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1

A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 Agency/Company /Organization: US DOT Focus Area: Vehicles Topics: Analysis Tools Website: www.fuelcells.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/busreport.pdf From 2002-2007 > 20 cities in the US, Europe, China, Japan & Australia demonstrated buses powered by fuel cells or hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines. The resulting report analyzes lessons learned from the demonstrations, identifies key remaining challenges for introduction of the technology, & suggests potential roles for government in supporting commercialization of fuel cell buses. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

2

SunLine Leads the Way in Demonstrating Hydrogen-Fueled Bus Technologies (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes SunLine Transit Agency's newest advanced technology fuel cell electric bus. SunLine is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This bus represents the sixth generation of hydrogen-fueled buses that the agency has operated since 2000.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

NREL: Technology Transfer - Renewable Hydrogen Bus Teaches ...  

The bus filled up at NRELs on-site hydrogen fueling station, which dispenses hydrogen made with wind and solar energy.

4

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen with compressed natural gas before dispensing theindustry. Both compressed natural gas, CNG, and hydrogen arenatural gas reformers or water electrolysers. The hydrogen must be compressed

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Hydrogen Enriched CNG Production Engine Conversion,from Hydrogen Enriched CNG Production Engines, SAE 02FFL-dynamometer ...13 Figure 2. CNG Brake Thermal Efficiency (

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

day (10 buses) Natural gas reformer Purifier Storage Systemday (100 buses) Natural gas reformer Purifier Storage Systemnatural gas stations are hydrogen production and storage, a

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to existing natural gas stations are hydrogen production andof the agencies natural gas station. While the cost of thefor example, natural gas for stations with reformers). Costs

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves as Showcase for Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVT) (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brochure describes the hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) shuttle bus at NREL. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding the lease of the bus from Ford to demonstrate market-ready advanced technology vehicles to visitors at NREL.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS DEMONSTRATION BUS 7. Author{s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: 1) fuel consumption, 2) tire wear, and 3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, Which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

Cheng-ming Wu; Ron Matthews; Mark Euritt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Their strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis (FMEA, referred to by Air Products as a ''HAZOP'' analysis) with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operational in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the campus shuttle route began in early June 2002. However, the work and challenges continued as it has been difficult to maintain operability of the shuttle bus due to fuel and component difficulties. In late June 2002, the pump head itself developed operational problems (loss of smooth function) leading to excessive stress on the magnetic coupling and excessive current draw to operate. A new pump head was installed on the system to alleviate this problem and the shuttle bus operated successfully on DME blends from 10-25 vol% on the shuttle bus loop until September 30, 2002. During the period of operation on the campus loop, the bus was pulled from service, operated at the PTI test track and real-time emissions measurements were obtained using an on-board emissions analyzer from Clean Air Technologies International, Inc. Particulate emissions reductions of 60% and 80% were observed at DME blend ratios of 12 vol.% and 25 vol.%, respectively, as the bus was operated over the Orange County driving cycle. Increases in NOx, CO and HC emissions were observed, however. In summary, the conversion of the shuttle bus was successfully accomplished, particulate emissions reductions were observed, but there were operational challenges in the field. Nonetheless, they were able to demonstrate reliable operation of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Bus Demonstration: Long Island, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initiated in 2003, this plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) bus program has three major phases: Odyne/EPRI Design and Build Phases coupled with Odyne/Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) Demonstration Phase. This interim report describes completion of an initial demonstration with Long Island Bus (LI Bus) Mass Transit Authority (MTA).

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

12

Harmonization and Sharing of Data from International Fuel Cell Bus Demonstrations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation, which was given by NREL's Leslie Eudy at the 2006 Fuel Cell Seminar, provides information on international fuel cell bus demonstrations.

Eudy, L.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured and initial investigations at low DME blend ratios (around 5-10 vol%) will begin shortly. They have also performed viscosity measurements on diesel fuel, DME and 50-50 blends of DME in diesel. These tests have verified that DME has a much lower viscosity than the diesel fuel and that the viscosity of the blended fuel is also much lower than the diesel base fuel. This has implications for the injection and atomization of the DME/diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the demonstration of a hybrid hydrogen internal combustion engine (HHICE) bus at SunLine Transit Agency.

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech Team Lead Fuel Cell Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 12/13/2011 Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Marni Lenahan December 13, 2011 Database Background * The Hydrogen Storage Materials Database was built to retain information from DOE Hydrogen Storage funded research and make these data more accessible. * Data includes properties of hydrogen storage materials investigated such as synthesis conditions, sorption and release conditions, capacities, thermodynamics, etc. http://hydrogenmaterialssearch.govtools.us Current Status * Data continues to be collected from DOE funded research.

16

NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) accomplishments in showcasing a Ford hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) bus at The Taste of Colorado festival in Denver. NREL started using its U.S. Department of Energy-funded H2ICE bus in May 2010 as the primary shuttle vehicle for VIP visitors, members of the media, and new employees. In September 2010, NREL featured the bus at The Taste of Colorado. This was the first major outreach event for the bus. NREL's educational brochure, vehicle wrap designs, and outreach efforts serve as a model for other organizations with DOE-funded H2ICE buses. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Education Group and Market Transformation Group in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Research, development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Phase 1, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose of the Phase I effort was to demonstrate feasibility of the fuel cell/battery system for powering a small bus (under 30 ft or 9 m) on an urban bus route. A brassboard powerplant was specified, designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate feasibility in the laboratory. The proof-of-concept bus, with a powerplant scaled up from the brassboard, will be demonstrated under Phase II.

NONE

1990-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves ...  

... up at NRELs on-site hydrogen fueling station, which dispenses some of the greenest hydrogen in the world made using wind and solar energy.

20

NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

557 * November 2010 557 * November 2010 NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Teams: Hydrogen Education, Melanie Caton; Market Transformation, Michael Ulsh Accomplishment: NREL started using its Ford hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H 2 ICE) bus in May 2010 as the primary shuttle vehicle for VIP visitors, members of the media, and new employees. As the first national laboratory to receive such a bus, NREL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives wer

Hitchcock, David

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Advanced hydrogen utilization technology demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study done by Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC). DDC used a 6V-92TA engine for experiments with hydrogen fuel. The engine was first baseline tested using methanol fuel and methanol unit injectors. One cylinder of the engine was converted to operate on hydrogen fuel, and methanol fueled the remaining five cylinders. This early testing with only one hydrogen-fueled cylinder was conducted to determine the operating parameters that would later be implemented for multicylinder hydrogen operation. Researchers then operated three cylinders of the engine on hydrogen fuel to verify single-cylinder idle tests. Once it was determined that the engine would operate well at idle, the engine was modified to operate with all six cylinders fueled with hydrogen. Six-cylinder operation on hydrogen provided an opportunity to verify previous test results and to more accurately determine the performance, thermal efficiency, and emissions of the engine.

Hedrick, J.C.; Winsor, R.E. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASTs UTC: demonstrating long lifetime in real UTC: demonstrating long lifetime in real-world bus operation world bus operation Ballard: developing strategies to Ballard:...

24

Malm Hydrogen and CNG/Hydrogen filling station and Hythane bus project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Vandenborre Hydrogen Systems in Belgium, a subsidiary of Stuart Energy, Canada now owned by Hydrogenics ltd % Fig 1. Hydrogen storage pressure tanks Fig 2. Hydrogen storage The above pictures show the compressed hydrogen storage at the site. The hydrogen storage is placed closed to the electrolyser unit. The pressure

25

Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using hydrogen as an alternative fuel. Final report, September 1997--May 1998  

SciTech Connect

Alternative fuels such as Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG), and alcohol fuels (methanol and ethanol) are already being used in commercial vehicles and transit buses in revenue service. Hydrogen, which has better air quality characteristics as a vehicle fuel, is being used in research demonstration projects in fuel cell powered buses, as well as in internal combustion engines in automobiles and small trucks. At present, there are no facility guidelines to assist transit agencies (and others) contemplating the use of hydrogen as an alternative fuel. This document addresses the various issues involved. Hydrogen fuel properties, potential hazards, fuel requirements for specified levels of bus service, applicable codes and standards, ventilation, and electrical classification are indicated in this document. These guidelines also present various facility and bus design issues that need to be considered by a transit agency to ensure safe operations when using hydrogen as an alternative fuel. Fueling facility, garaging facility, maintenance facility requirements and safety practices are discussed. Critical fuel-related safety issues in the design of the related system on the bus are also identified. A system safety assessment and hazard resolution process is also presented. This approach may be used to select design strategies which are economical, yet ensure a specified level of safety.

Raj, P.K.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.A.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Dept. of Energy/Dept. of Transportation Gas Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Program: program plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is the program plan for a cooperative project of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) of the Department of Transportation and the Division of Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) of the Department of Energy to test and evaluate the use of gas-turbine engines in transit buses. UMTA is responsible for furnishing buses from UMTA grantees, technical direction for bus/engine integration, and coordination of operational use of buses in selected cities. TEC is responsible for providing gas turbines, data acquisition/reduction services, and management for the complete project. The project will be carried out in three phases. In Phase I, prototype turbine engines will be used. One turbine-powered bus and diesel-powered bus will be tested at a test facility to obtain baseline data. Five turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in revenue service in one city. In Phase II, preproduction turbine engines will be used. One turbine-powered bus and diesel-powered bus will be baseline tested and ten turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in two cities. In Phase III, production gas turbine engines will be used. Only the turbine-powered bus will run baseline tests in this phase. Ten turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in two cities.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

Dr. Scott Staley

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

Dr. Scott Staley

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on

30

Hydrogen fueling station development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop and demonstrate a hydrogen fueling station for vehicles. Such stations are an essential infrastructural element in the practical application of hydrogen as vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology that is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle.

Edeskuty, F.J.; Daney, D.; Daugherty, M.; Hill, D.; Prenger, F.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: Second Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 new fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. The first results report was published in August 2011, describing operation of these new FCEBs from September 2010 through May 2011. New results in this report provide an update through April 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Transit Administration (Report and Appendix)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the hydrogen transit bus evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration (FTA).

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Renewable Hydrogen: Integration, Validation, and Demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is about producing hydrogen through the electrolysis of water and using the hydrogen in a fuel cell or internal combustion engine generator to produce electricity during times of peak demand, or as a transportation fuel.

Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2010.

Wipke, K.; Spirk, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

Stottler, Gary

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation, which provides information on the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project, was given at the Fuel Cell Seminar in November 2004.

Garbak, J.; Gronich, S.; Wipke, K.; Welch, C.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the early implementation experience for the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, the largest fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States. The ZEBA Demonstration group includes five participating transit agencies: AC Transit (lead transit agency), Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Golden Gate Transit (GGT), San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), and San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses U.S. DOE Learning Demonstration Project goals, fuel cell vehicle and H2 station deployment status, and technical highlights of vehicle and infrastructure analysis results and progress.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Research development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Interim report, August 1, 1991--April 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the progress in the Georgetown University research, development and demonstration project of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. The topics addressed in the report include vehicle design and application analysis, technology transfer activities, coordination and monitoring of system design and integration contractor, application of fuel cells to other vehicles, current problems, work planned, and manpower, cost and schedule reports.

Romano, S.; Wimmer, R.

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster discusses hydrogen fuel cell transit bus evaluations conducted for the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT). It was presented at the 2006 HFCIT Program Review.

Eudy, L.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop: Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles December 11, 2009 John Garbak, Todd Ramsden Keith Wipke, Sam Sprik, Jennifer Kurtz Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 Innovation for Our Energy Future Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration Project Objectives and Targets * Objectives - Validate H 2 FC Vehicles and Infrastructure in Parallel - Identify Current Status and Evolution of the Technology - Objectively Assess Progress Toward Technology Readiness - Provide Feedback to H 2 Research and Development Photo: NREL Solar Electrolysis Station, Sacramento, CA Performance Measure

42

Direct Hydrogenation Magnesium Boride to Magnesium Borohydride: Demonstration of >11 Weight Percent Reversible Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We here for the first time demonstrate direct hydrogenation of magnesium boride, MgB2, to magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2 at 900 bar H2-pressures and 400C. Upon 14.8wt% hydrogen release, the end-decomposition product of Mg(BH4)2 is MgB2, thus, this is a unique reversible path here obtaining >11wt% H2 which implies promise for a fully reversible hydrogen storage material.

Severa, Godwin; Ronnebro, Ewa; Jensen, Craig M.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle  

SciTech Connect

This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Leslie Eudy at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's fuel cell bus evaluations.

Eudy, L.

2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

46

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review showing status of U.S. and international fuel cell transit bus evaluations.

Eudy, L.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Data Analysis Overview; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Paper for the 2005 National Hydrogen Association conference provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

Welch, C.; Wipke, K.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Progress Update (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation outlining the progress of DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project, prepared for the 2006 National Hydrogen Association Meeting.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak. J.; Hooker, D.

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Progress Update (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation outlining the progress of DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project, prepared for the 2006 National Hydrogen Association Meeting.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak. J.; Hooker, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2008.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Progress Update; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summary of DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project from initiation through January 2006.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.; Hooker, D.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hydrogen Technology Validation as a "Learning Demonstration" that Feeds the R&D Process (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation, which provides information about how hydrogen technology validation is used as a learning demonstration that feeds the research and development process, was given at a National Hydrogen Association meeting in April 2004.

Wipke, K.; Gronich, S.; Hooker, D.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section III. Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hydrogen Storage #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 200 #12 square inch (psi) 7.5 wt % and 8.5 wt% Type IV composite hydrogen storage tanks of specified sizes for DOE Future Truck and Nevada hydrogen bus programs · Demonstrate 10,000 psi storage tanks Approach

54

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Project Overview and Fall 2006 Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation on NREL's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project was given by Keith Wipke at the ZEV Technology Symposium on September 15, 2006.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.; Hooker, D.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2006 Progress Update (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation, given by NREL's Keith Wipke at EVS-22, provides an update on the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

56

Advanced hydrogen/method utilization technology demonstration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the work was to seek homogeneous blend ratios of hydrogen:methane that provide ``leverage`` with respect to exhaust emissions or engine performance. The leverage sought was a reduction in exhaust emissions or improved efficiency in proportions greater than the percentage of hydrogen energy in the blended fuel gas mixture. The scope of the study included the range of air/fuel mixtures from the lean limit to slightly richer than stoichiometric. This encompasses two important modes of engine operation for emissions control; lean burn pre-catalyst (some natural gas engines have no catalyst) and post-catalyst; and stoichiometric with three-way catalyst. The report includes a brief discussion of each of these modes.

Lynch, F.; Fulton, J. [Hydrogen Consultants, Inc., Littleton, CO (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Case Study on the Effects of Distribution Line Capacitors on Substation Bus Voltage Regulated with a Load Tap Changing (LTC) Power Transformer: Southern Company Smart Grid Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study describes research to address the adverse effects of distribution capacitors on substation bus voltage with a load-tap-changing (LTC) power transformer. By adding fixed and switched capacitors to the distribution system, Southern Company is able to maintain an efficient distribution grid by providing the reactive power near the end-use devices consuming this power. However, pressure to improve the efficiency of the distribution system has resulted in Southern Company adding a large ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the Burbank Bus Fleet  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This fact sheet reports on the City of Burbank, California's fuel cell bus demonstration project and the U.S. Department of Energy's involvement.

59

Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Project: Fuel Cell Efficiency and Initial Durability (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation by NREL's Keith Wipke at the 2006 Fuel Cell Seminar provides information about the Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Project, with a focus on fuel cell efficiency and durability.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Spring 2009; Composite Data Products, Final Version March 19, 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through March 2009.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Spring 2010; Composite Data Products, Final Version March 29, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through March 2010.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project; Spring 2008 Composite Data Products, Final Version: February 29, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through February 2008.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2009; Composite Data Products, Final Version September 11, 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2009.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hydrogen Bus Technology Validation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buses. Station 1: Steam Methane Reformer, 100 kg/day (10kg) $/yr Station 2: Steam Methane Reformer, 1000 kg/day (100

Burke, Andy; McCaffrey, Zach; Miller, Marshall; Collier, Kirk; Mulligan, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Final Report for the H2Fuel Bus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H2Fuel Bus is the world's first hydrogen-fueled electric hybrid transit bus. It was a project developed through a public/private partnership involving several leading technological and industrial organizations, with primary funding by the Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goals of the project are to gain valuable information on the technical readiness and economic viability of hydrogen fueled buses and to enhance the public awareness and acceptance of emerging hydrogen technologies.

Jacobs, W.D.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

67

United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration - Status and Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides status and results for the United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, including project objectives, partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in the project and methodology, how to access complete results, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

Wipke,K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

68

Hydrogen production from liquid hydrocarbons demonstration program. Final report, 26 August 1985-1 September 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force now uses diesel-engine generators as sources of heat and electricity at selected remotes sites. Simultaneously, it has investigated alternative cogeneration candidates that offer improved reliability, maintain ability, and economics. One system that shows high potential is a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant consisting of a fuel conditioner to convert logistic fuels such as DEF-2, DF-a and JP-4 to a hydrogen-rich gas, and a power conditioner to convert the direct-current power to alternating current. The objective of the project work was to define, and demonstrate, a fuel conditioner to meet performance criteria established for the Air Force Remote Site Fuel Cell Power Plant program. Key criteria included high fuel-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, rapid startup and load-following capability, and minimum water consumption during operations. A process configuration which has the potential to produce a minimum of 0.365 pound of hydrogen per pound of feed diesel consumed is described. The hydrogen-containing product is a suitable fuel for phosphoric-acid fuel-cell power plant. A 2 mole per hour (hydrogen) demonstration plant was designed, constructed and started up. Results are summarized.

O'Hara, J.B.; Chow, T.K.; Ling, J.K.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Hydrogen generation during IDMS demonstrations of the Late Washing and Nitric Acid flowsheets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, Late Washing (LW) and Nitric Acid (NA) flowsheets, developed respectively for the DWPF at Savannah River Technology Center SPC and CPC, were demonstrated in the one-fifth scale DWPF pilot facilities, PHEF and IDMS. Using the LW flowsheet, four runs in the PHEF produced enough PHA for two runs in the IDMS (denoted by PX4 and PX5). One of the objectives of these IDMS runs was to obtain peak hydrogen generation rates and compare them to the peak hydrogen generation rate design basis obtained from a previous IDMS run, based on the HAN and Formic Acid (HAN-FA) flowsheets.

Ritter, J.A.

