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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Residual Fuel Oil - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

2

Unfinished Oils - Heavy Gas Oils Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

3

Unfinished Oils - Naphthas and Lighter Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

4

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Unfinished Oils - Kerosene and Light ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

5

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

6

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

7

The Spatial Scales, Distribution, and Intensity of Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine hydrocarbon seeps (Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara,marine hydrocarbon seepage near Coal Oil Point, California,associated with offshore oil production", Geology, 27(11),

Washburn, Libe; Clark, Jordan F.; Kyriakidis, Phaedon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Spatial Scales, Distribution, and Intensity of Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine hydrocarbon seeps (Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara,marine hydrocarbon seepage near Coal Oil Point, California,source areas such as near Coal Oil Point. Furthermore,

Washburn, Libe; Clark, Jordan F.; Kyriakidis, Phaedon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thermal conversion of oil shale into recoverable hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrocarbons is accomplished by pyrolysis of oil shale with controlled removal of the resulting layer of spent oil-shale residue. A procedure is described for the in situ thermal conversion of oil shale wherein fluidized abrasive particles are employed to foster improved hydrocarbon production, in amount and kind, by a controlled partial removal of the layer of spent oil shale which results from application of flowing fluids to heat exposed surfaces of the oil shale to release hydrocarbons. (5 claims)

Slusser, M.L.; Bramhall, W.E.

1969-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

11

Unfinished Oils Imports from China  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

12

Unfinished Oils Imports from Azerbaijan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

13

Unfinished Oils Imports from Syria  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

14

Unfinished Oils Imports from Iraq  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

15

Unfinished Oils Imports from Oman  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

16

Unfinished Oils Imports from Chile  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

17

Unfinished Oils Imports from Ecuador  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

18

Unfinished Oils Imports from Peru  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

19

Unfinished Oils Imports from Bolivia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

20

Unfinished Oils Imports from Greece  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

22

BP Oil Spill and Air Chemistry Crude oil contains various hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BP Oil Spill and Air Chemistry Crude oil contains various hydrocarbons NOAA and CIRES here at CU went to the oil spill in an aircraft that was equipped with instruments to measure the air quality. 1/3 of the oil dissolved into the water column (methane completely, benzene and ethane almost completely) Showed

Toohey, Darin W.

23

Method for production of hydrocarbon diluent from heavy crude oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of producing a hydrocarbon diluent from a heavy crude oil extracted from an underground petroleum formation via a production well. It comprises: preheating a quantity of heavy crude oil extracted from the production well to yield a heated crude oil; separating in a separator vessel by flashing the heated crude oil to produce a first vapor fraction and a first liquid fraction; thermally cracking in a cracking unit at least a portion of the first liquid fraction to produce a first liquid effluent; quenching the first liquid effluent; introducing at least a portion of the quenched fist liquid effluent into a separator; condensing the first vapor fraction; separating in a separator vessel the condensed vapor fraction to produce a liquid hydrocarbon diluent middle fraction characterized in having a boiling range between about 400{degrees}-700{degrees}F. and a gas; and, directing the liquid hydrocarbon diluent into the formation via an injection well for enhancing production of petroleum from the formation via the production well.

McCants, M.F.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar Lett (2010) 30:331–338 Fig. 3 Coal Oil Point seep field,hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California. Marhydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field,

Leifer, Ira; Kamerling, Marc J.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Wilson, Douglas S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The spatial scales, distribution, and intensity of natural marine hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial scales, distribution, and intensity of natural marine hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil pollution sources. A field of strong hydrocarbon seepage offshore of Coal Oil Point near Santa Barbara in the Coal Oil Point field to measure directly the atmospheric gas flux from three seeps of varying size

California at Santa Barbara, University of

27

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from Benin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PAD District Imports by Country of Origin Product: ... Crude oil and unfinished oils are reported by the PAD District in which they are processed; ...

28

: Plasma-Hydrocarbon conversion  

crude oil and hydrocarbon gases like natural gas, into lighter hydrocarbon materials (e.g. synthetic light oil).

29

Unfinished Oils Imports from Persian Gulf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

30

Unfinished Oils Imports from Puerto Rico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

31

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.  

SciTech Connect

BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

35

Factors affecting in-situ recovery of hydrocarbons from oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Batch thermal solution of Hell's Hole Canyon oil shale in hydrocarbon solvents has been studied at temperatures of from 274/sup 0/ to 410/sup 0/C. Three solvents were used: cyclohexane; 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene; and creosote oil. In 24-hour, constant-temperature runs under autogenous pressure, each solvent was found to be capable of removing over 90% of the original organic material at extraction temperatures of from 360 to 375/sup 0/C. Cyclohexane extraction resulted in somewhat greater yields than tetralin extraction in runs below 365/sup 0/C but approximately the same yields as tetralin at higher extraction temperatures. With one oil shale sample, virtually identical yields were observed in both cyclohexane and tetralin extractions. This finding suggests that mass-transfer restrictions within some oil shales may restrict the yield regardless of the solvent used. Carbon-13 NMR analyses of the spent shales showed that the aromaticity of the residual organic material in tetralin-extracted shale increased slightly from the raw shale value of 0.27 and remained essentially constant at a value of 0.31 increased. In constant temperature runs of 24-hour duration, the aromaticity of an oil shle sample increased from the raw oil shale value of 0.17 to 0.28 after cyclohexane extraction at 326/sup 0/C, while a tetralin-extracted sample of the same oil shale had an aromaticity of only 0.20 after extraction at 321/sup 0/C. The nitrogen content of the cyclohexane extracts, which ranged from 1.58 to 2.24%, was comparable to that of values reported in the literature for shale oils. The tetralin extracts had somewhat lower nitrogen content, ranging from 0.58 to 1.95%. Extract nitrogen content generally increased with extraction temperature. 55 references, 58 figures, 22 tables.

Tyler, A.L.; Kafesjian, A.S.; Fischer-Calderon, P.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Purchased Electricity - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

37

Purchased Steam - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

38

East Coast (PADD 1) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

39

Midwest (PADD 2) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

40

PAD District 5 Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

42

Liquefied Petroleum Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

43

PAD District 4 Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

44

Still Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

45

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, ...

46

Glossary API Gravity: An  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

47

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, re- sidual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

48

Glossary Glossary  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, residual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

49

X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

50

Amine derivatives of thio-bis-lactone acids in combination with coadditive hydrocarbons are flow improvers for middle distillate fuel oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amine salts, amino acids, amino acid salts bis-amides and imides of oil-soluble thio-bis-(C12-50 alkyl lactone acid), e.g. a secondary hydrogenated tallow amide of dithio-bis-(C16-c24 alkyl lactone carboxylic acid), are useful in combination with a coadditive hydrocarbon such as an amorphous hydrocarbon or a hydrogenated polybutadiene in improving the cold flow properties of distillate hydrocarbon oils.

Brois, S.J.; Feldman, N.; Gutierrez, A.

1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation, the primary source of petroleum hydrocarbons inPetroleum Geologists, Tulsa Clark JF, Washburn L, Hornafius JS, Luyendyk BP (2000) Natural marine hydrocarbon seep source

Leifer, Ira; Kamerling, Marc J.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Wilson, Douglas S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Unfinished Oils Imports from Syria - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

53

Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Muslim oil and gas periphery; the future of hydrocarbons in Africa, southeast Asia and the Caspian. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis is a study of the contemporary political, economic, and technical developments and future prospects of the Muslim hydrocarbon exporters of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caspian. The established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia has four members in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and is systemically increasing its production of natural gas. I analyze US government and corporate policies regarding the countries and the major dilemmas of the Muslim hydrocarbon periphery. The first chapter provides a selective overview of global energy source statistics; the policies, disposition and composition of the major hydrocarbon production and consumption players and communities; a selective background of OPEC and its impact on the globe; and a general portrait of how the Muslim periphery piece fits into the overall Muslim oil and gas puzzle. Chapter two analyzes the established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia asking the following questions: What are the major political, economic, and technical trends and dilemmas affecting these producer nations. And what are the United States` policies and relationships with these producers. Chapter three asks the same questions as chapter two, but with regard to the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea. I probe the regional petroleum exploration and transportation dilemmas in some detail.

Crockett, B.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated with crude oil and Bunker C fuel oil for the past 20 years. Two treatments, Inipol EAP-22 (INIPOL) and basic nutrients with indigenous organisms (BNIO), were compared to a control (CONTROL) plot over an 11 week period. In site PAH biodegradation was quantified by plotting the time dependence of PAH to 17?,21?-hopane concentration ratios. 17?,21?-hopane, a nondegradable, C30 triterpane, was used as a natural internal standard. Sediment characterization was performed to determine the effect of geologic conditions on PAH biodegradation rates. Total Ion Chromatograms (TICs) of extracted oil showed high concentrations of an unresolved complex mixture that did not change over the 11 week period. The particle size of the sediments from the plots averaged 51% and 34% for clay and silt content, respectively. Sediment mineralogy was dominated by kaolinite and smectite. [PAH]/[Hopane] ratios indicate no significant PAH degradation in either the INIPOL, BNIO, or CONTROL plots over the 11 week period. This data indicates that bioremediation was unsuccessful at this site due to the extreme weathered state of the oil, the limited bioavailability of the PAH compounds, and the potential toxicity of the petroleum. The use of hopane as a natural internal standard was important in quantifying the effectiveness of bioremediation due to the high spatial variability in initial oil concentrations.

Moffit, Alfred Edward

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

57

Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. Concentrations in produced water discharge plume/receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. concentrations in produced water discharge plume / receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentration of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hydrocarbon biomarkers of Neoproterozoic to Lower Cambrian oils from eastern Siberia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with increasing amounts of thiol and thiophene compounds. Non-hydrocarbon gases from petroleum source rocks, L69 3GP It is assumed typically that minerals do not affect the geochemistry of petroleum, the consequences being bleaching of rocks by petroleum and the increasing availability of ferrous iron

Rothman, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Strategy Plan (NES) has called for 900,000 barrels/day production of heavy oil in the mid-1990s to meet our national needs. To achieve this goal, it is important that the Alaskan heavy oil fields be brought to production. Alaska has more than 25 billion barrels of heavy oil deposits. Conoco, and now BP Exploration have been producing from Schrader Bluff Pool, which is part of the super heavy oil field known as West Sak Field. Schrader Bluff reservoir, located in the Milne Point Unit, North Slope of Alaska, is estimated to contain up to 1.5 billion barrels of (14 to 21{degrees}API) oil in place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion; however, the primary recovery will be much smaller than expected. Hence, waterflooding will be implemented earlier than anticipated. The eventual use of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques, such as hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process, is vital for recovery of additional oil from this reservoir. The purpose of this research project was to determine the nature of miscible solvent slug which would be commercially feasible, to evaluate the performance of the hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug process, and to assess the feasibility of this process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. The laboratory experimental work includes: slim tube displacement experiments and coreflood experiments. The components of solvent slug includes only those which are available on the North Slope of Alaska.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O' Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to biomass fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. The project was a cooperative research and development agreement among UOP LLC, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis undertaken at PNNL. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of catalyst formulations were tested over a range of operating parameters including temperature, pressure, and flow-rate with bio-oil derived from several different biomass feedstocks. Effects of liquid hourly space velocity and catalyst bed temperature were assessed. Details of the process results were presented including mass and elemental balances. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition, chemical functional type determined by mass spectrometry, and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to bio-oil.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Oil from Tobacco Leaves: FOLIUM - Installation of Hydrocarbon Accumulating Pathways in Tobacco Leaves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: LBNL is modifying tobacco to enable it to directly produce fuel molecules in its leaves for use as a biofuel. Tobacco is a good crop for biofuels production because it is an outstanding biomass crop, has a long history of cultivation, does not compete with the national food supply, and is highly responsive to genetic manipulation. LBNL will incorporate traits for hydrocarbon biosynthesis from cyanobacteria and algae, and enhance light utilization and carbon uptake in tobacco, improving the efficiency of photosynthesis so more fuel can be produced in the leaves. The tobacco-generated biofuels can be processed for gasoline, jet fuel or diesel alternatives. LBNL is also working to optimize methods for planting, cultivating and harvesting tobacco to increase biomass production several-fold over the level of traditional growing techniques.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. I. MOLECULAR CRITERIA FOR HYDROCARBON GENESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isoprenoid hydrocarbons in crude oils and sediments must beisomers (up to C ) in crude oil and those characterised inarc found ubiqubtously in crude oils and shalt extracts as

McCarthy, Eugene D.; Calvin, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Photocatalytic degradation of oil industry hydrocarbons models at laboratory and at pilot-plant scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photodegradation/mineralization (TiO{sub 2}/UV Light) of the hydrocarbons: p-nitrophenol (PNP), naphthalene (NP) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) at three different reactors: batch bench reactor (BBR), tubular bench reactor (TBR) and tubular pilot-plant (TPP) were kinetically monitored at pH = 3, 6 and 10, and the results compared using normalized UV light exposition times. The results fit the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) model; therefore, LH adsorption equilibrium constants (K) and apparent rate constants (k) are reported as well as the apparent pseudo-first-order rate constants, k{sub obs}{sup '} = kK/(1 + Kc{sub r}). The batch bench reactor is the most selective reactor toward compound and pH changes in which the reactivity order is: NP > DBT > PNP, however, the catalyst adsorption (K) order is: DBT > NP > PNP at the three pH used but NP has the highest k values. The tubular pilot-plant (TPP) is the most efficient of the three reactors tested. Compound and pH photodegradation/mineralization selectivity is partially lost at the pilot plant where DBT and NP reaches ca. 90% mineralization at the pH used, meanwhile, PNP reaches only 40%. The real time, in which these mineralization occur are: 180 min for PNP and 60 min for NP and DBT. The mineralization results at the TPP indicate that for the three compounds, the rate limiting step is the same as the degradation one. So that, there is not any stable intermediate that may accumulate during the photocatalytic treatment. (author)

Vargas, Ronald; Nunez, Oswaldo [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica Organica y Quimica Ambiental, Departamento de Procesos y Sistemas, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado Postal 89000, Caracas (Venezuela)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of this three-year research project is to evaluate the performance of the hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. This will be accomplished through measurement of PVT and fluid properties of Schrader Bluff oil, determination of phase behavior of Schrader Bluff oil solvent mixtures, asphaltene precipitation tests, slim tube displacement tests, core flood experiments and reservoir simulation studies. The expected results from this project include: determination of optimum hydrocarbon solvent composition suitable for hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug displacement process, optimum slug sizes of solvent needed, solvent recovery factor, solvent requirements, extent and timing of solvent recycle, displacement and sweep efficiency to be achieved and oil recovery.

Sharma, G.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. and Calvin, M. J. Amer. Oil Chern. Assoc. Science,· 208,of the production of oil and alcohol from hydrocarbon-Figure 1 Cumulative U.S. crude oil discoveries as a function

Calvin, Melvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Annual report, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Alaska is the second largest oil producing state in the nation and currently contributes nearly 24% of the nations oil production. It is imperative that Alaskan heavy oil fields be brought into production. Schrader Bluff reservoir, located in the Milne Point Unit, which is part of the heavy oil field known as West Sak is estimated to contain 1.5 billion barrels of (14 to 21 degree API) oil-in-place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion. The eventual implementation of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques will be vital for the recovery of additional oil from this reservoir. The availability of hydrocarbon gases (solvents) on the Alaska North Slope make the hydrocarbon miscible solvent injection process an important consideration for the EOR project in Schrader Bluff reservoir. Since Schrader Bluff oil is heavy and viscous, a water-alternating-gas (WAG) type of process for oil recovery is appropriate since such a process tends to derive synergetic benefits from both water injection (which provides mobility control and improvement in sweep efficiency) and miscible gas injection (which provides improved displacement efficiency). A miscible solvent slug injection process rather than continuous solvent injection is considered appropriate. Slim tube displacement studies, PVT data and asphaltene precipitation studies are needed for Schrader bluff heavy oil to define possible hydrocarbon solvent suitable for miscible solvent slug displacement process. Coreflood experiments are also needed to determine the effect of solvent slug size, WAG ratio and solvent composition on the recovery and solvent breakthrough. A compositional reservoir simulation study will be conducted later to evaluate the complete performance of the hydrocarbon solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir.

Sharma, G.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Crude oil and alternate energy production forecasts for the twenty-first century: The end of the hydrocarbon era  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictions of production rates and ultimate recovery of crude oil are needed for intelligent planning and timely action to ensure the continuous flow of energy required by the world`s increasing population and expanding economies. Crude oil will be able to supply increasing demand until peak world production is reached. The energy gap caused by declining conventional oil production must then be filled by expanding production of coal, heavy oil and oil shales, nuclear and hydroelectric power, and renewable energy sources (solar, wind, and geothermal). Declining oil production forecasts are based on current estimated ultimate recoverable conventional crude oil resources of 329 billion barrels for the United States and close to 3 trillion barrels for the world. Peak world crude oil production is forecast to occur in 2020 at 90 million barrels per day. Conventional crude oil production in the United States is forecast to terminate by about 2090, and world production will be close to exhaustion by 2100.

Edwards, J.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Chang, Y. Alice (Westmont, IL); Gatsis, John G. (Des Plaines, IL); Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, S.S.; Chang, Y.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Funk, E.W.

1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Experimental and analytical modeling studies of steam injection with hydrocarbon additives to enhance recovery of San Ardo heavy oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to better understand production mechanisms of heavy oil under steam injection with propane and petroleum distillate as… (more)

Simangunsong, Roly

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Co-cultured Synechococcus and Shewanella Produce Hydrocarbons ...  

... microbes has been developed. These hydrocarbons may be further processed into vehicle fuels using traditional oil refining techniques.

75

Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction  

SciTech Connect

A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulate bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the twelfth quarter, July 1--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal. Five different coal samples were used in the column flotation test program. They are Mammoth, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Illinois No. 6 seam coals, which correspond to anthracite-, low volatile-, medium volatile-, and high volatile-seam coals, respectively. In this quarterly report, the test results for the Upper Freeport seam coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal are reported.

Peng, F.F. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Mineral Processing Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 2,297 2,086 2,138 2,169 2,159 2,331 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 52 48 113 -52 15 114 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,245 2,038 2,025 2,222 2,144 2,217 1973-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 921 930 894 963 940 1,027 1981-2013 Propane/Propylene 1,148 924 979 1,052 1,036 1,093 1973-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 130 138 85 141 103 78 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 47 45 68 66 64 18 1981-2013 Other Liquids 66 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 0 0 0 0 0 0 1991-2013 Unfinished Oils 67 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013

79

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the ninth quarter, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

A main portion of this reporting period has been consumed in the following tasks to establish the base line for hydrocarbon oil encapsulated bubble flotation: (1) to measure the residence time distribution and formulate the axial dispersion model of 1-in. I.D. flotation column, (2) to obtain the optimum operating conditions using three phase experiment design approach followed the fractional factorial design, (3) to develop the column scale-up procedure and formulate recovery predicting model for flotation column, (4) to apply the models developed to design a 3-in. ID flotation column and predicting the cleaning results, (5) to test the collector gasification system installed on the 3-in. I.D. flotation column for hydrocarbon-oil capsulated bubble flotation of fine coal. Column flotation of minus 47 {mu}m (-400 US sieve) Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal was carried out to study the column scale-up procedure using one-inch column. The dispersion model of nonideal flow was applied to describe the hydrodynamic state within the column. This model may be used to predict the collection zone recovery of column flotation in scale-up procedure if the column flotation is a first-order rate process. Residence Time Distribution (RTD) data of the column flotation were measured to determine the parameters of the model. It was found that an empirical distribution, logarithmic normal distribution can describe the RTD curve well. The effects of operating variables and column geometry on the Peclet number, Pe, which measure the extent of axial dispersion were studied and an empirical expression of Pe was obtained. Using the dispersion model, the column flotation of fine coal recovery can be predicted.

Peng, F.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Annual report, December 1, 1992--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The shallow Cretaceous sands of the Schrader Bluff Reservoir occur between depths of 4,000 and 4,800 feet below surface and are estimated to contain up to 1.5 billion barrels of oil in place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion. Initial production indicated that primary recovery will fall short of earlier estimates and waterflooding will have to be employed much earlier than expected. A large portion of the oil-in-place thus would still be left behind in this reservoir after primary and secondary recovery methods have been applied. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques will be needed to recover the additional portion of remaining oil in this huge reservoir and to add significant additional reserves. Slim tube displacement studies, PVT data and asphaltene precipitation studies are needed for Schrader Bluff heavy oil to define possible hydrocarbon solvent suitable for miscible solvent slug displacement process. Such studies are essential because the API gravity of the crude in Schrader Bluff reservoir varies significantly from well to well. Coreflood experiments are also needed to determine effect of solvent slug size, WAG ratio and solvent composition on the oil recovery and solvent breakthrough. A compositional reservoir simulation study will be conducted later to evaluate the complete performance of the hydrocarbon solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. This report contains the following: reservoir description; slim tube displacement studies; and coreflood experiments.

Sharma, G.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydrocarbons in the deep earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

composed of the elements hydrogen and carbon) are the main building block of crude oil and natural gas. Hydrocarbons contribute to the global carbon cycle (one of the most...

82

U.S. Imports from Azerbaijan of Unfinished Oils (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1998: 0: 31: 0: 0: 0: 165: 92: 618: 748: 0: 0: 0: 2005: 193: 101: 2006: 215: 2007: 614: 33: 524: 171: 359: 143 ...

