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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Lithium Batteries Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

3

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

4

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

5

Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

6

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems  

SciTech Connect

Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Molecular Structures of Polymer/Sulfur Composites for Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structures of PolymerSulfur Composites for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Long Cycle Life. Molecular Structures of PolymerSulfur Composites for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Long...

8

Polymers with Tailored Electronic Structure for High Capacity Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymers with Tailored Electronic Structure for High Capacity Lithium Polymers with Tailored Electronic Structure for High Capacity Lithium Battery Electrodes Title Polymers with Tailored Electronic Structure for High Capacity Lithium Battery Electrodes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Liu, Gao, Shidi Xun, Nenad Vukmirovic, Xiangyun Song, Paul Olalde-Velasco, Honghe Zheng, Vince S. Battaglia, Linwang Wang, and Wanli Yang Journal Advanced Materials Volume 23 Start Page 4679 Issue 40 Pagination 4679 - 4683 Date Published 10/2011 Keywords binders, conducting polymers, density funcational theory, lithium batteries, X-ray spectroscopy Abstract A conductive polymer is developed for solving the long-standing volume change issue in lithium battery electrodes. A combination of synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation techniques tailors the electronic structure of the polymer to enable in situ lithium doping. Composite anodes based on this polymer and commercial Si particles exhibit 2100 mAh g-1 in Si after 650 cycles without any conductive additive.

9

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplishments 1 m SEM of cathode LiFePO 4 +Binder (5050) Nothing else, no optimization Li metal (anode) Al current collector Polymer electrolyte membrane (S-EO-S)...

10

Polymer–Graphene Nanocomposites as Ultrafast-Charge and -Discharge Cathodes for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polymer–Graphene Nanocomposites as Ultrafast-Charge and -Discharge Cathodes for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries ... Lithium battery; cathode; polymer; graphene; nanocomposite ...

Zhiping Song; Terrence Xu; Mikhail L. Gordin; Ying-Bing Jiang; In-Tae Bae; Qiangfeng Xiao; Hui Zhan; Jun Liu; Donghai Wang

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

Measurements of Ionic Structure in Shock Compressed Lithium Hydride from Ultrafast X-Ray Thomson Scattering  

SciTech Connect

We present the first ultrafast temporally, spectrally, and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements from shock-compressed matter. The experimental spectra yield the absolute elastic and inelastic scattering intensities from the measured density of free electrons. Laser-compressed lithium-hydride samples are well characterized by inelastic Compton and plasmon scattering of a K-alpha x-ray probe providing independent measurements of temperature and density. The data show excellent agreement with the total intensity and structure when using the two-species form factor and accounting for the screening of ion-ion interactions.

Kritcher, A. L. [L-399, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Neumayer, P.; Doeppner, T.; Landen, O. L.; Glenzer, S. H. [L-399, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Brown, C. R. D. [Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); AWE plc., Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Davis, P. [L-399, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Falcone, R. W.; Lee, H. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Wuensch, K. [CFSA, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Gregori, G. [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Holst, B.; Redmer, R. [Universitaet Rostock, Institut fuer Physik, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Morse, E. C. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Pelka, A.; Roth, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Performance and Characterization of Lithium-Ion Type Polymer Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance and Characterization of Lithium-Ion Type Polymer Batteries Performance and Characterization of Lithium-Ion Type Polymer Batteries Speaker(s): Myung D. Cho Date: January 18, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Frank McLarnon A new process for the preparation of lithium-polymer batteries with crosslinked gel-polymer electrolyte will be introduced. The new process employs a thermal crosslinking method rather than cell lamination, and is termed "lithium ion type polymer battery (ITPB)". This thermal crosslinking process has many advantages over the standard lamination method, such as fusing the polymer into the electrodes and better adhesion between the electrolyte and electrodes. The new method results in improved high-temperature stability and a simpler process, as well as the improved

13

hybrid electric vehicle and lithium polymer nev testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P1.2 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle and Lithium Polymer NEV Testing P1.2 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle and Lithium Polymer NEV Testing James Edward Francfort Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID. 83415-3830 james.francfort@inl.gov Abstract: The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity tests hybrid electric, pure electric, and other advanced technology vehicles. As part of this testing, 28 hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) are being tested in fleet, dynamometer, and closed track environments. This paper discusses some of the HEV test results, with an emphasis on the battery performance of the HEVs. It also discusses the testing results for a small electric vehicle with a lithium polymer traction battery. Keywords: hybrid; neighborhood; electric; battery; fuel;

14

Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer bonded sheet product is described suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance. 1 fig.