1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

High Density Hydrogen Storage Systems Demonstration Using NaAIH4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Density Hydrogen Storage Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH 4 Complex Compound Hydrides D. Mosher, X. Tang, S. Arsenault, B. Laube, M. Cao, R. Brown, S. Saitta, J. Costello United Technologies Research Center East Hartford, Connecticut Report to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract Number: DE-FC36-02AL-67610 December 19, 2006 * * Presented to the DOE and the FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Storage Tech Team This presentation does not contain proprietary or confidential information 2 Overview Objective: Identify and overcome the critical technical barriers in developing complex hydride based storage systems, especially those which differ from conventional metal hydride systems, to meet DOE system targets. Approach: Design, fabricate and test a sequence of subscale and full scale

71

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: First Set of Composite Data Products for Publication - March 1, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides the initial composite data products available for publication from NREL's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Spring 2007 Composite Data Products; March 8, 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides the composite data products from Spring 2007 from NREL's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Thomas, H.; Welch, C.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2006 Progress Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project through a competitive solicitation process in 2003. The purpose of this project is to conduct an integrated field validation that simultaneously examines the performance of fuel cell vehicles and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure. Four industry teams have signed cooperative agreements with DOE and are supporting plans for more than 130 fuel cell vehicles and 20 hydrogen refueling stations over the 5-year project duration. This paper provides a status update covering the progress accomplished by the demonstration and validation project over the last six months; the first composite data products from the project were published in March 2006. The composite data products aggregate individual performance into a range that protects the intellectual property of the companies involved, while publicizing the progress the hydrogen and fuel cell industry is making as a whole relative to the program objectives and timeline. Updates to previously published composite data products, such as on-road fuel economy and vehicle/infrastructure safety, will be presented along with new composite data products, such as fuel cell stack efficiency and refueling behavior.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P. Yoho, P.E. i l i * Green corporate philosophy and senior management commitment * Reduced greenhouse gas emissions nine years ahead of target * Alternatives to oil are a big part of BP' including natural gas, LNG, solar and hydrogen * Hydrogen Bus Project won Australia' prestigious environmental award * UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station * Two hydrogen pipelines in Houston area BP Env ronmenta Comm tment s portfolio, s most BP' * li l " li i i * i l pl i i * Li l li l * " i i l i 2 i i ll i i l pl ifi i * 8" ly idl i i l s Hydrogen Pipelines Two nes, on y a brand new 12 ne s act ve Connect Houston area chem ca ant w th a ref nery nes come off a p

75

Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Fuel Cell Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 12, 2013 2 Why Fuel Cells for Transit Buses? * Reduce transit bus emissions * Improve fuel efficiency * Improve vehicle performance * Consumer Acceptance * Transit industry is excellent test-bed for new technologies o Centrally fueled and maintained o Fixed routes with urban stop-go duty cycle o Professional operators and mechanics o Federal Capital Funding Support o High Visibility & High Impact 3 FCEB Development Timeline since 2000 California Air Resources Board Transit Rule Early demonstrations of single prototypes DOE begins funding NREL technology validation for FCEBs First multiple bus fleet demonstrations in California FTA initiates National Fuel Cell Bus Program and

76

PinBus Interface Design  

SciTech Connect

On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Fuel Cell Bus Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) held a Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on June 7, 2010 in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program Annual Merit Review. The workshop plenary and breakout session brought together technical experts from industry, end users, academia, DOE national laboratories, and other government agencies to address the status and technology needs of fuel cell powered buses. Meeting Summary Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report Presentations Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Overview & Purpose, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, DOE Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology, Nico Bouwkamp, CaFCP and Leslie Eudy, NREL Progress and Challenges for PEM Transit Fleet Applications, Tom Madden, UTC Power, LLC

78

SunLine Begins Extended Testing of Hybrid Fuel Cell Bus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing the fuel cell hybrid bus demonstration being managed by SunLIne Transit Agency.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

On-board hydrogen storage system using metal hydride  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen powered hybrid electric bus has been developed for demonstration in normal city bus service in the City of Augusta, Georgia, USA. The development team, called H2Fuel Bus Team, consists of representatives from government, industry and research institutions. The bus uses hydrogen to fuel an internal combustion engine which drives an electric generator. The generator charges a set of batteries which runs the electric bus. The hydrogen fuel and the hybrid concept combine to achieve the goal of near-zero emission and high fuel efficiency. The hydrogen fuel is stored in a solid form using an on-board metal hydride storage system. The system was designed for a hydrogen capacity of 25 kg. It uses the engine coolant for heat to generate a discharge pressure higher than 6 atm. The operation conditions are temperature from ambient to 70 degrees C, hydrogen discharge rate to 6 kg/hr, and refueling time 1.5 hours. Preliminary tests showed that the performance of the on-board storage system exceeded the design requirements. Long term tests have been planned to begin in 2 months. This paper discusses the design and performance of the on-board hydrogen storage system.

Heung, L.K.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rear bike rack image Rear bike rack image The Laboratory provides shuttle bus services, contracted through MV Transportation Services. Routes run throughout its 200-acre facility, downtown Berkeley, local off-site facilities, UC Campus, Downtown Berkeley BART, and Rockridge BART stations. Shuttles offer free wifi onboard. Riders are asked to adhere to riding instructions. Active shuttle stops are marked with this sign: Bus sign image Shuttles run Monday through Friday, except Laboratory holidays. There is no weekend service. Special service for tours, group travel, etc. is available for a fee. All shuttles are equipped with Nextbus which uses GPS technology to enable riders to obtain real-time information on bus arrivals. Contact Bus Services at busservices@lbl.gov or 510-486-4165 to provide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High Efficiency Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy: Laboratory Demonstration of S-I Water-Splitting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the French CEA, US-DOE INERI project is to perform a lab scale demonstration of the sulfur iodine (S-I) water splitting cycle, and assess the potential of this cycle for application to nuclear hydrogen production. The project will design, construct and test the three major component reaction sections that make up the S-I cycle. The CEA will design and test the prime (Bunsen) reaction section. General Atomics will develop and test the HI decomposition section, and SNL will develop and test the H2SO4 decomposition section. Activities for this period included initial program coordination and information exchange, the development of models and analyses that will support the design of the component sections, and preliminary designs for the component reaction sections. The sections are being designed to facilitate integration into a closed loop demonstration in a later stage of the program.

Buckingham, R.; Russ, B.; Brown, L.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Gelbard, F.; Pickard F.S.; Leybros, J.; Le Duigou, A.; Borgard, J.M.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Introduction to the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation, which provides information on the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project, was given at EVS-21 in April 2005.;

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.; Hooker, D.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Experimental Demonstration of Advanced Palladium Membrane Separators for Central High Purity Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives for this project were to: (1) confirm the high stability and resistance of a PdCu trimetallic alloy to carbon and carbide formation and, in addition, resistance to sulfur, halides, and ammonia; (2) develop a sulfur, halide, and ammonia resistant alloy membrane with a projected hydrogen permeance of 25 m{sup 3}m{sup -2}atm{sup -0.5}h{sup -1} at 400 C and capable of operating at pressures of 12.1 MPa ({approx}120 atm, 1750 psia); and (3) construct and experimentally validate the performance of 0.1 kg/day H{sup 2} PdCu trimetallic alloy membrane separators at feed pressures of 2 MPa (290 psia) in the presence of H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and HCl. This project successfully increased the technology readiness level of palladium-based metallic membranes for hydrogen separation from coal-biomass gasifier exhaust or similar hydrogen-containing gas streams. The reversible tolerance of palladium-copper (PdCu) alloys was demonstrated for H{sub 2}S concentrations varying from 20 ppmv up to 487 ppmv and NH{sub 3} concentrations up to 9 ppmv. In addition, atomistic modeling validated the resistance of PdCu alloys to carbon formation, irreversible sulfur corrosion, and chlorine attack. The experimental program highlighted two key issues which must be addressed as part of future experimental programs: (1) tube defects and (2) non-membrane materials of construction. Four out of five FCC PdCu separators developed leaks during the course of the experimental program because {approx}10% of the alloy tubes contained a single defect that resulted in a thin, weak point in the tube walls. These defects limited operation of the existing tubes to less than 220 psig. For commercial applications of a PdCu alloy hydrogen separator under high sulfur concentrations, it was determined that stainless steel 316 is not suitable for housing or supporting the device. Testing with sulfur concentrations of 487 {+-} 4 ppmv resulted in severe corrosion of the stainless steel components of the separators. The project identified an experimental methodology for quantifying the impact of gas contaminants on PdCu alloy membrane performance as well as an atomistic modeling approach to screen metal alloys for their resistance to irreversible sulfur corrosion. Initial mathematical descriptions of the effect of species such as CO and H{sub 2}S were developed, but require further experimental work to refine. At the end of the project, an improvement to the experimental approach for acquiring the necessary data for the permeability model was demonstrated in preliminary tests on an enhanced PdCu separator. All of the key DOE 2010 technical targets were met or exceeded except for the hydrogen flux. The highest flux observed for the project, 125 ft{sup 3}ft{sup -2}h{sup -1}, was obtained on a single tube separator with the aforementioned enhanced PdCu separator with a hydrogen feed pressure of 185 psig at 500 C.

Sean Emerson; Neal Magdefrau; Susanne Opalka; Ying She; Catherine Thibaud-Erkey; Thoman Vanderspurt; Rhonda Willigan

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Certification Testing and Demonstration of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen and Natural Gas Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are working on developing an alternative technology for storage of hydrogen or natural gas on light-duty vehicles. This technology has been titled insulated pressure vessels. Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can accept either liquid fuel or ambient-temperature compressed fuel. Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of cryogenic liquid fuel tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for fuel liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described in this paper is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen or LNG. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Future activities include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for obtaining insulated pressure vessel certification.

Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Schaffer, R; Clapper, W

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

85

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: First Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This report provides the early data results and implementation experience of the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Plan - Delivery Technical Plan - Delivery Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.2 - 1 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery Delivery is an essential component of any future hydrogen infrastructure. It encompasses those processes needed to transport hydrogen from a central or semi-central production facility to the final point of use and those required to load the energy carrier directly onto a given fuel cell system. Successful commercialization of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell systems, including those used in vehicles, back-up power sources, and distributed power generators, will likely depend on a hydrogen delivery infrastructure that provides the same level of safety, convenience, and functionality as existing liquid and gaseous fossil

88

Introduction to the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early in 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the ''Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project'' solicitation. The purpose of this project is to examine the impact and performance of fuel cell vehicles and the requisite hydrogen infrastructure in real-world applications. The integrated nature of the project enables DOE to work with industry to test, demonstrate, and validate optimal system solutions. Information learned from the vehicles and infrastructure will be fed back into DOE's R&D program to guide and refocus future research as needed, making this project truly a ''learning demonstration''.

Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.; Hooker, D.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Downtown Minneapolis Bus Layover Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Express Bus Demand by Provider #12;2008 2030 Local 41 49 Express 72 125 Total 113 174 Maximum Layover? ·! What is our current demand for bus layover facilities? ·! How will demand increase as the region seeks;Local/ Limited (steady all day) Express (Peaked) Time of Day #of Buses Downtown Bus Layover Demand #12

Minnesota, University of

90

Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology Lesl lie Eud dy - NREL Nico Bouwkamp - CaFCP DOE/FTA FCB Workshop DOE/FTA FCB Workshop June 7, 2010 - Transit Agencies FCB Demonstrations Transit Agencies FCB Demonstrations Reasons for participation Reasons for participation - Government regulations to reduce emissions - Public pressure Public pressure - Agency desire to be 'green' - Funding opportunity Funding opportunity - Learn about the newest technology 2 - Challenges: Performance Challenges: Performance Bus should match conventional bus performance Bus should match conventional bus performance - Operate 7 days/week, up to 20 hr/day - Complete day of service with one tank of fuel Complete day of service with one tank of fuel - Keep up with duty-cycle

91

Program on Technology Innovation: Nuclear Hydrogen Assessment and Evaluation of SuperGrid Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen economy is a response to concerns about greenhouse gas emissions and the national security consequences of over-reliance on foreign petroleum imports. Hydrogen can replace petroleum as a transportation fuel, yield nothing but water from the tailpipe, and can be produced with little to no greenhouse gas emissions. Nuclear power will play a key role in energizing a future hydrogen economy. A new generation of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) is being developed that can generate el...

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: Multiyear Research, Development and Demonstration Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen Program.

Milliken, J.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: Multiyear Research, Development and Demonstration Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen Program.

Milliken, J.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Polylith Software Bus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a system called Polylith that helps programmers prepare and interconnect mixed-language software components for execution in heterogeneous environments. Polylith's principal benefit is that programmers are free to implement functional requirements separately from their treatment of interfacing requirements; this means that once an application has been developed for use in one execution environment (such as a distributed network) it can be adapted for reuse in other environments (such as a shared-memory multiprocessor) by automatic techniques. This flexibility is provided without loss of performance. We accomplish this by creating a new run-time organization for software. An abstract decoupling agent, called the software bus, is introduced between the system components. Heterogeneity in language and architecture is accommodated since program units are prepared to interface directly to the bus, not to other program units. Programmers specify application structure in terms of ...

James M. Purtilo

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Bus Stop - Environment Connection: Do Characteristics of the Built Environment Correlate with Bus Stop Crime?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlate with Bus Stop Crime? Robin Liggett Anastasiawith Bus Stop Crime? Robin Liggett Anastasia Loukaitou-Correlate with Bus Stop Crime? Robin Liggett, Anestasia

Liggett, Robin S; Loukaitou-Sideris, Anastasia; Iseki, Hiroyuki

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Oil-Free Centrifugal Hydrogen Compression Technology Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Hooshang Heshmat Mohawk Innovative Technology, Inc. (MiTi) 1037 Watervliet Shaker Road Albany, NY 12205 Phone: (518) 862-4290 Email: HHeshmat@miti.cc DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18060 Subcontractor: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Compressor Corporation, Hiroshima, Japan Project Start Date: September 25, 2008 Project End Date: May 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Design a reliable and cost-effective centrifugal compressor for hydrogen pipeline transport and delivery: Eliminate sources of oil/lubricant contamination * Increase efficiency by using high rotational speeds *

97

Final Technical Report: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-FC36-04GO14285 by Mercedes-Benz & Research Development, North America (MBRDNA), Chrysler, Daimler, Mercedes Benz USA (MBUSA), BP, DTE Energy and NextEnergy to validate fuel cell technologies for infrastructure, transportation as well as assess technology and commercial readiness for the market. The Mercedes Team, together with its partners, tested the technology by operating and fueling hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under real world conditions in varying climate, terrain and driving conditions. Vehicle and infrastructure data was collected to monitor the progress toward the hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure performance targets of $2.00 to 3.00/gge hydrogen production cost and 2,000-hour fuel cell durability. Finally, to prepare the public for a hydrogen economy, outreach activities were designed to promote awareness and acceptance of hydrogen technology. DTE, BP and NextEnergy established hydrogen filling stations using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage and dispensing. DTE established a hydrogen station in Southfield, Michigan while NextEnergy and BP worked together to construct one hydrogen station in Detroit. BP constructed another fueling station in Burbank, California and provided a full-time hydrogen trailer at San Francisco, California and a hydrogen station located at Los Angeles International Airport in Southern, California. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2011. The Team deployed 30 Gen I Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) in the beginning of the project. While 28 Gen I F-CELLs used the A-Class platform, the remaining 2 were Sprinter delivery vans. Fuel cell vehicles were operated by external customers for real-world operations in various regions (ecosystems) to capture various driving patterns and climate conditions (hot, moderate and cold). External operators consisted of F-CELL partner organizations in California and Michigan ranging from governmental organizations, for-profit to and non-profit entities. All vehicles were equipped with a data acquisition system that automatically collected statistically relevant data for submission to National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), which monitored the progress of the fuel cell vehicles against the DOE technology validation milestones. The Mercedes Team also provided data from Gen-II vehicles under the similar operations as Gen I vehicles to compare technology maturity during program duration.

Ronald Grasman

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Certification Testing and Demonstration of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as alternatives to today's petroleum-powered vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles can use the advanced technology of electric vehicles to improve environmental quality and energy security, while providing the range it provides a 640-km (400-mile) range in a 34 km/liter (80 mpg) hybrid vehicle or fuel cell vehicle. Storing

99

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Overview hazard analysis for the H2Fuel Bus Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H2Fuel Bus project is a joint development effort to produce a safe, near-zero emission, 32 passenger bus that is propelled by electric power with continuous on-board hydrogen powered battery recharging. A key initiative in the hydrogen bus development effort is a rigorous evaluation of operational safety. Westinghouse Savannah River Co., the prime contractor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site, has developed a hazard analysis methodology designed to provide a systematic, comprehensive identification and evaluation of hazards. Although originally developed to support nuclear/chemical facility safety basis documentation, the SRS Methodology has widespread applicability to operations and/or systems that utilize hazardous materials and energy. This methodology was used to perform an overview hazard analysis for the H2Fuel Bus project to focus attention on those hypothetical circumstances that pose the greatest threat to the populace and property. The hazard analysis yields a listing of all known H2Fuel Bus hazards, postulated accident scenarios describing possible hazardous releases or conditions, an assessment of the scenarios in terms of frequency of occurrence and consequence, and binning in frequency-consequence space to assess the relative severity of postulated scenarios.

Hovis, G.L.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hydrogen-Powered Buses Brochure … 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Powered by Hydrogen EERE Information Center 1-877-EERE-INFO (1-877-337-3463) eere.energy.gov/informationcenter Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. October 2010 Source: NREL, Dennis Schroeder Source: NREL, Dennis Schroeder Hydrogen-Powered Buses Showcase Advanced Vehicle Technologies Visitors to federal facilities across the country may now have the opportunity to tour the sites in a hydrogen- powered shuttle bus. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting the demonstration of hydrogen-powered vehicles and hydrogen infrastructure at federal facilities across the country. Nine facilities will receive fourteen hydrogen- powered buses to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced by Ford Motor Company, the

102

Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRIs coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERCs TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRIs patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERCs TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Available Alternative Fuel School Bus Products--2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 4-page Clean Cities fact sheet provides a list of the currently available (and soon to be available) model year 2004 alternative fuel school bus and school bus engine products. It includes information from Blue Bird Corporation, Collins Bus Corporation, Corbeil Bus, Ford Motor Company, General Motors Corporation, Thomas Built Buses, Inc., Clean Air Partners, Cummins Westport, and Deere & Company.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

X-231B technology demonstration for in situ treatment of contaminated soil: Laboratory evaluation of chemical oxidation using hydrogen peroxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Treatability studies were conducted as part of a comprehensive research project initiated to demonstrate as well as evaluate in situ treatment technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radioactive substances in wet, slowly permeable soils. The site of interest for this project was the X-231B Oil Biodegradation unit at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility in southern Ohio. This report describes the treatability studies that investigated the feasibility of the application of low-strength hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) solutions to treat trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated soil.