83

31443,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

CO",7,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",2704,"LOS ANGELES, CA","CALIFORNIA",5,515,"KOREA, REPUBLIC OF",205,0,0,,,,, 31443,"ATLANTIC TRDG & MKTG INC",1,509,"RESIDUAL FUEL,...

84

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Area of Entry by Area of Entry Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Ethylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Bonded Aircraft Fuel Other Bonded Aircraft Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Bonded, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Other, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 2000 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

85

Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of results from experimental research conducted at FSEC's Flexible Roofing Facility in the summer of 2002. The Flexible Roof Facility (FRF) is a test facility in Cocoa, Florida designed to evaluate a combination of five roofing systems against a control roof using dark shingles. The intent of the testing is to evaluate how roofing systems impact residential cooling energy use. Recent testing emphasizes evaluation of how increasingly popular metal roofing systems, both finished and unfinished, might compare with other more traditional roofing types. All of the test cells had R-19 insulation installed on the attic floor except in the double roof configuration which had R-19 of open cell foam blown onto the underside of the roof decking. The test results were used to determine relative thermal performance of various roofing systems under typical Florida summer conditions. Measured impacts included changes to ceiling heat flux and attic air temperature which influences loads from unintended attic air leakage and duct heat gain. We also develop an analysis method to estimate total cooling energy benefits of different roofing systems considering the various impacts. The results show that all the options perform better than dark composition shingles. White metal performs best with an estimated cooling energy reduction of about 15%, but the spectrally selective metal shingles (12%) and unfinished Galvalume roofs (11%) do surprisingly well. Galvanized roofing did less well than Galvalume (7% reduction) and worse performance in the second year of exposure was observed due to corrosion of the zinc surface. The sealed attic with a double roof produced an estimated cooling energy reduction of only 2% -- largely due to increases in ceiling flux.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Direct determination of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal liquids and shale oil by laser excited Shpol'skii spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article reports that tunable, dye laser excitation of Shpol'skii effect spectra provides a potentially useful means of determining PAH compounds directly in coal liquids and shale oil without prior isolation of the PAH fraction by chromatographic or other techniques. The data reported were obtained by selecting excitation wavelengths within the response curve of a single dye, 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4 oxadiazole (PBD). The characteristic low temperature excitation spectra of PAH compounds in appropriate Shpol'skii matrices are known to be sharp (FWHM approx. 10cm/sup -1/). The luminescence of four individual PAHs is included. The analytical results obtained for a typical solvent refined coal and shale oil sample are summarized. 2 figures, 1 table. (DP)

Yen, Y.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.; Iles, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hydrocarbon reclaimer system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a filtering process for filtering sludge from a finished product oil storage tank and thereby separating solids from oil and hydrocarbon. The process requires no added water, solvents or diluents. It comprises: pumping a volume sludge from a finished product oil storage tank to a mixing tank; mixing the sludge; sampling the sludge to determine solid content; adding filter aid comprising diatomaceous earth to the mixing tank; mixing the filter aid with the sludge in the mixing tank; enclosing and sealing a plurality of filter plates inside a horizontal plate filter; pressurizing the horizontal plate filter by operation of pump means; pumping the sludge from the mixing tank through the horizontal plate filter to filter out solids; recirculating the sludge from the horizontal plate filter back through the mixing tank; and pumping a purified hydrocarbon and water filtrate from the horizontal plate filter.

Uremovich, M.J.

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Inhibitory effect of petroleum oil on photosynthetic electron transport ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ecosystems from oil refineries, necessitating studies ... made to assess the impact of oils and hydrocarbons on ... variability in chemical composition of test oils.

89

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated bubble flotation of fine coal using 3-in. ID flotation column. Technical progress report for the eleventh quarter, April 1--June 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are four modes of the collector dispersion techniques. They are (1) direct liquid additions and stirring, (2) ultrasonic energy collector dispersion, (3) atomized collector dispersion, and (4) gasified collector transported in air stream. Among those collector dispersion techniques, the technique using the gasified collector transported in air phase can be used to enhance the flotation performance with substantial reduction in collector usage and selectivity, compared to the flotation using direct liquid addition (and mechanical agitation) technique. In this phase of study, two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. The 1-in. ID flotation column was used to scale-up to 3-in. ID flotation column. The initial starting point to operate the 3-in ID flotation column were determined using both 1-in. and 3-in. flotation columns based on the three phases of work plans and experiment design. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal.

Peng, F.F.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Processing Area  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Total Products Other Liquids Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History East Coast (PADD 1) 62,196 60,122 54,018 52,671 54,668 52,999 1981-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 54,439 53,849 53,638 60,984 63,482 56,972 1981-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 141,142 150,846 138,204 149,059 141,421 138,656 1981-2013

91

U.S. Product Supplied of Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Product Supplied for Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons ; U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

92

U.S. Exports of Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates (Thousand Barrels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Supply and Disposition; U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

93

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil ...  

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing ...

94

Role of crude-oil components in surfactant interaction. [Effect of acids, bases and heavy ends hydrocarbons (alkanes) on the solubilization, optimal salinity and interfacial tension of surfactant systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three crude oils from Bell Creek, Bradford, and Delaware-Childers fields were separated into distillates, acids, bases and heavy ends hydrocarbon. The effect of these components on the solubilization, optimal salinity, and bases shifted the optimal salinity significantly; their effects on the solubilization and interfacial tension are smaller. The bases appear to interact with the sulfonates, causing desorption from the interface, phase separation, and higher interfacial tension. The hydrocarbons, as expected have the strongest influence on the properties studied, due to their high concentration. The importance of the chemical nature and molecular weights of these components was also apparent. Even though the product sigma*/sup 2/..gamma.. is not constant, it was found that there is a definite relation between the solubilization (sigma*) and the interfacial tension (..gamma..). This is true even for such complex compounds as acids and bases. 41 references, 6 figures, 14 tables.

Tham, M.K.; Lorenz, P.B.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels from biomass pyrolysis bio-oil (PNNL IPID 16665) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

96

Massively-parallel electrical-conductivity imaging of hydrocarbons using the Blue Gene/L supercomputer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of potential offshore oil and gas reservoirs. To cope within hydrocarbon, i.e. oil and gas, exploration, and aresuch as brines, water, oil and gas. This has encouraged the

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California, Marineet al. , 2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from aand P.G. Mikolaj, Natural oil seepage at Coal Oil Point,

Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

100

Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Allocation of the Social Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use to Six Classes of Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alcohol Unfinished oils Motor gasoline blending componentsalcohol Unfinished oils Motor gasoline blending componentsthe Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (M. Delucchi

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

METHOD FOR RECOVERING URANIUM FROM OILS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for recovering uranium from hydrocarbon oils, wherein the uranium is principally present as UF/sub 4/. According to the invention, substantially complete removal of the uranium from the hydrocarbon oil may be effected by intimately mixing one part of acetone to about 2 to 12 parts of the hydrocarbon oil containing uranium and separating the resulting cake of uranium from the resulting mixture. The uranium in the cake may be readily recovered by burning to the oxide.

Gooch, L.H.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Characterization of hydrotreated TOSCO shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A shale oil that had been produced by the TOSCO-II process and hydrotreated was characterized according to its hydrocarbon and other functional compound composition. The oil was separated by distillation, adsorption chromatography, acid and base extraction, and gel permeation chromatography into fractions suitable for mass spectral characterization. The oil was composed largely of saturate hydrocarbons with the remainder being mostly monoaromatic and diaromatic hydrocarbons. Very small amounts of heterocompounds were present.

Vogh, J.W.; Holmes, S.A.; Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Woodward, P.W.; Dooley, J.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Conventional Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

105

Removing the Hydrocarbon from Hydrocarbon Flow ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gas and petroleum products. Therefore is important to have primary calibration standards with low uncertainty. NIST has several hydrocarbon liquid ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

106

Method for producing hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols and ketones from an aqueous solution containing the same into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. Another object of the invention is to provide a mixture consisting of hydrocarbon, alcohols or ketones, polyoxyalkylene polymer and water which can be directly added to fuels or further purified. The above stated objects are achieved in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5 to 18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is mixed in the presence or one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers described in detail hereinafter; the fermentation alcohol being extracted into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Tan, Eric; Dutta, Abhijit; Jacobson, Jacob; Cafferty, Kara

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Complex conductivity tensor of anisotropic hydrocarbon-1 bearing shales and mudrocks2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to describe seismic and electromagnetic (EM) measurements in these anisotropic54 materials.55 Oil-shale to release their hydrocarbons. Hence, oil shales and58 mudrocks are typically water-wet, single- or dual

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

109

A Review of World Hydrocarbon Resource Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reviews assessments of world oil, natural gas, and oil shale resources made between the end of World War II and the end of 1980. Details are provided on the methods used in developing these assessments, geographic coverage, time horizons, and major assumptions (e.g., about discovery rates and recovery factor). Conclusions on the current state of knowledge concerning each of these hydrocarbon resources are presented.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Experimental study of lube oil characteristics in the PCV system and effects on engine oil consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine oil consumption is an important source of hydrocarbon and particulate emissions in modem automobile engines. Great efforts have been made by automotive manufacturers to minimize the impact of oil consumption on ...

Lopez, Oscar, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Preliminary investigation of the nature of hydrocarbon migration and entrapment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations indicate that hydrocarbon migration and entrapment in stacked fault-bounded reservoirs are mainly affected by the following factors: charge time, faults, pressure and geological structures. The charge time for commercial hydrocarbon accumulation is much longer in oil-water systems than in oil-gas-water systems. Faults are classified into charging faults and 'back doors' faults other than charging faults in stacked fault-bounded reservoirs. The lower the displacement pressure of a fault, the higher its updip oil transportation ability. The downdip oil transportation ability of a fault is usually low and cannot cause commercial downdip oil accumulation. Back doors affect both hydrocarbon percent charge and hydrocarbon migration pathways. Updip back doors improve updip oil charge. The lower the displacement pressure of an updip back door, the more efficient the updip oil charge before 3,000 years. Back doors whose displacement pressure is equal to or higher than 28.76 psi are effective in sealing faults in oil-water systems. On the contrary, only sealing faults result in commercial gas accumulations in stacked fault-compartmentalized reservoirs. Otherwise gas is found over oil. Downdip back doors generally have few effects on downdip hydrocarbon charge. Geopressure enhances the updip oil transportation of a fault and improves the positive effects of updip back doors during updip oil charge. Geopressure and updip back doors result in more efficient updip oil charge. A physical barrier is not necessarily a barrier to oil migration with the aid of geopressure and updip back doors. The chance for hydrocarbon charge into reservoirs along growth faults is not equal. Any one of the above controlling factors can change the patterns of hydrocarbon charge and distribution in such complex geological structures. Generally, lower reservoirs and updip reservoirs are favored. Reservoirs along low-permeability charging faults may be bypassed. Gas can only charge the updip reservoirs. Both updip and downdip back doors can facilitate oil penetrating a barrier fault to charge reservoirs offset by the barrier fault. Interreservoir migration among stacked fault-compartmentalized reservoirs is an important mechanism for hydrocarbon accumulation and trap identification. The interreservoir migration is a very slow process, even though the displacement pressures of bounding faults may be very low.

Bai, Jianyong

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Massively-parallel electrical-conductivity imaging of hydrocarbons using the Blue Gene/L supercomputer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon, i.e. oil and gas, exploration, and are provenoil and gas reservoirs at the highest resolution possible, and on time scales acceptable to the explorationexploration in basin hydrocarbon systems including the subsurface visualization of earth resistivity volumes applied to oil and gas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Supply, disposition, and stocks of all oils by P. A. D. districts and imports into the United States, by country, final 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final annual US supply, disposition, and stocks are detailed for: all oils, petroleum products, crude oil, selected natural gas plant liquids, and net unfinished oils for each of five P.A.D. (Petroleum Administration for Defense) Districts for 1978. Petroleum products include motor gasoline, aviation gasoline, jet engine fuels, ethane, liquefied gases, kerosene, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, petrochemical feedstocks, naphthas, lubricants, wax, coke, asphalt, and other products. Also given is the percentage of refinery yields based on crude and net unfinished oil rerun. Imports of petroleum products and of crude oil into the United States are shown by country and continent, with US totals and subtotals for each P.A.D. District. OPEC (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries) members are indicated. Data are reported in barrels per day. An accompanying map indicates the US P.A.D. Districts. A brief narrative discusses salient statistics. Prior to the 1978 annual issue, this report was entitled Supply Demand, and Stocks of All Oils by P.A.D. Districts and Imports into the United States, by Country. 1 figure, 6 tables.

Not Available

1980-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The northern GOM is a prolific hydrocarbon province where rapid migration of oil, gases, and brines from deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs occurs through faults...

116

Excess water production diagnosis in oil fields using ensemble classifiers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In hydrocarbon production, more often than not, oil is produced commingled with water. As long as the water production rate is below the economic level… (more)

Rabiei, Minou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Formation of seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California. Marof seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field Irameasurement system in the Coal Oil Point seep field in the

Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

GIS-based modeling of secondary hydrocarbon migration pathways and its application in the northern Songliao Basin, northeast China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon migration pathways are the linkage between hydrocarbon source areas and accumulation sites. Modeling accurately the pathways of hydrocarbon migration is of important significance in determining the location of favorable petroleum exploration ... Keywords: Digital elevation model (DEM), Geographic information system (GIS), Migration pathway, Oil and gas-bearing basin, Visualization

Xuefeng Liu; Guangfa Zhong; Jingyuan Yin; Youbin He; Xianhua Li

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Process and apparatus for oil shale retorting  

SciTech Connect

A process and apparatus are disclosed for the continuoua steady state retorting of ground oil shale in the absence of air. Retorting is accomplished by countercurrently contacting heated spent oil shale with fresh ground oil shale in a vessel from which air is excluded. The spent oil shale is heated by combustion of its carbonaceous residue to form a hot heat transfer medium which, when contacted with fresh oil shale in the retorting process, provides the energy for the recovery of hydrocarbons. (auth)

Frick, G.W.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Kyoto's Unfinished Business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors offer a provisional assessment of where the Kyoto negotiations have left the climate change issue. They present a few widely divergent assesments of what the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change will accomplish, ...

Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Schmalensee, Richard.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

In-situ laser retorting of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale formations were retorted in-situ and gaseous hydrocarbon products recovered by drilling two or more wells into an oil shale formation. After fracturing a region of oil shale formation by directing a high energy laser beam into one of the wells and focussing the laser beam into a region of oil shale formation from a laser optical system, compressed gas was forced into the well which supports combustion in the flame front ignited by laser beam, thereby retorting the oil shale and recovering gaseous hydrocarbon products which permeate through the fractured oil shale from one of the auxiliary wells.

Bloomfield, H.S.

1977-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

124

Clean, economical, underwater (hydrocarbon) storage  

SciTech Connect

A consortium consisting of Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft A.G., Phoenix Gummiwerke A.G., Strabag Bau-A.G., and Bugsier Reederei und Bergungs-A.G. offers a plausible solution to the large-scale underwater storage of hydrocarbons. Up to 20 storage compartments of 8000 cu m capacity can be assembled for a capacity of 160,000 cu m. Each compartment is divided in half by a nylon-reinforced polyurethane diaphragm which isolates oil or other products on one side from sea-water ballast on the other side. As oil is pumped into storage on one side of the diaphragm, the diaphragm moves and ballast on the other side is displaced to the sea. Ballast re-enters the compartment during unloading. The system can enable small offshore platforms to produce more economically. Cargo tankers load at 8000 cu m/hr. The tanks will be used in 200 m or greater water depths. The loading station is installed in a buoy 30 m below the water surface.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms for the transport of hydrocarbons from the source rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures have been proposed, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes it is imperative to use the ...

Panahi, Hamed; Renard, Francois; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Malthe-Sřrenssen, Anders; Meakin, Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Hydrocarbon adsorption system  

SciTech Connect

In a solid adsorbent hydrocarbon recovery system for processing natural gas, towers adapted for performing adsorbing, cooling, and regenerating functions are used. It is recommended that a regeneration gas be used of substantially uniform richness in hydrocarbons in the closed-cycle regeneration system. The natural gas stream is flowed through an adsorbent bed to remove liquid hydrocarbons. A portion of the stripped gas stream is flowed through a second adsorbent bed for cooling purposes. A heated, rich, regeneration gas is circulated through a closed-cycle regeneration system that includes a third adsorbent bed. This rich regeneration gas is combined with the stripped gas stream. These steps are repeated in a cyclic operation. (10 claims)

Humphries, C.L.

1966-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Long-run models of oil stock prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification of the forces that drive oil stock prices is extremely important given the size of the Oil & Gas industry and its links with the energy sector and the environment. In the next decade oil companies will have to deal with international ... Keywords: C32, Cointegration, Energy, Environment, Hydrocarbon fuels, L71, Non-renewable resources, Oil companies, Oil stock prices, Q30, Q40, Vector error correction models

Alessandro Lanza; Matteo Manera; Margherita Grasso; Massimo Giovannini

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hydrocarbon/Total Combustibles Sensor  

the invention is an electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor that is more reliable and reproducible than any other hydrocarbon sensor on the market today. The patented method for producing the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for ...

129

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Catalysts for hydrocarbon conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalyst, particularly useful in catalytic reforming and for producing highly pure aromatic hydrocarbons, comprising an alumina carrier and containing, expressed in proportion of the weight of the alumina carrier: 005 to 1% of platinum 01 to 4% of gallium, indium or thallium 01 to 2% of tungsten, and 1 to 10% of halogen.

Le P. J.; Malmaison, R.; Marcilly, C.; Martino, G.; Miquel, J.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006. “California Crude Oil Production and Imports” Aprilwww.energy.ca.gov/oil/statistics/crude_oil_receipts.html desector shows inputs of crude oil, unfinished oil and

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

Blandford, J.W.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

135

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

136

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

137

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual FO - Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual FO - 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual FO - Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

138

Enhanced solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons using biosurfactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigation included two similarly-designed experiments. In the first, a biological surfactant produced by Rhodococcus strain H13-A and a commonly-used synthetic surfactant, Tween-80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate), were compared for their effectiveness in enhancing the transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a complex organic phase into aqueous solution. In the batch-reactor experiment, each reactor contained a surfactant solution and West Texas Crude oil, while the control reactors contained distilled-deionized water and the crude oil. Using a temporal-monitoring scheme, the reactors were sacrificially sampled to determine the water-accommodated fraction (WAF). The phenanthrenes, fluorenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes showed significant increases in their aqueous-plus-micellar-phase concentrations in the presence of surfactants; the increase was greater for the biosurfactant compared to the synthetic surfactant. The enhancement in "solubility" was also more significant for the highly-substituted aromatics, when compared to their parent compounds. In the second study, the effects of four biosurfactants on the solubility of petroleum saturated hydrocarbons were compared. Rhodococcus species H13-A (glycolipid-producing), Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 (rhamnolipid-producing), Candida bombicola ATCC 22214 (sophorolipid-producing), and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 21332 (surfactin-producing) were compared to a control of distilled-deionized water. The experimental design was similar that of the first study. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa treatment significantly enhanced the solubility of the lower-weight, higher-weight and branched saturated hydrocarbons. The Rhodococcus treatment significantly enhanced the solubility of the low-molecular-weight compounds, but only moderately increased the solubilities of the other saturates. Neither the Candida nor the Bacillus solutions produced any negligible increase in solubility under these laboratory conditions.

Page, Cheryl Ann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

FROZEN HYDROCARBONS IN COMETS  

SciTech Connect

Recent investigations of the luminescence of frozen hydrocarbon particles of icy cometary halos have been carried out. The process of luminescence of organic icy particles in a short-wavelength solar radiation field is considered. A comparative analysis of observed and laboratory data leads to 72 luminescent emission lines in the spectrum of the comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. The concept of cometary relict matter is presented, and the creation of a database of unidentified cometary emission lines is proposed.

Simonia, Irakli, E-mail: irakli.simonia@jcu.edu.au [School of Graduate Studies, Ilia State University, 3/5 Cholokashvili Street, Tbilisi, 0162 (Georgia); Center for Astronomy, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811 (Australia)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

143

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

144

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis for the Production of the Hydrocarbon Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising technique for conversion of biomass into hydrocarbons for use as transportation fuels. For over 30 years this process has been studied and it has been demonstrated that oils can be produced with high concentrations of hydrocarbons and low levels of oxygen. However, the yields from this type of conversion are typically low and the catalysts, which are often zeolites, are quickly deactivated through coking. In addition, the hydrocarbons produced are primarily aromatic molecules (benzene, toluene, xylene) that not desirable for petroleum refineries and are not well suited for diesel or jet engines. The goals of our research are to develop new multifunction catalysts for the production of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel range molecules and to improve process conditions for higher yields and low coking rates. We are investigating filtration and the use of hydrogen donor molecules to improve catalyst performance.

Nimlos, M. R.; Robichaud, D. J.; Mukaratate, C.; Donohoe, B. S.; Iisa, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

From upstream to downstream: Megatrends and latest developments in Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector has been characterized by reorganization, revitalization, regional cooperation, environmental awakening, and steady expansion. The pattern of these changes, which appear to be the megatrends of the region`s hydrocarbons sector development, will continue during the rest of the 1990s. To further study the current situation and future prospects of Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector, we critically summarize in this short article the key issues in the region`s oil and gas development. These megatrends in Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector development will impact not only the future energy demand and supply in the region, but also global oil flows in the North American market and across the Pacific Ocean. Each country is individually discussed; pipelines to be constructed are discussed also.