MacFadden, K.O.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Conduction mechanism of lithium bis(oxalato)borate–cellulose acetate polymer gel electrolytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polymer gel electrolytes (PGE) belonging to salt–solvent–polymer hybrid systems are prepared using a mixture of lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), ?-butyrolactone (?-BL), and cellulose acetate (CA). The increase...

S. Z. Z. Abidin; M. Z. A. Yahya; O. H. Hassan; A. M. M. Ali

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Electronically conductive polymer binder for lithium-ion battery electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of carboxylic acid group containing fluorene/fluorenon copolymers is disclosed as binders of silicon particles in the fabrication of negative electrodes for use with lithium ion batteries. These binders enable the use of silicon as an electrode material as they significantly improve the cycle-ability of silicon by preventing electrode degradation over time. In particular, these polymers, which become conductive on first charge, bind to the silicon particles of the electrode, are flexible so as to better accommodate the expansion and contraction of the electrode during charge/discharge, and being conductive promote the flow battery current.

Liu, Gao; Xun, Shidi; Battaglia, Vincent S; Zheng, Honghe

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Electrophoretic NMR measurements of lithium transference numbers in polymer gel electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

Polymer gel electrolytes are of increasing interest for plastic lithium batteries largely because of their high room temperature conductivity. Several studies have probed their conductivity and electrochemical stability but very little work has been done related to lithium transference numbers. Lithium ion transference numbers, the net number of Faradays carried by lithium upon the passage of 1 Faraday of charge across a cell, are key figures of merit for any potential lithium battery electrolytes. The authors describe here their application of electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to the determination of transference numbers of lithium ions in polymer gel electrolytes. Two types of polymer gel electrolytes were selected for this study: PAN/PC/EC/LiX and Kynar/PC/LiX. Results obtained for the two types of gels are compared and the effects of anion, polymer-ion interactions and ion-ion interactions on lithium transference numbers are discussed. Significant differences in the behavior of transference numbers with salt concentration are observed for the two types of gels. This may be due to the extent of interaction between the polymer and the ions. Implications for solid polymer electrolytes are discussed.

Dai, H.; Sanderson, S.; Davey, J.; Uribe, F.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Electronics Materials and Device Research Group

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Thermally stable hyperbranched polyether-based polymer electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermally stable polymer matrix, comprising hyperbranched polyether PHEMO (poly(3-{2-[2-(2-hydroxyethoxy) ethoxy] ethoxy}methyl-3'-methyloxetane)) and PVDF-HFP (poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene)), has been successfully prepared for applications in lithium-ion batteries. This type of polymer electrolyte has been made by adding different amounts of lithium bis(oxalate)borate (LiBOB) to the polymer matrix. Its thermal and structural properties were measured using differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffraction. Experimental results show that the polymer electrolyte system possesses good thermal stability, with a decomposition temperature above 420?°C. The ionic conductivity of the polymer electrolyte system is dependent on the lithium salt content, reaching a maximum of 1.1 ? 10?5?S?cm?1 at 30?°C and 2.3 ? 10?4?S?cm?1 at 80?°C when doped with 10?wt% LiBOB.

Feng Wu; Ting Feng; Chuan Wu; Ying Bai; Lin Ye; Junzheng Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Polymer–Graphene Nanocomposites as Ultrafast-Charge and -Discharge Cathodes for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Electroactive polymers are a new generation of 'green' cathode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries. We have developed nanocomposites combining graphene with two promising polymer cathode materials, poly(anthraquinonyl sulfide) and polyimide, to improve their high-rate performance. The polymer-graphene nanocomposites were synthesized through a simple in-situ polymerization in the presence of graphene sheets. The highly dispersed graphene sheets in the nanocomposite drastically enhanced the electronic conductivity and allowed the electrochemical activity of the polymer cathode to be efficiently utilized. This allows for ultrafast charging and discharging - the composite can deliver more than 100 mAh/g within just a few seconds.