Gates, D.D.; Siegrist, R.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has partnered with Proterra, a Colorado-based bus manufacturer, to bring its first fuel cell bus to the area. The bus design features a battery-dominant plug-in hybrid...

107

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operation of a Solid Polymer Fuel Cell: A Parametric Model,"1991). G. Bronoel, "Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cells Without PreciousG. Abens, "Development of a Fuel Cell Power Source for Bus,"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hydrogen  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Hydrogen production ...

110

National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Wrap-up National Renewable Energy Laboratory 3 Innovation for Our Energy Future Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demo Project Objectives, Relevance, and Targets *...

111

On Bus-Stop Crime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Martin Wachs, Crime in Public Transit Systems: AnOn Bus-Stop Crime B Y A N A S TA S I A L O U K A I T O U - Sas common settings for crime, pro v i d i n g cover for

Loukaitou-Sideris, Anastasia; Liggett, Robin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Electrical system architecture having high voltage bus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical system architecture is disclosed. The architecture has a power source configured to generate a first power, and a first bus configured to receive the first power from the power source. The architecture also has a converter configured to receive the first power from the first bus and convert the first power to a second power, wherein a voltage of the second power is greater than a voltage of the first power, and a second bus configured to receive the second power from the converter. The architecture further has a power storage device configured to receive the second power from the second bus and deliver the second power to the second bus, a propulsion motor configured to receive the second power from the second bus, and an accessory motor configured to receive the second power from the second bus.

Hoff, Brian Douglas (East Peoria, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002-September 30, 2004  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Development and Demonstration Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses October 15, 2002 - September 30, 2004 A. Del Toro SunLine Services Group Thousand Palms, California M. Frailey National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado F. Lynch Hydrogen Components Inc. Littleton, Colorado S. Munshi Westport Innovations Inc. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada S. Wayne West Virginia University Morgantown, West Virginia Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38707 November 2005 Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses October 15, 2002 - September 30, 2004 A. Del Toro SunLine Services Group Thousand Palms, California M. Frailey National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado

114

Enterprise Service Bus Implementation Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define an implementation profile for International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61968 using technologies commonly found on an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB). More specifically, this document describes how message payloads defined by parts 3 through 9 of IEC 61968 are conveyed using Web Services and the Java Message Service (JMS). The goal is to provide details that are sufficient to enable implementations of IEC 61968 to be interoperable.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, Global Environment Facility Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.thegef.org/gef/sites/thegef.org/files/documents/GEF.C.28.Inf_.12.p The Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the United Nations Development Programme launched a fuel cell bus deployment program to support commercial demonstrations of buses and fueling infrastructure in large bus markets in developing countries. The program's objective was to reduce the long-term greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector in GEF program countries. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

116

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration (MYRDD) Plan - Appendix C: Hydrogen Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page C - 1 Page C - 1 2012 Appendix C: Hydrogen Quality Appendix C - Hydrogen Quality The hydrogen fuel quality specification in Table C.1 below is based on the SAE International Surface Vehicle Standard SAE-2719 - Hydrogen Fuel Quality Guideline for Fuel Cell Vehicles, June 2011. This specification has been harmonized to the extent possible with the draft international standard, ISO/DIS 14687-2, Hydrogen Fuel - Product Specification - Part 2: Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell applications for road vehicles, recently approved by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The primary purpose of this specification is to ensure that the effects of possible fuel contaminants on fuel cell performance and durability in early commercial vehicles are acceptable. Modeling and

117

SunLine Transit Agency Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a protoype fuel cell bus, a prototype hydrogen hybrid interal combustion engine bus, and five new compressed natural gas buses.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Designing New Transit Bus Garages to be Fuel Flexible  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Designing New Transit Bus Garages to be Fuel Flexible Prepared By: Marathon Technical Services Six Venus Crescent P.O. Box 318 Heidelberg, Ontario, Canada N0B1Y0 Telephone: 519-699-9250 May 12, 2006 ______________________________________________________________________________ DESIGNING NEW TRANSIT BUS GARAGES TO BE FUEL FLEXIBLE Background Information Before discussing the building design features that are recommended for CNG and GH2 buses, it is important to understand what makes these fuels different from gasoline or diesel. The items below summarize the basic differences between the properties of gaseous and liquid fuels that influence the building design changes: 1. Natural Gas and Hydrogen are both lighter-than-air and in gaseous form at atmospheric

119

Demonstration and System Analysis of High Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Using SOFCs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, an integrated laboratory scale (ILS), 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) facility has been developed under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other integral issues. Additionally, a reference process model of a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The reference plant design is driven by a 600 megawatt thermal high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.01106 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohmcm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.36 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation. The paper will also present the optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant which may be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety, Codes and Standards Safety, Codes and Standards Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.7 - 1 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards The United States and many other countries have established laws and regulations that require commercial products and infrastructure to meet all applicable codes and standards to demonstrate that they are safe, perform as designed and are compatible with the systems in which they are used. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies have a history of safe use with market deployment and commercialization underway. The Safety, Codes and Standards sub-program (SCS) facilitates deployment and commercialization of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies by developing information resources for their safe use. SCS relies on extensive input from automobile

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equipment is heavy and costly * Slow response time of the fuel cell adversely affects regenerative energy recovery potential and efficiency Barriers to full fuel cell bus...

122

Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on the results from the DOE fuel cell bus evaluation given at the Transportation Research Board's 87th annual meeting, January 14, 2008.

Eudy, L.

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

Danko, E.

2011-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

124

A comprehensive study on IEC61850 process bus architecture and spit bus based differential protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEC61850 communication standard for digital substation automation creates a new way to think about conventional protection scheme and configuration of substation. The presence of communication link in process bus makes a revolutionary change for future ... Keywords: IEC61850, bus fault detection unit (BFDU), nonconventional instrumental transformer (NCIT), process bus, sampled measured value (SMV)

Mojaharul Islam; Hong-Hee Lee

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gas turbines engines and transmissions for bus demonstration programs  

SciTech Connect

The technical status report fulfills the contractual requirements of Contract EM-78-C-02-4867. The report covers the period from 31 January 1979 through 30 April 1979 and is a summary of DDA activities for the effort performed on the procurement of eleven (11) Allison GT 404-4 gas turbine engines and five (5) HT740CT and siz (6) V730CT Allison automatic transmissions and the required associated software. (TFD)

Nigro, D.N.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hp horsepower HVAC heating, ventilation, and air conditioning in. inches kg kilograms kW kilowatts lb pounds MBRC miles between roadcalls mpDGE miles per diesel gallon...

127

The operation result of the demonstration of energy networks of electricity, heat, and hydrogen at an apartment building in 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell stacks, fuel processors, hydrogen storage devices, and large storage tanks for hot water, and the electricity and hot water from the fuel cells are shared via an internal electricity grid and a hot water pipe the system. Three small PEM fuel cells with hot water tanks have been installed, and the electricity and hot

128

Development of the bus joint for the ITER Central Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

The terminations of the Central Solenoid (CS) modules are connected to the bus extensions by joints located outside the CS in the gap between the CS and Torodial Field (TF) assemblies. These joints have very strict space limitations. Low resistance is a common requirement for all ITER joints. In addition, the CS bus joints will experience and must be designed to withstand significant variation in the magnetic field of several tenths of a Tesla per second during initiation of plasma. The joint resistance is specified to be less than 4 nOhm. The joints also have to be soldered in the field and designed with the possibility to be installed and dismantled in order to allow cold testing in the cold test facility. We have developed coaxial joints that meet these requirements and have demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate and assemble them in the vertical configuration. We introduced a coupling cylinder with superconducting strands soldered to the surface of the cable that can be installed in the ITER assembly hall and at the Cold Test Facility. This cylinder serves as a transition area between the CS module and the bus extension. We made two racetrack samples and tested four bus joints in our Joint Test Apparatus. Resistance of the bus joints was measured by a decay method and by a microvoltmeter; the value of the current was measured by the Hall probes. This measurement method was verified in the previous tests. The resistance of the joints varied insignificantly from 1.5 to 2 nOhm. One of the challenges associated with a soldered joint is the inability to use corrosive chemicals that are difficult to clean. This paper describes our development work on cable preparation, chrome removal, compaction, soldering, and final assembly and presents the test results.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL] [ORNL; Irick, David Kim [ORNL] [ORNL; Kenney, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report and Appendices, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 through October 2008. Evaluation results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, fuel cell bus operations at Golden Gate Transit, and evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and roadcalls).

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Alternative Fuel School Bus Information Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 4-page Clean Cities fact sheet provides a list of important resources for learning more about alternative fuels in school buses. It includes information regarding Alternative Fuel School Bus Manufacturers, Alternative Fuel HD Engine Manufacturers, Alternative Fuel School Bus Operators, and Key Web Resources for Alternative Fuels.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Interprocessor bus switching system for simultaneous communication in plural bus parallel processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bus switching apparatus and method for multiple processor computer systems comprises a plurality of bus switches interconnected by branch buses. Each processor or other module of the system is connected to a spigot of a bus switch. Each bus switch also serves as part of a backplane of a modular crate hardware package. A processor initiates communication with another processor by identifying that other processor. The bus switch to which the initiating processor is connected identifies and secures, if possible, a path to that other processor, either directly or via one or more other bus switches which operate similarly. If a particular desired path through a given bus switch is not available to be used, an alternate path is considered, identified and secured. 11 figures.

Atac, R.; Fischler, M.S.; Husby, D.E.

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Shuttle Bus and Couriers | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific authority for the use of appropriated funds to pay for transportation for official purposes is contained in section 1344(a)(1) of Title 31, U.S. Code. Use of this transportation for any other purpose is inappropriate and against the

133

Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Instructions for Bicyclists  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructions for Bicyclists Instructions for Bicyclists Front bike rack image Rear bike rack image Front bike rack Rear bike rack Bicyclists are required to wear helmets while riding at the Berkeley Lab. LBNL buses are equipped with bicycle racks in the front and rear of the bus. Use bicycle rack at your own risk. Berkeley Lab does not assume liability for damage to your bicycle. If you experience difficulties, or notice the bicycle rack is not working properly, please notify the bus operator and/or contact the bus supervisor at 486-4165 or email busservices@lbl.gov and/or post your comments with specific information on the Operations Suggestion box. Loading a bicycle on the bus: Prepare your bicycle for loading by: removing water bottles, pumps and other loose items that could fall off while the bus is in motion.

134

Orion Bus Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bus Industries Bus Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name Orion Bus Industries Place Ontario, Canada Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2001 Link to project description http://www.nrel.gov/news/press/2002/3002_hybird_buses.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Orion Bus Industries is a company located in Ontario, Canada. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Orion_Bus_Industries&oldid=381704" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

135

Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Instructions for Riders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructions for Riders Instructions for Riders Shuttle stops are marked with this sign: Bus sign image Tips for riders: When you see a shuttle bus approaching WAVE AT THE DRIVER so the driver knows you want to board the bus For safety reasons, shuttle bus drivers can only pick-up and drop-off passengers at designated stops. Shuttle services are for Berkeley Lab employee and guest use only. All riders are required to show ID when boarding off-site buses. Acceptable ID's are: LBNL badge, UC Berkeley student and faculty ID badge, DOE badge, or UCOP badge. Guests are required to present a visitor bus pass, email, or permission from Lab host, written on official letterhead. See Site Access for more information. As you board, tell the driver the building number of your destination. The driver will be able to assist you with directions.

136

Chemical Hydride Rate Modeling, Validation, and System Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Troy A. Semelsberger (Primary Contact), Biswajit Paik, Tessui Nakagawa, Ben Davis, and Jose I. Tafoya Los Alamos National Laboratory MS J579, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 665-4766 Email: troy@lanl.gov DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Project Start Date: February 2009 Project End Date: February 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Investigate reaction characteristics of various fluid-phase * ammonia-borane (AB)-ionic liquid (IL) compositions Identify and quantify hydrogen impurities and develop *

137

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume III. Final report: demonstration plant equipment descriptions, test plan, and operating instructions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The elements of the final, detailed design of the demonstration plant for the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam are summarized. Descriptions are given of all items of equipment in sufficient detail that they can serve as purchase specifications. The process and mechanical design criteria which were used to develop the specifications, and the process descriptions and material and energy balance bases to which the design criteria were applied are included. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells:Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells:based energy storage system to produce hydrogen for a fuel

Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations School bus drivers must turn off bus engines as soon as possible at loading

140

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement School bus operators must turn off the bus engine immediately after

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus USA School Bus USA to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean School Bus USA Clean School Bus USA is a public-private partnership that focuses on reducing children's exposure to harmful diesel exhaust by limiting school bus idling, implementing pollution reduction technologies, improving route

142

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 December 14, 2010 Hydrogen Bus Lets Lab Visitors Glimpse Future The hydrogen bus uses the same basic technology as a conventional gasoline-powered engine but runs on renewable hydrogen. October 25, 2010 New Report Identifies Ways to Reduce Cost of Fuel Cell Power Plants A new report by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory details technical and cost gap analyses of molten carbonate fuel cell and phosphoric acid fuel cell stationary fuel cell power plants and identifies pathways for reducing costs. October 18, 2010 NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves as Showcase for Advanced Vehicle Technologies NREL uses its hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine bus as the primary shuttle vehicle for VIP visitors, members of the media, and new employees. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the lease for the bus to

143

Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Industrial Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kriston P. Brooks (Primary Contact), Siva P. Pilli, Dale A. King Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 372-4343 Email: kriston.brooks@pnnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Subcontractor: ClearEdge Power, Portland, OR Project Start Date: May 2010 Project End Date: September 2012

144

Ultralight Stainless Steel Urban Bus Concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While stainless steel buses are certainly not new, this study reveals opportunities for substantial improvements in structural performance.The objective of this project was to investigate the mass saving potential of ultra-high strength stainless steel as applied to the structure of a full size urban transit bus.The resulting design for a low floor,hybrid bus has an empty weight less than half that of a conventional transit bus.The reduced curb weight allows for a greater payload,without exceeding legal axle limits. A combination of finite element modeling and dynamic testing of scale models was used to predict structural performance.

J. Bruce Emmons; Leonard J. Blessing

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Data collection plan for Phase 2 Alternative Fuels Bus Data Collection Program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document constitutes the plan for collecting and reporting data associated with a special set of transit bus demonstrations to be conducted under the Urban Bus Program of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. This program, called the Phase 2 Bus Data Collection Program, serves as an adjunct to the Phase I Bus Data Collection Program, collecting detailed data on just a few buses to augment and enhance the Phase 1 data in fulfilling the urban bus requirements of AMFA. Demonstrations will be conducted at a few transit system locations throughout the US and will use alternative fuels and associated technologies to reduce undesirable transit bus exhaust emissions. Several organizations will be involved in the data collection; NREL will manage the program, analyze and store vehicle data, and make these data available through the Alternative Fuels Data Center. This information will enable transit agencies, equipment manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and government policy makers to make informed decisions about buying and using alternative fuels.

Krenelka, T. [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3704 Email: todd.ramsden@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Oorja Protonics, Inc., Fremont, CA Project Start Date: June 1, 2010 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Operate and maintain fuel-cell-powered material * handling equipment (MHE) using direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. Compile operational data of DMFCs and validate their * performance under real-world operating conditions. Provide an independent technology assessment that * focuses on DMFC system performance, operation, and

147

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxiliary Power Unit Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dan Hennessy (Primary Contact), Jim Banna Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC 300 University Drive m/c 480-300-385 Auburn Hills, MI 48326 Phone: (248) 732-0656 Email: daniel.t.hennessy@delphi.com DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000478 Subcontractors: * Electricore, Inc., Valencia, CA * PACCAR, Inc., Bellevue, WA * TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO Project Start Date: August 1, 2009 Project End Date: April 30, 2013 Objectives

148

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BUS++  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUS++ BUS++ New generation platform for building energy, ventilation, noise level and indoor air quality simulations. A network assumption is adopted, and BUS++ allows both steady-state and dynamic simulations on a desired level of accuracy. BUS++ includes modern solution routines and has passed the most commonly used rigorous air flow and heat transfer test cases. However, only a limited number of special applications are completed. Keywords energy performance, ventilation, air flow, indoor air quality, noise level Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Special expertise needed for utilizing all potential calculation features. Common knowledge of building components needed for using special applications with graphical user interfaces. Users 20 users in VTT Building Technology and other companies in Finland.

149

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Policy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Policy School bus drivers or drivers of other vehicles that the school district

150

Hydrogen Technology Validation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This fact sheet provides a basic introduction to the DOE Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration for non-technical audiences.

151

HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY, CENTER FOR HYDROGEN RESEARCH, AND THE HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. Many of SRNL's programs support dual-use applications. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation on hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

Danko, E

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

152

SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

Danko, E

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transit and School Bus Transit and School Bus Users Group to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions Natural Gas Transit & School Bus Users Group

154

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Retrofit School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement The Illinois Department of Education will reimburse any qualifying school

155

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Conversion Research to someone by E-mail School Bus Conversion Research to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research

156

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emissions Bus Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan As part of a state effort to identify strategies to expand the availability

157

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean School Bus Clean School Bus Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean School Bus Requirements Full-size school buses equipped with an engine from Model Year (MY) 1993 or older may not be used to transport school children in Rhode Island.

158

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emissions School Low Emissions School Bus Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emissions School Bus Grants The Lower-Emission School Bus Program (Program) provides grant funding for

159

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Retrofit School Bus Retrofit Grant Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Retrofit Grant Program The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the Clean Diesel

160

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement The Mississippi State Department of Education requires public school

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Pilot School Bus Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Pilot Program The Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles will approve up to three participants for a pilot program to operate Type II school buses that are

162

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Emissions School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

163

Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

National Fuel Cell Bus National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) The goal of the NFCBP is to facilitate the development of commercially

164

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program As part of the Children's Environmental Health Project, the Arizona

165

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement All local boards of education in North Carolina have adopted idle reduction

166

DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific authority for the use of appropriated funds to pay for transportation for official purposes is contained in section 1344(a)(1) of Title 31, U.S. Code. Use of this transportation for any other purpose is

167

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars

168

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel School Bus Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations The Virginia Board of Education may not unreasonably limit the authority of

169

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Emissions Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Emissions Reduction Each full-sized school bus with a Model Year (MY) 1994 or newer engine that transports children in the state must be equipped with specific emissions

170

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive Any county that uses compressed natural gas (CNG) for the operation of any

171

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Retrofit Retrofit Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Retrofit Program The goals of the Connecticut Clean School Bus Program are to: 1) establish grants for municipalities and local and regional school boards to reimburse

172

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives Research & Development

173

3 One-Line Diagram and Bus/Branch Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-line diagram and bus/branch model Ohms law Losses Kirchoffs law Power flow calculations (different model idealizations) Reference bus Power System & LMP Fundamentals WEM 301 2008 ISO New England Inc.