Wu, Kang; Pezeshki, S.; McMahon, J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Process for oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Particulate oil shale is subjected to a pyrolysis with a hot, non-oxygenous gas in a pyrolysis vessel, with the products of the pyrolysis of the shale contained kerogen being withdrawn as an entrained mist of shale oil droplets in a gas for a separation of the liquid from the gas. Hot retorted shale withdrawn from the pyrolysis vessel is treated in a separate container with an oxygenous gas so as to provide combustion of residual carbon retained on the shale, producing a high temperature gas for the production of some steam and for heating the non-oxygenous gas used in the oil shale retorting process in the first vessel. The net energy recovery includes essentially complete recovery of the organic hydrocarbon material in the oil shale as a liquid shale oil, a high BTU gas, and high temperature steam.

Jones, John B. (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501); Kunchal, S. Kumar (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 80501)

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

147

HYDROCARBON LIQUID FLOW CALIBRATION SERVICE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and is the cross correlation coefficient ... a NIST Hydrocarbon Liquid Flow Calibration Facility ... FED2004-56790, 2004 Heat Transfer/Fluids Engineering ...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap therebetween. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap there between. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition. 6 figs.

Kong, P.C.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Potential of Deep Seismic Profiling for Hydrocarbon Exploration _ B. Pinet, C. Bois (Editors) and Editions Technip, Paris 1990, pp. 141-160  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for deep hydrocarbon exploration at the time of World War II when the demand for oil rose (Sloss, 1987 producer of oil, gas, lignite and potash. The major bordering, and to, some extent, controlling structures) Geological Survey of Canada, 1 Observatory Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario KIA OY3, Canada. (2) ARCO Oil & Gas Co

Jones, Alan G.

151

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil shale: A sedimentary rock containing kerogen, a solid organic material. Oil stocks: Oil stocks include crude oil (including strategic reserves), unfinished ...

153

Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Finding Hidden Oil and Gas Reserves Key Challenges: Seismic imaging methods, vital in our continuing search for deep offshore oil and gas fields, have a long and established history in hydrocarbon reservoir exploration but the technology has encountered difficulty in discriminating different types of reservoir fluids, such as brines, oil, and gas. Why it Matters: Imaging methods that improve locating and extracting petroleum and gas from the earth by even a few percent can yield enormous payoffs. Geophysical realizations of hydrocarbon reservoirs at unprecedented levels of detail will afford new detection abilities, new efficiencies and new exploration savings by revealing where hydrocarbon deposits reside. Can also be used for improved understanding of potential

154

Two decades of hydrocarbon exploration activity in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, hydrocarbon exploration activity within Indonesia has been based on the Indonesian Energy Policy, aims of which include intensifying and expanding hydrocarbon exploration programs. Expansion into the offshore regions of the nation has resulted in the discovery of petroliferous basins. The first offshore oil production came on stream in 1971. Since then, significant achievements have been made in developing these resources. Intensified onshore exploration has resulted in additional oil fields being discovered in these more mature areas. Among the significant gas fields discovered during the past 20 years, Arun and Badak both supply major LNG projects. Oil fields have been found in the onshore areas of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Java, and Irian Jaya, and in the offshore areas around West Java, Madura, Natuna, and East Kalimantan. The exploration drilling success during this time has been approximately 32%. In addition, the ratio of oil field development to these discoveries is about 54%. For technical and economic reasons, not all discoveries can be developed into oil fields. Recently, Pertamina's Research and Development Division organized the study of data contributed by Pertamina exploration, foreign contractors, and science institutes. This study reveals that 60 basins are spread throughout the onshore and offshore areas of the nation. Using PAUS (plan and analysis of uncertainty situation), a Monte Carolo simulation program, the hydrocarbon potential of each basin has been estimated. These estimates will be continually revised as more data are made available to the study, as the geology of Indonesia is better understood in terms of plate tectonic theory, and as computing techniques improve.

Suardy, A.; Taruno, J.; Simbolon, P.H.; Simbolon, B.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

Meyer, R.F.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Microbial hydrocarbons: back to the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The defining challenge of energy research in the 21st century is the development and deployment of technologies for large-scale reconfiguration of global energy infrastructure. Modern society is built upon a concentrated yet finite reservoir of diverse hydrocarbons formed through the photosynthetic transformation of several hundred million years of solar energy. In human history, the fossil energy era will be short lived and never repeated. Although the timing of peak oil is extensively debated, it is an eventuality. It is, therefore, imperative that projections for both when it will occur and the degree to which supply will fall short of demand be taken into serious consideration, especially in the sectors of energy technology development, political and economic decision making, and societal energy usage. The requirement for renewable energy systems is no longer a point for discussion, and swift advances on many fronts are vital to counteract current and impending crises in both energy and the environment.

Work, Victoria H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Posewitz, Matthew C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Lubricant formulation for lower unburnt hydrocarbon emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engine-out emissions of unburnt hydrocabons from spark ignition engines are attributable to a number of mechanisms, occurring during the engine cycle, by which fuel escapes combustion. These include absorption of fuel components into the bore lubricating oil film during compression, and subsequent desorption into hot combustion gases throughout expansion. A proportion of the hydrocarbons desorbed will then be emitted, either as unburnt or partially oxidised fuel. This mechanism has been studied by a number of workers, and estimates of its importance vary from 10 to 30% of total hydrocarbons being related to the absorption/desorption process. A novel lubricant additive has been formulated for the purpose of reducing the quantity of fuel which is absorbed into the bore lubricant film, and hence the quantity of fuel subsequently desorbed. This paper describes a programme to evaluate the effect that this lubricant additive can have on engine-out emissions from a single cylinder research engine, together with results from current technology, low-emitting US and European vehicles, tested over FTP and ECE drive cycles. 11 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Beckwith, P.; Cooper, J.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms › Facebook Twitter ... Petroleum products include unfinished oils, liquefied petroleum gases, pentanes plus, aviation gasoline, motor gasoline, ...

159

Oil shale retorting and retort water purification process  

SciTech Connect

An oil shale process is provided to retort oil shale and purify oil shale retort water. In the process, raw oil shale is retorted in an in situ underground retort or in an above ground retort to liberate shale oil, light hydrocarbon gases and oil shale retort water. The retort water is separated from the shale oil and gases in a sump or in a fractionator or quench tower followed by an API oil/water separator. After the retort water is separated from the shale oil, the retort water is steam stripped, carbon adsorbed and biologically treated, preferably by granular carbon adsorbers followed by activated sludge treatment or by activated sludge containing powdered activated carbon. The retort water can be granularly filtered before being steam stripped. The purified retort water can be used in various other oil shale processes, such as dedusting, scrubbing, spent shale moisturing, backfilling, in situ feed gas injection and pulsed combustion.

Venardos, D.G.; Grieves, C.G.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hydrocarbon adsorption apparatus and process  

SciTech Connect

A method of recovering hydrocarbons from natural gas by the use of solid adsorbents consists of 3 steps. The main flow stream of natural gas is passed through a first and only bed of solid adsorbent so that at least a portion of the hydrocarbons present is adsorbed in the bed. A heated regeneration gas is next passed through a second bed of solid adsorbent so that at least a portion of the hydrocarbons is desorbed from the bed. The main flow of natural gas is passed through the second and only bed when in a heated condition after regeneration and the flow of heated regeneration gas is passed through the first bed. The hydrocarbons desorbed from the first and second beds from the regeneration gas are recovered while the previous 3 steps are repeated. (6 claims)

Humphries, C.L.

1966-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum Seeps Near Coal Oil Point, CA C distribution of oil forms a plume along the continental shelf that we suggest represents a chronic fallout the distribution of the fallout over a period of 0.4-5 days. The extent of hydrocarbon loss is consistent for all

Fabrikant, Sara Irina

162

Oil gravity distribution in the diatomite at South Belridge Field, Kern County, CA: Implications for oil sourcing and migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding oil gravity distribution in the Belridge Diatomite has led to economic infill development and specific enhanced recovery methods for targeted oil properties. To date more than 100 wells have provided samples used to determining vertical and areal distribution of oil gravity in the field. Detailed geochemical analyses were also conducted on many of the oil samples to establish different oil types, relative maturities, and to identify transformed oils. The geochemical analysis also helped identify source rock expulsion temperatures and depositional environments. The data suggests that the Belridge diatomite has been charged by a single hydrocarbon source rock type and was generated over a relatively wide range of temperatures. Map and statistical data support two distinct oil segregation processes occurring post expulsion. Normal gravity segregation within depositional cycles of diatomite have caused lightest oils to migrate to the crests of individual cycle structures. Some data suggests a loss of the light end oils in the uppermost cycles to the Tulare Formation above, or through early biodegradation. Structural rotation post early oil expulsion has also left older, heavier oils concentrated on the east flank of the structure. With the addition of other samples from the south central San Joaquin area, we have been able to tie the Belridge diatomite hydrocarbon charge into a regional framework. We have also enhanced our ability to predict oil gravity and well primary recovery by unraveling some key components of the diatomite oil source and migration history.

Hill, D.W.; Sande, J.J. [Shell Western E& P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States); Doe, P.H. [Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ukraine hobbled by oil, gas shortfall  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that oil and gas shortages have dealt a severe economic blow to Ukraine. The former Soviet republic ranks second behind Russia in population and gross domestic product among members of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Ukraine's hydrocarbon output has fallen sharply since the 1970s, and the republic's fuel problems have been exacerbated by declining coal extraction.

Not Available

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

Solution mining and heating by oxidation for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation. A second fluid is produced from the portion. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. A controlled amount of oxidant is provided to the portion of the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Experimental Studies Focused on the Pore-Scale Aspects of Heavy Oil and Bitumen Recovery Using the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) and Solvent-Aided SAGD (SA-SAGD) Recovery Processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing energy consumption and continuous depletion of hydrocarbon reservoirs will result in a conventional oil production peak in the near future. Thus, the gap between… (more)

Mohammadzadeh Shanehsaz, Omidreza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Application of Multivariable Control to Oil and Coal Fired Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased visibility provided by advanced measurement and control techniques has shown that control of oil and coal fired boilers is a complex problem involving simultaneous determination of flue gas carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, opacity and temperature levels. A microcomputer-based control system which recognizes the inter-relationship of these variables has produced fuel savings averaging about 3% on coal and oil fired boilers. The system is described and case study data is presented for both coal and oil fired boilers.

Swanson, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EIA-14 REFINERS’ MONTHLY COST REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

completed forms to: Oil & Gas Survey . U.S. Department of Energy . Ben Franklin Station . PO Box 279 . ... finished petroleum products from crude oil, unfinished oils,

168

Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Hopson, Dr Janet L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Jia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Oil shale combustion/retorting  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) conducted a number of feasibility studies on the combustion and retorting of five oil shales: Celina (Tennessee), Colorado, Israeli, Moroccan, and Sunbury (Kentucky). These studies generated technical data primarily on (1) the effects of retorting conditions, (2) the combustion characteristics applicable to developing an optimum process design technology, and (3) establishing a data base applicable to oil shales worldwide. During the research program, METC applied the versatile fluidized-bed process to combustion and retorting of various low-grade oil shales. Based on METC's research findings and other published information, fluidized-bed processes were found to offer highly attractive methods to maximize the heat recovery and yield of quality oil from oil shale. The principal reasons are the fluidized-bed's capacity for (1) high in-bed heat transfer rates, (2) large solid throughput, and (3) selectivity in aromatic-hydrocarbon formation. The METC research program showed that shale-oil yields were affected by the process parameters of retorting temperature, residence time, shale particle size, fluidization gas velocity, and gas composition. (Preferred values of yields, of course, may differ among major oil shales.) 12 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

Rao, Dandina N. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

171

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Solubilization of petroleum hydrocarbons using biosurfactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons in water is the major factor limiting the degradation rates of these compounds (Zhang and Miller, 1994). The fraction that is more soluble in the aqueous phase is degraded at higher rates, while less soluble or insoluble compounds have lower degradation rates due to limited bioavailability to the microbial community. A recent study in our lab found no significant degradation of weathered petroleum at a Texas petrochemical plant site. It was concluded that bioavailability of the crude oil to the microorganisms limited the degradation rates (Mills, 1994). Preliminary experiments at our laboratories have also indicated enhanced solubilities of petroleum hydrocarbons due to the effects of biosurfactants (Kanga et al., 1994). This research focused on biosurfactants because they have been shown to be as effective as chemical surfactants and, most importantly, they enhance biodegradation. Glycolipid biosurfactants are produced by Rhodococcus species HI 3-A to enhance substrate solubility and promote bioavailability for degradation. The work proceeded in two stages. The initial stage involved production and characterization of extracellular biosurfactants by HI 3-A when grown on minimal salts media with hexadecane as the carbon source. The second stage evaluated the performance of the biosurfactants in enhancing the aqueous solubility of weathered West Texas Crude. Initial results indicated production of the biosurfactants by Rhodococcus species H13-A during the stationary growth stage. Biosurfactants lowered the surface tension from 72 to-30 dynes/cm and interfacial tension to below 5 dynes/cm. The two-, three-, and four-ring aromatic compounds showed substantial increase in their aqueous phase concentrations in the presence of biosurfactants. The enhancement was more dramatic with the larger aromatics and also the highly substituted-compounds. Preliminary experiments on toxicity and biodegradation indicated higher levels of toxicity in the surfactant/aqueous mixtures due to increased PAH partitioning (Lambert, 1995), and increased degradation rates for the target PAH compounds.

Kanga, Shahrukh

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reclamation and reuse of freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

SciTech Connect

ADS is using a commercially available solvent reclamation system to recycle 95-97 percent of the Freon used in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses. ADS has further developed the commercially available solvent reclamation system to accommodate radioactive contaminated Freon. This report establishes the following: validity of the method; success of recycling; and effect of radionuclides in recycling radioactive contaminated Freon. The standard analysis method for determining total petroleum hydrocarbons (commonly known as oil and grease determination) involves solvent extraction of the hydrocarbons using Freon followed by quantitation using infrared detection. This has been the method of choice because it is simple, rugged, inexpensive, and applicable to both solid and liquid samples and to radioactive samples. Due to its deleterious effect on the ozone layer, the use of Freon and other chloro-fluorocarbons (CFCs) has been greatly restricted. Freon has become very expensive (800$/liter) and will soon be unavailable entirely. Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon extraction method. These methods include solid-phase extraction, solvent extraction, and supercritical fluid extraction all of which use gravimetric determination or infrared analysis of the extracted hydrocarbons. These methods are not as precise or as sensitive as the Freon extraction method, and a larger amount of sample is therefore required due to the decreased sensitivity. The solid phase extraction method cannot accommodate solid samples. Supercritical fluid extraction requires expensive instrumentation. ADS opted to keep the existing Freon method and recycle the solvent. An inexpensive solvent reclamation system was procured to reclaim the spent Freon. This reclaimer removes hydrocarbons from the Freon solvent by passage through an activated carbon bed.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Peterson, S.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Cleanup of hydrocarbon conversion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a substantially contaminant-free second hydrocarbon feed using a second reforming catalyst, in a catalytic-reforming system having equipment contaminated through contact with a contaminant-containing prior feed. It comprises: contacting the first hydrocarbon feed in the catalytic-reforming system at first reforming conditions with a first reforming catalyst until contaminant removal from the conversion system is substantially completed and the system is contaminant-free; thereafter replacing the first reforming catalyst in the contaminant-free catalytic-reforming system with a second reforming catalyst; and thereafter contacting the second hydrocarbon feed in the contaminant-free catalytic-reforming system with the second reforming catalyst at second reforming conditions.

Peer, R.L.; Russ, M.B.

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

Yang, Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

176

Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

Yang; Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Application and Prospect of Distributed Temperature Sensor in Oil-Gas Exploration Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obtaining temperature information is of great significance to distinguish borehole conditions, monitor oil-field performance, and optimize working system after hydrocarbon exploration and production started. Distributed temperature sensor is developed ... Keywords: distributed, temperature, sensor, application

Yang Chuan; Chen Ping; Ma Tianshou; Han Xiong

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Determination of concentration-dependent dispersion of propane in vapor extraction of heavy oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vapex (vapor extraction) is a solvent-based non-thermal in-situ heavy oil recovery process. In Vapex process, a vaporized hydrocarbon solvent is injected into an upper horizontal… (more)

Abukhalifeh, Hadil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction - Energy ...  

A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including ...

180

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons ...  

Conventional biomass to hydrocarbon conversion is generally not commercially feasible, due to costs of the conversion process.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Getty mines oil sands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large deposit of oil-laden diatomaceous earth in the McKittrick oil field 40 miles west of Bakersfield, California, has resisted all efforts at production by standard means. Getty Oil Co. is in the pilot phase of a project to recover the Diatomite's oil by an open pit mining operation. It also could have significant implications for other California oil fields, possibly setting the stage for the mining of oil sands in shallow fields like Kern River, S. Belridge, and Lost Hills to maximize oil recovery. A report on the project is summarized. The Diatomite is estimated to have 500 million bbl of oil in reserves, of which 380 million bbl are recoverable. The estimated amount of recoverable oil exceeds the McKittrick field's cumulative production of 240 million bbl. A pilot plant was built to test solvent extraction method of recovering heavy oil. The multistep process involves a series of 6 extractors. The Lurgi retorting plant employs a 2-step heating process to separate hydrocarbons from crushed ore.

Rintoul, B.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of this project is to overcome existing water-related environmental barriers to possible oil shale development in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Data collected from this study will help alleviate problems associated with disposal of produced saline water, which is a by-product of methods used to facilitate conventional hydrocarbon production. Performers Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84114 Collaborators Uinta Basin Petroleum Companies: Questar, Anadarko, Newfield, Enduring Resources, Bill Barrett, Berry Petroleum, EOG Resources, FIML, Wind River Resources, Devon, Rosewood, Flying J, Gasco, Mustang Fuel,

183

DETERMINATION OF SOLID-LIQUID EQUILIBRIA DATA FOR MIXTURES OF HEAVY HYDROCARBONS IN A LIGHT SOLVENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology was developed using an FT-IR spectroscopic technique to obtain solid-liquid equilibria (SLE) data for mixtures of heavy hydrocarbons in significantly lighter hydrocarbon diluents. SLE was examined in multiple Model Oils that were assembled to simulate waxes. The various Model oils were comprised of C-30 to C-44 hydrocarbons in decane. The FT-IR technique was used to identify the wax precipitation temperature (WPT). The DSC technique was also used in the identification of the onset of the two-phase equilibrium in this work. An additional Model oil made up of C-20 to C-30 hydrocarbons in decane was studied using the DSC experiment. The weight percent solid below the WPT was calculated using the FT-IR experimental results. The WPT and the weight percent solid below the WPT were predicted using an activity coefficient based thermodynamic model. The FT-IR spectroscopy method is found to successfully provide SLE data and also has several advantages over other laboratory-based methods.

F.V. Hanson; J.V. Fletcher; Karthik R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hydrocarbons from plants and trees  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The way energy was used in the US in 1980 was examined. A diagram shows the development of energy from its source to its end use. The following are described: the carbon dioxide problem - the greenhouse effect, sugar cane as an energy source, hydrocarbon-producing plants and trees, and isoprenoids from plants and trees. (MHR)

Calvin, M.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or natural gas or even oil shale (which represents anotherto transform the coal or oil shale or gaseous, fuel. There

Calvin, Melvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N. (Pertamina Exploration and Production, Jakarta (Indonesia))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Enhanced oil recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Western oil shale conversion using the ROPE copyright process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing to develop the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process to recover liquid hydrocarbon products from oil shale, tar sand, and other solid hydrocarbonaceous materials. The process consists of three major steps: (1) pyrolyzing the hydrocarbonaceous material at a low temperature (T {le} 400{degrees}C) with recycled product oil, (2) completing the pyrolysis of the residue at a higher temperature (T > 400{degrees}C) in the absence of product oil, and (3) combusting the solid residue and pyrolysis gas in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor to produce process heat. Many conventional processes, such as the Paraho and Union processes, do not use oil shale fines (particles smaller than 1.27 cm in diameter). The amount of shale discarded as fines from these processes can be as high as 20% of the total oil shale mined. Research conducted to date suggests that the ROPE process can significantly improve the overall oil recovery from western oil shale by processing the oil shale fines typically discarded by conventional processes. Also, if the oil shale fines are co-processed with shale oil used as the heavy recycle oil, a better quality oil will be produced that can be blended with the original shale oil to make an overall produce that is more acceptable to the refineries and easier to pipeline. Results from tests conducted in a 2-inch process development unit (PDU) and a 6-inch bench-scale unit (BSU) with western oil shale demonstrated a maximum oil yield at temperatures between 700 and 750{degrees}F (371 and 399{degrees}C). Test results also suggest that the ROPE process has a strong potential for recovering oil from oil shale fines, upgrading shale oil, and separating high-nitrogen-content oil for use as an asphalt additive. 6 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Fahy, L.J.; Grimes, R.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

192

PREDICTIVE MODELS. Enhanced Oil Recovery Model  

SciTech Connect

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1 chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2 carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3 in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4 polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5 steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

Ray, R.M. [DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hydrocarbon Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Technologies Hydrocarbon Technologies Place Lawrenceville, New Jersey Zip 8648 Sector Efficiency Product String representation "Technology-base ... onmental risks." is too long. Coordinates 36.761678°, -77.845048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.761678,"lon":-77.845048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

194

Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

195

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) generated during the oil shale extraction process. AMSO, which holds a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) lease from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for a 160-acre parcel of Federal land in northwest Colorado's oil-shale rich Piceance Basin, will provide technical assistance and oil shale core samples. If AMSO can demonstrate an economically viable and environmentally acceptable extraction process, it retains the right to acquire a 5,120-acre commercial lease. When subject to high temperatures and high pressures, oil shale (a sedimentary rock that is rich in hydrocarbons) can be converted into oil. Through mineralization, the CO 2 could be stored in the shale

196

Thailand: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that, out of 104 new concessions offered during 1990 by the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) in Thailand, 33 concession blocks were recently awarded to 17 oil companies. Thailand and Vietnam also agreed last December to set up a joint committee as soon as possible to study exploration possibilities in the overlapping area both claim in the eastern Gulf of Thailand. PTT Exploration and Production (PTTEP) also is planning the joint development of an offshore area claimed by Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. If it materializes, all benefits and costs will be split three ways. The area between Thailand and Cambodia is thought to have high potential for hydrocarbons.

