually, consumers will have an array of low-carbon fuel such as blending low-carbon biofuels into conventional gasoline, selling low-carbon fuels such as hydrogen and for their customers. At first, fuel providers will most likely offer liquid fuels that work in today's cars

464

Crossed beam reaction of atomic carbon C ( 3 P j ) with hydrogen sulfide, H 2 S (X 1 A 1 ): Observation of the thioformyl radical, HCS (X 2 A?)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the simplest organosulfur reactions that between ground statecarbon atoms C ( 3 P j ) and hydrogen sulfide H 2 S (X 1 A 1 ) was studied at an average collision energy of 21.0 kJ? mol ?1 using the crossed molecular beams technique. The product angular distribution and time-of-flight spectra of m/e=45 ( HC 32 S ) were monitored. Forward-convolution fitting of our data yields an almost isotropic center-of-mass angular flux-distribution whereas the center-of-mass translational energy flux distribution peaks at about 50 kJ? mol ?1 indicating a tight exit transition state from the decomposing thiohydroxycarbene HCSH complex to the reaction products. The high energy cut-off of the translational energy flux distribution is consistent with the formation of the thioformyl radical HCS in its X 2 A electronic ground state. The first experimental verification of an existing thiohydroxycarbene intermediate and the rigorous assignment of the HCS radical product under single collision conditions explicitly suggest inclusion of the title reaction in chemical reaction networks of molecular clouds TMC-1 and OMC-1 the outflow of the carbon star IRC+10216 Shoemaker/Levy 9 impact-induced nonequilibrium sulfur chemistry in the Jovian atmosphere as well as combustion of sulfur containing coal.

R. I. Kaiser; W. Sun; A. G. Suits

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Hydrogen Uptake of DPB Getter Pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical and chemical properties of 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) blended with carbon-supported Pd (DPB-Pd/C) in the form of pellets during hydrogenation were investigated. A thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) was employed to measure the kinetics of the hydrogen uptake by the DPB getter pellets. The kinetics obtained were then used to develop a semi-empirical model, based on gas diffusion into solids, to predict the performance of the getter pellets under various conditions. The accuracy of the prediction model was established by comparing the prediction models with independent experimental data on hydrogen pressure buildup in sealed systems containing DPB getter pellets and subjected to known rates of hydrogen input. The volatility of the hydrogenated DPB products and its effects on the hydrogen uptake kinetics were also analyzed.

Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Herberg, J L; Saab, A P; Weigle, J; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; McLean II, W

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hydrogen and Hydrogen-Storage Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, neutron applications in the field of hydrogen and hydrogen-storage materials represent a large and promising research ... relevant topics from this subject area, including hydrogen bulk properties (con...

Milva Celli; Daniele Colognesi; Marco Zoppi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol gas additives Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alcohol. In addition, you will not want to use... , methyl gas, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, wood alcohol, carbon, water, and a lot of other... if gas storage tanks...

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