Eugene Litvinov Director; Marginal Loss Pricing; Market System; Major Components; Line Line; Line Line

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit (and School Bus) Users Group...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Transit (and School Bus) Users Group Meeting Archives to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit (and School Bus) Users Group Meeting Archives on...

175

Analysis of a diesel-electric hybrid urban bus system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hybrid bus powered by a diesel engine and a battery pack has been analyzed over an idealized bus-driving cycle in Chicago. Three hybrid configurations, two parallel and one series, have been evaluated. The results indicate that the fuel economy of a hybrid bus, taking into account the regenerative braking, is comparable with that of a conventional diesel bus. Life-cycle costs are slightly higher because of the added weight and cost of the battery.

Marr, W.W.; Sekar, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ahlheim, M.C. [Regional Transportation Authority, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy DataBus (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

NREL has developed the Energy DataBus, an open-sourced software that collects massive amounts of energy-related data at second-to-second intervals; stores it in a massive, scalable database; and turns it into useful information.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

July 4, 1997 The Stanford InfoBus and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 4, 1997 1 of 30 The Stanford InfoBus and Its Service Layers Augmenting the Internet Project Computer Science Department Stanford University, CA 94305 The Stanford InfoBus is a prototype service layers pro­ vided by the Stanford InfoBus: protocols for managing items and collections (DLIOP

Gravano, Luis

178

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations - DOE Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of FCEB design. Using fuel cells in a transit application can help accelerate the learning curve for the technology because of the high mileage accumulated in short periods...

179

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission or Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on AddThis.com...

180

Bus application of oxygen-enrichment technology and diesel-electric hybrid systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) mandate very strict limits on particulate, smoke, and other emissions from city buses. The use of alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) or methanol, can help transit operators, such as the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), meet the mandated limits. However, the capital investment needed to convert the fueling infrastructure and buses is large, as is the expense of training personnel. If a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus can be implemented with the help of oxygen-enrichment technology or a diesel-electric hybrid system, this large investment could be postponed for many years. The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) initiated this project to evaluate the possibility of applying these technologies to CTA buses. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a limited number of engine tests and computer analyses and concluded that both concepts are practical and will help in a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus that can meet the mandated limits of the CAA amendments. The oxygen enrichment of combustion air depends on the availability of a compact and economical membrane separator. Because the technology for this critical component is still under development, it is recommended that an actual bus demonstration be delayed until prototype membranes are available. The hybrid propulsion system is ready for the demonstration phase, and it is recommended that the CTA and RTA commence planning for a bus demonstration.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Substation Bus Ampacity Uprating: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continuous increase in demand for electric power has pushed some of the components in the Con Edison system to their design limits. These limits, established in the past, were often selected with general and conservative assumptions. Consequently, Con Edison requested the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to investigate the possibility of raising the rating of their 3,000A substation bus to a higher value.The first step in the investigation was to conduct a feasibility study ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

Danko, E

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

183

Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Transportation & Development Policy Focus Area: Public Transit & Infrastructure Topics: Best Practices Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.itdp.org/microsites/bus-rapid-transit-planning-guide/ The Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide is the most comprehensive resource for planning a bus rapid transit (BRT) system, beginning with project preparation all the way through to implementation. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

184

Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change July 1, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked outside the Department of Energy offices Monday to showcase its clean energy features. | Photo Courtesy of Joshua Delung | The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked outside the Department of Energy offices Monday to showcase its clean energy features. | Photo Courtesy of Joshua Delung | Joshua DeLung Twelve Dartmouth College students stopped at the U.S. Department of Energy Monday in a Big Green Bus, a 1989 MCI coach with an engine modified to run on waste vegetable oil. The students' goals are to promote alternative fuels and sustainable living with the slogan "Vehicle for

185

Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change July 1, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked outside the Department of Energy offices Monday to showcase its clean energy features. | Photo Courtesy of Joshua Delung | The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked outside the Department of Energy offices Monday to showcase its clean energy features. | Photo Courtesy of Joshua Delung | Joshua DeLung Twelve Dartmouth College students stopped at the U.S. Department of Energy Monday in a Big Green Bus, a 1989 MCI coach with an engine modified to run on waste vegetable oil. The students' goals are to promote alternative fuels and sustainable living with the slogan "Vehicle for Change" on this sixth-annual cross-country educational tour.

186

NREL: Energy Analysis - The Energy DataBus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share The Energy DataBus Register for a Demo Screen capture of the Energy DataBus's dashboards. Register for free download and install at your organization. As part of its ongoing mission to advance renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created the Energy DataBus-a system for organizations to store and process their energy data (or any time-series data). This is a special system that allows NREL to conduct energy informatics (EI) research and development, while delivering this research to the industry in the form of plug-ins to DataBus. Organizations that have DataBus can use these plug-ins for their own energy data research. DataBus is part of NREL's portfolio of EI projects and was developed to be

187

NREL Energy DataBus/Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Databus Factsheet Energydatabusfacthseet.pdf Read more about the Energy Databus Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleNRELEnergyDataBusResources&oldid662041...

188

Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Using NH3-Fueled SOFC Systems, Ammonia - The Keysolid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems as these are relativelyper kW in an ammonia-based SOFC system compared with about $

Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002--September 30, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report covers literature and laboratory analyses to identify modification requirements of a Cummins Westport B Gas Plus engine for transit buses using a hydrogen/compressed natural fuel blend.

Del Toro, A.; Frailey, M.; Lynch, F.; Munshi, S.; Wayne, S.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

191

Study on Electric Control System for a Full Hybrid Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For efficient and reliable operation of a novel hybrid powertrain assembled in the bus, a set of control strategy combined with the structural characteristics was researched. Based on the identification of the driver's intension, this paper presented ... Keywords: full hybrid bus, eletric control system, stretegy, fuel economy

Zhiguo Kong, Hongxiu Wang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database Agency/Company /Organization: EMBARQ Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.brtdata.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/global-bus-rapid-transit-brt-database Language: English Related Tools European Green Cars Initiative Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium Sized Cities in India Making Car Sharing and Car Clubs Work: Final Report ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS This tool provides public access to current data about bus rapid transit systems around the world, including data for the design, performance, and cost of these systems. The database can be filtered by location or

193

A Model for the Bus System in Cuernevaca (Mexico)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bus transportation system in Cuernevaca, Mexico, has certain distinguished, innovative features and has been the subject of an intriguing, recent study by M. Krbalek and P. Seba. Krbalek and Seba analyzed the statistics of bus arrivals on Line 4 close to the city center. They studied, in particular, the bus spacing distribution and also the bus number variance measuring the fluctuations of the total number of buses arriving at a fixed location during a time interval T. Quite remarkably, it was found that these two statistics are well modeled by the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE) of random matrix theory. Our goal in this paper is to provide a plausible explanation of these observations, and to this end we introduce a microscopic model for the bus line that leads simply and directly to GUE.

Jinho Baik; Alexei Borodin; Percy Deift; Toufic Suidan

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

Bus industry market study. Report -- Task 3.2: Fuel cell/battery powered bus system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the commercialization of fuel cells for transportation, Georgetown University, as a part of the DOE/DOT Fuel Cell Transit Bus Program, conducted a market study to determine the inventory of passenger buses in service as of December, 1991, the number of buses delivered in 1991 and an estimate of the number of buses to be delivered in 1992. Short term and long term market projections of deliveries were also made. Data was collected according to type of bus and the field was divided into the following categories which are defined in the report: transit buses, school buses, commercial non-transit buses, and intercity buses. The findings of this study presented with various tables of data collected from identified sources as well as narrative analysis based upon interviews conducted during the survey.

Zalbowitz, M.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system  

SciTech Connect

A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell research projects focus on developing, integrating, and demonstrating advanced hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and fuel cell...

197

DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific authority for the use of appropriated funds to pay for transportation for official purposes is contained in section 1344(a)(1) of Title 31, U.S. Code. Use of this transportation for any other purpose is inappropriate and against the law.

198

Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System Speaker(s): Steve Black Date: December 5, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 BACKGROUND: Several recent issues of Today At Berkeley Lab, including for today, December 1, have called our attention to the planned changes to the Lab's shuttle bus system. If you have not yet viewed the description of the planned new system and the maps showing the new routes it is advisable for you to do so as the changes are significant, not just a "fine tuning". Several EETD staff members and shuttle bus riders have expressed serious concerns about the changes, which has prompted us to set up this special seminar. DESCRIPTION: Steve Black, who is fairly new to the Lab, has responsibility for a number of Laboratory support services

199

Lessons Learned: Battery-Electric Transit-Bus Opportunity Charging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details the results of a study of battery-electric bus opportunity charging. This document is an interim report pending conclusion of further experiments with at least one other rapid-charging system and battery type.

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Sustainable transport at MIT : improving area bus services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everyday each member of the MIT community makes a decision about how they will travel to school or work. Using the Commuter Habit Survey and information regarding local bus services as guides, this report analyzes the ...

Beasley, Aimee K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Isolated Phase Bus Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information on design, operating experience, and maintenance practices associated with the isophase bus system. The information is meant to be useful for system engineers, component engineers, maintenance personnel, and their supervision in understanding and maintaining this system. This document is an update to Isolated Phase Bus Maintenance Guide (EPRI report TR-112784), and the scope has been expanded to include boundary components, such as potential transformers (PTs) and current...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Demonstrating Economic and Operational Viability of 72-Hour Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems to Support Emergency Communications on the Sprint Nextel Network - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kevin Kenny Sprint Nextel 12000 Sunrise Valley Drive MS: VARESQ0401-E4064 Reston, VA 20191 Phone: (703) 592-8272 Email: kevin.p.kenny@sprint.com DOE Managers HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov GO: James Alkire Phone: (720) 356-1426 Email: James.Alkire@go.doe.gov Contract Number: EE-0000486 Project Partners: * Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (Fuel Project Partner) * Altergy Systems, Folsum, CA (PEM Fuel Cell Project Partner) * Black & Veatch Corporation, Overland Park, KS (A&E

203

Demonstration of EIC's copper sulfate process for removal of hydrogen sulfide and other trace contaminants from geothermal steam at turbine inlet temperatures and pressures. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results obtained during the operation of an integrated, one-tenth commercial scale pilot plant using EIC's copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide and other contaminants from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions are discussed. The tests took place over a six month period at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Unit No. 7 at The Geysers Power Plant. These tests were the final phase of a development effort which included the laboratory research and engineering design work which led to the design of the pilot plant. Broadly, the objectives of operating the pilot plant were to confirm the preliminary design criteria which had been developed, and provide data for their revisions, if appropriate, in a plant which contained all the elements of a commercial process using equipment of a size sufficient to provide valid scale-up data. The test campaign was carried out in four phases: water testing; open circuit, i.e., non integrated scrubbing, liquid-solid separation and regeneration testing; closed circuit short term; and closed circuit long term testing.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hydrogen and fuel cell research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen and fuel cell research Hydrogen and fuel cell research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hydrogen and fuel cell research Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/proj_fc_bus_eval.html This webside contributes to the growing role that advanced technologies play in addressing the nation's energy challenges. Their projects focus on hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; education; and manufacturing. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydrogen_and_fuel_cell_research&oldid=515025" Categories: Transportation Toolkits

205

Analysis of U.S. School Bus Populations and Alternative Fuel Potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Clean Cities final report provides information concerning different school bus types, school bus populations, school bus miles and fuel use, school bus emissions, alternative fuel school buses, and potential for alternative fuel school bus use through 2010. It is intended to provide general information concerning the size of the school bus market in the U.S., as well as to provide some quantification of the potential for alternative fuel use in school buses in the U.S., and what that might mean for petroleum displacement and emissions reductions.

Laughlin, M.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Berkeley Lab: Special Bus/Shuttle Service Reservations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Service Special Service Buses and/or Vans are available for special service by reservation. Costs are: $136.50 required 2 hour minimum $68.25 per vehicle each additional hour Bus image Bus image Buses accommodate: 41 passengers (26 Seated plus 15 Standing) (and up to 2 wheelchair passengers) Vans accommodate: 15 passengers To arrange special service shuttle transportation: Fill out the request form below A valid project id is required for special service requests Complete the form and click on the "send" button The request for special bus service will be sent to busservices@lbl.gov and reviewed. A confirmation will be sent back via email to the requestor regarding the status. For additional information contact: Kori Porter at 486-5112 or email busservices@lbl.gov.

207

Switching surge test results ehv substation bus configurations  

SciTech Connect

The industry has been actively engaged in, and has presented many results of, ehv switching surge test programs associated with transmission line designs. It would seem equally important that similar efforts be staged relative to ehv switching surge capabilities of the terminal equipment as it would normally be found in its variety of configurations. Toward this end, a series of switching surge test programs on a number of substation bus configurations was conducted. Particular emphasis was placed on the determination of switching surge characteristics of the air gaps found in ehv substation bus designs. The test data are presented with pertinent data evaluations in an attempt to provide a more refined basis for the application of final judgments to bus designs for 345, 500, and 750 kV substations.

Hertig, G.E.; Kelly, W.B.

1966-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ultra-Clean Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: Dynamometer Durability Testing, the Denali Bus Fleet Demonstration, Bus Fleet Demonstrations Emissions Analysis, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Emissions Analysis, Feasibility Study of SFPs for Rural Alaska, and Cold Weather Testing of Ultra Clean Fuel.

Steve Bergin

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Application Layer Definition and Analyses of Controller Area Network Bus for Wire Harness Assembly Machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the feature of multi-master bus access, nondestructive contention-based arbitration and flexible configuration, Controller Area Network (CAN) bus is applied into the control system of Wire Harness Assembly Machine (WHAM). To accomplish desired goal, ...

Hui Guo; Ying Jiang

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration: Spring 2008 Results; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conference paper presented at the 2008 National Hydrogen Association Meeting that describes the spring, 2008 results of the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

NETL: CCPI - Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Energy California Project: Commercial Demonstration of Advanced IGCC with Full Carbon Capture Greenfield Site, Kern County, California PROJECT FACT SHEET Hydrogen Energy...

212

Steady State Analysis of an induction generator infinite bus system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of grid connected wind energy conver- sion systems employing induction generators, one1 Steady State Analysis of an induction generator infinite bus system Rajesh G Kavasseri Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105 - 5285, USA (email: rajesh

Kavasseri, Rajesh

213

BUSpec: A framework for generation of verification aids for standard bus protocol specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A typical verification intellectual property (VIP) of a bus protocol such as ARM advanced micro-controller bus architecture (AMBA) or PCI consists of a set of assertions and associated verification aids such as test-benches, design-ware models and coverage ... Keywords: Assertion-based verification, Bus functional models, Protocol validation, Verification intellectual property

Bhaskar Pal; Ansuman Banerjee; Pallab Dasgupta; P. P. Chakrabarti

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Potter St./JBEI Shuttle Bus Routes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Routes & Schedules Blue Route Orange Route Rockridge Route Potter St./JBEI Route Combined Routes & Schedules Blue Route Orange Route Rockridge Route Potter St./JBEI Route Potter St./JBEI Map Scroll down or click here for schedule ↓ Printable Map | Printable Schedule Potter St/JBEI Route Potter St./JBEI Schedule Bus Service @ lbl.gov email link LBNL - POTTER ST/JBEI START - LBL STOP 65 CORY HALL SHATTUCK BART JCAP POTTER CFO JBEI SHATTUCK BART CORY HALL Depart on the 08's and 38's Depart on the 10's and 40's Depart on the 15's and 45's Depart on the 28's and 58's Depart on the 00's and 30's Depart on the 05's and 35's Depart on the 08's and 35's Depart on the 20's and 50's Depart on the 25's and 55's 1 8:08 AM 8:10 AM 8:15 AM 8:28 AM 8:30 AM 8:35 AM 8:38 AM 8:50 AM 8:55 AM 2 8:38 AM 8:40 AM 8:45 AM 8:58 AM 9:00 AM 9:05 AM 9:08 AM 9:20 AM 9:25 AM

215

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural residues, in the near-term time frame (~three years) and at a comparable cost to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power a bus in Albany, GA. Our strategy is to produce hydrogen from biomass pyrolysis oils in conjunction with high value co-products. Activated carbon can be made from agricultural residues in a two- stage process: (1) slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce charcoal, and (2) high temperature processing to form activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio-

216

South Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg Jump to: navigation, search Logo: South Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg Name South Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Partner City of Johannesburg Sector Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/um Program Start 2006 Country South Africa UN Region Southern Africa References GTZ's Contribution to the Johannesburg Rea Vaya Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Project [1] Sustainable Urban Transport Project [2] Johannesburg started planning a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system in November 2006. For the city of Johannesburg and on behalf of KfW Entwicklungsbank, GTZ is working to create a network of bus routes totalling 120 kilometres

217

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid and Zero Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on AddThis.com...