Song, Zhiping; Xu, Terrence (Tianren) [Tianren; Gordin, Mikhail; Jiang, Yingbing; Bae, In-Tae; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Zhan, Hui; Liu, Jun; Wang, Donghai

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Conjugated Polymer Energy Level Shifts in Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conjugated Polymer Energy Level Shifts in Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes ... By comparing the data obtained in the different systems, it is found that the IPs of the conjugated polymer films determined by conventional CV (IPC) can be correlated with UPS-measured HOMO energy levels (EH,UPS) by the relationship EH,UPS = (1.14 ± 0.23) × qIPC + (4.62 ± 0.10) eV, where q is the electron charge. ...

Charles Kiseok Song; Brian J. Eckstein; Teck Lip Dexter Tam; Lynn Trahey; Tobin J. Marks

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Polyethylene-supported polyvinylidene fluoride–cellulose acetate butyrate blended polymer electrolyte for lithium ion battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The polyethylene (PE)-supported polymer membranes based on the blended polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) are prepared for gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) of lithium ion battery. The performances of the prepared membranes and the resulting \\{GPEs\\} are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, linear potential sweep, and charge–discharge test. The effect of the ratio of PVDF to CAB on the performance of the prepared membranes is considered. It is found that the GPE based on the blended polymer with PVDF:CAB = 2:1 (in weight) has the largest ionic conductivity (2.48 × 10?3 S cm?1) and shows good compatibility with anode and cathode of lithium ion battery. The LiCoO2/graphite battery using this GPE exhibits superior cyclic stability at room temperature, storage performance at elevated temperature, and rate performance.

Jiansheng Liu; Weishan Li; Xiaoxi Zuo; Shengqi Liu; Zhao Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Continuous process to produce lithium-polymer batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid polymer electrolytes are extruded with active electrode material in a continuous, one-step process to form composite electrolyte-electrodes ready for assembly into battery cells. The composite electrolyte electrode sheets are extruded onto current collectors to form electrodes. The composite electrodes, as extruded, are electronically and ionically conductive. The composite electrodes can be over coated with a solid polymer electrolyte, which acts as a separator upon battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte separator has low resistance. 1 fig.

Chern, T.S.H.; Keller, D.G.; MacFadden, K.O.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)/poly(methylmethacrylate)/nanoclay composite gel polymer electrolyte for lithium/sulfur batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Herein, we describe the preparation of a gel polymer consisting of a solution of lithium salt in alkyl carbonate mixture solvent dispersed in a matrix of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)/poly(meth...

Yongguang Zhang; Yan Zhao; Zhumabay Bakenov…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Aliphatic thioether polymers as novel cathode active materials for rechargeable lithium battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two aliphatic thioether polymers, poly[methanetetryl-tetra(thiomethylene)] (PMTTM) and poly(2,4-dithiopentanylene) (PDTP) were designed, synthesized, characterized and tested as cathode active materials. The chemical structure of polymers was confirmed by FT-IR, FT-Raman, and XPS spectral analysis. Both polymers were found to have electrochemical activity as cathode materials for rechargeable lithium battery by the electrochemical tests. The specific capacity of PMTTM was 504 mA h g?1 at the third cycle and faded to 200 mA h g?1 after 10 cycles; PDTP showed low and stable specific capacity around 100 mA h g?1 even after 50 cycles. The specific capacity of fully saturated aliphatic thioether polymers demonstrated that thioether bonds offered energy storage. It was proposed that thioether bond was oxidized to form thioether cations with the help of ether solvents.

Jingyu Zhang; Lingbo Kong; Lizhi Zhan; Jing Tang; Hui Zhan; Yunhong Zhou; Caimao Zhan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal runaway in lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics. In another aspect, the electrolyte exhibits a conductivity drop when the temperature of electrolyte increases over a threshold temperature, thereby providing a shutoff mechanism for preventing thermal runaway in lithium battery cells.

Mullin, Scott; Panday, Ashoutosh; Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

Effect of oleic acid plasticizer on chitosan–lithium acetate solid polymer electrolytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasticized polymer electrolytes composed of chitosan as the host polymer, oleic acid (OA) as the plasticizer and lithium acetate (LiOAc) as the doping salt were prepared by the solution cast technique. These complexes with different amounts of salts and plasticizers were investigated as possible ionic conducting polymers. The highest ionic conductivity of the plasticized chitosan–LiOAc was ?10?5 S cm?1 for the film containing 40.0 wt.% LiOAc and 10.0 wt.% of OA. Conductivity for the plasticized LiOAc-doped chitosan polymer was also studied as a function of temperature between 300 and 363 K. The plot of ln(?T) versus 103/T for each sample obeys Arrhenius rule indicating the conductivity to be thermally assisted. XRD and FTIR spectroscopy techniques have been used for the structural studies.