Khin, J.A. (AFKA Co., PTE Ltd. (SG))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Characteristics of pyrobitumen and oil obtained from the pyrolysis of Tipton member Green River oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pyrobitumens and oils produced from the Green River oil shale at 375, 400 and 425{degree}C for various reaction times were characterized to obtain information for kerogen decomposition models. The atomic H/C ratio of pyrobitumen decreased with increasing reaction temperature and time. The average molecular weight of pyrobitumen increased with reaction temperature and time, reached a maximum at each temperature, and then decreased. The pyrobitumens contained an extremely high amount of polar materials; the variations of polar materials, nitrogen contents of pyrobitumen, and pyrobitumen amounts followed the same pattern, suggesting that the nitrogen functional groups play an important role during kerogen decomposition. In contrast, the oils contained much lower amounts of polars and had a constant atomic H/C ratio of 1.70 and an average molecular weight of about 270. Most of the aliphatic hydrocarbons occurred in the oil rather than pyrobitumen after the oil shale pyrolysis.

Chong, S.L.; Miknis, F.P. (Western Research Institute, Laramie, WY (USA)); Zhao, X. (Daqing Petroleum Institute, Heilongjiang (China)); Holmes, S. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Study of net soot formation in hydrocarbon reforming for hydrogen fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen fuel cell is expected to be a valuable addition to the electric utility industry; however, the current fuel supply availability requires that conventional heavier hydrocarbon fuels also be considered as primary fuels. Typical heavier fuels would be No. 2 fuel oil with its accompanying sulfur impurities, compared with the currently used light hydrocarbon gases. The potential future use of alternate fuels which are rich in aromatics would exacerbate the problems associated with hydrogen production. Among the more severe of these problems, is the greater tendency of heavier hydrocarbons to form soot. The development of a quasi-global kinetics model to represent the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions which control the autothermal hydrogen reforming process and the accompanying soot formation and gasification was the objective of this study.

Edelman, R. B.; Farmer, R. C.; Wang, T. S.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Annular centrifugal contactors as rapid oil-water separation devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of preliminary test to apply devices known as annular centrifugal contactors to the rapid separation of oil-water mixtures are presented. Separation efficiencies of oil from water of >99% have been demonstrated on both light and heavy oils. Equilibrium within the separating zone of the contractor is reached within seconds. Dynamic testing in which water to oil flow ratios of 1:5 and 5:1 have been conducted without loss of performance. The laboratory scaled contactors tested have total throughout of 80 cc/min. The design and construction of larger devices with total throughputs of hundreds of gallons per minute is feasible. Such contactors would be compact units capable of allowing rapid recovery from a broad range of hydrocarbon spills on waterways. The efficiency of these contactors is such that water discharged can be returned directly to the environment. Recovered hydrocarbons may be useful without further refinement. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Meikrantz, D.H.; Bourne, G.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Annular centrifugal contactors as rapid oil-water separation devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of preliminary tests to apply devices known as annular centrifugal; contactors to the rapid separation of oil-water mixtures are presented. Separation efficiencies of oil from water of >99% have been demonstrated on both light and heavy oils. Equilibrium within the separating zone of the contactor is reached within seconds. Dynamic testing in which water to oil flow ratios of 1:5 and 5:1 have been conducted without loss of performance. The laboratory scaled contactors tested have total throughput of 80 cc/min. The design and construction of larger devices with total throughputs of hundreds of gallons per minute is feasible. Such contactors would be compact units capable of allowing rapid recovery from a broad range of hydrocarbon spills on waterways. The efficiency of these contactors is such that water discharged can be returned to the environment. Recovered hydrocarbons may be useful without further refinement.

Meikrantz, D.H.; Bourne, G.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Topical viscosity control for light hydrocarbon displacing fluids in petroleum recovery and in fracturing fluids for well stimulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solvent-type flooding fluids comprising light hydrocarbons in the range of ethane to hexane (and mixtures thereof) are used to displace crude oil in formations having temperatures of about 20 degrees to about 150 degrees Centigrade and pressures above about 650 psi, the light hydrocarbons having dissolved therein from about 0.05% to about 3% of an organotin compound of the formula R.sub.3 SnF where each R is independently an alkyl, aryl or alkyaryl group from 3 to 12 carbon atoms. Under the pressures and temperatures described, the organotin compounds become pentacoordinated and linked through the electronegative bridges, forming polymers within the light hydrocarbon flooding media to render them highly viscous. Under ambient conditions, the viscosity control agents will not readily be produced from the formation with either crude oil or water, since they are insoluble in the former and only sparingly soluble in the latter.

Heller, John P. (Socorro, NM); Dandge, Dileep K. (Socorro, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

East Coast (PADD 1) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products for  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Total 60,122 54,018 52,671 54,668 52,999 47,100 1981-2013 Crude Oil 27,587 25,670 24,699 27,070 27,065 18,146 1981-2013 Total Products 32,535 28,348 27,972 27,598 25,934 28,954 1995-2013 Other Liquids 24,957 20,056 20,754 17,137 16,653 17,339 1981-2013 Unfinished Oils 4,375 2,077 2,253 1,874 1,960 1,500 1981-2013

204

Evaluation of biological treatment for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon can be an effective treatment method applied to control oil pollution in both fresh water and marine environments. Hydrocarbon degraders, both indigenous and exogenous, are responsible for utilizing petroleum hydrocarbon as their substrate for growth and energy, thereby degrading them. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons is often enhanced by bioaugmentation and biostimulation depending on the contaminated environment and the competence of the hydrocarbon degraders present. An evaluation of the performance of the biological treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon by the hydrocarbon degrading microbes at the Brayton Fire School??s 4 million gallon per day (MGD) wastewater treatment plant was the main research objective. Samples were taken for two seasons, winter (Nov 03 ?? Jan 03) and summer (Jun 04 ?? Aug 04), from each of the four treatment units: the inlet tank, equalization tank, aeration tank and the outfall tank. The population of aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders were enumerated and nutrient availability in the system were used to evaluate the effectiveness of on-going bioaugmentation and biostimulation. Monitoring of general effluent parameters was conducted to evaluate the treatment plant??s removal efficiency and to determine if effluent discharge was in compliance with the TCEQ permit. The aeration tank is an activated sludge system with no recycling. Hydrocarbon degraders are supplied at a constant rate with additional nutrient supplement. There was a significant decrease in the population of microbes that was originally fed to the system and the quantity resident in the aeration tank. Nutrient levels in the aeration tank were insufficient for the concentration of hydrocarbon degraders, even after the application of dog food as a biostimulant. The use of dog food is not recommended as a nutrient supplement. Adding dog food increases the nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in the aeration tank but the amount of carbon being added with the dog food increases the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). An increase in the concentration of total COD and BOD further increases the nitrogen and phosphorus requirement in the system. The main objective of supplying adequate nutrients to the hydrocarbon degraders would never be achieved as there would be an additional demand of nutrients to degrade the added carbon source. This research study was conducted to identify the drawbacks in the treatment plant which needs further investigation to improve efficiency.

Basu, Pradipta Ranjan

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Microbial dynamics during intrinsic remediation of oil contaminated coastal wetland sediments (a microcosm study)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arabian medium crude oil was applied to historically exposed estuarine sediments contained in a controlled laboratory environment and intrinsically remediated for 56 days. In situ microbial and petroleum dynamics were monitored via Most Probable Number (MPN) statistical analysis, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments (PCR-DGGE). The microbial community was monitored to determine (i) the extent of intrinsic remediation and (ii) if hydrocarbon contamination caused structural changes to chronically exposed microbial communities. MPN statistical analysis revealed that the addition of oil caused 3-fold increases in both aliphatic and aromatic-degrading bacteria. Petroleum chemistry demonstrated a concomitant decrease of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions. Therefore, an inverse relationship between hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial populations and hydrocarbon concentrations was observed throughout the experiment, illustrating that oil was being intrinsically remediated. Kinetic analysis showed that the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons had a half-life of 18 and 56 days, respectively. While MPN and GC-MS analysis showed that microbial populations were increasing and hydrocarbon concentrations were decreasing, PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the addition of oil to a complex microbial community had no detectable effect upon the microbial structure. Community changes that occurred in sediments with oil were consistent with those observed in unoiled sediments. Band pattern analysis revealed that microbial community dynamics were independent of oil contamination. Therefore, when historically contaminated sediments are re-exposed to hydrocarbon pollution, the overall structure of the microbial community as detected by PCR-DGGE is negligibly affected, however dominance of specific subpopulations (i.e. aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon-degraders) can change significantly.

Thornburg, Nathaniel David

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Review Paper/ Crude Oil at the Bemidji Site: 25 Years of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Paper/ Crude Oil at the Bemidji Site: 25 Years of Monitoring, Modeling, and Understanding of hydrocarbon contamination. A considerable volume of oil remains in the subsurface today despite 30 years of natural attenuation and 5 years of pump-and-skim remediation. Studies at Bemidji were among the first

207

Continental margin subsidence and heat flow: important parameters in formation of petroleum hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive continental margins have been shown to subside with a 50-My exponentially decaying rate which cannot be explained by isostatic compensation for sediment loading. This suggests that the subsidence is dominated by geodynamic processes similar to those in the deep ocean. Two simple geologic models for continental breakup are developed: (1) attenuation of continental lithosphere; and (2) intrusion of mantle diapirs. These models for rifting give a direct relation between subsidence of passive margins and their surface heat flow through time. On this basis we develop a method of reconstructing the thermal history of sedimentary strata from regional subsidence and sedimentation history. Because generation of petroleum hydrocarbons depends on the intergrated time/temperature history of buried organic material, this reconstruction technique can be used to determine the depth to the oil range of the hydrocarbon generation window in advance of drilling. By way of example, we reconstruct time/temperature/depth plots and estimate hydrocarbon maturity for one site in the Falkland Plateau and three sites in the North Atlantic near Cape Hatteras. In addition to providing a method for evaluating hydrocarbon potential in frontier regions where there is little or no well control, this approach suggests that there may be significant potential for oil and gas generation on the outer part of the continental rise and in deep-sea sedimentary basins. 13 figures, 1 table.

Royden, L. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge); Sclater, J.G.; Von Herzen, R.P.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically converting an alcohol ...

210

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically ...

211

Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Low-Volatility Motor Oils. Development and Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

saturated hydrocarbons. Viscosity index. 1. >0.03. <90. 80 – 120. 2. ?0.03. ?90 ... GOST 20799–88 does not set a volatility level for this oil, which is within the limits of .... Short Handbook of the Properties of Lubricating Materials and Fuels [

215

EOR (enhanced oil recovery): the reservoir and its contents  

SciTech Connect

Factors in commitment to enhanced oil recovery of any type are discussed with relation to reservoir characteristics. Core analysis, well logging, reservoir engineering studies, well transient testing, and chemical tracer testing are recommended in order to ascertain the dimensions and conditions of the potentially hydrocarbon bearing reservoir. The calculated risk that is necessary even after conducting the recommended practices is emphasized.

Frederick, R.O.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Oil shale of the Uinta Basin, northeastern Utah  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary rocks, which occupy the interior of the Uinta basin, have been subdivided into four formations: Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Uinta. The division is based on stratigraphic and paleontologic evidence. Hydrocarbon materials have been found in all four formations, although bedded deposits (asphaltic sandstone and oil shale) are known only in the Wasatch and Green River. Veins of gilsonite, elaterite, ozocerite, and other related hydrocarbons cut all the Tertiary formation of the Uinta basin. Good oil shale (Uinta basin of Utah) is black or brownish black except on weathered surfaces, where it is blue-white or white. It is fine grained, slightly calcareous, and usually free from grit. It is tough and in thin-bedded deposits remarkably flexible. Although oil shale consists of thin laminae, this is not apparent in some specimens until after the rock has been heated and the oil driven off. Freshly broken oil shale gives off a peculiar odor similar to that of crude petroleum. Oil shale contains a large amount of carbonaceous matter (largely remains of lower plants, including algae), which is the source of the distillation products. Thin splinters of oil shale will burn with a very sooty flame and give off an asphaltic odor. Lean specimens of oil shale have a higher specific gravity than rich specimens and are generally heavier than coal.

Winchester, D.E.

1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

218

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

Greenbaum, E.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Experimental and analytical studies of hydrocarbon yields under dry-, steam-, and steam with propane-distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experimental and simulation studies -conducted at the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University - confirm oil production is accelerated when propane is used as an additive during steam injection. To better understand this phenomenon, distillation experiments were performed using seven-component synthetic oil consisting of equal weights of the following alkanes: n-C5, n-C6, n-C7, n-C8, n-C9, nC10, and n-C15. For comparison purposes, three distillation processes were investigated: dry-, steam-, and steam-propane-distillation, the latter at a propane:steam mass ratio of 0.05. The injection rate of nitrogen during dry-and steam-distillation was the same as that of propane during steam-propane distillation, 0.025 g/min, with steam injection rate kept at 0.5 g/min. The distillation temperatures ranged from 115°C to 300°C and were increased in steps of 10°C. The cell was kept at each temperature plateau (cut) for 30 minutes. Distillation pressures ranged from 0 psig for dry distillation to 998 psig for steam-and steam-propane distillation. The temperature-pressure combination used represented 15°C superheated steam conditions. Distillate samples were collected at each cut, and the volume and weight of water and hydrocarbon measured. In addition, the composition of the hydrocarbon distillate was measured using a gas chromatograph. Main results of the study may be summarized as follows. First, the hydrocarbon yield at 125°C is highest with steam-propane distillation (74 wt%) compared to steam distillation (58 wt%), and lowest with dry distillation (36 wt%). This explains in part the oil production acceleration observed in steam-propane displacement experiments. Second, the final hydrocarbon yield at 300°C however is the same for the three distillation processes. This observation is in line with the fact that oil recoveries were very similar in steam- and steam-propane displacement experiments. Third, based on the yields of individual hydrocarbon components, steam-propane distillation lowers the apparent boiling points of the hydrocarbons significantly. This phenomenon may be the most fundamental effect of propane on hydrocarbon distillation, which results in a higher yield during steam-propane distillation and oil production acceleration during steam-propane displacement. Fourth, experimental K-values are higher in distillations with steam-propane for the components n-hexane, n-heptane, n-octane, and n-nonane. Fifth, vapor fugacity coefficients for each component are higher in distillations with steam-propane than with steam. Finally, Gibbs excess energy is overall lower in distillations with steam-propane than with steam. The experimental results clearly indicate the importance of distillation on oil recovery during steam-or steam-propane injection. The experimental procedure and method of analysis developed in this study (for synthetic oil) will be beneficial to future researchers in understanding the effect of propane as steam additive on actual crude oils.

Ramirez Garnica, Marco Antonio

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Silurian shale origin for light oil, condensate, and gas in Algeria and the Middle East  

SciTech Connect

Two of the largest gas fields in the world, Hasi R'Mel, Algeria and North Dome, Qatar, also contain substantial condensate and light oil reserves. Gas to source rock geochemical correlation is difficult due to the paucity of molecular parameters in the former although stable isotope composition is invaluable. However, by correlating source rocks with light oils and condensates associated with gas production using traditional geochemical parameters such as biomarkers and isotopes, a better understanding of the origin of the gas is achieved. Much of the crude oil in the Ghadames/Illizi Basins of Algeria has long been thought to have been generated from Silurian shales. New light oil discoveries in Saudi Arabia have also been shown to originate in basal euxinic Silurian shales. Key sterane and terpane biomarkers as well as the stable carbon isotopic compositions of the C15+ saturate and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions allow for the typing of Silurian-sourced, thermally mature light oils in Algeria and the Middle East. Even though biomarkers are often absent due to advanced thermal maturity, condensates can be correlated to the light oils using (1) carbon isotopes of the residual heavy hydrocarbon fractions, (2) light hydrocarbon distributions (e.g., C7 composition), and (3) compound specific carbon isotopic composition of the light hydrocarbons. The carbon isotopes of the C2-C4 gas components ran then be compared to the associated condensate and light oil isotopic composition.

Zumberge, J.E. (GeoMark Research Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Macko, S. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)) Engel, M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

Evans, R.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

224

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission...

225

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana)...

226

Biogeochemistry of Isoprenoid Production and Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Biodgeradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is an exploration of microbial isoprenoid production and destruction by anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation. Isoprenoids are methyl-branched hydrocarbons, and include biomarkers from all three… (more)

Dawson, Katherine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Compositional changes in heavy oil steamflood simulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The numerical simulation of heavy oil steamfloods has generally been conducted assuming that the oil is non-volatile. Reservoir simulation has traditionally ignored compositional effect s due to heat and steam and assumed that the hydrocarbon phase is non-volatile. This is equivalent to assuming that the equilibrium ratios, K-values, are zero. In order to properly model the mechanism of steamflooding, however, compositional effects need to be taken into account. In this study, laboratory data including distillation, vapor pressure, steam distillation and viscosity measurements, along with a commercial PVT simulator are used to tune equation-of-state (EOS) and viscosity parameters to properly model the PVT properties of the oil. The Peng-Robinson equation-of-state (PR-EOS) was used for all phase behavior calculations. Viscosity as a function of temperature and composition was modeled with the Pedersen correlation for heavy oils. Once a tuned equation-of-state, compositional fluid description was developed for the heavy oil, one-dimensional numerical simulations of the steamflooding process were performed. These simulations demonstrated the utility of the equation-of-state approach. In addition, it was concluded that compositional effects are essential for the proper modeling of low residual oil saturations seen in the field and the formation of an in-situ solvent bank at the steam-oil interface.

Lolley, Christopher Scott

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

229

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

Westhoff, James D. (Laramie, WY); Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company is investigating the direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels via partial oxidation. This report describes work completed in the first quarter of the two-year project (first quarter FY 1990). Task 1 of the work, preparation of the Project Management Plan, has been completed. Work was started and progress made on three other tasks during this quarter: Task 2. Modification of an existing Amoco pilot plant to handle the conditions of this project. Minor modifications were made to increase the maximum operating pressure to 1500 psig. Other more extensive modifications are being designed, including addition of an oxygen compressor and recycle system. Task 3.1. Evaluation of a Los Alamos National Laboratory methane oxidation kinetic model for suitability in guiding the experimental portions of this project. Task 3.2. Process variable (e.g. temperature, pressure, residence time) studies to determine optimal partial oxidation conditions. 1 fig.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre (Rijswijk, NL); Schoeling, Lanny Gene (Katy, TX)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

1988-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society's growing demands for energy results in rapid increase in oil consumption and motivates us to make unconventional resources conventional resources. There are enormous amounts of heavy oil reserves in the world but the lack of cost effective technologies either for extraction, transportation, or refinery upgrading hinders the development of heavy oil reserves. One of the critical problems with heavy oil and bitumen is that they require large amounts of thermal energy and expensive catalysts to upgrade. This thesis demonstrates that electron beam (E-Beam) heavy oil upgrading, which uses unique features of E-Beam irradiation, may be used to improve conventional heavy oil upgrading. E-Beam processing lowers the thermal energy requirements and could sharply reduce the investment in catalysts. The design of the facilities can be simpler and will contribute to lowering the costs of transporting and processing heavy oil and bitumen. E-Beam technology uses the high kinetic energy of fast electrons, which not only transfer their energy but also interact with hydrocarbons to break the heavy molecules with lower thermal energy. In this work, we conducted three major stages to evaluate the applicability of E-Beam for heavy oil upgrading. First, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of E-Beam on hydrocarbons. To do so, we used a Van de Graff accelerator, which generates the high kinetic energy of electrons, and a laboratory scale apparatus to investigate extensively how radiation effects hydrocarbons. Second, we studied the energy transfer mechanism of E-Beam upgrading to optimize the process. Third, we conducted a preliminary economic analysis based on energy consumption and compared the economics of E-Beam upgrading with conventional upgrading. The results of our study are very encouraging. From the experiments we found that E-Beam effect on hydrocarbon is significant. We used less thermal energy for distillation of n-hexadecane (n-C16) and naphtha with E-Beam. The results of experiments with asphaltene indicate that E-Beam enhances the decomposition of heavy hydrocarbon molecules and improves the quality of upgraded hydrocarbon. From the study of energy transfer mechanism, we estimated heat loss, fluid movement, and radiation energy distribution during the reaction. The results of our economic evaluation show that E-Beam upgrading appears to be economically feasible in petroleum industry applications. These results indicate significant potential for the application of E-Beam technology throughout the petroleum industry, particularly near production facilities, transportation pipelines, and refining industry.