218

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

219

Hawaii hydrogen power park Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy source. (Barrier V-Renewable Integration) Hydrogen storage & distribution system. (Barrier V fueled vehicle hydrogen dispensing system. Demonstrate hydrogen as an energy carrier. Investigate Electrolyzer ValveManifold Water High Pressure H2 Storage Fuel Cell AC Power H2 Compressor Hydrogen Supply O2

220

Learning Demonstration Interim Progress Report -- Summer 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the key results to date from the U.S. DOE Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration project.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Thomas, H.; Welch, C.; Kurtz, J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Learning Demonstration Progress Report -- Spring 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents key results from DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project based on data through December 2007.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

NREL Energy DataBus/Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » NREL Energy DataBus/Partners < NREL Energy DataBus Jump to: navigation, search Energy Databus Commercial Partners Buffalo.png Buffalo Software offers Databus Support and Maintenance contracts, Installation of Databus and also offers feature development for new custom databus features. We have some committers on the NREL Energy Databus project and can easily customize and help make the Energy Databus meet your company's needs. We also offer training on Databus as well as certification to ensure your devices work with Databus. Buffalo Software (303) 517-8902 Magpie.jpg

223

RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary K. Proc, R. Barnitt, and R.L. McCormick Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38364 August 2005 RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary K. Proc, R. Barnitt, and R.L. McCormick Prepared under Task No. FC05.9400 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38364 August 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

224

NREL Energy DataBus/Contact | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contact Contact < NREL Energy DataBus Jump to: navigation, search View the Databus Partners NREL's Energy Databus NREL's Energy DataBus is used for tracking and analyzing energy use on its own campus. The system is applicable to other facilities-including anything from a single building to a large military base or college campus-or for other energy data management needs. Managing and minimizing energy consumption on a large campus is usually a difficult task for facility managers: There may be hundreds of energy meters spread across a campus, and the meter data are often recorded by hand. Even when data are captured electronically, there may be measurement issues or time periods that may not coincide. Making sense of this limited and often confusing data can be a challenge that makes the assessment of

225

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record 12012: Fuel Cell Bus Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Record #: 12012 Date: March 2, 2012 Title: Fuel Cell Bus Targets Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Sunita Satyapal * Date: September 12, 2012 Item: Performance, cost, and durability targets for fuel cell transit buses are presented in Table 1. These market-driven targets represent technical requirements needed to compete with alternative technologies. They do not represent expectations for the status of the technology in future years. Table 1. Performance, cost, and durability targets for fuel cell transit buses. Units 2012 Status 2016 Target Ultimate Target Bus Lifetime years/miles 5/100,000 1 12/500,000 12/500,000 Power Plant Lifetime 2,3 hours 12,000 18,000 25,000

226

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section V. Integrated Hydrogen and Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refineries HC hydrocarbon RFG reformulated gasoline NA North American NNA non-North American FG flared gas CNG compressed natural gas LNG liquefied natural gas LPG liquefied petroleum gas (propane) Et compressed hydrogen. The 40-foot buses will be built on a Van Hool (from Belgium) bus platform in a hybrid

227

Distribution Operations Guide to Enterprise Service Bus Suites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise integration is often the last crosscutting issue considered when a firm implements a large information system. Organizations frequently find that after a period of time they are in possession of what can be described as Accidental Architecture, often the result of the evolution of systems and point-to-point integration. These ramshackle systems become increasingly unwieldy and expensive to maintain. To avoid these problems, the implementation and use of an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) is a cri...

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

The systems edge of the Parameterized Linear Array with a Reconfigurable Pipelined Bus System (LARPBS(p)) optical bus parallel computing model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is about exploring the various systems related aspects pertinent in the recent Parameterized Linear Array with a Reconfigurable Pipelined Bus System (LARPBS(p)) model. The two principal features of the LARPBS(p) model is, firstly, its bridging ... Keywords: Optical bus, Parallel computing model

Brian J. D'Auriol

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hydrogen Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sensor for detectingquantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces...

230

Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure Learning Demonstration: Status and Results; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Article prepared for ECS Transactions that describes the results of DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Learning Demonstration Progress Report -- September 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the key results from the DOE Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration project. This project is also referred to as the fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure learning demonstration.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Thomas, H.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making Agency/Company /Organization: Federal Transit Administration, United States Department of Transportation Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.nbrti.org/docs/pdf/Characteristics_BRT_Decision-Making.pdf Cost: Free Language: English FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making Screenshot References: FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making[1] "The Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making (CBRT) report was prepared to provide transportation planners and decision makers with

234

Testing and Evaluation of Batteries for a Fuel Cell Powered Hybrid Bus  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory conducted performance characterization and life-cycle tests on various batteries to qualify them for use in a fuel cell/battery hybrid bus. On this bus, methanol-fueled, phosphoric acid fuel cells provide routine power needs, while batteries are used to store energy recovered during bus braking and to produce short-duration power during acceleration. Argonne carried out evaluation and endurance testing on several lead-acid and nickel/cadmium batteries selected by the bus developer as potential candidates for the bus application. Argonne conducted over 10,000 hours of testing, simulating more than 80,000 miles of fuel cell bus operation, for the nickel/cadmium battery, which was ultimately selected for use in the three hybrid buses built under the direction of H-Power Corp.

Miller, J.F.; Webster, C.E.; Tummillo, A.F.; DeLuca, W.H.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Hydrogen Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. ... These articles, of interest to the hydrogen community, can be viewed by clicking on the title. ...

236

Properties Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. PROPERTIES, ... For information on a PC database that includes hydrogen property information click here. ...

237

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Chicago team. On-board hydrogen storage is critical to the development of future high energy efficiency transportation technologies, such as hydrogen-powered fuel...

238

Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mark Paster Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology Program Hydrogen Production and Delivery Team Hydrogen Delivery Goal Hydrogen Delivery Goal Liquid H 2 & Chem. Carriers Gaseous Pipeline Truck Hydrides Liquid H 2 - Truck - Rail Other Carriers Onsite reforming Develop Develop hydrogen fuel hydrogen fuel delivery delivery technologies that technologies that enable the introduction and enable the introduction and long long - - term viability of term viability of hydrogen as an energy hydrogen as an energy carrier for transportation carrier for transportation and stationary power. and stationary power. Delivery Options * End Game - Pipelines - Other as needed * Breakthrough Hydrogen Carriers * Truck: HP Gas & Liquid Hydrogen

239

NREL Energy DataBus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL Energy DataBus NREL Energy DataBus (Redirected from Databus) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NREL's Energy Databus Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Resource Type: Dataset, Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/databus/index.html Country: United States Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/databus/index.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

NREL Energy DataBus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL Energy DataBus NREL Energy DataBus Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NREL's Energy Databus Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Resource Type: Dataset, Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/databus/index.html Country: United States Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/databus/index.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Design of Micro-Satellite AOCS Software Architecture Based on Software Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) software architecture is presented in this paper by using the concept of software bus. According to the analysis of the function flow and data flow of AOCS, its software components are partitioned clearly ... Keywords: AOCS software architecture, software bus, software components

Chen Jian; Yan Ruidong; Sun Zhaowei; Xu Guodong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Study on Energy-Saving Control Strategy of Idling Stop System for City Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel economy of city bus is poor, because the urban traffic is congested, the city bus is constantly in the idle condition resulting in fuel consumption is increasing. In order to improve the vehicle fuel economy and protect environment, the energy consumption ... Keywords: idling stop, energy-saving, control strategy, regenerative braking

Daxing Huang; Ren He

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Modeling shared cache and bus in multi-cores for timing analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timing analysis of concurrent programs running on multi-core platforms is currently an important problem. The key to solving this problem is to accurately model the timing effects of shared resources in multi-cores, namely shared cache and bus. In this ... Keywords: WCET, multi-core, shared bus, shared cache

Sudipta Chattopadhyay; Abhik Roychoudhury; Tulika Mitra

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Analysis of the impact of bus implemented EDCs on on-chip SSN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the impact of error detecting codes, implemented on an on-chip bus, on the on-chip simultaneous switching noise (SSN). First, we analyze in detail how SSN is impacted by different bus transitions, pointing out its dependency ...

Daniele Rossi; Carlo Steiner; Cecilia Metra

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ground Source Heat Pump Air Conditioner Monitoring Control System Design Based on CAN Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on CAN bus technology, chooses ST's ARM Cortex-M3 core, new generation STM32 embedded enhanced processor STM32F103 as main control chip, designs the overall structure of system, CAN functional block diagram, CAN communication software and so on. ... Keywords: CAN bus embedded STM32F103

Tong Gang; Li Ping

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Florida Hydrogen Initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

Block, David L

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joan Ogden, The Hope for Hydrogen, Issues in Science andand James S. Cannon. The Hydrogen Energy Transition: MovingHydrogen Highways BY TIMOTHY LIPMAN H 2 T H E S TAT E O F C

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

250

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

NREL Energy DataBus/Nonprofit Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nonprofit Partners Nonprofit Partners < NREL Energy DataBus Jump to: navigation, search Energy Databus Non-Profit Partners Nrellogo.jpg The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is the founder of the Energy Databus. NREL is located in Golden, Colorado. Become a Databus partner If you would like to register as a Databus partner, please send email to with the following information: Organization Name Organization Website Phone Contact Email Contact Name of Contact Description of what you support To be approved as a Databus partner, you must fill in a description that tells the community about what you are in the stages of developing that will work with Databus or what services/support you offer on or around Databus including products that might work with Databus through the Databus

252

TL5002 Provides DDR Bus Termination Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double data rate (DDR) bus termination power requirements bring new challenges to the power supply by requiring voltage tracking of a reference supply, requiring both sourcing and sinking current, and maintaining a high efficiency over a wide current range. This paper address these issues while presenting an example DDR design of 12 A of output current with voltage outputs between 0.9 V and 1.25 V. Issues and their solutions are provided for the power supply operating as a tradition buck power stage in the sourcing mode as well as for operating as a synchronous boost regulator in the sinking mode. Regulation and control loop characteristics of the examples are presented for both current sinking and sourcing modes of operation. Transient load response is also presented showing output voltage variation, as the current is transitioned from sourcing to sinking.

Robert Kollman; John Betten; Bang S. Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Hydrogen Filling Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water Districts land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hydrogen Filling Station  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water Districts land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, nonbinding, and nonlegal

256

The Overall Energy Balance of the Hydrogen Bus in Berkeley, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell buses are being tested in several cities in California as a clean, environmentally stations 8 millions Methane 30 coal/biomass gasification plants 8 millions Coal/sludge 10 nuclear water in the U.S. came from coal, with nuclear power being a distant second at 20.2 percent, and natural gas

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

257

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

258

Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Heisenberg Spin Bus as a Robust Transmission Line for Perfect State Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the protocol known as quantum state transfer for a strongly coupled antiferromagnetic spin chain or ring (acting as a spin bus), with weakly coupled external qubits. By treating the weak coupling as a perturbation, we find that perfect state transfer (PST) is possible when second order terms are included in the expansion. We also show that PST is robust against variations in the couplings along the spin bus and between the bus and the qubits. As evidence of the quantum interference which mediates PST, we show that the optimal time for PST can be smaller with larger qubit separations, for an even-size chain or ring.

Sangchul Oh; Lian-Ao Wu; Yun-Pil Shim; Mark Friesen; Xuedong Hu

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2009 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Delivery Printable Version 2009 Annual Progress Report III. Hydrogen Delivery This section of the 2009 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on hydrogen delivery. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Hydrogen Delivery Program Element Introduction, Monterey Gardiner, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 67 KB ) Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis (PDF 267 KB), Marianne Mintz, Argonne National Laboratory H2A Delivery Components Module (PDF 315 KB), Olga Sozinova, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania (PDF 1.3 MB), Eileen Schmura, Concurrent Technologies Corporation Oil-Free Centrifugal Hydrogen Compression Technology Demonstration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Code for Hydrogen Hydrogen Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;2 Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, Georgia August development · Charge from BPTCS to B31 Standards Committee for Hydrogen Piping/Pipeline code development · B31.12 Status & Structure · Hydrogen Pipeline issues · Research Needs · Where Do We Go From Here? #12;4 Code

262

Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measurements of * hydrogen solubility in volatile liquid solvents in both bulk form and nano-confined liquidscaffold composites. Demonstrate volumetric measurements of hydrogen *...

263

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2011 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handling Equipment Demonstration, Todd Ramsden, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Landfill Gas-to-Hydrogen, Shannon Baxter-Clemmons, South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

264

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2012 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handling Equipment Demonstration, Todd Ramsden, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Landfill Gas-to-Hydrogen, Shannon Baxter-Clemmons, South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

265

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Solicitation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet...

266

Secretary Bodman Tours LNG Powered City Bus in Seoul | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Powered City Bus in Seoul LNG Powered City Bus in Seoul Secretary Bodman Tours LNG Powered City Bus in Seoul December 13, 2006 - 9:46am Addthis Joins Secretary Gutierrez to Highlight Cooperation in Developing and Deploying Clean Energy Technologies SEOUL, KOREA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today joined U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez in Seoul, Korea to view a city bus and industrial equipment powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) built with U.S. technology. Secretaries Bodman and Gutierrez and senior Korean government officials highlighted the importance of diversifying to clean and efficient energy sources to increase global energy security. "South Korea and the United States are allies in advancing the use of cleaner, safer, and healthier clean energy technologies," Secretary Bodman

267

TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid Transit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid Transit Agency/Company /Organization: Transportation Research Board Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: www.trb.org/Main/Public/Blurbs/152921.aspx Country: United States, Australia, United Kingdom, France, Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador Cost: Free Northern America, Australia and New Zealand, Northern Europe, Western Europe, South America, South America, South America Language: English TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid Transit Screenshot

268

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... March 9, 2010 - 5:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program I have a love/hate relationship with buses. I love that they save me gasoline, are more efficient than driving a car, and reduce my greenhouse gas emissions. However, I hate them when they're running late! But there is one category of buses that I'm particularly fond of - those that run on alternative fuels. In fact, alternative fuel and advanced technology transit buses offer a number of health, environmental, and social benefits. As anyone who has walked behind a traditional diesel bus knows, the plume of black smoke from its tailpipe is both unpleasant and unhealthy. That

269

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... March 9, 2010 - 5:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program I have a love/hate relationship with buses. I love that they save me gasoline, are more efficient than driving a car, and reduce my greenhouse gas emissions. However, I hate them when they're running late! But there is one category of buses that I'm particularly fond of - those that run on alternative fuels. In fact, alternative fuel and advanced technology transit buses offer a number of health, environmental, and social benefits. As anyone who has walked behind a traditional diesel bus knows, the plume of black smoke from its tailpipe is both unpleasant and unhealthy. That

270

The Energy DataBus (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for particular sites and applications. Free Software for Open-Source Development The Energy DataBus uses open-source software, which not only saves the high cost of licensed...

271

Field Demonstration of a 24-kV Superconducting Cable at Detroit Edison: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following up the successful testing of a complete 50 m, 115 kV high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable system prototype, EPRI, Pirelli Power Cables and Systems, the Department of Energy, Detroit Edison, and American Superconductor Corporation undertook a project to design, install, and operate a 24 kV HTS power cable at Detroit Edison's Frisbie substation to serve customer load. The demonstration cable circuit ran approximately 120 m between the 24 kV bus distribution bus and a 120 kV-24 kV tr...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing Mark Leavitt Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide, Inc. August 11, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information History of Innovations... Announced breakthrough in all-composite lightweight, high capacity, low-cost fuel storage technologies. * Developed a series of robust, OEM compatible electronic control products. Developed H 2 storage system for SunLine Tran-sit Hythane® bus. Awarded patent for integrated module including in-tank regulator * Developed high efficiency H 2 fuel storage systems for DOE Future Truck programs Developed H 2 storage and metering system for Toyota's FCEV platform. First to certify 10,000 psi systems in Japan

273

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen Production Argonne researchers are studying thermochemical cycles to determine their potential...

274

Hydrogen Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These...

275

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

276

Hydrogen Radialysis  

INL scientists have invented a process of forming chemical compositions, such as a hydrides which can provide a source of hydrogen. The process exposes the chemical composition decaying radio-nuclides which provide the energy to with a hydrogen source ...

277

Hydrogen Safety  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

278

Hydrogen wishes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen Wishes, presented at MIT's Center for Advanced Visual Studies, explores the themes of wishes and peace. It dramatizes the intimacy and power of transforming one's breath and vocalized wishes into a floating sphere, a bubble charged with hydrogen. ...

Winslow Burleson; Paul Nemirovsky; Dan Overholt

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas EA-1846:...

280

Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration: Spring 2008 Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation prepared for the 2008 National Hydrogen Association Conference that describes the spring 2008 results for DOE's Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

282

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest...

283

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of...

284

Highly Efficient, 5-kW CHP Fuel Cells Demonstrating Durability and Economic Value in Residential and Light Commercial Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Petrecky Plug Power 968 Albany Shaker Road Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 782-7700 ext: 1977 Email: james_petrecky@plugpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Vendor: ClearEdge Power, Hillsboro, OR Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 15, 2013 Objectives Quantify the durability of proton exchange membrane * (PEM) fuel cell systems in residential and light commercial combined heat and power (CHP) applications in California. Optimize system performance though testing of multiple * high-temperature units through collection of field data.

285

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Energy Station Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Energy Station Validation Hydrogen Energy Station Validation Project Summary Full Title: Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station Previous Title(s): Validation of an Integrated System for a Hydrogen-Fueled Power Park Project ID: 128 Principal Investigator: Dan Tyndall Keywords: Power parks; co-production; hydrogen; electricity; digester gas Purpose Demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell (HTFC) designed to produce power and hydrogen from digester gas. Performer Principal Investigator: Dan Tyndall Organization: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Address: 7201 Hamilton Blvd. Allentown, PA 18195 Telephone: 610-481-6055 Email: tyndaldw@airproducts.com Period of Performance Start: September 2001 End: March 2009

286

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Permitting Hydrogen Facilities Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy The objective of this U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Permitting Web site is to help local permitting officials deal with proposed hydrogen fueling stations, fuel cell installations for telecommunications backup power, and other hydrogen projects. Resources for local permitting officials who are looking to address project proposals include current citations for hydrogen fueling stations and a listing of setback requirements on the Alternative Fuels & Advanced Vehicle Data Center Web site. In addition, this overview of telecommunications fuel cell use and an animation that demonstrates telecommunications site layout using hydrogen fuel cells for backup power should provide helpful

287

Hydrogenation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

Friedman, J.; Oberg, C.L.; Russell, L.H.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: News Archives - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 January February March April May June July August September October November December January 10 Questions for a Materials Scientist: Brian Larsen DOE Fuel Cell Bus Analysis Finds Fuel Economy to be up to Two Times Higher than Diesel DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Releases 2012 Annual Progress Report Rescheduled for January 17: DOE Webinar on Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings February Automotive Fuel Cell Cost and Durability Target Request For Information Issued Energy Department Announces New Investment to Advance Cost-Competitive Hydrogen Fuel Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Webinar February 22: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols March Energy Department Study Examines Potential to Reduce Transportation Petroleum Use and Carbon Emissions

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Energy Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Energy Plan Hydrogen Energy Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Energy Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Energy Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Energy Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Energy Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Energy Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Energy Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Energy Plan The Minnesota Department of Commerce (DOC), in coordination with the Department of Administration (DOA) and the Pollution Control Agency, must identify opportunities for demonstrating the use of hydrogen fuel cells

291

Hydrogen Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ASHRAE 62.1, 7 air changes per hour, 100 ... I, Division II, Group B: testing and research laboratory; ... Planning Guidance for Hydrogen Projects as a ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen...

293

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Companies in Hydrogen Sector List of Hydrogen Incentives Hydrogen Energy Data Book Retrieved from...