M.Z.A. Yahya; A.K. Arof

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

P1.2 -- Hybrid Electric Vehicle and Lithium Polymer NEV Testing  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity tests hybrid electric, pure electric, and other advanced technology vehicles. As part of this testing, 28 hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) are being tested in fleet, dynamometer, and closed track environments. This paper discusses some of the HEV test results, with an emphasis on the battery performance of the HEVs. It also discusses the testing results for a small electric vehicle with a lithium polymer traction battery.

J. Francfort

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electrospun nanocomposite fibrous polymer electrolyte for secondary lithium battery applications  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid nanocomposite [poly(vinylidene fluoride -co- hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-co-HFP)/magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4})] fibrous polymer membranes were prepared by electrospinning method. The prepared pure and nanocomposite fibrous polymer electrolyte membranes were soaked into the liquid electrolyte 1M LiPF{sub 6} in EC: DEC (1:1,v/v). XRD and SEM are used to study the structural and morphological studies of nanocomposite electrospun fibrous polymer membranes. The nanocomposite fibrous polymer electrolyte membrane with 5 wt.% of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} exhibits high ionic conductivity of 2.80 × 10{sup ?3} S/cm at room temperature. The charge-discharge capacity of Li/LiCoO{sub 2} coin cells composed of the newly prepared nanocomposite [(16 wt.%) PVdF-co-HFP+(5 wt.%) MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}] fibrous polymer electrolyte membrane was also studied and compared with commercial Celgard separator.

Padmaraj, O.; Rao, B. Nageswara; Jena, Paramananda; Satyanarayana, N., E-mail: nallanis2011@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry-605014 (India); Venkateswarlu, M. [R and D, Amaraja batteries, Thirupathi-517501 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

30

Compression-Induced Open Circuit Voltage Increase in All-Polymer Solar Cells with Lithium Fluoride Nanolayers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compression-Induced Open Circuit Voltage Increase in All-Polymer Solar Cells with Lithium Fluoride Nanolayers ... The P3HT polymer (weight-average molecular weight = 50 kDa; polydispersity index = 2.2) was used as received from Rieke Metals (Nebraska, U.S.A.), while the F8BT polymer (weight-average molecular weight = 46 kDa) was supplied from American Dye Sources (Quebec, Canada). ...

Sooyong Lee; Sungho Nam; Hwajeong Kim; Youngkyoo Kim

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

31

Studies on lithium acetate doped chitosan conducting polymer system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of chitosan contains the amine group that can act as electron donors. Complexation between chitosan and the salt can be proven by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy methods. The NH2, NH3+ and O?C-NHR vibrations which can be observed at 1590, 1560 and 1650 cm?1 shift to lower wave numbers when the complexes are formed. The after deconvolution Li 1s core level spectrum of the chitosan–salt complexes can contain several gaussian components one of which has a binding energy peak at 55.2 eV which signifies Li–N interaction. The component that peaks at ?403 eV in the N 1s core level spectrum complements the proof of N–Li interaction. The highest conductivity achieved for a plasticized chitosan–salt complex is of the order 10?6 S/cm using lithium acetate as the doping salt. Transference number studies prove that this material is ionic conductor and from transient ionic current studies that mobility of the ions is of the order of 10?4 cm2/V s.

M.Z.A. Yahya; A.K. Arof

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Sulfides organic polymer: Novel cathode active material for rechargeable lithium batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two novel sulfide polymers, poly(2-phenyl-1,3-dithiolane) and poly[1,4-di(1,3-dithiolan-2-yl)benzene], were prepared via facile oxidative-coupling polymerization under ambient conditions, characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TGA and elemental analysis, and were tested as cathode materials in rechargeable lithium battery. The charge–discharge tests showed that the specific capacity of poly[1,4-di(1,3-dithiolan-2-yl)benzene)] was 378 mAh g?1 at the third cycle, and retained at 300 mAh g?1 after 20 cycles. The specific capacity of poly(2-phenyl-1,3-dithiolane) was 117 mAh g?1 at the second cycle, and retained at 100 mAh g?1 after 20 cycles. The results indicated that thiolane group could be used as cathode active function group for lithium secondary batteries and the novel electrode reaction is proposed tentatively.