Yang, Daegil

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Hydrocarbon Resin Manufacturing Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The results of a plant-wide assessment of the manufacturing facilities of Neville Chemical Company, a manufacturer of hydrocarbon resins will be presented in this paper. The project was co-funded by US Department of Energy under its Plant-Wide Opportunity Assessment Program. Resin manufacturing is a highly energy intensive process. The process needs extensive heating accomplished through steam boilers and thermal oil heaters, and cooling which is accomplished through refrigeration as well as process cooling water systems. Detailed energy assessment of Neville Chemical plants has shown significant energy conservation opportunities. For the less capital-intensive measures, energy cost savings of 20% to 30% with paybacks of less than two years were identified. The identified measures can be easily replicated in similar facilities. In this paper, details of the processes in hydrocarbon resin production from an energy consumption viewpoint will be discussed, current prevalent practices in the industry will be elaborated, and potential measures for energy use and cost savings will be outlined."

Ganji, A. R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Southern Mozambique basin: most promising hydrocarbon province offshore eat Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent offshore acquisition of 12,800 km (8,000 mi) of seismic reflection data, with gravity and magnetic profiles encompassing the southern half of the Mozambique basin, reveals new facets of the subsurface geology. Integrated interpretation of these new geophysical data with old well information results in the development of depositional and tectonic models that positively establish the hydrocarbon potential of the basin. The recent comprehensive interpretation affords the following conclusions. (1) Significant oil shows accompany wet gas discoveries suggest that the South Mozambique basin is a mature province, as the hydrocarbon associations imply thermogenic processes. (2) Super-Karoo marine Jurassic sequences have been encountered in Nhamura-1 well onshore from the application of seismic stratigraphy and well correlation. (3) Steeply dipping reflectors truncated by the pre-Cretaceous unconformity testify to significant tectonic activity preceding the breakup of Gondwanaland. Hence, preconceived ideas about the depth of the economic basement and the absence of mature source rocks of pre-Cretaceous age should be revised. (4) Wildcats in the vicinity of ample structural closures have not been, in retrospect, optimally positioned nor drilled to sufficient depth to test the viability of prospects mapped along a major offshore extension of the East African rift system delineated by this new survey.

De Buyl, M.; Flores, G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Oil production by Candida curvata and extraction, composition and properties of the oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strain of the yeast C. curvata was grown in cheese whey permeate under conditions that allowed for oil production. The N-C ratio of the fermentation medium influenced the amount of oil produced. Concentrated permeate could be used as a substrate, but the efficiency of conversion to oil was reduced. The yeast grew well and produced oil in several different types of whey and milk permeates and also in nonsterile systems. The lipid of C. curvata amounted to approximately 50% of its dry weight and could be extracted by sequential treatment with ethanol, hexane, and benzene. The extraction with benzene was necessary for good yields even though nearly all the material extracted with benzene was soluble in hexane. The lipid was 80-90% triglyceride, contained little free fatty acid, and could be degummed by traditional methods. The triglyceride was 30.4% palmitic, 0.84% palmitoleic acid, 11.4% stearic, 51.0% oleic, 6.2% linoleic, and 0.4% linolenic acid. The saturated acyl groups were almost completely on the sn-1 and 3 positions of the glycerol. The oil melting point was -10 to 22 degrees. No tocopherol was detected and the oil oxidized at a rate similar to that for soybean oil at 55 degrees. The oil contained a variety of linear hydrocarbons and 4 sterols. The polar lipids include phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid.

Hammond, E.G.; Glatz, B.A.; Choi, Y.; Teasdale, M.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Separation of polar shale oil compounds using high-speed liquid chromatography. [Compounds known to exist in shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods for separation of potentially toxic compounds from shale oil and its waste products by high-speed liquid chromatography (HSLC) are discussed. The following classes of compounds were selected for study: aromatic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, thiophenes, and indoles. No attempt was made to identify or quantitate compounds in shale oil, but it was demonstrated that HSLC can be a rapid and sensitive method for the separation of polar compounds from classes recognized to be present in shale oil and its waste products. Specific compounds studied were: phenanthrene, naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, triphenylene, chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, 1,2,3,4-dibenzanthracene, and 1,2,5,6-dibenzanthracene. (JGB)

Riley, R.G.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV. Also conducted was screening of 13 chemicals to determine their relative effectiveness and the selection of three chemicals for further testing.

L.A. Johnson, Jr.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

240

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

242

LOW TEMPERATURE OXIDATION OF CYCLIC HYDROCARBONS IN A MOTORED ENGINE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With foreseeable depletion of conventional crude oil, alternative oil sources, e.g. oil sands, oil shale, and coal liquids, will be increasingly used for transportation fuels… (more)

Yang, Yi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

244

Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement  

SciTech Connect

A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Methane is recovered as a gas for discharge to a pipeline from a gas stream containing methane and heavier hydrocarbons, principally ethane and propane. Separation is accomplished by condensing the heavier hydrocarbons and distilling the methane therefrom. A liquid product (LPG) comprising the heavier hydrocarbons is subsequently recovered and transferred to storage. Prior to being discharged to a pipeline, the recovered methane gas is compressed and in undergoing compression the gas is heated. The heat content of the gas is employed to reboil the refrigerant in an absorption refrigeration unit. The refrigeration unit is used to cool the LPG prior to its storage.

Millar, J.F.; Cockshott, J.E.

1978-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

246

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

247

Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Berkeley, CA); Sun, Hai (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

249

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

250

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

251

Expectations for Oil Shale Production (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Oil shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that contain relatively large amounts of kerogen, which can be converted into liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons (petroleum liquids, natural gas liquids, and methane) by heating the rock, usually in the absence of oxygen, to 650 to 700 degrees Fahrenheit (in situ retorting) or 900 to 950 degrees Fahrenheit (surface retorting) [60]. (Oil shale is, strictly speaking, a misnomer in that the rock is not necessarily a shale and contains no crude oil.) The richest U.S. oil shale deposits are located in Northwest Colorado, Northeast Utah, and Southwest Wyoming. Currently, those deposits are the focus of petroleum industry research and potential future production. Among the three States, the richest oil shale deposits are on Federal lands in Northwest Colorado.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Thermodynamic Properties of Acetic Acid + Hydrocarbons ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Properties of Acetic Acid + Hydrocarbons Mixtures L. Negadi1,C,S, N. Ainous2, A. Negadi1, I. Mokbel2, A. Kaci3 and J. Jose2 ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

254

Dissolved Hydrocarbons and related microflora in a fjordal seaport: sources, sinks, concentrations, and kinetics  

SciTech Connect

The continuous addition of toluene as a solute of treated ballast water from oil tankers into a well-defined estuary facilitated the study of the dynamics of dissolved hydrocarbon metabolism in seawater. Near the ballast water injection point, a layer of warm ballast water, rich in bacteria, that was trapped below the less-dense fresh surface water was located. Toluene residence times were approximately 2 weeks in this layer, 2 years elsewhere in Port Valdez, and 2 decades in the surface water of a more oceanic receiving estuary adjacent. The origin of bacteria in this layer was traced to growth in oil tanker ballast during shipments. The biomass of toluene oxidizers in water samples was estimated from the average affinity of pure-culture isolates for toluene (28 liters per g of cells per h) and observed toluene oxidation kinetics. Values ranged from nearly all of the total bacterial biomass within the bacteria-rich layer down to 0.2% at points far removed. Because the population of toluene oxidizers was large with respect to the amount of toluene consumed and because water from a nearby nonpolluted estuary was equally active in facilitating toluene metabolism, we searched for an additional hydrocarbon source. It was found that terpenes could be washed from spruce trees by simulated rainfall, which suggested that riparian conifers provide an additional and significant hydrocarbon source to seawater. (JMT)

Button, D.K.; Robertson, B.R.; Craig, K.S.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Possible hydrocarbon habitat of the bulge, Alaska and Yukon Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bedrock geology of the northernmost Bulge of the Rocky Mountain Cordillera consists of units ranging in age from the Proterozoic to the Recent. Concerted LANDSAT imagery, field mapping, and CDP seismic interpretation indicates that there are several thick, unconformity-bounded and areally distinct depositional mega-sequences in northern Alaska and Yukon Territory. Analyses of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), 1002 area, subsurface suggest the presence of several large structures. However, seismic resolution is insufficient to determine the stratigraphy with a high degree of confidence. The oldest sediments in the Bulge are the northerly derived Katakturuk dolomite and the southerly derived, predominantly clastic Neruokpuk Formation. Tests of these units immediately outside ANWR produced oil, gas, and water from vugs and fractures. Both the Katakturuk and Neruokpuk are overlain by dissimilar but thick and areally limited Cambrian-Devonian sediments with undetermined reservoir potential. Middle and Upper Ellesmerian crop out around the periphery of the coastal plain and are found in the subsurface. Their presence and reservoir development in the structures of the 1002 area depend upon the extent of Lower Cretaceous truncation. Two dissimilar locally derived breakup megasequence sandstones having limited lateral extends overlie older units. They have increasing regional importance as commercial oil and gas reservoirs. Very thick, southerly derived, Brookian clastics overstep this area. They contain the largest endowment of the in-place hydrocarbons in Alaska and the Yukon. Their commercial development is incipient.

Banet, A.C. Jr. (Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Process for Photochemical Chlorination of Hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for chlorination of a major portion of the hydrogen atoms of paraffinic hydrocarbons of five or more carbon atoms may be replaced by subjecting the hydrocarbon to the action of chlorine under active light. The initial chlorination is begun at 25 to 30 deg C with the chlorine diluted with HCl. The later stages may be carried out with undiluted chlorine and the temperature gradually raised to about 129 deg C.

Beanblossom, W.S.

1950-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae  

SciTech Connect

A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

Tornabene, T.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Magnetic and gravity anomaly patterns related to hydrocarbon fields in northern West Siberia  

SciTech Connect

A study of the features of gravity and magnetic fields in the vicinity of oil and gas reservoirs in West Siberia demonstrated a spatial relationship with the hydrocarbon deposits. The relevant magnetic and gravity anomalies cover approximately 900,000 km{sup 2} in northern West Siberia. Amplitude and frequency were investigated initially using double Fourier spectrum (DFS) analysis. This was followed by (1) application of transformations, filtering, and moving windows analysis; (2) compilation of maps of regional and local anomalies, and potential field derivatives; and (3) investigation of the distribution of parameters in areas of known deposits. Hydrocarbon deposits are located mostly at the slopes of positive regional gravity and magnetic anomalies which are interpreted as relating to deep riftogenic structures. At the same time, it is established that the location of hydrocarbon depositions coincides commonly with local gravity and magnetic minima generated by lows in basement density and magnetization. All known hydrocarbon deposits in northern West Siberia are in areas characterized by comparatively high gradients of constituent of gravity anomalies with a wavelength of about 90--100 km. These newly revealed links between reservoirs and potential field parameters may be a means to predict new discoveries in poorly explored territories and seas, primarily in Russia`s Arctic shelf.

Piskarev, A.L.; Tchernyshev, M.Yu. [VNIIOkeangeologia, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

Greene, D.L.

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

Definition: Petroleum | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petroleum Petroleum A broadly defined class of liquid hydrocarbon mixtures. Included are crude oil, lease condensate, unfinished oils, refined products obtained from the processing of crude oil, and natural gas plant liquids.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Petroleum is a naturally occurring flammable liquid consisting of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons of various molecular weights and other liquid organic compounds, that are found in geologic formations beneath the Earth's surface. The name Petroleum covers both naturally occurring unprocessed crude oils and petroleum products that are made up of refined crude oil. A fossil fuel, it is formed when large quantities of dead organisms, usually zooplankton and algae, are buried underneath sedimentary rock and undergo intense heat and pressure. Petroleum is recovered mostly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Surface detection of free hydrocarbon microseepage from subsurface petroleum accumulation: case study  

SciTech Connect

In January 1979, Pemex began a 2-yr test project designed to evaluate the surface detection of free hydrocarbon microseepage as an integrated exploration tool. The tests were performed by analyzing samples collected over fields selected to represent various hydrocarbon entrapment conditions. The structure selected is a lenticular anticline that produces oil from an Austin equivalent at 2500 m and dry gas from the Jurassic at approximately 3500 m. The 350 surface samples definitely indicate that methane is seeping into the near-surface sediments and forming a distinct anomaly directly above the 2 superimposed reservoirs. Apparently, only the methane is able to migrate through the stratigraphic section, and the heavier components, if they were able to escape from the Cretaceous reservoir, have been stripped and retained by the sediments. The surface anomaly appears to contain elements of both a circular halo and a centralized anomaly that overlies the apex of the producing structure.

Brown, S.W.; Salce, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing the same  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing them from carbonaceous biomass feedstock are provided. The carbonaceous biomass feedstock is pyrolyzed in the presence of a catalyst comprising base metal-based catalysts, noble metal-based catalysts, treated zeolitic catalysts, or combinations thereof to produce pyrolysis gases. During pyrolysis, the catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction whereby at least a portion of the oxygenated hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis gases are converted into hydrocarbons. The oxygen is removed as carbon oxides and water. A condensable portion (the vapors) of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Marinangeli, Richard; Brandvold, Timothy A; Kocal, Joseph A

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Coal-oil slurry preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Phase II Interim Report -- Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage Detection Methods on the Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana  

SciTech Connect

The following work was performed: (1) collected reconnaissance micro-magnetic data and background field data for Area 1, (2) identified and collected soil sample data in three anomalous regions of Area 1, (3) sampled soils in Northwest Poplar Oil Field, (4) graphed, mapped, and interpreted all data areas listed above, (5) registered for the AAPG Penrose Conference on Hydrocarbon Seepage Mechanisms and Migration (postponed from 9/16/01 until 4/7/02 in Vancouver, B.C.). Results include the identification and confirmation of an oil and gas prospect in the northwest part of Area 1 and the verification of a potential shallow gas prospect in the West Poplar Area. Correlation of hydrocarbon micro-seepage to TM tonal anomalies needs further data analysis.

Monson, Lawrence M.

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

266

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

267

Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pure cultures, including Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanococcus maripaludus, were combined with model oil samples and oil/diesel mixtures to optimize extraction techniques of signature lipids from oil in support of investigation of microbial communities in oil deposit samples targets for microbial enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Several techniques were evaluated, including standard phospholipid extraction, ether linked lipid for Archaeal bacterial detection, and high pressure extractiontechniques. Recovery of lipids ranged from 50-80percent as compared to extraction of the pure culture. Extraction efficiency was evaluated by the use of internal standards. Field samples will also be tested for recovery of signature lipids with optimized extraction techniques.

Borglin, Sharon; Geller, Jil; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry; Mason, Olivia

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

J:\\_GasAss97\\Current\\Motor Gas Ass2.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Distillation Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Table C.2 PADD 3 Annual Average Refinery Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Table C.3 PADD 3 Unfinished Oil...

269

DRAFT - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: 242: Propane/Propylene. 246: Unfinished Oils. 812: Fuel Ethanol. 141: Finished ...

270

OMB No. 1905-0165 Expiration Date: 1/31/2013 Version No.:2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: 242 Propane/Propylene 246 Unfinished Oils 812 Fuel Ethanol 141 Finished Motor ...

271

EU Gas Supply Security: Unfinished Business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

country in Europe for shale gas production. Exploration work was suspended after hydraulic fracturing-induced seismic activity was reported but the government allowed companies to resume work in late 2012. The UK enjoys a relatively wide political... of factors: rapid growth in Europe’s natural gas consumption until 2005; even more rapid growth of imports as European production declined; Europe’s reliance on a very small number of external suppliers; dominance of long- term, bilateral contracts between...

Noël, Pierre

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Enron's Dabhol Power Project - An Unfinished Saga  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will focus briefly on the background of this project showcased as the biggest foreign direct investment in India. It will discuss the issues in conflict between the Dabhol Power...

273

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

274

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated aqueous and sediment environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six bioremediation methods were tested in laboratory microcosms using field soil and water samples from within the fire-wall area of a petroleum storage tank. This soil had been intermittently contaminated with Bunker C fuel oil and other petroleum materials over an extended period of time. This study focuses on the behavior of the laboratory microcosms designed to simulate the in situ conditions and the six bioremedial methods employed in a related field study. The six treatment methods were: 1) aeration with essential nutrients and indigenous organisms, 2) aeration with essential nutrients and an inoculation from a refinery wastewater treatment facility, 3) aeration with oleophilic fertilizer and indigenous organisms, 4) aeration with essential nutrients and biosurfactant organisms, 5) aeration with nutrients and proprietary organisms, and 6) aeration only. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) analyses and gas chromatographic/mass spectrophotometric (GC-MS) analyses of the petroleum fractions were used to determine if the enhancement methods were more effective than the control in biodegrading the contaminants. Results indicated that there was no significant difference in the petroleum reduction rates among the six treatment methods. The conclusions were that the petroleum was not bioavailable --transfer from soil-to-water was likely the rate controlling factor in this study. Biodegradation rates were significantly slowed by the highly weathered state of the petroleum, and the extreme spatial heterogeneity hindered the sampling and analysis of the petroleum. These conclusions were further supported in a second experiment using only the extracted petroleum contaminant. The extracted petroleum was biodegraded when made available in shake flasks. Three different ,consortia were shown to significantly biodegrade the petroleum contaminant when made bioavailable. These consortia were able to reduce the TPH and many other specific hydrocarbons.

Mills, Marc Allyn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Vertical pump turbine oil environmental evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Oregon low-temperature geothermal injection well construction, siting and receiving formations requires approval by the Water Resources Department (OWRD). In addition, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) has regulations concerning injection. Conversations with the OWRD and ODEQ representatives indicated they were very concerned about the potential for contamination of the geothermal (and cooler but hydraulically connected) aquifers by oils and grease. Their primary concern was over the practice of putting paraffin, motor oils and other hydrocarbons in downhole heat exchanger (DHE) wells to prevent corrosion. They also expressed considerable concern about the use of oil in production well pumps since the fluids pumped would be injected. Oregon (and Idaho) prohibit the use of oil-lubricated pumps for public water supplies except in certain situations where non-toxic food-grade lubricants are used. Since enclosed-lineshaft oil-lubricated pumps are the mainstay of direct-use pumping equipment, the potential for restricting their use became a concern to the Geo-Heat Center staff. An investigation into alternative pump lubrication schemes and development of rebuttals to potential restrictions was proposed and approved as a contract task. (SM)

Culver, G.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

ASSESSMENT OF HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE DETECTION METHODS ON THE FORT PECK RESERVATION, NORTHEAST MONTANA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, Head Gas and Thermal Desorption methods best match production; other methods also map depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, Head Gas along with Microbial, Iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, that could represent micro-seepage chimneys, results are inconclusive. Reconnaissance mapping using Magnetic Susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent Soil Gas and Head Gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential. In the final year of this project the principle contractor, the Fort Peck Tribes, completed a second survey in the Wicape 3D Seismic Prospect Area (also known as Area 6 in Phase I of the project) and sampled several Landsat image features contained in the Smoke Creek Aeromag Anomaly Area (also known as Area 1 in Phase II of the project). Methods determined to be most useful in Phases I and II, were employed in this final Phase III of the study. The Southwest Wicape seismic anomaly was only partially confirmed. The abundant curvilinears proposed to be possible hydrocarbon micro-seepage chimneys in the Smoke Creek Area were not conclusively verified as such. Insufficient sampling of background data precludes affirmative identification of these mostly topographic Landsat features as gas induced soil and vegetation anomalies. However relatively higher light gas concentrations were found associated with some of the curvilinears. Based on the findings of this work the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation intend to utilize surface hydrocarbon exploration techniques for future identification and confirmation of oil and gas prospects.

Lawrence M. Monson

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

2012-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

280

Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Inc Hydrocarbon Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc Address 2016 Main St Place Houston, Texas Zip 77002 Sector Biofuels Product Wholesale marketing of biodiesel and ethanol to refiners, blenders and petroleum distributors Website http://www.gulfhydrocarbon.com Coordinates 29.749227°, -95.371693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.749227,"lon":-95.371693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Aggregation and transport kinetics of crude oil and sediment in estuarine waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the transport and fate of spilled crude oil is important for estimating short and long-term toxicity effects in coastal ecosystems. This research project investigates the partitioning of hydrocarbons from a surface crude oil slick, the resurfacing of chemically dispersed crude oil droplets, the suitability of in-situ field instruments for oil and sediment characterization, and the aggregation and settling of dispersed oil and suspended sediments. An initial laboratory study was conducted to investigate apparent hydrocarbon solubility in petroleum/water systems. Mixing shear and initial crude oil layer thickness were related empirically to oil entrainment rate. A model describing hydrocarbons partitioned in colloidal and soluble phases was consistent with experimental data. A second laboratory study was conducted to investigate the influence of coalescence kinetics on mean droplet size and resurfacing rate of chemically dispersed crude oil droplets. Increased mean shear rates resulted in mean droplet diameters and oil resurfacing rates. A third laboratory study was conducted to compare particle size and fractal dimension measurements obtained using a submersible flow cytometer, an electrozone particle counter, and a light scattering particle sizer. Measured particles included latex beads, crude oil, clay, crude oil-clay aggregates, and crude oil-silica aggregates. Tested instruments gave consistent size measurements for all particle systems, suggesting their suitability for sizing marine particles. To describe the aggregation kinetics of oil-sediment systems, a modified Smoluchowski model based on coalesced sphere (CS) assumptions was developed. Observed collision efficiency values (?OBS) were related to collision efficiency values for single particle type systems (?HOMO) and those for two particle type systems (?HET) using a probabilistic approach. For clay and crude oil, ?HOMO values were higher than the ?HOMO value for silica. Clay-oil and silica-oil have similar ?HET values. Thus, crude oil can significantly increase the aggregation rates of noncohesive sediments such as silica. The CS model above was modified to incorporate sediment fractal geometry. The ability of this modified coalesced fractal sphere (mCFS) model to fit experimental data sets was better than that of a coalesced sphere (CS) model. Because of their reduced settling rates, sediments with lower fractal dimension form more aggregate with dispersed oil.