294

Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas fueled school bus: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents work conducted under Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Project 03-6871, ``Development of an Ultra-Safe and Low-Emission Dedicated Alternative Fuel School Bus.`` The project was sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Subcontract No. ZCF-5-13519-01. This report documents Phase 3 -- Integration and Phase 4 -- Demonstration and serves as the final report for this project. Phase 1 -- Systems Design and Phase 2 -- Prototype Hardware Development were documented in NREL publications TP-425-7609 and TP-425-2 1081, respectively. Several significant areas of work are summarized in this report. Integration of the engine technologies developed under Phase 2 into a production Deere 8.1-L, spark-ignition compressed natural gas engine is detailed, including information on the engine and control system modifications that were made. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions results verifying the ultra-low emissions output of this engine are also included. The informal project goal of producing oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions less than or equal to 1.0 g/bhp-hr over the FTP heavy-duty engine cycle was attained. In addition, a test run that resulted in less than one half of the Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle limit for NO{sub x} plus non-methane hydrocarbons was obtained. These results were for engine-out (no catalyst) emissions. Results using a catalyst produced very low formaldehyde emissions and virtually zero carbon monoxide and particulate matter emissions. Following these excellent results, a duplicate engine was assembled and integrated into the prototype ultra-safe school bus, the Envirobus 2000. Many of the new and modified subsystems developed during this project for the engine are considered strong candidates for inclusion into the production Deere 8.1-L gas engine in the near future.

Kubesh, J.T. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Learning Demonstration Interim Progress Report -- July 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses key results based on data through December 2009 from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. The report serves to help transfer knowledge and lessons learned within various parts of DOE's hydrogen program, as well as externally to other stakeholders. It is the fourth such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, and April 2008.

Wipke, K.; Spirk, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hydrogen Bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Study on Intelligent Control Strategy of Battery-Electric Bus Based on the Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How to use the lithium-ion power battery effectively, how to improve the discharging efficiency and the cycle-life of the power battery is a hotspot of research in battery-electric vehicle(BEV) field. The fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method is used ... Keywords: battery-electric bus, CAN-bus, control strategy, fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method

Lin Cheng; Zhou Hui; Sun Fengchun; Nan Jinrui

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Field Demonstration of a 24-kV Superconducting Cable at Detroit Edison  

SciTech Connect

Customer acceptance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable technology requires a substantial field demonstration illustrating both the system's technical capabilities and its suitability for installation and operation within the utility environment. In this project, the world's first underground installation of an HTS cable using existing ductwork, a 120 meter demonstration cable circuit was designed and installed between the 24 kV bus distribution bus and a 120 kV-24 kV transformer at Detroit Edison's Frisbie substation. The system incorporated cables, accessories, a refrigeration system, and control instrumentation. Although the system was never put in operation because of problems with leaks in the cryostat, the project significantly advanced the state-of-the-art in the design and implementation of Warm Dielectric cable systems in substation applications. Lessons learned in this project are already being incorporated in several ongoing demonstration projects.

Kelley, Nathan; Corsaro, Pietro

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Hydrogen: Helpful Links & Contacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Helpful Links & Contacts. Helpful Links. Hydrogen Information, Website. ... Contacts for Commercial Hydrogen Measurement. ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Several different approaches are being pursued to develop on-board hydrogen storage systems for light-duty vehicle applications. The different approaches have different characteristics, such as: the thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved requirements for the materials and energy interfaces between the storage system and the fuel supply system on one hand, and the fuel user on the other Other storage system design and operating parameters influence the projected system costs as well. Argonne researchers are developing thermodynamic, kinetic, and engineering models of the various hydrogen storage systems to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on these approaches and to evaluate their potential to meet the DOE targets for on-board applications. The DOE targets for 2015 include a system gravimetric capacity of 1.8 kWh/kg (5.5 wt%) and a system volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L (40 g/L). We then use these models to identify significant component and performance issues, and evaluate alternative system configurations and design and operating parameters.

302

Optimal partitioned fault-tolerant bus layout for reducing power in nanometer designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As technology scales down to nanometer dimensions, coupling capacitances between adjacent bus wires grow rapidly, and have a significant impact on power consumption and signal integrity of an integrated circuit. As buses are major components of a design, ... Keywords: coupling capacitance, fault-tolerant, low power, reliability

Shanq-Jang Ruan; Edwin Naroska; Chun-Chih Chen

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fourth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from April 2008 through October 2008. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous three evaluation reports.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

Murty, Balarama Vempaty (West Bloomfield, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Orbital disc insulator for SF.sub.6 gas-insulated bus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An insulator for supporting a high voltage conductor within a gas-filled grounded housing consists of radially spaced insulation rings fitted to the exterior of the bus and the interior of the grounded housing respectively, and the spaced rings are connected by trefoil type rings which are integrally formed with the spaced insulation rings.

Bacvarov, Dosio C. (Greensburg, PA); Gomarac, Nicholas G. (West Newton, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

IAC-09.C3.2.8 A REDUNDANT POWER BUS FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The idea behind the proposed Power Bus is to have power conversion (from solar panels) and power storage") which contain, each: a solar panel; energy storage batteries with the corresponding power converters in a distributed way. For instance: i) accumulating the power from all solar panels towards the load(s); ii

307

Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fuzzy Approach to Critical Bus Ranking under Normal and Line Outage Contingencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of critical or weak buses for a given operating condition is an important task in the load dispatch centre. It has become more vital in view of the threat of voltage instability leading to voltage collapse. This paper presents a fuzzy approach for ranking critical buses in a power system under normal and network contingencies based on Line Flow index and voltage profiles at load buses. The Line Flow index determines the maximum load that is possible to be connected to a bus in order to maintain stability before the system reaches its bifurcation point. Line Flow index (LF index) along with voltage profiles at the load buses are represented in Fuzzy Set notation. Further they are evaluated using fuzzy rules to compute Criticality Index. Based on this index, critical buses are ranked. The bus with highest rank is the weakest bus as it can withstand a small amount of load before causing voltage collapse. The proposed method is tested on Five Bus Test System.

Shankar, Shobha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Optimized Parameter Matching Method of Plug-in Series Hybrid Electric Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research attempts to deal with the coupling-influence among different powertrain parameters in the parameter matching process of Plug-in Series Hybrid Electric Bus(PSHEB), the research target is a PSHEB (with no gearbox) which is currently under ... Keywords: Plug-in, hybrid electric vehicle, parameter matching, Matlab simulation

Kai Xu, Bin Qiu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility, hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated includes a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer, required for conducting these tests, as well as a heavy

Lee, Dongwon

311

Investigating the electric power distribution system (EPDS) bus voltage in the presence of distributed generation (DG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the Electric Power Distribution System (EPDS) bus voltage in the presence of Distributed Generation (DG). Distribution Company's (Discos) planner endeavor to develop new planning strategies for their network in order to serve ... Keywords: PSCAD, distributed generation, electric power distribution system, islanding, power quality, voltage stability

Hasham Khan; Mohammad Ahmad Choudhry; Tahir Mahmood; Aamir Hanif

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Extensions to wireless M-Bus protocol for smart metering and smart grid application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart metering and smart grid applications are rapidly finding their place in the market in order to improve the provisioning process efficiency of electricity, gas, water and heat. The usage of communication technologies is a major stepping stone for ... Keywords: optimization, smart grid, smart metering, wireless M-Bus

Axel Sikora; Pancra Villalonga; Klaus Landwehr

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2010 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Delivery Printable Version 2010 Annual Progress Report III. Hydrogen Delivery This section of the 2010 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on hydrogen delivery. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Hydrogen Delivery Sub-Program Overview, Sara Dillich, DOE Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Marianne Mintz, Argonne National Laboratory H2A Delivery Analysis and H2A Delivery Components Model, Olga Sozinova, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Oil-Free Centrifugal Hydrogen Compression Technology Demonstration, Hooshang Heshmat Development of a Centrifugal Hydrogen Pipeline Gas Compressor, Francis Di Bella, Concepts NREC Advanced Hydrogen Liquefaction Process, Joseph Schwartz, Praxair, Inc. Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier, John Barclay, Prometheus

315

Hydrogen ICE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD Hydrogen ICE 1 Conversion Vehicle Specifications Engine: 6.0 L V8 Fuel Capacity: 10.5 GGE Nominal Tank Pressure: 5,000 psi Seatbelt Positions: Five...

316

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

317

Hydrogen and OUr Energy Future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, President George W. Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to accelerate the research and development of hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies that would enable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to reach the commercial market in the 2020 timeframe. The widespread use of hydrogen can reduce our dependence on imported oil and benefit the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutant emissions that affect our air quality. The Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, reinforces Federal government support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Title VIII, also called the 'Spark M. Matsunaga Hydrogen Act of 2005' authorizes more than $3.2 billion for hydrogen and fuel cell activities intended to enable the commercial introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2020, consistent with the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. Numerous other titles in the Act call for related tax and market incentives, new studies, collaboration with alternative fuels and renewable energy programs, and broadened demonstrations--clearly demonstrating the strong support among members of Congress for the development and use of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. In 2006, the President announced the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI) to accelerate research on technologies with the potential to reduce near-term oil use in the transportation sector--batteries for hybrid vehicles and cellulosic ethanol--and advance activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The AEI also supports research to reduce the cost of electricity production technologies in the stationary sector such as clean coal, nuclear energy, solar photovoltaics, and wind energy.

Rick Tidball; Stu Knoke

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hydrogen production costs -- A survey  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

319

Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials. Summary: ... Hydrogen is promoted as petroleum replacement in the Hydrogen Economy. ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Early Market TRL/MRL Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011a. The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan - An Integrated Strategic Plan for the Research, Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

322

Hydrogen Future Act of 1996  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4-271-OCT. 9, 1996 4-271-OCT. 9, 1996 HYDROGEN FUTURE ACT OF 1996 110 STAT. 3304 PUBLIC LAW 104-271-OCT. 9, 1996 Oct. 9, 1996 [H.R. 4138] Hydrogen Future Act of 1996. 42 USC 12401 note. 42 USC 7238 note. Public Law 104-271 104th Congress An Act To authorize the hydrogen research, development, and demonstration programs of the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the ''Hydrogen Future Act of 1996''. SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS. For purposes of titles II and III- (1) the term ''Department'' means the Department of Energy; and (2) the term ''Secretary'' means the Secretary of Energy. TITLE I-HYDROGEN SEC. 101. PURPOSES AND DEFINITIONS.

323

Storing Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hydrogen Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A H2A: Hydrogen Analysis Margaret K. Mann DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. H2A Charter * H2A mission: Improve the transparency and consistency of approach to analysis, improve the understanding of the differences among analyses, and seek better validation from industry. * H2A was supported by the HFCIT Program H2A History * First H2A meeting February 2003 * Primary goal: bring consistency & transparency to hydrogen analysis * Current effort is not designed to pick winners - R&D portfolio analysis - Tool for providing R&D direction * Current stage: production & delivery analysis - consistent cost methodology & critical cost analyses * Possible subsequent stages: transition analysis, end-point

326

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

328

The Transition to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prospects for Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure,and James S. Cannon. The Hydrogen Energy Transition: Movingof Energy, National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap, November 2002.

Ogden, Joan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Hydrogen SRNL Connection  

hydrogen storage. Why is Savannah River National Laboratory conducting hydrogen research and development? ... Both the Department of Energys hydrogen ...

330

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

331

National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap...

332

National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen...

333

Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2007 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Printable Version 2007 Annual Progress Report IV. Hydrogen Storage This section of the 2007 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on hydrogen storage. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Hydrogen Storage Sub-Program Overview, Sunita Satyapal, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 729 KB) A. Metal Hydrides-Independent Projects Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity, Daniel A. Mosher, United Technologies Research Center (PDF 475 KB) Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods, David A. Lesch, UOP LLC (PDF 529 KB) High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Complex Compound Hydrides, Daniel A. Mosher, United Technologies Research

335

Hydrogen Safety Training for First Responders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies is emerging in the U.S. through vehicle demonstration programs and early deployments of fuel cells for onsite power generation, materials handling, and other applications. To help first responders prepare for hydrogen and fuel cell use in their communities, the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has developed hydrogen safety training for first responders. A web-based awareness-level course, 'Introduction to Hydrogen Safety for First Responders,' launched in 2007, is available at http://hydrogen.pnl.gov/FirstResponders/. Approximately 17,000 first responders have accessed the online training.

Fassbender, Linda L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Wide Area and Distributed Hydrogen Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advances in optical sensors show promise for the development of new wide area monitoring and distributed optical network hydrogen detection systems. Optical hydrogen sensing technologies reviewed here are: 1) open path Raman scattering systems, 2) back scattering from chemically treated solid polymer matrix optical fiber sensor cladding; and 3) shlieren and shearing interferometry imaging. Ultrasonic sensors for hydrogen release detection are also reviewed. The development status of these technologies and their demonstrated results in sensor path length, low hydrogen concentration detection ability, and response times are described and compared to the corresponding status of hydrogen spot sensor network technologies.

Zalosh, Robert G.; Barilo, Nick F.

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home  

SciTech Connect

This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Operational Demonstration Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Demonstration Program Operational Demonstration Program Operational Demonstration Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate $500,000 Program Info Funding Source CEFIA Start Date 2005 State Connecticut Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount $150,000 - $500,000 Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority This program is currently closed. Applications were due in February 2012.

339

The potential for bus rapid transit to promote transit oriented development : an analysis of BRTOD in Ottawa, Brisbane, and Pittsburgh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the conditions under which bus rapid transit (BRT) can promote transit oriented development (TOD). At a time when cities throughout the U.S. are searching for methods to reduce road congestion and limit ...

Judy, Meredith H. (Meredith Hampton)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

All Other Editions Are Obsolete U.S. Department of Energy Shuttle Bus Passenger List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

511.1 511.1 (02-94) All Other Editions Are Obsolete U.S. Department of Energy Shuttle Bus Passenger List Date: Time: Bus Number: Driver's Signature: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Shuttle operates Express between the Germantown Building and the Washington Office (Forrestal Building). ICC regulations prohibits en-route stops. The information being collected below is for the purpose of identifying individuals utilizing DOE Shuttle service. It is not retrievable by a personal identifier and is, therefore, not being kept in a Privacy Act system of records. Official Government Travelers I certify that travel on this trip is for Official Government business. (Please print all information) Name: (First/Last) Office Symbol or Agency Duty Station 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Multilevel-Dc-Bus Inverter For Providing Sinusoidal And Pwm Electrical Machine Voltages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A circuit for controlling an ac machine comprises a full bridge network of commutation switches which are connected to supply current for a corresponding voltage phase to the stator windings, a plurality of diodes, each in parallel connection to a respective one of the commutation switches, a plurality of dc source connections providing a multi-level dc bus for the full bridge network of commutation switches to produce sinusoidal voltages or PWM signals, and a controller connected for control of said dc source connections and said full bridge network of commutation switches to output substantially sinusoidal voltages to the stator windings. With the invention, the number of semiconductor switches is reduced to m+3 for a multi-level dc bus having m levels. A method of machine control is also disclosed.

Su, Gui-Jia (Knoxville, TN)

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SunLine Transit Agency SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report L. Eudy and K. Chandler Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-57560 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report L. Eudy and K. Chandler Prepared under Task No. HT12.8210 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-57560 January 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

343

Data Analysis of Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation about early fuel cell markets, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and its role in data analysis and demonstrations, and composite data products, and results reported to multiple stakeholders.

Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

344

Data Analysis of Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about early fuel cell markets, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and its role in data analysis and demonstrations, and composite data products, and results reported to multiple stakeholders.

Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

Murty, Balarama Vempaty (West Bloomfield, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The St. Louis Metro Bodiesel Transit Bus Evaluation project is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between NREL and the National Biodiesel Board to evaluate the extended in-use performance of buses operating on B20 fuel. The objective of this research project is to compare B20 and ultra-low sulfur diesel buses in terms of fuel economy, veicles maintenance, engine performance, component wear, and lube oil performance.

Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.; Lammert, M.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

348

{open_quotes}Secure Bus{close_quotes} disturbance-free power at the utility substation level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 18 months Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), El Camino Real Engineering, Inc. (CRE), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have worked on the development of disturbance-free power at the medium voltage substation level. The work resulted in the Secure Bus concept, a system in which a medium voltage bus in a substation is immune to power outages and voltage sags on the utility source. The Secure Bus voltage is also immune to voltage sags resulting from faults on any distribution feeder connected to the bus. The Secure Bus concept originated from work conducted to improve power quality for large high-tech manufacturing facilities, in particular for large semiconductor manufacturing plants. For the demands on quality power of a modern facility conventional equipment is not adequate for protecting the end user. For example, the operation of conventional vacuum breakers during short circuit conditions on a feeder circuit, requiring 3 to 5 cycles for breaker opening, does not allow for fast enough current interruption to avoid a voltage dip on the main bus. A sever voltage sag could result in a shut down of sensitive equipment being supplied by the other feeder circuits, which are connected to the main bus. The circumvent the problem, a fast breaker was introduced which interrupts the short circuit before the current causes a significant voltage disturbance. To make the bus immune also to power disturbances caused by power outages, energy storage is introduced to provide the necessary energy back-up in case the primary source is not available.

Boenig, H.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jones, W.H. [El Camino Real Engineering, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Group l 19 l R e n e w a b l e Hydrogen Table 1: U.S.International Renewable Hydrogen Demonstration Projects (CONTINUED) U.S. ProjectS Hydrogen Production from

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Set up DataBus as a system service? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Set up DataBus as a system service? Set up DataBus as a system service? Home > Groups > Databus What is the recommended way to configure a system service for DataBus? My old-skool approach would be to write a script in /etc/init.d/ . Are there specific recommendations or requirements for the start & stop commmands? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 6 August, 2013 - 14:33 1 answer Points: 0 The start command would be just like the runProduction.sh script found in databus/webapp directory though you probably want to log the pid. echo $! > pid.file and the stop script can use the pid to kill {pid} using the pid from that file. The webservers are stateless so killing them is is not a big deal...there is nothing they need to cleanup. Deanhiller on 7 August, 2013 - 06:14 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

351

Set up DataBus as a system service? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Set up DataBus as a system service? Set up DataBus as a system service? Home > Groups > Databus What is the recommended way to configure a system service for DataBus? My old-skool approach would be to write a script in /etc/init.d/ . Are there specific recommendations or requirements for the start & stop commmands? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 6 August, 2013 - 14:33 1 answer Points: 0 The start command would be just like the runProduction.sh script found in databus/webapp directory though you probably want to log the pid. echo $! > pid.file and the stop script can use the pid to kill {pid} using the pid from that file. The webservers are stateless so killing them is is not a big deal...there is nothing they need to cleanup. Deanhiller on 7 August, 2013 - 06:14 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

352

The effect of magnetic field on optimal design of a rigid-bus substation  

SciTech Connect

Substation rigid-bus design involves electrical, mechanical, and structural considerations. In order to integrate these considerations into one document, IEEE in cooperation with ANSI has issued a comprehensive guide for design of substation rigid-bus systems. The design process based on this guide involves substantial manual effort to integrate all types of calculations. This is particularly evident when the computations have to be repeated several times in order to arrive at a more economic design. In an earlier paper the authors presented a mathematical model and computer program which automates the design process. Recently there has been concern expressed about the possible biological effects of low level magnetic fields. In view of this, a new design constraint taking into account the limits imposed on the magnitude of the magnetic field can be added to the design guidelines. In this paper the authors introduce such a constraint and they show how the magnitude of allowable magnetic field at a specified distance from the station buses affects the optimal design of a rigid bus substation.