Jing Yu Zhang; Ling Bo Kong; Li Zhi Zhan; Jing Tang; Hui Zhan; Yun Hong Zhou; Cai Mao Zhan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Effect of polymer electrode morphology on performance of a lithium/polypyrrole battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/discharge experiments. sevu vive. see 1 s m eszse6 ~ ~ I Figure 12 is a schematic of a battery cathode used to make a fibrillar polypyrrole film. A gold-coated Anopore electrode is attached to one side of a Kel-f' plug with silver epoxy before inserting...EFFECT OF POLYMER ELECTRODE MORPHOLOGY ON PERFORMANCE OI' A LITHIUM/POLYPYRROLE BATTERY A Thesis by MARJORIE ANNE NICHOLSON Submitted to the OfIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Nicholson, Marjorie Anne

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Lithium Ion Transport Mechanism in Ternary Polymer Electrolyte-Ionic Liquid Mixtures - A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lithium transport mechanism in ternary polymer electrolytes, consisting of PEO/LiTFSI and various fractions of the ionic liquid N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, are investigated by means of MD simulations. This is motivated by recent experimental findings [Passerini et al., Electrochim. Acta 2012, 86, 330-338], which demonstrated that these materials display an enhanced lithium mobility relative to their binary counterpart PEO/LiTFSI. In order to grasp the underlying microscopic scenario giving rise to these observations, we employ an analytical, Rouse-based cation transport model [Maitra at al., PRL 2007, 98, 227802], which has originally been devised for conventional polymer electrolytes. This model describes the cation transport via three different mechanisms, each characterized by an individual time scale. It turns out that also in the ternary electrolytes essentially all lithium ions are coordinated by PEO chains, thus ruling out a transport mechanism enhanced by the presence of ionic-liquid molecules. Rather, the plasticizing effect of the ionic liquid contributes to the increased lithium mobility by enhancing the dynamics of the PEO chains and consequently also the motion of the attached ions. Additional focus is laid on the prediction of lithium diffusion coefficients from the simulation data for various chain lengths and the comparison with experimental data, thus demonstrating the broad applicability of our approach.

Diddo Diddens; Andreas Heuer

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Electrochemical properties of lithium polymer batteries with doped polyaniline as cathode material  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) was doped with different lithium salts such as LiPF{sub 6} and LiClO{sub 4} and evaluated as cathode-active material for application in room-temperature lithium batteries. The doped PANI was characterized by FTIR and XPS measurements. In the FTIR spectra, the characteristic peaks of PANI are shifted to lower bands as a consequence of doping, and it is more shifted in the case of PANI doped with LiPF{sub 6}. The cathodes prepared using PANI doped with LiPF{sub 6} and LiClO{sub 4} delivered initial discharge capacities of 125 mAh g{sup ?1} and 112 mAh g{sup ?1} and stable reversible capacities of 114 mAh g{sup ?1} and 81 mAh g{sup ?1}, respectively, after 10 charge–discharge cycles. The cells were also tested using polymer electrolyte, which delivered highest discharge capacities of 142.6 mAh g{sup ?1} and 140 mAh g{sup ?1} and stable reversible capacities of 117 mAh g{sup ?1} and 122 mAh g{sup ?1} for PANI-LiPF{sub 6} and PANI-LiClO{sub 4}, respectively, after 10 cycles. The cathode prepared with LiPF{sub 6} doped PANI shows better cycling performance and stability as compared to the cathode prepared with LiClO{sub 4} doped PANI using both liquid and polymer electrolytes.

Manuel, James [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900, Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900, Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Kwang; Matic, Aleksandar; Jacobsson, Per [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Göteborg (Sweden)] [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Chauhan, Ghanshyam S. [Department of Chemistry, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla 171005 (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla 171005 (India); Ha, Jong Keun; Cho, Kwon-Koo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, 900, Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, 900, Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jou-Hyeon, E-mail: jhahn@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900, Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900, Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Metal Hydrides - Science Needs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Grand Challenge Pre-Solicitation Meeting, June 19, 2003 1 Metal Hydrides - Science Needs TRADITIONAL METALLIC HYDRIDES: 1.5 to 2 wt.% H. Well studied. COMPLEX...

39

Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage R and D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's research on complex metal hydrides targets the development of advanced metal hydride materials including light-weight complex hydrides, destabilized binary hydrides, intermetallic hydrides,...