Sterling, Michael Conroy, Jr.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Catalysts for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Method and apparatus (10), including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO.sub.2 aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions (18) are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor (12) having a transparent window (16), by hydrogen and CO, C.sub.2 H.sub.4 or C.sub.2 H.sub.6 gas mixtures (20), and exposed to radiation (34) from a light source (32) external to the reactor (12), to produce the short chain hydrocarbons (36).

Colmenares, Carlos (Alamo, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Microbial petroleum degradation enhancement by oil spill bioremediation products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradation of an artificially weathered crude oil (Alaska North Slope) was compared using 13 different oil spill bioremediation agents. All products were evaluated under identical conditions emulating a marine environment. The research was conducted using unpolluted, natural seawater. The products were tested in triplicate using 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and evaluated over a 28 day period to determine the products' capabilities based on the extent of petroleum degradation. Toxicity and petroleum chemistry data were used to assess the products' degrading capabilities. Total petroleum hydrocarbons analyses were completed on all the products. GC-MS analyses of the petroleum fractions helped to determine the concentration of target compounds for the products. Six products showed a significant extent of microbial degradation, however only one met the toxicity criteria. A total of 68 analytes were quantified from the six successful products. The petroleum hydrocarbons were significantly degraded by six treatments as compared with the nutrient and non-nutrient control. The saturate resolved hydrocarbons were reduced an average of 90% of the original weight, while the aromatic resolved hydrocarbons were degraded approximately 60%. The toxicity criteria reduced the initial number of products to one product only. Biodegradation to a lesser extent was also achieved by the indigenous microbial population with the addition of nutrients alone. Further research should be completed before considering any of these products for application in the field.

Lee, Salvador Aldrett

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 June 23, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) - a program that has successfully provided and transferred technological advances to small, independent oil and gas operators over the past nine years - has been extended to 2015 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). An industry-driven consortium initiated in 2000, SWC's goal is to keep "stripper wells" productive in an environmentally safe manner, maximizing the recovery of domestic hydrocarbon resources. The consortium is managed and administered by The Pennsylvania State University on behalf of DOE; the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

286

Outsourcing Logistics in the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supply chain challenges that the Oil and Gas industry faces in material logistics have enlarged in the last few decades owing to an increased hydro-carbon demand. Many reasons justify the challenges, such as exploration activities which have moved to remote locations, not only increasing distances from supply houses and refineries but also escalating logistics costs. Mammoth costs of material unavailability drive the inefficiencies largely. The objectives of the study is to discover the logistics needs of oil and gas companies, the motivation, benefits and the requirements of outsourcing logistics. The study aims to identify the material supply chain inefficiencies in the industry and proposes solutions to solve them. In this study, Oil and Gas industry’s outsourcing practices in logistics are analyzed along with the trends of the third party logistics companies serving the industry. The participants of this study are from different companies in the Oil and Gas industry dealing with supply chain operations.

Herrera, Cristina 1988-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hydroprocessing Bio-oil and Products Separation for Coke Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast pyrolysis of biomass can be used to produce a raw bio-oil product, which can be upgraded by catalytic hydroprocessing to hydrocarbon liquid products. In this study the upgraded products were distilled to recover light naphtha and oils and to produce a distillation resid with useful properties for coker processing and production of renewable, low-sulfur electrode carbon. For this hydroprocessing work, phase separation of the bio-oil was applied as a preparatory step to concentrate the heavier, more phenolic components thus generating a more amenable feedstock for resid production. Low residual oxygen content products were produced by continuous-flow, catalytic hydroprocessing of the phase separated bio-oil.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Studies on multi-phase equilibrium separation of hydrocarbon/water systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equations of State (EOS) have been used successfully in compositional simulators to describe phase behavior of reservoir crude and gas condensates without water. The three-phase behavior of water/reservoir crude oils both at reservoir and steam flooding temperature has not yet been successfully predicted by an EOS. Recent publications show that incorporation of the association concept into simple cubic equations such as Peng-Robinson EOS significantly improves phase behavior prediction of water/hydrocarbon and nonhydrate systems, but there are still some numerical difficulties in the pre-diction of three phase flash equilibria. In this thesis we presented, an efficient procedure that will help us eliminate common numerical difficulties in predicting three-phase equilibria for systems containing water, and simplify the programming technique. This scheme checks the existence of three-phase flash at given reservoir conditions, and if three-phase flash (vapor-oleic-aqueous) doesn't exist, it automatically switches to check correct type of two-phase flash (vapor-oleic, vapor-aqueous, or oleic-aqueous). This convergence scheme is used in an EOS-simulator (VLLESIM), which uses nine different EOS's and van der Waals mixing rules, to accurately describe multi-phase equilibrium separation of hydrocarbon/water systems. VLLESIM will be validated with literature data and experimental results obtained from two different experimental setups, for different multi-component hydrocarbon/water systems, for hydrocarbon component varying from C6 to C20. PVT-VLLE apparatus can provide on-line compositional analysis and phase volumes of all equilibrium phases for temperatures up to 350 'F and an Isochoric Steam Distillation Cell (ISDC) can provide only vapor phase compositions, but it can be used up to 500 'F. VLLESIM will then be used to study the effect of temperature, pressure and molecular weight of hydrocarbon components on multiphase equilibria of different hydrocarbon/water systems. Detailed analysis is also provided in this thesis, of the effect of increasing concentration of different hydrocarbon components on the size of the three-phase region for ranges of temperature and pressure mostly prevalent under reservoir conditions.

Chawla, Inderjit Singh

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Mass Spectrometric Studies on the Limitations of Oil Diffusion Pumped Coaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residual gas conditions in numerous commercial oil diffusion pumped coaters have been examined by mass spectroscopy during an extensive program. Particular regard is devoted to organic contamination. The main topics covered are: hydrocarbon partial pressures and their determining parameters in systems equipped with water-cooled and deep-cooled baffles; the influence of oil backstreaming; suitable measures to reduce contamination; a discussion of various contamination sources

W. K. Huber; G. Rettinghaus

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Biogenic Hydrocarbons in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonmethane hydrocarbons are ubiquitous trace atmospheric constituents yet they control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Both anthropogenic and biogenic processes contribute to the release of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. In this ...

J. D. Fuentes; L. Gu; M. Lerdau; R. Atkinson; D. Baldocchi; J. W. Bottenheim; P. Ciccioli; B. Lamb; C. Geron; A. Guenther; T. D. Sharkey; W. Stockwell

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andWorld Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andProduction of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, and Re?

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

294

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpretations of China’s foreign oil strategy. Argumentsof aspects of China’s foreign oil activities, they do notits largest directly-run foreign oil project. Supplying 10

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

297

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the residual quantity of oil that never gets produced.order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil at a price P tD t Q t Q t+1 Quantity Figure 5. Monthly oil production for

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an important oil source for China, yet unlike itsthe United States as a major oil source outside the volatileto be a critical source of oil, and one that is almost

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Materials Challenges in Hostile Environments for Hydrocarbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The rising demand for energy combined with our depleting natural oil and gas reserves ... Mitigation of Scale Formation using Liquid Impregnated Surfaces.

303

Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

304

Producing light cycle oil in the cat cracker  

SciTech Connect

The refining industry in the United States uses the catalytic-cracking process primarily to produce gasoline (generally defined as hydrocarbons in the 100-430/sup 0/F boiling range). When compared with other refinery processes, such as hydrocracking, coking, and thermal cracking, cat cracking provides an efficient, inexpensive means of upgrading gas oils and heavy residual oils into gasoline-range products. However, in many other areas of the world, light cycle oil (generally defined as hydrocarbons in the 430-650/sup 0/F boiling range) has a higher value because automobiles are less plentiful. And in the United States many refiners seek seasonal means of increasing light cycle oil (LCO) yields to meet higher wintertime fuel oil demands. The Davison planning group estimates one third of the LCO produced in the United States is derived from cat cracking. Because of the many questions and misunderstandings about light cycle yields and quality from the cat cracker, the aim in this paper is to (1) provide a general overview of ways the industry can change the cat-cracker operation to increase LCO yield, and (2) clear up some misunderstandings about yield and quality.

Ritter, R.E.; Creighton, J.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

503 CARCINOGENIC ACTION OF MOTOR ENGINE OIL ADDITIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PREVIOUSLY it was reported that a proprietary engine oil additive was carcinogenic following repeated skin painting in mice (Baldwin, Cunningham and Pratt, 1961). This additive, which is utilized as a high pressure, high temperature lubricant, contains a formulation consisting mainly of lead naphthenate together with small amounts of chlorinated hydrocarbons such as carbon tetrachloride or 1: 1: 1-trichlorethane dispersed in a mineral oil base. The various components are themselves highly heterogeneous mixtures without any well defined characteristics. Thus the lead naphthenate fraction is a subsidiary oil product obtained during the manufacture of hydrocarbon distillates. This fraction, which is of varying composition depending upon the source of crude oil, contains lead salts of a complex mixture of aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acids (Knotnerus, 1957). Clearly therefore isolation and chemical characterization of the carcinogenic component(s) in the proprietary oil additives, although desirable, is not practical at this time. However it was considered essential to ascertain whether the carcinogenic activity was associated with any one of the crude products,

R. W. Baldwin; G. J. Cunningham; D. Pratt

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Monetization of Nigeria coal by conversion to hydrocarbon fuels through Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect

Given the instability of crude oil prices and the disruptions in crude oil supply chains, this article offers a complementing investment proposal through diversification of Nigeria's energy source and dependence. Therefore, the following issues were examined and reported: A comparative survey of coal and hydrocarbon reserve bases in Nigeria was undertaken and presented. An excursion into the economic, environmental, and technological justifications for the proposed diversification and roll-back to coal-based resource was also undertaken and presented. The technology available for coal beneficiation for environmental pollution control was reviewed and reported. The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and its advances into Sasol's slurry phase distillate process were reviewed. Specifically, the adoption of Sasol's advanced synthol process and the slurry phase distillate process were recommended as ways of processing the products of coal gasification. The article concludes by discussing all the above-mentioned issues with regard to value addition as a means of wealth creation and investment.

Oguejiofor, G.C. [Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait, inday. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.Arabia PRODUCTION QUOTA Iran PRODUCTION QUOTA Venezuela

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Production of hydrocarbons from hydrates. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical and safe method of producing hydrocarbons (or natural gas) from in situ hydrocarbon-containing hydrates is given. Once started, the method will be self-driven and will continue producing hydrocarbons over an extended period of time (i.e., many days).

McGuire, P.L.

1981-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices. WTI Crude Oil Price. Retail Gasoline Price. Source: Energy Information Administration

313

Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Method for recovery of hydrocarbon material from hydrocarbon material-bearing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for heating a hydrocarbon material contained in a recovery zone in an underground hydrocarbon material-bearing formation to reduce the viscosity thereof for facilitating recovery of the hydrocarbon material. A gaseous penetration medium comprising a gaseous working fluid and a carrier gas, is fed into the formation at a penetration pressure sufficient for penetration of the recovery zone, the working fluid being a water soluble gas which generates heat of solution upon absorption in an aqueous medium, and in which the partial pressure of the working fluid in relation to the penetration pressure and the temperature prevailing in the recovery zone is controlled to inhibit working fluid condensation but to provide for absorption of working fluid by water present in the formation to release heat for heating the hydrocarbon material in the recovery zone.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

316

Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus, and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, G.R.B.; Barraclough, B.L.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1981-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

317

Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.2 Anthropogenic emissions 28 2.3 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons 30 2.3.1 Sources of PAHs 30 2.3.2 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 2.3.3 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 CHAPTER THREE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

The effect of bioremediation on microbial populations in an oil-contaminated coastal wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of controlled, crude oil applications was carried out in a Texas coastal wetland near the Houston Ship Channel to determine the effectiveness of bioremediation in these sensitive areas. The first application, conducted in 1996, was performed to assess the use of diammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate plus nitrate (potential electron acceptor) as treatments to stimulate microbial growth and hydrocarbon degradation. The second application, conducted in 1997, was performed to determine the potential of two commercial bioaugmentation products to supplement native microbial populations and enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation. Diammonium phosphate was also re-evaluated during this phase as a biostimulation treatment. For each application, 2 1 test plots were used and data from bioremediation treatment plots were compared to oiled control plots to assess treatment differences. Sediment samples from each phase of research (each application) were analyzed for petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations, microbial numbers, nutrient levels, and acute toxicity. Only data from the microbial enumerations are presented here. For both applications, sediment samples from all oiled test plots showed exponential increases in the numbers of aliphatic hydrocarbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading microorganisms. These increases were observed at 0-5 cm and 5- 10 cm depths. For the first application, the average numbers of aliphatic-degrading and PAH-degrading microorganisms on nutrient amended plots were slightly higher, though not significantly higher, than populations on oiled control plots on most sample days. Total heterotroph numbers increased slightly following the oil application and were slightly higher on nutrient-amended plots. The numbers of hydrocarbon degraders and total heterotrophs returned to near pre-application levels by the end of the monitoring period. The bin/augmentation products examined during the second application did not significantly increase the numbers of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (aliphatic-degrading or PAH- degrading) on any sample day. The microbial dynamics from both phases of research illustrated a well-documented response to a petroleum hydrocarbon input. Overall, the bioremediation treatments examined in both phases of research did not appear to have a significant impact on the numbers of hydrocarbon degraders or total heterotrophs.

Townsend, Richard Todd

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

5/20/09 9:14 AMPhysics in the oil sands of Alberta -Physics Today March 2009 Page 1 of 4http://ptonline.aip.org/journals/doc/PHTOAD-ft/vol_62/iss_3/31_1.shtml?type=PTFAVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations-theSchmoker, J.W., 1999, U.S. Geological Survey assessment model for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations-the ""FORESPANFORESPANTechnically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbon resourceshydrocarbon resources ­­ oil, natural gas, natural gas

Podgornik, Rudolf

320

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Physics and the Search for Hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical Note from 1979 #12;In 1979, US imported 30% of its oil supply. In 2010, US imported 61% of its oil photo · Anisotropic properties: electrical resistivity, fluid flow (permeability), acoustic propagation, creates pressure pulses Pressure waves travel inside drill pipe from downhole to rig Low data-rates: 1 ­24

Dai, Pengcheng

323

The role of Cretaceous seal to the hydrocarbon potential of the Salawati and Bintuni basins, Irian Jaya, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

The Salawati and Bintuni basins are late Tertiary depocenters located in the westernmost part of Irian Jaya, Indonesia. The two basins are closely located and only separated by a 50-km-wide structural high known as the Ajamaru Plateau. Petroleum exploration results in the Salawati basin are very successful. This basin has produced around 300 Mbbl of oil from the Miocene carbonates of the Kais Formation. Exploration with similar objectives in the Bintuni basin, however, gave only little success. Some oil was obtained from small Wasian and Mogoi fields, which jointly produced around 7 Mbbl of oil between 1951 and 1960. Extensive exploration campaigns between 1970 and 1980 with Miocene Kais Limestone as the objective resulted only in the discovery of the small Wiriagar field. The big difference in petroleum potentially of the Salawati and Bintuni basins has attracted explorationists to evaluate what significant geological factors had influenced it. Evaluation on available exploration data of the basins had some interesting results. In terms of geologic factors controlling hydrocarbon accumulation (presence of mature source rock, migration pathway, good reservoir quality, valid trap, and effective seal), it seems that shales of Cretaceous age have played the most important role. If this regional seal is absent or noneffective, oil could migrate vertically from pre-Tertiary sources to the Tertiary reservoirs. On the contrary, if the Cretaceous shales are present and sealing, then the underlying Mesozoic sequence is attractive and may trap hydrocarbon, if supported by the other geologic factors.

Samuel, L.; Kartanegara, L. (PERTAMINA, Jakarta (Indonesia))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mathematical modeling of chemical oil-soluble transport for water control in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High water-cut is a long-standing problem in the upstream petroleum industry. Typically one-fourth of the produced fluids from oil wells worldwide are hydrocarbons and the remaining is water. Self-selective in-situ gel formation is a new potential technology ... Keywords: Gelation, Numerical modeling, Porous media, Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate or tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Water cut

H. Valiollahi; Z. Ziabakhsh; P. L. J. Zitha

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Sepik-Ramu area, Ramu basin, Papua New Guinea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements in seismic processing have made new interpretations of the structural and depositional history of the northwestern portion of the Ramu basin possible. Support for a wrench tectonic model for this area is observed in the reprocessed seismic data. Strike-slip movement along major fault zones has allowed compressional forces to be translated laterally and resulted in only minor deformation occurring in the Sepik-Ramu area. The major tectonic event is thought to have occurred during late Miocene-early Pliocene, and not during the middle Miocene, as earlier hypothesized. Consequently, Miocene deposition is postulated to have occurred uninterrupted by periods of erosion. A thick Miocene section is preserved in this region and is postulated to contain slope, reef, and shelf carbonates of early to middle Miocene age. This interpretation has led to the identification of a reef trend over 7 mi wide and at least 42 mi long containing numerous pinnacle reefs. The pinnacle reefs are analogous to those found in the Salawati basin of Irian Jaya, Indonesia. The reefs are overlain by deep-water shales, a combination that provides potential reservoirs and seals necessary for the entrapment of hydrocarbons. The presence of oil and gas seeps document the existence of a source. These three factors justify hydrocarbon exploration in this area. The numerous potential drilling targets may lead to the discovery of significant quantities of hydrocarbons.

Donaldson, J.C.; Wilson, J.T. (Anderman/Smith Operating Co., Denver, CO (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Help Operators See Oil, Gas Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Six Research Teams to Develop Advanced Diagnostics And Imaging Technologies for Oil, Gas Fields TULSA, OK - If oil and gas producers could "see" hydrocarbon-bearing formations more accurately from the surface or from nearby wellbores, they can position new wells more precisely to produce more oil or gas with less risk and ultimately, at lower costs. For many producers in the United States, especially smaller producers operating on razor-thin margins, advanced diagnostics and imaging systems can help them in business. By visualizing the barriers and pathways for the flow of oil and gas through underground rock formations, producers can avoid dry holes and increase ultimate recovery.

327

In the OSTI Collections: Oil Shales | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Oil Shales Oil Shales Extraction Water Use History References Additional References Research Organizations Reports Available through OSTI's SciTech Connect Petroleum is commonly extracted from pores in rock formations below the earth's surface. Different kinds of rock have petroleum in their pores, but the petroleum is not part of the rock itself. Kerogen, another hydrocarbon material, is a constituent material of a type of rock called oil shale. While oil shales can be burned directly as a fuel, it's possible to extract a liquid substitute for petroleum from kerogen by heating the oil shale to a high temperature, thus producing a vapor, which is then cooled. Some of the cooled vapor remains gaseous (and is called "combustible oil-shale gas"), while the rest condenses

328

Motor gasoline from shale oil. [Review of selected research on upgrading shale gasoline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Shale oil produced from oil shale of the Rocky Mountain region by many of the usual retorting processes consists mainly of high boiling compounds of nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen; less than half of the oil consists of hydrocarbons. Selected research on the upgrading of shale oil is reviewed. Thermal cracking of the oil followed by acid and caustic treating of the gasoline fraction has produced stable gasolines with low to moderate octane numbers. Hydrogenating the raw crude oil has produced higher yields of stable gasolines, also with low to moderate octane numbers. The yields and octane numbers of the gasolines are dependent on the hydrogenation temperatures used. Low-octane hydrogenated gasoline has been catalytically reformed over platinum-containing catalyst to produce high-octane motor fuel.

Cottingham, P.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Effect of water dissolution on oil viscosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water dissolution in crude oil becomes significant at temperatures > 150 C, and 250 C, water solubilities in heavy crudes are [approx]40 mol%. Dissolved water acts as a low-viscosity solvent that reduces oil-phase viscosity. This phenomenon has been considered in thermal recovery simulations but has never been substantiated. In this work, the effect of water on viscosity was measured for four crude samples with gravities ranging from 0.97 to 1.03 g/cm[sup 3]. At the highest experimental temperature of 286 C, viscosities of water-saturated samples were about one-half those of water-free counterparts. The viscosity reduction, although quite significant, was not as pronounced as the drop estimated by viscosity mixing rules used for hydrocarbon systems. While a log mixing rule or a one-quarter power mixing rule overestimated viscosity effects, a mole-fraction-weighted average of oil and water viscosities matched the experimental data. A possible explanation for failure of the log mixing rule is that the water dissolved in the oil exists not as monomers but as hydrogen-bonded clusters. The authors find good agreement with experiment when the mole fraction of water clusters, calculated from a statistical mechanics based theory is used in the log mixing rule.

Giandt, C.A. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Chapman, W.G. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Eco Oil 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

332

Subject is oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The article reviews the current financial, legislative and regulatory problems of oil shale development. 2 refs.

Due, M.J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hydrocarbons in New Guinea, controlled by basement fabric, Mesozoic extension and Tertiary convergent margin tectonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocene arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of [approx]139[degrees]E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.