Anders, G.J.; Ford, G.L.; Horrocks, D.J. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hydrogen Generation From Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale (100-500 kg H2/day) electrolysis is an important step in increasing the use of hydrogen as fuel. Until there is a large population of hydrogen fueled vehicles, the smaller production systems will be the most cost-effective. Performing conceptual designs and analyses in this size range enables identification of issues and/or opportunities for improvement in approach on the path to 1500 kg H2/day and larger systems. The objectives of this program are to establish the possible pathways to cost effective larger Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis systems and to identify areas where future research and development efforts have the opportunity for the greatest impact in terms of capital cost reduction and efficiency improvements. System design and analysis was conducted to determine the overall electrolysis system component architecture and develop a life cycle cost estimate. A design trade study identified subsystem components and configurations based on the trade-offs between system efficiency, cost and lifetime. Laboratory testing of components was conducted to optimize performance and decrease cost, and this data was used as input to modeling of system performance and cost. PEM electrolysis has historically been burdened by high capital costs and lower efficiency than required for large-scale hydrogen production. This was known going into the program and solutions to these issues were the focus of the work. The program provided insights to significant cost reduction and efficiency improvement opportunities for PEM electrolysis. The work performed revealed many improvement ideas that when utilized together can make significant progress towards the technical and cost targets of the DOE program. The cell stack capital cost requires reduction to approximately 25% of todays technology. The pathway to achieve this is through part count reduction, use of thinner membranes, and catalyst loading reduction. Large-scale power supplies are available today that perform in a range of efficiencies, >95%, that are suitable for the overall operational goals. The balance of plant scales well both operationally and in terms of cost becoming a smaller portion of the overall cost equation as the systems get larger. Capital cost reduction of the cell stack power supplies is achievable by modifying the system configuration to have the cell stacks in electrical series driving up the DC bus voltage, thereby allowing the use of large-scale DC power supply technologies. The single power supply approach reduces cost. Elements of the cell stack cost reduction and efficiency improvement work performed in the early stage of the program is being continued in subsequent DOE sponsored programs and through internal investment by Proton. The results of the trade study of the 100 kg H2/day system have established a conceptual platform for design and development of a next generation electrolyzer for Proton. The advancements started by this program have the possibility of being realized in systems for the developing fueling markets in 2010 period.

Steven Cohen; Stephen Porter; Oscar Chow; David Henderson

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

354

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

355

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government interests, a variety of vendors, and numerous utilities. Keywords: Hydrogen production, natural gas, costs Purpose Assess progress toward the 2005 DOE Hydrogen...

356

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Futures Simulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen scenarios will affect carbon and other environmental effluents and U.S. oil import requirements Outputs: Delivered hydrogen costs (cost per gallon of gas...

357

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project ID: 273 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

358

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project ID: 268 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

359

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Electrolytic Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Principal Investigator Projects by Date U.S. Department of Energy Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Project Summary Full Title: Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production:...

360

NETL: Major Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstrations performed to date have made significant contributions related to environmental performance and efficiency, the greatest challenges may lie ahead from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ???¢????????real-world???¢??????? retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation???¢????????s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products???¢???????? Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user???¢????????s fueling experience.

Edward C. Heydorn

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Hydrogen program summary Fiscal Year 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual program summary provides stakeholders within the hydrogen community with a snapshop of important advances that have occurred in the National Hydrogen Program over the fiscal year, including industry interactions and cooperation. The document will also be used to encourage additional potential industrial partners to join the Hydrogen Program Team. Fiscal Year 1994 marked a turning point for the Hydrogen Program, with a budget that grew significantly. The focus of the program was broadened to include development of hydrogen production technologies using municipal solid waste and biomass, in addition to an increased emphasis on industrial involvement and near-term demonstration projects. In order to maintain its near- and long-term balance, the Hydrogen Program will continue with basic, fundamental research that provides the long-term, high-risk, high-payoff investment in hydrogen as an energy carrier.

Not Available

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

SciTech Connect

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S. (Tampa, FL); Niemann, Michael U. (Venice, FL); Goswami, D. Yogi (Tampa, FL); Stefanakos, Elias K. (Tampa, FL)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

CAES Demonstration Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

CAES Demonstration Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Renewable Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its efforts to promote hydrogen as an alternative transportation fuel, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) is implementing a renewable hydrogen fueling demonstration project. The project involves hydrogen production by electrolysis using NYPA's large renewable hydropower generating resources. An earlier EPRI report (1014383) provides background and results from a preliminary engineering and feasibility study. This report provides an update on the project and the refueling station bid and procurement p...

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hydrogen Sensor Testing, Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Factsheet describing the hydrogen sensor testing laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Not Available

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Solar energy demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The solar heating demonstration system at the DOE cafeteria at Grand Junction, Colorado, is briefly described. The system will supply an estimated 40 percent of the energy required for domestic hot water and building heat. (WHK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Montana ICTL Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana ICTL Demonstration Program Montana ICTL Demonstration Program Background The Department of Energy (DOE) funds basic and applied research toward the development of technologies that will allow the U.S. to depend to a greater extent on renewable fuels, especially those derived from domestic sources of energy. Coal is one of the nation's most abundant domestic energy resources; however, conventional technologies using coal release large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO

371

successfully demonstrated the separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent of the c arbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a pulve rized coal plant. In t he ARRA-funded project, Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR) and its partners tested the Polaris(tm) membrane system, which uses a CO 2 -selective polymeric membrane material and module to capture CO 2 from a plant's flue gas. Since the Polaris(tm) membranes

372

Hydrogen as a fuel  

SciTech Connect

A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Completed Learning Demonstration Composite Data Products as of December 1, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These public technical analysis results from DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project are generated in the form of composite data products.

Wipke, K.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration: Study of Factors Affecting Fuel Cell Degradation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conference paper prepared for the FuelCell2008 conference describing the results of the DOE Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Storage Printable Version Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power...

376

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

377

Development of a Physics of Failure Model and Quantitative Assessment of the Fire Fatality Risk of Compressed Natural Gas Bus Cylinders.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Title of Dissertation: DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSICS OF FAILURE MODEL AND QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE FIRE FATALITY RISKS OF COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS BUS CYLINDERS The (more)

Chamberlain, Samuel Seamore

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

Zaleski, T M

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

TRUEX hot demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Introduction to hydrogen energy  

SciTech Connect

The book comprises the following papers: primary energy sources suitable for hydrogen production, thermochemical and electrolytic production of hydrogen from water, hydrogen storage and transmission methods, hydrogen-oxygen utilization devices, residential and industrial utilization of energy, industrial utilization of hydrogen, use of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation, an assessment of hydrogen-fueled navy ships, mechanisms and strategies of market penetration for hydrogen, and fossil/hydrogen energy mix and population control. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). (LK)

Veziroglu, T.N. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Life Cycle Inventory of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel for Use in an Urban Bus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SR-580-24089 UC Category 1503 SR-580-24089 UC Category 1503 Life Cycle Inventory of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel for Use in an Urban Bus A Joint Study Sponsored by: U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Energy Final Report May 1998 NOTICE NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees,

383

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

Yang, Ralph T. (Tonawanda, NY); Smol, Robert (East Patchogue, NY); Farber, Gerald (Elmont, NY); Naphtali, Leonard M. (Washington, DC)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Integrated Agricultural Technologies Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major challenges currently face California's agricultural community. Increasingly stringent environmental and regulatory controls mandate changes in the use and disposal of agricultural chemicals, require the more aggressive management of farm wastes, and impose new responsibilities for water use. This program demonstrated a number of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies designed to address these issues.

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

Building Mashups by Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latest generation of WWW tools and services enables Web users to generate applications that combine content from multiple sources. This type of Web application is referred to as a mashup. Many of the tools for constructing mashups rely on a widget ... Keywords: Mashups, information integration, programming by demonstration

Rattapoom Tuchinda; Craig A. Knoblock; Pedro Szekely

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

MSW to hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the preparation and conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen by gasification and purification. The laboratory focus will be on pretreatment of MSW waste in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. Initial pretreatment approaches include (1) hydrothermal processing at saturated conditions around 300 C with or without chemical/pH modification and (2) mild dry pyrolysis with subsequent incorporation into an appropriate slurry. Initial experiments will be performed with newspaper, a major constituent of MSW, prior to actual work with progressively more representative MSW samples. Overall system modeling with special attention to energy efficiency and waste water handling of the pretreatment process will provide overall guidance to critical scale-up parameters. Incorporation of additional feed stock elements (e.g., heavy oil) will be evaluated subject to the heating value, viscosity, and economics of the MSW optimal slurry for hydrogen production. Ultimate scale-up of the optimized process will provide sufficient material for demonstration in the Texaco pilot facility; additional long term objectives include more detailed economic analysis of the process as a function of technical parameters and development of a measure/control system to ensure slagging ash for variable MSW feed stocks. Details of the overall project plan and initial experimental and modeling results are presented.

Pasternak, A.D.; Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B.; Wallman, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Richter, G.N.; Wolfenbarger, J.K. [Texaco Inc., Montebello, CA (United States). Montebello Research Lab.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Long-term commercialization approach with first products first Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Washington, DC Glenn Rambach August 11, 2011 Potential market area for fuel cells (or other power plants). Defined by peak power vs. cost per unit power capacity (W vs. $/kW) for typical applications currently satisfied by legacy technologies. Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable Educational device Retail A Less difficult Less difficult (smaller units) (cost tolerant market) Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable Educational device Retail A Range of application size and specific cost that all can be commercially satisfied

389

Potential Role of Exergy in Analysis of Hydrogen Infrastructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the potential role of exergy (second-law) analysis, as a complementary tool for economic assessments of hydrogen infrastructures.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Webinar (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel...

391

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2008 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards, Gary Nakarado, Regulatory Logic LLC (PDF 84 KB) IEA Hydrogen Task 18: Evaluation of Integrated Demonstration Systems, Susan Schoenung, Longitude 122 West, Inc. (PDF 169...

392

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2006 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDF 597 KB) IEA Hydrogen Task 18: Evaluation of Integrated Demonstration Systems, Susan Schoenung, Longitude 122 West, Inc. (PDF 371 KB) Management of International Energy...

393

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2007 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDF 496 KB) IEA Hydrogen Task 18: Evaluation of Integrated Demonstration Systems, Susan M. Schoenung, Longitude 122 West, Inc. (PDF 343 KB) Global Technical Regulations,...

394

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

Not Available

1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO and NO emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

Not Available

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

AVNG system demonstration  

SciTech Connect

An attribute measurement system (AMS) measures a number of unclassified attributes of potentially classified material. By only displaying these unclassified results as red or green lights, the AMS protects potentially classified information while still generating confidence in the measurement result. The AVNG implementation that we describe is an AMS built by RFNC - VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. To provide additional confidence, the AVNG was designed with two modes of operation. In the secure mode, potentially classified measurements can be made with only the simple red light/green light display. In the open mode, known unclassified material can be measured with complete display of the information collected from the radiation detectors. The AVNG demonstration, which occurred in Sarov, Russia in June 2009 for a joint US/Russian audience, included exercising both modes of AVNG operation using a number of multi-kg plutonium sources. In addition to describing the demonstration, we will show photographs and/or video taken of AVNG operation.

Thron, Jonathan Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kondratov, Sergey [VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [VNIIEF; Razinkov, Sergey [VNIIEF

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Automatic lighting controls demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Nucla CFB Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

400

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Basics Hydrogen is a clean-burning fuel, and when combined with oxygen in a fuel cell, it produces heat and electricity with only water vapor as a by-product. But hydrogen...

402

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background: The photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen has drawn properties In order to develop better materials for solar energy applications, in-depth photoelectrochemical simulated solar irradiance. Hydrogen production experiments are conducted in a sealed aluminum cell

Raftery, Dan

403

The Hype About Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: The Hype About Hydrogen By Joseph J. Romm ReviewedJ. Romm. The Hype About Hydrogen. Washington, DC: IslandEmissions. The Hype About Hydrogen describes in detail what

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

405

Statistical Characterization of School Bus Drive Cycles Collected via Onboard Logging Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to characterize the dynamics typical of school bus operation, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers set out to gather in-use duty cycle data from school bus fleets operating across the country. Employing a combination of Isaac Instruments GPS/CAN data loggers in conjunction with existing onboard telemetric systems resulted in the capture of operating information for more than 200 individual vehicles in three geographically unique domestic locations. In total, over 1,500 individual operational route shifts from Washington, New York, and Colorado were collected. Upon completing the collection of in-use field data using either NREL-installed data acquisition devices or existing onboard telemetry systems, large-scale duty-cycle statistical analyses were performed to examine underlying vehicle dynamics trends within the data and to explore vehicle operation variations between fleet locations. Based on the results of these analyses, high, low, and average vehicle dynamics requirements were determined, resulting in the selection of representative standard chassis dynamometer test cycles for each condition. In this paper, the methodology and accompanying results of the large-scale duty-cycle statistical analysis are presented, including graphical and tabular representations of a number of relationships between key duty-cycle metrics observed within the larger data set. In addition to presenting the results of this analysis, conclusions are drawn and presented regarding potential applications of advanced vehicle technology as it relates specifically to school buses.

Duran, A.; Walkowicz, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest to Design Drop-In Hydrogen Fueling 2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest to Design Drop-In Hydrogen Fueling Station Dec 16, 2013 The 10th annual Hydrogen Student Design Contest will challenge student teams to design a transportable, containerized hydrogen fueling station solution. Registration for the contest, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, is open until January 15, 2014. Through the contest, multidisciplinary student teams will demonstrate their talents in engineering, public planning, architecture, marketing, and entrepreneurship. In previous years, teams have designed fueling stations, airport systems, and green buildings-all using hydrogen. The Grand Prize winning team will receive an expenses-paid trip to present their winning entry to hundreds of industry professionals in a session at

407

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Photoelectrochemical Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photoelectrochemical Laboratory Photoelectrochemical Laboratory Photo of researcher examining a glass-enclosed photoelectrochemical cell producing hydrogen as a beam of light is shined on it. NREL researcher demonstrating direct production of hydrogen from light energy by a photoelectrochemical cell. Credit: Warren Gretz. NREL's Photoelectrochemical Laboratory enables NREL's pioneering work in photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from solar energy. Photoelectrochemical devices combine elements of solar cells and electrolyzers to produce hydrogen directly from sunlight in a single step. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen production is a holy grail of renewable hydrogen production, and NREL researchers are at the forefront of this research effort. The primary focus is to identify and develop current photovoltaic

408

Overview of U.S. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Hydrogen and Fuel United States Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities U.S. Department of Energy Dr. Sunita Satyapal Fuel Cell Technologies Program CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop December 10, 2009 2 Workshop Objectives * To coordinate lessons learned from compressed natural gas and hydrogen vehicles * Collect feedback from demonstration activities and real world applications in the United States and internationally * Identify additional RD&D to ensure safe use of onboard and bulk storage hydrogen and compressed natural gas tanks * Enhance domestic and international codes and standards harmonization * Identify potential future collaborations, workshops, education and communication strategies 3 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells - Where are we today? Fuel Cells for Transportation

409

Hydrogen (H2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen (H2) Hydrogen (H2) Historical Records from Ice Cores Deuterium Record from Dome C, Antarctica Continuous Measurements Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE,...

410

Hydrogen Program Overview  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: Why Hydrogen?

411

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

412

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Task 6 Report Promoting a Southeast Hydrogen Consortium  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project task was to establish a technical consortium to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. The goal was to partner with fuel cell manufacturers, hydrogen fuel infrastructure providers, electric utilities, energy service companies, research institutions, and user groups to improve education and awareness of hydrogen technologies in an area that is lagging behind other parts of the country in terms of vehicle and infrastructure demonstrations and deployments. This report documents that effort.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

Terry W. Battiest

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

Santa Clara Demonstration Status  

SciTech Connect

Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. The commercial product specifications have been developed by working closely with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). FCCG members include municipal utilities, rural electric co-ops, and investor owned utilities who have expressed interest in being the initial purchasers of the first commercial DFC power plants. The utility participants in the SCDP have been drawn from the membership of FCCG. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant, and FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer for the design and construction of the plant, and also provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O' Shea, Thomas P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Santa Clara Demonstration Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. The commercial product specifications have been developed by working closely with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). FCCG members include municipal utilities, rural electric co-ops, and investor owned utilities who have expressed interest in being the initial purchasers of the first commercial DFC power plants. The utility participants in the SCDP have been drawn from the membership of FCCG. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant, and FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer for the design and construction of the plant, and also provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines - Natural Gas Pipelines for Hydrogen Use #12;3 OAK embrittlement of pipeline steels under high gaseous pressures relevant to hydrogen gas transmission pipeline behavior as function of pressure and temperature - Effects of steel composition, microstructure

417

www.hydrogenics.com Hydrogenics Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integration capabilities · Control and load profile software Hydrogen Energy Storage and Power Systems · Off Power ...Powering Change #12;www.hydrogenics.com Hydrogenics Profile Designer and manufacturer-grid renewable power · On-grid community or residential power · Grid incentives for load control · Renewable

418

FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Delivery: Hydrogen Delivery...

419

PFBC Utility Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Status Production Energy Efficiency % 72 70 Storage, Compression, Dispensing Efficiency Total Hydrogen Costs Hydrogen Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By 2012, develop and demonstrate distributed reforming technology for producing hydrogen from bio-oil at $3.80/kilogram (kg) purified hydrogen. By 2011, develop a prototype that incorporates the key operations: bio-oil injection, catalytic autothermal reforming, water-gas shift, and hydrogen isolation. Develop the necessary understanding of process chemistry, bio-oil compositional effects, catalyst chemistry, and deactivation and regeneration strategy to form a basis for process definition for automated distributed reforming to meet the DOE targets. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, demonstrate the process of auto-thermal reforming of bio-oil including a longterm catalyst performance, yields of hydrogen, and mass balances. Using a bench-scale reactor system, demonstrate catalytic conversion consistent with $3.80/kg hydrogen.