Hill, K.C.; Kendrick, R.D.; Crowhurst, P.V. (VIEPS, Melbourne (Australia) SAEFUDIN Ijep, GRDC (India))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Oil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

336

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

An otter tragedy. [Environmental effects of oil spills  

SciTech Connect

Otters appear to be the most vulnerable of all marine mammals to oil; oil reduces the insulating value of their fur by as much as 70% and otters are extremely vulnerable to oil poisoning through inhalation of hydrocarbon fumes, ingestion of petroleum, and absorption through the skin. After the Exxon Valdez accident in Alaska's Prince William Sound, dramatic efforts were made to rescue and rehabilitate otters and other sea animals. One hundred ninety seven of the treated otters were released back into the wild. However, soon after the release, wildlife biologist Lisa Rotterman reported an unprecidented die-off of never-oiled otters. Many of the treated otters may have carried a potentially novel herpesvirus, but whether this caused the die-off is controversial. It is also hard to separate symptoms of sickness, stress, and fear from oil toxicity. Overall the findings suggest a generic regimen for all oiled otters: antibiotics, vitamin and mineral supplements, and prompt administration of fluids. Assessing which animals need care is an urgent need. Strict quarantine, short captivity time, and protected handling of oiled animals are further suggestions.

Raloff, J.

1993-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of hydrocarbons having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 340 to 360/sup 0/C, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, CH/sub 3/OH is produced in an amount of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture, and comprised 1 mole % of the effluent gas.

Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

339

Chemical kinetic modelling of hydrocarbon ignition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon ignition is discussed with reference to a range of experimental configurations, including shock tubes, detonations, pulse combustors, static reactors, stirred reactors and internal combustion engines. Important conditions of temperature, pressure or other factors are examined to determine the main chemical reaction sequences responsible for chain branching and ignition, and kinetic factors which can alter the rate of ignition are identified. Hydrocarbon ignition usually involves complex interactions between physical and chemical factors, and it therefore is a suitable and often productive subject for computer simulations. In most of the studies to be discussed below, the focus of the attention is placed on the chemical features of the system. The other physical parts of each application are generally included in the form of initial or boundary conditions to the chemical kinetic parts of the problem, as appropriate for each type of application being addressed.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Marinov, N.M.

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

340

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Asheville, NC Mike Burdette Petroleum Division, Energy ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

342

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Wilmington, DE by Douglas MacIntyre

343

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

344

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

345

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT  

SciTech Connect

In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During ·the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Literature Review of Background Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) continuously move through the environment, often via atmospheric transport. The subsequent deposition of particulates containing PAHs along with other sources of PAHs, such as natural vegetative decay, result in "background" PAHs in surficial soils. Even in pristine areas, surface and near surface soils can contain detectable levels of PAHs. This study provides data on the concentrations and distributions of background PAHs observed in environmental media. Such inf...

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hydrocarbon content of geopressured brines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design Well data (bottomhole pressure minus wellhead pressure, GWR, and hydrocarbon composition) is presented as a function of producing conditions. These are examined in conjunction with the following models to attempt to deduce the reservoir brine saturation level: (1) reservoir contains gas dispersed in the pores and the gas saturation is greater than critical; (2) reservoir brine is gas-saturated; (3) bubble point below hydrostatic pressure; and (4) bubble point between hydrostatic pressure and reservoir pressure. 24 figs., 10 tabs. (ACR)

Osif, T.L.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm.sup.2. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000.degree. C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity.

Hsu, Wen L. (Danville, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Flash pyrolysis of oil shale with various gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flash pyrolysis of Colorado Oil Shale with methane at a temperature of 800/sup 0/C and pressure of 500 psi appears to give the highest yield of hydrocarbon gas and liquid followed by hydrogen and lowest with helium. In the methane pyrolysis over 54.5% of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to ethylene and benzene. The flash pyrolysis with hydrogen (flash hydropyrolysis) of the oil shale at increasing temperatures showed a rapidly increasing amount of methane formed and a decrease in ethane formation, while the BTX (benzene mainly) yield remained at approximately 10%. At 950/sup 0/C and 500 psi almost all (97.0%) of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Experiments with a mixture of a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal and oil shale under flash hydropyrolysis and methane pyrolysis conditions indicated higher yields of methane and ethylene and slightly lower yields of benzene than predicted by partial additive calculations. These exploratory experiments appear to be of sufficient interest to warrant a fuller investigation of the interaction of the natural resources, oil shale, coal and natural gas under flash pyrolysis conditions.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hydrocarbon Fouling of SCR during PCCI combustion  

SciTech Connect

The combination of advanced combustion with advanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst formulations was studied in the work presented here to determine the impact of the unique hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion on SCR performance. Catalyst core samples cut from full size commercial Fe- and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. The zeolites which form the basis of these catalysts are different with the Cu-based catalyst made on a chabazite zeolite which las smaller pore structures relative to the Fe-based catalyst. Subsequent to exposure, bench flow reactor characterization of performance and hydrocarbon release and oxidation enabled evaluation of overall impacts from the engine exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOX conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (<250 C), after the catalyst was exposed to the raw engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite showed better tolerance to HC fouling at low temperatures compared to the Fe-zeolite but PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOX conversion efficiency. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the hydrocarbons trapped on the SCR cores was conducted to better determine chemistry specific effects.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waxes, unfinished oils, motor and aviation gasoline blendingimports for motor gasoline, jet fuel, and residual fuel oil.Motor gasoline consumption by end-use sector 41 Table 24. Distillate fuel oil

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Allocation of the Social Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use to Six Classes of Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higher the amount of foreign oil embodied, and consequentlyof domestic and foreign crude oil used to make motor fuels10-13b). Mass of foreign crude oil (including unfinished

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power, and Oil Commission (FERC) Source: http://10,718 Unfinished Oils Source: CEC 2006a The energy sectorIndustries Data Sources Oil and gas extraction energy use

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Costs of aggregate hydrocarbon reserve additions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In what follows, we highlight problems created by aggregation using fixed conversion coefficients (Section 1). We then offer an economic index approach as an alternative, one that recognizes changing relative values of oil ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Natural Oil Production from Microorganisms: Bioprocess and Microbe Engineering for Total Carbon Utilization in Biofuel Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: MIT is using carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen generated from electricity to produce natural oils that can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels. MIT has designed a 2-stage biofuel production system. In the first stage, hydrogen and CO2 are fed to a microorganism capable of converting these feedstocks to a 2-carbon compound called acetate. In the second stage, acetate is delivered to a different microorganism that can use the acetate to grow and produce oil. The oil can be removed from the reactor tank and chemically converted to various hydrocarbons. The electricity for the process could be supplied from novel means currently in development, or more proven methods such as the combustion of municipal waste, which would also generate the required CO2 and enhance the overall efficiency of MIT’s biofuel-production system.

None

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Particles of spilled oil-absorbing carbon in contact with water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen generator coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. Carbon particles with surface filaments having a hydrophobic property of oil film absorption, compositions of matter containing those particles, and a system for using the carbon particles for cleaning oil spills.

Muradov, Nazim (Melbourne, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fuel Oil Use in Manufacturing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and residual fuel oils. Distillate fuel oil, the lighter product, is also used for heating of homes and commercial buildings. Residual oil is a much denser, heavier product...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Experimental and analytical studies of hydrocarbon yields under dry-, steam-, and steam-with-propane distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation study has shown oil production is accelerated when propane is used as an additive during steam injection. To better understand this phenomenon, distillation experiments were performed using San Ardo crude oil (12oAPI). For comparison purposes, three distillation processes were investigated: dry-, steam-, and steam-propanedistillation, the latter at the propane-to-steam mass ratio of 0.05 at steam injection rate 0.5 g/min. Two sets of the distillation experiments were carried out. In the first set of experiments, the distillation temperatures ranged from 115Ă‚ÂşC to 300Ă‚ÂşC. Distillation pressures ranged from 0 psig to 998 psig for steam- and steam-propane distillation. The temperature-pressure combination used represented 15Ă‚ÂşC superheated steam conditions. In the second set of experiments, the distillation temperatures ranged from 220oC to 300oC at 260 psig. The temperature pressure combination used represented field conditions for crude oil. For both conditions, the cell was kept at each temperature plateau (cut) until no increase occurs in distillation yields. Distillation yields were collected at each cut, and the volume and weight of water and hydrocarbon measured. Based on these experiments, a thermodynamic modeling framework was developed that describes distillation effect and oil production for steam distillation experiments. The model is based on composition of crude oil, molecular weight of heavy fraction. The analytical model results are compared against the experimental data for synthetic crude and crude oil to verify the validity of the model. Main results of the study may be summarized as follows. The yields for steam distillation for saturated conditions of Tsat+15 o C and Psat is 10 % and with addition of 5% of propane to steam no significant increase occurs in distillation yields. The yields for steam distillation for field conditions of 260 psig and temperature range (220 ~300oC) is 18 % and with addition of 5% of propane to steam no significant increase in distillation yields. The results indicate that propane has minimal distillation effect on the heavy oil. This occurs possibly because of lesser amount of light fractions in the heavy oil that enhance the separation of components in the oil caused by the concentration gradient.

Jaiswal, Namit

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the technology "Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview This invention discloses a method to reform hydrocarbon fuels using hexa- aluminate catalysts. In general, the method successfully disrupts the forma- tion of carbon that leads to the deactivation of the catalyst, a key element in the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. When researchers are designing catalysts to reform hydrocarbon fuels, one

364

Harvester ants utilize cuticular hydrocarbons in nestmate recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Cuticular hydrocarbons appear to play a role in ant nestmate recognition, but few studies have tested this hypothesis experimentally with purified hydrocarbon extracts. We exposed captive colonies of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex barbatus to small glass blocks coated with whole cuticular lipid extracts and the purified hydrocarbon portion of extracts from nestmate and nonnestmate workers. As an estimate of agonistic behavior, we measured the proportion of ants in contact with blocks that flared their mandibles. Blocks coated with cuticular extracts from nonnestmates were contacted by more workers in one of two experiments and elicited higher levels of aggression in both experiments than blocks bearing extracts from nestmates. The cuticular hydrocarbon fraction of extracts alone was sufficient to elicit agonistic behavior toward nonnestmates. The results demonstrate that harvester ants can perceive differences in cuticular hydrocarbon composition, and can use those differences in nestmate recognition. Key Words—Cuticular hydrocarbons, Formicidae, Nestmate recognition, Pogonomyrmex barbatus.

Diane Wagner; Madeleine Tissot; William Cuevas; Deborah M. Gordon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Soybean Oil Derivatives for Fuel and Chemical Feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plant based sources of hydrocarbons are being considered as alternatives to petrochemicals because of the need to conserve petroleum resources for reasons of national security and climate change. Changes in fuel formulations to include ethanol from corn sugar and methyl esters from soybean oil are examples of this policy in the United States and elsewhere. Replacements for commodity chemicals are also being considered, as this value stream represents much of the profit for the oil industry and one that would be affected by shortages in oil or other fossil fuels. While the discovery of large amounts of natural gas associated with oil shale deposits has abated this concern, research into bio-based feedstock materials continues. In particular, this chapter reviews a literature on the conversion of bio-based extracts to hydrocarbons for fuels and for building block commodity chemicals, with a focus on soybean derived products. Conversion of methyl esters from soybean triglycerides for replacement of diesel fuel is an active area of research; however, the focus of this chapter will not reside with esterification or transesterification, except has a means to provide materials for the production of hydrocarbons for fuels or chemical feedstocks. Methyl ester content in vehicle fuel is limited by a number of factors, including the performance in cold weather, the effect of oxygen content on engine components particularly in the case of older engines, shelf-life, and higher NOx emissions from engines that are not tuned to handle the handle the enhanced pre-ignition conditions of methyl ester combustion [1]. These factors have led to interest in synthesizing a hydrocarbon fuel from methyl esters, one that will maintain the cetane number but will achieve better performance in an automobile: enhanced mixing, injection, and combustion, and reduce downstream issues such as emissions and upstream issues such as fuel preparation and transportation. Various catalytic pathways from oxygenated precursor to hydrocarbon will be considered in the review: pyrolysis [2], deoxygenation and hydrogenation [3, 4], and hydrotreatment [5]. The focus of many of these studies has been production of fuels that are miscible or fungible with petroleum products, e.g., the work published by the group of Daniel Resasco at U. Oklahoma [6]. Much of the published literature focuses on simpler chemical representatives of the methyl esters form soybean oil; but these results are directly applicable to the production of chemical feedstocks, such as ethylbenzene that can be used for a variety of products: polymers, solvent, and reagent [3]. Although many chemical pathways have been demonstrated in the laboratory, the scale-up to handle quantities of bio-derived material presents a number of challenges in comparison with petroleum refining. These range from additional transportation costs because of distributed feedstock production to catalyst cost and regeneration. Other chapters in the book appear to address the cultivation and harvesting of soybeans and production of oil, so these areas will not be dealt with directly in this chapter except as they may relate to chemical changes in the feedstock material. However, the feasibility of the production of hydrocarbons from soybean triglycerides or methyl esters derived from these triglycerides will be considered, along with remaining technical hurdles before soybeans can make a significant contribution to the hydrocarbon economy.

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

367

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils offers new insights into these important (and growing) products of vegetable oils, while also covering developments in biodegradable grease, vegetable oils-based polyols, and the synthesis of surfactants from vegetable oil

368

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a 1979 exploratory oil well blew out and leaked oil foraddicted to oil directly causes spills as well as globalmagnitudes of past oil spills. They are well aware of the

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

370

Novel catalyst for selective NOx reduction using hydrocarbons ...  

This invention discloses a catalyst and process for removing nitrogen oxides from exhaust streams under lean burn conditions using hydrocarbons as the reductant.

371

Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene ...  

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas United States Patent. Patent Number: 6,576,043: Issued: June 10, 2003: Official Filing:

373

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY); Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

376

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure in German Coke Oven Workers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed whenever there is incomplete combustion of carbonaceous material. They are ubiquitous in the environment and background levels are found… (more)

Thoroman, Jeffrey S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Oil and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Plants Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: If you could please tell me exactly what motor oil (unused) does to plants, and the effects. Does it...

378

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Palm oil pundit speaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dorab E. Mistry, director of Godrej International Ltd. in Mumbai, India, spoke about palm oil on March 15, 2010, during the 2010 Annual Convention of the National Institute of Oilseed Products in Palm Springs, California, USA. Palm oil pundit speaks ...

380

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well below unity accounts for the broad trends we see in the share of oil purchases in totalWells. ” Middle panel: percent of U.S. total crude oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Reaction kinetics for remodeling oil shale retorting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from recent laboratory kinetic studies at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) on gasification, pyrolysis, and mineral reactions in oil shale are presented. The specific pyrolysis reactions investigated include the decomposition of kerogen, the evolution of oil, hydrogen and C/sub 2/ plus C/sub 3/ hydrocarbons and the formation of a carbonaceous residue. Data describing the evolution of H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ during secondary pyrolysis of the carbonaceous residue are also presented. The mineral reaction kinetics discussed include the decomposition and/or reaction (with silica or silicates) of calcite, dolomite, dawsonite and nahcolite. Rate equations describing the effects of CO/sub 2/ and steam on the reactions of calcite and dolomite are presented. Finally, kinetics describing gasification of the carbonaceous residue by CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O are examined. The above kinetic data are summarized in a set of rate expressions that can be used in numerical modeling of oil shale retorting. The rate equations are general enough for modeling both in-situ and surface retorting processes.

Campbell, J.H.; Burnham, A.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Oil Peak or Panic?  

SciTech Connect

In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint.

Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Sansone, Michael J. (Summit, NJ); Slegeir, William A. R. (Hampton Bays, NY)

1983-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

Collisional processes of hydrocarbons in hydrogen plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated the reactions of methane and its derivatives with hydrogen plasmas for use in modelling carbon and hydrocarbon transport in hydrogen plasmas. We provide quantitative information over the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 2 keV for the most significant reactions of methane and methane fragments with electrons and protons. We review the properties of each reaction, present graphs of the cross section and reaction rate coefficient, and give analytical fits for sigma and (sigmav). 34 refs.

Ehrhardt, A.B.; Langer, W.D.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and Tea Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Camellia Oil and T

388

Using Oils As Pesticides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing oils for use, application and precautions are discussed.

Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a “negative” storage cost for oil in the form of a bene?tin levels. oil for more than your costs, that is, if P t+1 QSaudi oil, and M S the Saudi’s marginal cost of production.

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the behaviour of oil and gas prices and the fruits of future exploration. The rate of technological progress. How optimistic are you that the North Sea remains a viable source of oil and gas? A) Our new researchNorth Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen

Levi, Ran

391

Effects of selected thermophilic microorganisms on crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Particular attention was paid to heavy crude oils from Venezuela, California, Alabama, Arkansas, Wyoming, Alaska, and other oil producing areas. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between {open_quotes}biodegraded{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}biotreated{close_quotes} oils. Preliminary results indicate the introduced microorganisms may become the dominant species in the bioconversion of oils. These studies also indicate the biochemical interactions between crude oils and microorganisms follow distinct trends, characterized by a group of chemical markers. Core-flooding experiments have shown significant additional crude oil recoveries are achievable with thermophilic microorganisms at elevated temperatures similar to those found in oil reservoirs. In addition, the biochemical treatment of crude oils has technological applications in downstream processing of crude oils such as in upgrading of low grade oils and the production of hydrocarbon based detergents.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Geology and hydrocarbon potentials of Arafura Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arafura Sea is a continental-shelf sea located between Irian Jaya (western New Guinea) and the northern part of the Australian continent. On the south it adjoins the stable Australian craton, and on the north it is bordered by the Tertiary collision zone between the Australian craton and the northern Irian Jaya island arc. On the west and northwest it is bounded by the active Banda arc collision zone, whereas on the east it is bordered by the northern extension of the Gulf of Carpentaria that also forms the western limit of the zone of late Paleozoic granites. Shelf sediments, ranging in age from late Paleozoic to Cenozoic, predominate in the Arafura Sea continental shelf, and are underlain by granitic basement. Gas shows have been reported from Jurassic to Cretaceous fine-grained marine limestones and sandstones, and gas and condensate also are present in Cretaceous sediments and Middle Jurassic fine-grained sandstones. At the north, the most prospective area seems to be the hinge zone of the Aru high, where a combination of traps and reservoir rocks presumably exists. On the south, the Money Shoal area is considered a significant prospect. In the Arafura basin, stratigraphic traps seem to be the most promising target for hydrocarbon exploration as tectonics seems not to have played an important role in the area. The sedimentary area occupied by the eastern extension of the Tarera-Aiduna wrench fault should also be investigated in detail for its hydrocarbon potential.

Katili, J.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Oil reservoir characterization using ensemble data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing world energy demand combined with decreasing discoveries of new and accessible hydrocarbon reserves are necessitating optimal recovery from the world's current hydrocarbon resources. Advances in drilling and ...

Jafarpour, Behnam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Oil shale commercialization study  

SciTech Connect

Ninety four possible oil shale sections in southern Idaho were located and chemically analyzed. Sixty-two of these shales show good promise of possible oil and probable gas potential. Sixty of the potential oil and gas shales represent the Succor Creek Formation of Miocene age in southwestern Idaho. Two of the shales represent Cretaceous formations in eastern Idaho, which should be further investigated to determine their realistic value and areal extent. Samples of the older Mesozonic and paleozoic sections show promise but have not been chemically analyzed and will need greater attention to determine their potential. Geothermal resources are of high potential in Idaho and are important to oil shale prospects. Geothermal conditions raise the geothermal gradient and act as maturing agents to oil shale. They also might be used in the retorting and refining processes. Oil shales at the surface, which appear to have good oil or gas potential should have much higher potential at depth where the geothermal gradient is high. Samples from deep petroleum exploration wells indicate that the succor Creek shales have undergone considerable maturation with depth of burial and should produce gas and possibly oil. Most of Idaho's shales that have been analyzed have a greater potential for gas than for oil but some oil potential is indicated. The Miocene shales of the Succor Creek Formation should be considered as gas and possibly oil source material for the future when technology has been perfectes. 11 refs.

Warner, M.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

397

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

398

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

399

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010 00:00 Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

400

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

402

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for a combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts. 19 figs.

Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stripper Well Consortium Stripper Well Consortium DE-FC26-00NT41025 Goal: The goal is to enhance the ability of the domestic production industry to keep stripper wells producing at economic production rates in an environmentally safe manner, maximizing the recovery of domestic hydrocarbon resources. Objective: The objective is to develop and manage an industry-driven consortium that provides a cost-efficient vehicle for developing, transferring, and deploying new technologies into the private sector that focus on improving the production performance of domestic natural gas and oil stripper wells. Performer: The Pennsylvania State University (Energy Institute) - Project management Accomplishments: Established a consortium governing structure, constitution and bylaws, Established areas of research focus (reservoir remediation and characterization, well bore cleanup, and surface systems optimization) and rules for proposal submission and selection, and

409

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

Yankee Mine oil seep: New research yields additional evidence of thrusting; original oil volume in the seep was possibly two orders of magnitude greater than previously calculated  

SciTech Connect

Mesomic thrusting combined with subsequent Eocene hydrothermal activity have created a regime favorable to major accumulation of both oil and gold in the Long Valley - Buck Mountain - Maverick Springs Range area of northeastern Nevada. Discoveries from ongoing exploration include: Numerous economic accumulations of hydrocarbon associated gold; various thrust relationships from surface geologic mapping and drill holes identifying Devonian rocks faulted onto Permian, Pennsylvanian (?) and Mississippian age rocks; numerous small scale compressional folds and faults indicative of both cast vergent (expected) and west vergent (unexpected) structural elements. Seismic data indicates that oil source rocks, primarily Chainman Shale and Pilot Shale formations, are present to the west in a downdip, subthrust position where hydrocarbon generation and migration would provide large oil volumes to migrate easterly (updip) prior to the formation of the Basin and Range. The Eocene age hydothermal cell which emplaced gold and oil bearing fluids into the Yankee and associated gold mines probably initiated directly below or east of the Yankee area, but certainly not west of it since no hydrothermal mineralization is present in the Yankee Mine 27-23X Well drilled by Pioneer Oil and Gas west of the mines.

Pinnell, M.L. [Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (United States); Anderson, D.W. [Anderson Geological Corp., Westminster, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013. Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 Industrial Oil Products Newsletter April 2013 ...

414

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota DE-FC26-08NT43291 – 01.2 Goal The goal of this project is to quantitatively describe and understand the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin by collecting and analyzing a wide range of parameters, including seismic and geochemical data, that impact well productivity/oil recovery. Performer Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Background The Bakken Formation is rapidly emerging as an important source of oil in the Williston Basin. The formation typically consists of three members, with the upper and lower members being shales and the middle member being dolomitic siltstone and sandstone. Total organic carbon (TOC) within the shales may be as high as 40%, with estimates of total hydrocarbon generation across the entire Bakken Formation ranging from 200 to 400 billion barrels. While the formation is productive in numerous reservoirs throughout Montana and North Dakota, with the Elm Coulee Field in Montana and the Parshall area in North Dakota being the most prolific examples of Bakken success, many Bakken wells have yielded disappointing results. While variable productivity within a play is nothing unusual to the petroleum industry, the Bakken play is noteworthy because of the wide variety of approaches and technologies that have been applied with apparently inconsistent and all too often underachieving results. This project will implement a robust, systematic, scientific, and engineering research effort to overcome these challenges and unlock the vast resource potential of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin.

416

Metagenomics for Greener Production and Extraction of Hydrocarbon Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transition to unconvention~loil could also shift the balanceof powerin world oil markets.This study. WHAT IS OIL? In this reporttwo kinds of oil are distinguished,conventionaland unconventional offshore crude oil was considered an unconventional resource. From that per- spective, what is called here

Gieg, Lisa

417

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook 8/13/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance OPEC Production Likely To Remain Low U.S. Reflects World Market Crude Oil Outlook Conclusions Distillate Prices Increase With Crude Oil Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter More Supply Possible This Fall than Forecast Distillate Fuel Oil Imports Could Be Available - For A Price Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Winter Crude Oil and Distillate Price Outlook Heating Oil Outlook Conclusion Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil

418

Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Crude Oil Watch - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Watch April 19, 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil & Gas A large stockbuild in crude oil inventories contributed to blunt crude oil inputs ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Stable isotope investigations of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable isotope ratio measurements for carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) can be used to elucidate the processes affecting transformation and transportation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in the environment. Methods recently developed in our laboratory for isotopic analysis of CAHs have been applied to laboratory measurements of the kinetic isotope effects associated with aerobic degradation of dichloromethane (DCM) and with both anaerobic and aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichlomethene (TCE) in batch and column microbial cultures. These experimental determinations of fractionation factors are crucial for understanding the behavior of CAHs in complex natural systems, where the extent of biotransformation can be masked by dispersion and volatilization. We have also performed laboratory investigations of kinetic isotope effects accompanying evaporation of CAHs, as well as field investigations of natural attenuation and in situ remediation of CAHs in a number of contaminated shallow aquifers at sites operated by the federal government and the private sector.

Abrajano, T.; Heraty, L. J.; Holt, B. D.; Huang, L.; Sturchio, N. C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of aliphatic alcohols having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further optionally includes Na ions present as substitutional cations in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 570 to 630/sup 0/K, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, methanol and isobutanol are the predominant products and are produced in amounts of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture. 6 figs.

Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

Hydrocarbon evaluation proposed southeastern New Mexico radioactive material storage site Eddy County, New Mexico. Volume I. Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The proposed radioactive waste material storage site is located in the northern portion of the Delaware Basin. No hydrocarbon production exists within the current boundaries of the ''site area'', but oil and gas are being produced from 60 wells in a 368 square-mile area around the site. These wells produce from the Delaware, Bone Springs, Wolfcamp, Strawn, Atoka and Morrow zones at a total rate of about 22,682 MCF of gas and 429 barrels of oil per day. This area is considered to be potentially rich in hydrocarbon reserves and the lack of fuller development and exploration drilling is due primarily to low gas prices, lack of sales outlets and/or pipelines and moratoriums on drilling in the potash areas. Proved producing and proved nonproducing reserves are present in two wells in the Los Medanos Field area immediately adjacent to the southwest corner of the ''site area''. In addition, proved undeveloped, probable and possible reserves exist at six potential drilling locations in the Los Medanos Field. Further, probable and possible reserves were assigned to fifteen other potential drilling locations in the northwest and south-central portions of the ''site area''. Total future economically recoverable reserves projected for these wells are 62,253,244 MCF of gas and 409,628 barrels of oil. The future net undiscounted revenue to the oil operators was determined to be $48,410,821. The discounted future net revenue is $21,216,899, discounted at 10 percent per annum. The fair market value for these projected reserves is $12,730,139, assuming a fair market factor of 0.60.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Preignition oxidation characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results obtained from a static reactor are presented for the oxidation of a variety of fuels. Pressure and temperature histories of the reacting fuel/oxidizer mixtures were obtained. Measurements of the stable reaction intermediate and product species were made using gas chromatographic analysis. One aspect of this work involved detailed studies of the oxidation chemistry of relatively low molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons: propane, propene, and n-butane. The oxidation chemistry of these fuels was examined at temperatures in the range 550-750 K, equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 4.0 and at subatmospheric pressures. The main characteristics and features of the oxidation mechanisms were determined for each fuel in each temperature regime. The experimental results from propene and propane were used to develop a low and intermediate temperature kinetic mechanism for these fuels based on a low temperature acetaldehyde mechanism of Kaiser et al. and a high temperature propene/propane mechanism of Westbrook and Pitz. General preignition characteristics of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons and binary mixtures of these fuels were also studied. The low temperature/cool flame ignition characteristics of dodecane were investigated at temperatures in the range 523-623 K, equivalence s ranging from 0.8 to 1.0 and at subatmospheric pressures. The preignition characteristics of binary mixtures of dodecane and the aromatic component tetralin were examined. The addition of the tetralin had the overall effect of decreasing the ignition tendency of the mixture, although this effect was nonlinear with respect to the amount of tetralin added.

Wilk, R.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Millimeter wave analysis of the dielectric properties of oil shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural sedimentation processes give rise to fine layers in shales. If these layers alternate between organic-rich and organic-poor sediments, then the contrast in dielectric properties gives rise to an effective birefringence as the presence of hydrocarbons suppresses the dielectric constant of the host rock. We have measured these effects with a quasioptical millimeter wave setup that is rapid and noncontacting. We find that the strength of this birefringence and the overall dielectric permittivity provide two useful diagnostic of the organic content of oil shales.

John A. Scales; Michael Batzle

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to determine the concentration of the cryocondensates in fluids of the various USDOE Geopressured wells as a function of production volume, to correlate the production of these compounds with reservoir and well production characteristics, to precisely measure solubilities of cryocondensates components in water and sodium chloride solutions (brines) as a function of ionic strength and temperature and the component's distribution coefficients between these solutions and oil, to develop models of the reservoir which are consistent with the data obtained, to monitor the wells for the production of aliphatic oils and relate any such production with the data obtained, and to develop a harsh environment pH probe for use in well brines. Results are summarized.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

(Enhydm Lutris) Collected Following the Exron Vuldez Oil Spill Marine Mammal Study 6-16 Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

part of the Natural Resource Damaxe Assessment (NRDA). The study had a broad scope, involving more than 20 scientists over a three year period. Final results are presented in a series of 19 reports that address the various project components. Abstract: Ten moderately to heavily oiled sea otters were collected in Prince William Sound early during the Enon Valdez oil spill and up to seven tissues from each were analyzed for hydrocarbons. All of the animals had gross pathological lesions consistent with exposure to crude oil as an ultimate cause of death. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were detected in all tissues. The alkane series C20 through C30 frequently was observed at relatively high concentrations in all tissue types, as were the aromatic compounds naphthalene, its alkylated

Brenda E. Ballachey; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service; Kimberly A. Kloecker; Brenda E. Ballachey; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service; Kimberly A. Kloecker

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Shale oil: process choices  

SciTech Connect

The four broad categories of shale-oil processing are discussed. All of these processes share the basic function of retorting oil-shale rock at high temperature so that the kerogen material in the rocks is thermally decomposed to shale oil and gaseous products. The technologies and the organizations working on their development are: solids-to-solids heating, The Oil Shale Co. (TOSCO) and Lurgi-Rhur; gas-to-solids heating with internal gas combustion, U. S. Bureau of Mines, Development Engineering Inc. and Union Oil of California; gas-to-solid heating with external heat generation, Development Engineering, Union Oil, Petrobas, and Institute of Gas Technology; and in-situ retorting, Occidental Petroleum Corp. The TOSCO II process is considered proven and on the verge of commercialization. (BLM)

1974-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

World Oil: Market or Mayhem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

Smith, James L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Process of treating oil shale  

SciTech Connect

A process of destructively distilling oil shale is described consisting in subjecting the oil shale containing aluminum to the action of heat and pressure to destructively distill it and separate the light oil constituents. Chlorine gas is simultaneously passed through the hot oil shale countercurrent to the direction of movement of the oil shale.

Egloff, G.

1927-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

2 World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) 140 120 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price Global financial collapse 100 80 60 U.S. spare capacity exhausted Iran-Iraq War Saudis abandon swing producer role Asian financial crisis 9-11 attacks Low spare capacity

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

U.S. Imports from Chad - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Import Area: Period/Unit: Country: ... 51: 30: 2003-2012: Crude Oil: 77: 102: 65: 18: 49: 28: 2003-2012: Products: 1: 2: 4: 13: 1: 2: 2003-2012: Unfinished Oils ...

433

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery Yield - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+)-8.3-7.7-8.3-7.9-8.8-8.7: 1993-2013 ... Based on crude oil input and net reruns of unfinished oils. See Definitions, ...

434

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+)-7.4-7.6-8.2-8.4-8.6-8.0: 1993-2012 ... Based on crude oil input and net reruns of unfinished oils. See Definitions, ...

435

Louisiana Gulf Coast Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+)-7.1-7.1-6.7-7.3-7.7-7.5: 1993-2012 ... Based on crude oil input and net reruns of unfinished oils. See Definitions, ...

436

38017,"AMERADA HESS CORP ",1,130,"MOTOR...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

CO ",32,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS OILS",1003,"NEWARK, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,515,"KOREA, REPUBLIC OF",265,0,0,"IMTT BAYONNE ","BAYONNE TERM","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1 38017,"SHELL...

437

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help reduce gasoline prices U.S. gasoline prices are expected to fall as more oil refineries come back on line and crude...

438

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

439

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Oil from rock  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses first the Green River Formation oil shale projects in the western United States from which conservative estimates have suggested an output of 400,000 to 600,000 bbl/day of crude shale oil by 1990. The western reserves recoverable with present technology are said to exceed 600 billion (10/sup 9/) bbl. Three major considerations could limit the large-scale development of shale oil: availability of water, environmental factors, and socio-economic considerations. Water is used to obtain and process the crude shale oil, and additional water is needed to cool the spent shale and to establish new vegetation on top of it. Nitrogenous compounds and arsenic in crude shale oil are among potential pollutants. Spent shale contains salts that are potentially leachable, as well as organic pyrolytic products. Retorting oil shales may release more CO/sub 2/ through decomposition of carbonate minerals that will subsequently be generated by burning the oil produced. Topographic effects of oil shale mining may raise socio-economic problems. Next the article discusses the conversion of coal to liquid by pyrolysis or hydrogenation, including the Gulf solvent refined coal (SRC) and the Exxon (EDS) liquefaction processes. Also described in the South African SASOL process for producing synthetic fuel from coal. A parallel account is included on the estimated complete cycle of United States and of worldwide crude oil production, forecasting depletion within less than a century. 11 refs.

Walters, S.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

442

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

443

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

444

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

445

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

446

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

447

Residual Fuel Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

448

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollution has become one of the main problems being faced by humanity. Preventing pollution from occurring might be the best idea but is not possible in this fast developing world. So the next best thing to do would be to respond to the pollution source in an effective manner. Oil spills are fast becoming pollution sources that are causing the maximum damage to the environment. This is owing to the compounds that are released and the way oil spreads in both water and land. Preventing the oil spill would be the best option. But once the oil has been spilled, the next best thing to do is to respond to the spill effectively. As a result, time becomes an important factor while responding to an oil spill. Appropriate response to contain and cleanup the spill is required to minimize its potential damage to the ecosystem. Since time and money play a very important role in spill response, it would be a great idea if decisions can be made in such a way that a quick response can be planned. The first part of this study deals with the formation of an 'Oil Spill Resources Handbook', which has information on all the important Oil Spill Contractors. The second and the main part of the study, deals with creating a database in Microsoft Access of the Oil Spill Contractors. The third portion of the study deals with planning an oil spill response using a systems approach.

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry analysts and academics agree that China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robert Ebel, China’s Energy

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Crude Oil Price Forecast  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We believe crude oil prices will strengthen somewhat, but prices will rise much more slowly than they fell, and they are expected to remain lower in ...

451

Oil And The Macroeconomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper examines the oil price-macro economy relationship by means of analyzing the impact ofoil price on Industrial production, real effective exchange rate, long… (more)

Al-Ameri, Leyth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

California Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of different quality crudes vary over time based on the value the market places on such quality attributes. A heavy crude oil has more heavy, ...

453

Classification of oil reserves and resources in the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect

The terminology and principles of classification of oil reserves and resources that are presently used in Russia and other countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU) differ from those in the Western countries. This difference stems from the specificity of the Soviet practice in exploration, assessment, and keeping a record of resources that were controlled by the centralized government. In the FSU, the fundamental approach to the assessment of hydrocarbon resources is traditionally based on the extent to which the resources are explored. Such important factors as thickness of separate reservoir beds, their quality, physical characteristics of oil, the recovery factor, and the economic efficiency are not considered. Owing to this approach, the resource base appeared to be strongly exaggerated due to inclusion of reserves and resources that are neither reliable nor technologically and economically viable. A critical analysis of the long-term dynamics of reserves in the leading oil-producing regions of Russia, including west Siberia, shows a negative effect of the obsolete classification and errors in resource assessment on the development and production of oil fields. The classification of hydrocarbon resources presently used in Russia should be changed so that the principles of the new classification would be similar to those commonly accepted in the oil business. A proposed new classification scheme will make the assessment of resource base for oil production in Russia more reliable. This scheme uses the principles of differentiation and assessment of hydrocarbon resources that are conventional in the world. Because no method of resource assessment is precise, the results of assessment should be presented in a probabilistic form or, at least, as an interval, but not as a single number assessment that is a common practice at present.

Khalimov, E.M. (Institute of Geology and Exploration of Combustible Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

455

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues on Aluminum Sheet and Foil by Using Elemental Analysis and Fourier  ...

457

Relaxation studies on oil, pressboard and oil impregnated pressboard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a laboratory relaxation study with FDS and RVM was carried out for a period of 3 years with the fabricated oil (OIL),… (more)

Cao, Hongyan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Why solar oil shale retorting produces more oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar oil shale retorting process may produce higher oil yield than conventional processing. High oil yield is obtained for three reasons: oil carbonization inside of the shale is reduced, oil cracking outside of the shale is reduced, and oil oxidation is essentially eliminated. Unique capabilities of focused solar energy produce these advantages. An increase in yield will reduce the cost of mining and shale transportation per barrel of oil produced. These cost reductions may justify the increased processing costs that will probably be associated with solar oil shale retorting.

Aiman, W.R.

1981-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

459

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Shale Oil Upgrading Utilizing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Companies providing oil samples of at least five (5) gallons include Chevron, Oil Shale Exploration Company (OSEC), and Red Leaf Resources, Inc. Background Work performed...

460

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that have unconventional characteristics (e.g., oil in fractured shales, kerogen in oil shale, bitumen in tar sands) constitute an enormous potential domestic supply of energy....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrocarbons unfinished oils" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 18 Notes: Using the Northeast as an appropriate regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming...

462

Distillate and Crude Oil Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fuel and residential heating oil prices on the East Coast is being driven by higher crude oil prices than last year and higher spreads. Crude oil is projected to average almost...

463

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Oil and Natural Gas Supply > Events Oil and Natural Gas Supply Events The following is a listing of events of interest to the oil and natural gas community....

464

The Legacy of Oil Spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

010-0527-5 The Legacy of Oil Spills J. T. Trevors & M. H.workers were killed, and oil has been gushing out everday. It is now June, and oil continues to spew forth into

Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book highlights various aspects of Australasian edible oils. Handbook of Australasian Edible Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Soft Bound Books Oils and Fats Specialist

466

Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

467

Analysis of the behavior of ternary hydrocarbon mixture as substitutes of the CFC-12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbons are stratospheric ozone friendly and have good heat transfer properties. The use of hydrocarbons (HCs) or their blend as refrigerant is extending in these days. This paper deals with the search of the best ternary hydrocarbons mixture of ... Keywords: CFC-12, LB-12, cub, hydrocarbon, ozone, refrigerant, ternary mixture

Rafael Quintero Ricardo

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

New insights into microbial responses to oil spills from the Deepwater Horizon incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On April 20, 2010, a catastrophic eruption of methane caused the Deepwater Horizon exploratory drill rig drilling the Macondo Well in Mississippi Canyon Block 252 (MC252) to explode. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was unprecendeted for several reasons: the volume of oil released; the spill duration; the well depth; the distance from the shore-line (77 km or about 50 miles); the type of oil (light crude); and the injection of dispersant directly at the wellhead. This study clearly demonstrated that there was a profound and significant response by certain members of the in situ microbial community in the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. In particular putative hydrocarbon degrading Bacteria appeared to bloom in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, even though the temperature at these depths is never >5 C. As the plume aged the shifts in the microbial community on a temporal scale suggested that different, yet metabolically important members of the community were able to respond to a myriad of plume constituents, e.g. shifting from propane/ethane to alkanes and finally to methane. Thus, the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the plume by Bacteria was a highly significant process in the natural attenuation of many compounds released during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Mason, O.U.; Hazen, T.C.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

A Feasibility Study for Recycling Used Automotive Oil Filters In A Blast Furnace  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study has indicated that of the approximately 120,000 tons of steel available to be recycled from used oil filters (UOF's), a maximum blast furnace charge of 2% of the burden may be anticipated for short term use of a few months. The oil contained in the most readily processed UOF's being properly hot drained and crushed is approximately 12% to 14% by weight. This oil will be pyrolized at a rate of 98% resulting in additional fuel gas of 68% and a condensable hydrocarbon fraction of 30%, with the remaining 2% resulting as carbon being added into the burden. Based upon the writer's collected information and assessment, there appears to be no operational problems relating to the recycling of UOF's to the blast furnace. One steel plant in the US has been routinely charging UOF's at about 100 tons to 200 tons per month for many years. Extensive analysis and calculations appear to indicate no toxic consideration as a result of the pyrolysis of the small contained oil ( in the 'prepared' UOFs) within the blast furnace. However, a hydrocarbon condensate in the ''gasoline'' fraction will condense in the blast furnace scrubber water and may require additional processing the water treatment system to remove benzene and toluene from the condensate. Used oil filters represent an additional source of high quality iron units that may be effectively added to the charge of a blast furnace for beneficial value to the operator and to the removal of this resource from landfills.

Ralph M. Smailer; Gregory L. Dressel; Jennifer Hsu Hill

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

470

Using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography to explore the geochemistry of the Santa Barbara oil seeps  

SciTech Connect

The development of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) has expanded the analytical window for studying complex mixtures like oil. Compared to traditional gas chromatography, this technology separates and resolves at least an order of magnitude more compounds, has a much larger signal to noise ratio, and sorts compounds based on their chemical class; hence, providing highly refined inventories of petroleum hydrocarbons in geochemical samples that was previously unattainable. In addition to the increased resolution afforded by GC x GC, the resulting chromatograms have been used to estimate the liquid vapor pressures, aqueous solubilities, octanol-water partition coefficients, and vaporization enthalpies of petroleum hydrocarbons. With these relationships, powerful and incisive analyses of phase-transfer processes affecting petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures in the environment are available. For example, GC x GC retention data has been used to quantitatively deconvolve the effects of phase transfer processes such as water washing and evaporation. In short, the positive attributes of GC x GC-analysis have led to a methodology that has revolutionized the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons. Overall, this research has opened numerous fields of study on the biogeochemical "?genetics"ť (referred to as petroleomics) of petroleum samples in both subsurface and surface environments. Furthermore, these new findings have already been applied to the behavior of oil at other seeps as well, for petroleum exploration and oil spill studies.

Reddy, Christopher; Nelson, Robert

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

471

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

472

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Leaching of BTEX from Aged Crude Oil Contaminated Model Soils: Experimental and Modeling Results  

SciTech Connect

It is generally assumed that soil properties such as organic matter content, porosity, and mineral surface area have a significant effect on the bioavailability and leachability of aged petroleum hydrocarbons. In order to test this hypothesis, nine model soils or sorbents (i.e., fine and coarse quartz sand, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay, peat, 60? and 150? silica gel, a loam soil, and non-porous glass beads) were spiked with a crude oil, aged for 27 months in the laboratory, and transferred to glass columns for the performance of continuous flow leaching experiments. The column effluents were periodically sampled for 43 days and analyzed for BTEX. A one-dimensional flow model for predicting the dissolution and dispersion of individual hydrocarbons from a multi-component NAPL such as crude oil was used to fit the leaching data (i.e., the BTEX concentration versus time cu