Richard French; Michael Penev; Rick Farmer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

Provenzano, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

praxair.com praxair.com Copyright © 2003, Praxair Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion BY Robert Zawierucha, Kang Xu and Gary Koeppel PRAXAIR TECHNOLOGY CENTER TONAWANDA, NEW YORK DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Workshop Augusta, GA August 2005 2 Introduction Regulatory and technical groups that impact hydrogen and hydrogen systems ASME, DOE, DOT etc, Compressed Gas Association activities ASTM TG G1.06.08 Hydrogen pipelines and CGA-5.6 Selected experience and guidance Summary and recommendations 3 CGA Publications Pertinent to Hydrogen G-5: Hydrogen G-5.3: Commodity Specification for Hydrogen G-5.4: Standard for Hydrogen Piping at Consumer Locations G-5.5: Hydrogen Vent Systems G-5.6: Hydrogen Pipeline Systems (IGC Doc 121/04/E) G-5.7: Carbon Monoxide and Syngas

424

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

<-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway <-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials KIA FCEV SUNRISE MG 7955 6 7.jpg Guidance on materials selection for hydrogen service is needed to support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen transportation. Materials property measurement is needed on deformation, fracture and fatigue of metals in environments relevant to this hydrogen economy infrastructure. The identification of hydrogen-affected material properties such as strength, fracture resistance and fatigue resistance are high priorities to ensure the safe design of load-bearing structures. To support the needs of the hydrogen community, Sandia National

425

Status of U.S. FCEV and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration Project (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented at the Japan Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Demonstration Project (JHFC), 1 March 2011, Tokyo, Japan. This presentation summarizes the status of U.S. fuel cell electric vehicles and infrastructure learning demonstration project.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

CCUS Demonstrations Making Progress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, First Quarter, 2013 9, First Quarter, 2013 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 CCUS Demonstrations Making Progress A Column from the Director of Clean Energy Sys- tems, Office of Clean Coal 4 LNG Exports DOE Releases Third Party Study on Impact of Natural Gas Exports 5 Providing Emergency Relief Petroleum Reservers Helps Out with Hurricane Relief Efforts 7 Game-Changing Membranes FE-Funded Project Develops Novel Membranes for CCUS 8 Shale Gas Projects Selected 15 Projects Will Research Technical Challenges of Shale Gas Development A project important to demonstrat- ing the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of inject-

428

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Final Results from U.S. FCEV Learning Demonstration: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 'Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project,' also known as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration, is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project started in 2004 and concluded in late 2011. The purpose of this project was to conduct an integrated field validation that simultaneously examined the performance of fuel cell vehicles and the supporting hydrogen fueling infrastructure. The DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) received and analyzed all of the raw technical data collected by the industry partners through their participation in the project over its seven-year duration. This paper reviews highlights from the project and draws conclusions about the demonstrated status of the fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen fueling infrastructure technology.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stations Stations Public-use hydrogen fueling stations are very much like gasoline ones. In fact, sometimes, hydrogen and gasoline cars can be fueled at the same station. These stations offer self-service pumps, convenience stores, and other services in high-traffic locations. Photo of a Shell fueling station showing the site convenience store and hydrogen and gasoline fuel pumps. This fueling station in Washington, D.C., provides drivers with both hydrogen and gasoline fuels Many future hydrogen fueling stations will be expansions of existing fueling stations. These facilities will offer hydrogen pumps in addition to gasoline or natural gas pumps. Other hydrogen fueling stations will be "standalone" operations. These stations will be designed and constructed to

431

Hydrogen Delivery Options and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options and Issues Options and Issues Mark Paster DOE August, 2006 Scope * From the end point of central or distributed production (300 psi H2) to and including the dispenser at a refueling station or stationary power site - GH2 Pipelines and Trucks, LH2 Trucks, Carriers <$1.00/kg of Hydrogen by 2017 Hydrogen Delivery H2 Delivery Current Status * Technology - GH2 Tube Trailers: ~340 kg, ~2600 psi - LH2 Trucks: ~3900 kg - Pipelines: up to 1500 psi (~630 miles in the U.S.) - Refueling Site Operations (compression, storage dispensing): Demonstration projects * Cost (Does NOT include refueling Site Operations) - Trucks: $4-$12/kg - Pipeline: <$2/kg H2A Analysis * Consistent, comparable, transparent approach to hydrogen production and delivery cost analysis * Excel spreadsheet tools with common economic

432

HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM PLASMATRON REFORMERS: A PROMISING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOX ADSORBER REGENERATION AND OTHER AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasmatron reformers are being developed at MIT and ArvinMeritor [1]. In these reformers a special low power electrical discharge is used to promote partial oxidation conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen and CO. The partial oxidation reaction of this very fuel rich mixture is difficult to initiate. The plasmatron provides continuous enhanced volume initiation. To minimize electrode erosion and electrical power requirements, a low current, high voltage discharge with wide area electrodes is used. The reformers operate at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Plasmatron reformers provide the advantages of rapid startup and transient response; efficient conversion of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas; compact size; relaxation or elimination of reformer catalyst requirements; and capability to process difficult to reform fuels, such as diesel and bio-oils. These advantages facilitate use of onboard hydrogen-generation technology for diesel exhaust after-treatment. Plasma-enhanced reformer technology can provide substantial conversion even without the use of a catalyst. Recent progress includes a substantial decrease in electrical power consumption (to about 200 W), increased flow rate (above 1 g/s of diesel fuel corresponding to approximately 40 kW of chemical energy), soot suppression and improvements in other operational features.. Plasmatron reformer technology has been evaluated for regeneration of NOx adsorber after-treatment systems. At ArvinMeritor tests were performed on a dual-leg NOx adsorber system using a Cummins 8.3L diesel engine both in a test cell and on a vehicle. A NOx adsorber system was tested using the plasmatron reformer as a regenerator and without the reformer i.e., with straight diesel fuel based regeneration as the baseline case. The plasmatron reformer was shown to improve NOx regeneration significantly compared to the baseline diesel case. The net result of these initial tests was a significant decrease in fuel penalty, roughly 50% at moderate adsorber temperatures. This fuel penalty improvement is accompanied by a dramatic drop in slipped hydrocarbon emissions, which decreased by 90% or more. Significant advantages are demonstrated across a wide range of engine conditions and temperatures. The study also indicated the potential to regenerate NOx adsorbers at low temperatures where diesel fuel based regeneration is not effective, such as those typical of idle conditions. Two vehicles, a bus and a light duty truck, have been equipped for plasmatron reformer NOx adsorber regeneration tests.

Bromberg, L.; Crane, S; Rabinovich, A.; Kong, Y; Cohn, D; Heywood, J; Alexeev, N.; Samokhin, A.

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Program Hydrogen Program www.hydrogen.energy.gov Hydrogen & Our Energy Future  | HydrOgEn & Our EnErgy FuturE U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program www.hydrogen.energy.gov u.S. department of Energy |  www.hydrogen.energy.gov Hydrogen & Our Energy Future Contents Introduction ................................................... p.1 Hydrogen - An Overview ................................... p.3 Production ..................................................... p.5 Delivery ....................................................... p.15 Storage ........................................................ p.19 Application and Use ........................................ p.25 Safety, Codes and Standards ............................... p.33

434

Initiators of coal hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initiators examined include cyclic and linear silico-organic compounds, the effects of which on the hydrogenation process are studied. The substances not only localize the active radicals before these are stabilised by hydrogen, but actually activate the destruction reaction of the coal substance and in this way generate atomic hydrogen: radical polymerization inhibitors thus convert to activators and hydrogen transfer. (8 refs.)

Krichko, A.A.; Dembovskaya, E.A.; Gorlov, E.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Facilities/Staff Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. FACILITIES and STAFF. The Thermophysical Properties Division is the Nation's ...

436

On 271 miles of Twin Cities-area roadways, bus drivers are allowed to operate their vehi-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ferguson continued on page 2 Bus continued on page 3 Conference continued on page 2 Public-private of research at Reason Foundation, titled "P3s-- Public Private Partnerships? Or Peripatetic Pain in the Pants resources through the use of public-private partner- ships (P3s or PPPs) has become increasingly attractive

Minnesota, University of

437

Adaptive fuzzy regulation of the DC-bus capacitor voltage in a wind energy conversion system (WECS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new voltage regulator of the DC-bus capacitor of a variable speed wind power generation system based on adaptive fuzzy system. The change in the fuzzy rule base is done using a variable-structure direct adaptive control algorithm ... Keywords: Adaptive control, Fuzzy systems, Wind energy conversion systems

A. L. Elshafei; M. A. Azzouz

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Enz, Glenn L. (N. Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

440

Microsoft Word - CX-MalinBusFY13_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Bob Trismen Project Manager - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Malin Substation relay equipment replacements PP&A Project No.: 2504 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 Electronic equipment Location: Klamath County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA plans to replace bus differential relays and associated electronic equipment inside an existing building at the BPA Malin Substation. The replacements are scheduled to be completed in January 2013. Findings: BPA has determined that the proposed action complies with Section 1021.410 and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrogen bus demonstrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Manifold, bus support and coupling arrangement for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Individual, tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are assembled into bundles called a module within a housing, with a plurality of modules arranged end-to-end in a linear, stacked configuration called a string. A common set of piping comprised of a suitable high temperature resistant material (1) provides fuel and air to each module housing, (2) serves as electrically conducting buses, and (3) provides structural support for a string of SOFC modules. Ceramic collars are used to connect fuel and air inlet piping to each of the electrodes in an SOFC module and provide (1) electrical insulation for the current carrying bus bars and gas manifolds, (2) damping for the fuel and air inlet piping, and (3) proper spacing between the fuel and air inlet piping to prevent contact between these tubes and possible damage to the SOFC. 11 figs.

Parry, G.W.

1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

443

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Modeling Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Projects Modeling Projects Below are models grouped by topic. These models are used to analyze hydrogen technology, infrastructure, and other areas related to the development and use of hydrogen. Cross-Cutting Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM) Renewable Energy Power System Modular Simulator (RPM-Sim) Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Energy Infrastructure All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM)

445

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE hydrogen storage activity focuses primarily on the applied research and development (R&D) of low-pressure, materials-based technologies to allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles (500 km) while meeting packaging, cost, safety, and performance requirements to be competitive with current vehicles. While automakers have recently demonstrated progress with some prototype vehicles traveling more than 300 miles on a single fill, this driving range must be achievable across different vehicle models and without compromising space, performance, or cost. In addition, hydrogen storage will be needed for both other niche vehicular applications and off-board uses such as for stationary power generation and for hydrogen delivery and refueling infrastructure.

446

Development of a Renewable Hydrogen Energy Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Renewable Development of a Renewable Hydrogen Energy Station Edward C. Heydorn - Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Pinakin Patel - FuelCell Energy, Inc. Fred Jahnke - FuelCell Energy, Inc. "Delivering Renewable Hydrogen - A Focus on Near-Term Applications" Palm Springs, CA 16 November 2009 Presentation Outline * Hydrogen Energy Station Technology Overview * Process Description * Performance and Economic Parameters * Proposed Demonstration on Renewable Feedstock * Status of Shop Validation Test * Conclusion 2 Objectives * Determine the economic and technical viability of a hydrogen energy station designed to co-produce power and hydrogen Utilize technology development roadmap to provide deliverables and go/no-go decision

447

Hydrogen chemisorption on diamond surfaces. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previously we demonstrated the ability to measure submonolayer quantities of surface hydrogen on insulating glasses. The present study builds on this by examining hydrogen coverages on another insulating material: the technologically important diamond (100) surface. The information to be obtained in the present study will allow us to deduce the correct structures for the diamond (100)-(1X1) and -(2X1) surface phases and provide information on the kinetics of hydrogen desorption from the (100) surface. Such experiments are essential for a complete understanding of hydrogen surface chemistry during the chemical vapor deposition of thin diamond films. This report summarizes progress made in FY93 for measuring surface hydrogen concentrations on the diamond (100) surface. Although the available LDRD resources were insufficient to finish this study in FY93, completion of the study is planned using other resources and this detailed report as a reference.

Daley, R.; Musket, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Liquid-Hydrogen Cerenkov Counter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two models of a liquid-hydrogen (?-illegible) Cherenkov counter (illegible) been constructed (illegible). The first served as a prototype (?-illegible) and was (illegible) to demonstrate the feasibility (?-illegible) of the (illegible) concept (?-illegible) (illegible) liquid hydrogen does not give scintillation (?-illegible) (illegible) that of Cherenkov light. The second, final version (?-illegible), (illegible) in an experiment (?-illegible) in which particles brought to rest (?-illegible) (illegible) (illegible) electrons. In this second counter, the efficiency (?-illegible) (illegible) relativistic (?-illegible) particles (?-illegible) by their Cherenkov radiation in liquid hydrogen (?-illegible) was measured by stopping (illegible) mesons in the hydrogen and detecting their decay electrons outside (?-illegible) of the flask (?-illegible) after a suitable time delay. An average detection (?-illegible) efficiency (?-illegible) of 75% (?-illegible) was (illegible) taken over the volume of the hydrogen (?-illegible).

Zipi, T.F.; Chamberlain, Owen; Kadyk, John A.; York, Carl M.

1963-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Analysis Repository H2A Analysis Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center Scenario Analysis Well-to-Wheels Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Systems Analysis > Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center Printable Version Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center The Hydrogen Analysis Resource Center provides consistent and transparent data that can serve as the basis for hydrogen-related calculations, modeling, and other analytical activities. This new site features the Hydrogen Data Book with data pertinent to hydrogen infrastructure analysis; links to external databases related to

451

Hydrogen Program Contacts; DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2008 Annual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 FY 2008 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen Program JoAnn Milliken, DOE Hydrogen Program Manager and Chief Engineer Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies...

452

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Production from Renewables...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the 1998 DOE Hydrogen Program Review. Keywords: Technoeconomic analysis; hydrogen production; costs; hydrogen storage; renewable Purpose To determine technical and economic...

453

Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the spillover process (i.e. kinetics of hydrogen dissociation, diffusion and recombination) and allow for optimization of these materials to meet the DOE targets for hydrogen storage. In a parallel effort, we are also designing CA materials as nanoporous scaffolds for metal hydride systems. Recent work by others has demonstrated that nanostructured metal hydrides show enhanced kinetics for reversible hydrogen storage relative to the bulk materials. This effect is diminished, however, after several hydriding/dehydriding cycles, as the material structure coarsens. Incorporation of the metal hydride into a porous scaffolding material can potentially limit coarsening and, therefore, preserve the enhanced kinetics and improved cycling behavior of the nanostructured metal hydride. Success implementation of this approach, however, requires the design of nanoporous solids with large accessible pore volumes (> 4 cm{sup 3}/g) to minimize the gravimetric and volumetric capacity penalties associated with the use of the scaffold. In addition, these scaffold materials should be capable of managing thermal changes associated with the cycling of the incorporated metal hydride. CAs are promising candidates for the design of such porous scaffolds due to the large pore volumes and tunable porosity of aerogel framework. This research is a joint effort with HRL Laboratories, a member of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. LLNL's efforts have focused on the design of new CA materials that can meet the scaffolding requirements, while metal hydride incorporation into the scaffold and evaluation of the kinetics and cycling performance of these composites is performed at HRL.

Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

454

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects by Date U.S. Department of Energy Distributed Hydrogen Production via Steam Methane Reforming Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Distributed...

455

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Gasification with Sequestration Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification with Sequestration Project ID:...

456

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Pathways Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 2020 ProductsDeliverables Description: FY 2012 Progress Report Publication Title: FY 2012 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report ArticleAbstract Title: Effects of...

457

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Deployment System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

routine to determine the layout of a least-cost infrastructure. Keywords: Hydrogen production; electrolysis; costs; fuel cells Purpose Initially, electrolytic H2 production...

458

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass feedstock price Units: million Btu Supporting Information: LHV Description: Electricity price Units: kWh Description: Hydrogen fill pressure Units: psi Description:...

459

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Biogas Resources Characterization Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power...

460

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Transition Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Period of Performance Start: June 2005 End: May 2008 Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways Objectives: Use agent-based modeling to provide...

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461

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

462

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Vehicle Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas. ProductsDeliverables Description: Report Publication Title:...

463

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Passenger Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

estimated the cost of both gasoline and methanol onboard fuel processors, as well as the cost of stationary hydrogen fueling system components including steam methane reformers,...

464

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Technology Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of hydrogen fueling systems for transportation: An application of perspective-based scenario analysis using the analytic hierarchy process Project ID: 121 Principal...

465

Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer technology for onboard applications in internal combustion engine vehicles using diesel, gasoline and biofuels. This included the reduction of NOx and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines using plasmatron reformer generated hydrogen-rich gas, conversion of ethanol and bio-oils into hydrogen rich gas, and the development of new concepts for the use of plasmatron fuel reformers for enablement of HCCI engines.

Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer technology for onboard applications in internal combustion engine vehicles using diesel, gasoline and biofuels. This included the reduction of NOx and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines using plasmatron reformer generated hydrogen-rich gas, conversion of ethanol and bio-oils into hydrogen rich gas, and the development of new concepts for the use of plasmatron fuel reformers for enablement of HCCI engines.

Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the electronic level of hydrogen (thick red bar) was notdescribing the behavior of hydrogen atoms as impuritiesenergy of interstitial hydrogen as a function of Fermi level

Van de Walle, Chris G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

Ishimoto, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

CU-ICAR Hydrogen Infrastructure Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to establish an innovation center to accelerate the transition to a 'hydrogen economy' an infrastructure of vehicles, fuel resources, and maintenance capabilities based on hydrogen as the primary energy carrier. The specific objectives of the proposed project were to: (a) define the essential attributes of the innovation center; (b) validate the concept with potential partners; (c) create an implementation plan; and (d) establish a pilot center and demonstrate its benefits via a series of small scale projects.

Robert Leitner; David Bodde; Dennis Wiese; John Skardon; Bethany Carter

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

471

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program January 5, 2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Overview - Goals & Objectives - Technology Status & Key Challenges * Progress - Research & Development - Deployments - Recovery Act Projects * Budget * Key Publications Agenda: DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Program Mission The mission of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program is to enable the widespread commercialization of a portfolio of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies through basic and applied research, technology development and demonstration, and