40

Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's research on complex metal hydrides targets the development of advanced metal hydride materials including light-weight complex hydrides, destabilized binary hydrides, intermetallic hydrides,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effects of cathode modification using spin-coated lithium acetate on the performances of polymer bulk-heterojunction solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this report we show that the performances of polymer bulk-heterojunction solar cells were improved by inserting thin films of lithium acetate layers between the active layer and the cathode using a spin-coating process. Comparing with the device without the cathode modification significant enhancements of Voc (open circuit voltage) from 0.42?V to 0.55?V and device efficiency from 1.4% to 4.1% were achieved. X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic studies indicate that both the improved damage tolerance of the active layer under the thermally evaporated metal and an n-type doping at the metal/organic interface play the crucial roles in the enhanced performances.

Liang Jiang; Aiyuan Li; Shizhao Zheng; King-Young Wong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Crosslinked polymer gel electrolytes based on polyethylene glycol methacrylate and ionic liquid for lithium battery applications  

SciTech Connect

Gel polymer electrolytes were synthesized by copolymerization polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate with polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of a room temperature ionic liquid, methylpropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (MPPY TFSI). The physical properties of gel polymer electrolytes were characterized by thermal analysis, impedance spectroscopy, and electrochemical tests. The ionic conductivities of the gel polymer electrolytes increased linearly with the amount of MPPY TFSI and were mainly attributed to the increased ion mobility as evidenced by the decreased glass transition temperatures. Li||LiFePO4 cells were assembled using the gel polymer electrolytes containing 80 wt% MPPY TFSI via an in situ polymerization method. A reversible cell capacity of 90 mAh g 1 was maintained under the current density of C/10 at room temperature, which was increased to 130 mAh g 1 by using a thinner membrane and cycling at 50 C.

Liao, Chen [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Dual phase polymer gel electrolyte based on non-woven poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)–layered clay nanocomposite fibrous membranes for lithium ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? P(VdF-co-HFP)–clay nanocomposite based electrospun membranes are prepared. ? The membranes are used as polymer gel electrolyte (PGE) in lithium ion batteries. ? The composite PGE shows ionic conductivity of 5.5 mS cm{sup ?1} at room temperature. ? Li/PGE/LiFePO{sub 4} cell delivers initial discharge capacity of 160 mAh g{sup ?1}. ? The use of prepared electrolyte significantly improved the cell performance. -- Abstract: A new approach for fabricating polymer gel electrolytes (PGEs) based on electrospun poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VdF-co-HFP)) incorporated with layered nanoclay has been employed to enhance the ionic conductivity and electrochemical properties of P(VdF-co-HFP) without compromising its mechanical strength. The effect of layered nanoclay on properties of membranes has been evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Surface morphology of the membranes has been studied using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Polymer gel electrolytes are prepared by soaking the fibrous membrane into 1 M LiPF{sub 6} in EC/DEC. The electrochemical studies show that incorporation of layered nanoclay into the polymer matrix greatly enhanced the ionic conductivity and compatibility with lithium electrodes. The charge–discharge properties and cycling performance of Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells comprising nanocomposite polymer gel electrolytes have been evaluated at room temperature.

Shubha, Nageswaran [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Prasanth, Raghavan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute - NTU (ERI-N) Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); TUM-CREATE Center for Electromobility, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Hoon, Hng Huey [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Srinivasan, Madhavi, E-mail: madhavi@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute - NTU (ERI-N) Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); TUM-CREATE Center for Electromobility, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Si6H12/Polymer Inks for Electrospinning a-Si Nanowire Lithium Ion Battery Anodes  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous silicon nanowires 'a-SiNWs' have been prepared by electrospinning a liquid silane-based precursor. Cyclohexasilane 'Si6H12' was admixed with poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) in toluene giving an ink that was electrospun into the Si6H12/PPMA wires with diameters of 50-2000 nm. Raman spectroscopy revealed that thermal treatment at 350 C transforms this deposit into a-SiNWs. These materials were coated with a thin carbon layer and then tested as half-cells where a reasonable plateau in electrochemical cycling was observed after an initial capacity fade. Additionally, porous a-SiNWs were realized when the thermally decomposable binder polypropylene carbonate/polycyclohexene carbonate was used as the polymer carrier.

Schulz, Douglas L.; Hoey, Justin; Smith, Jeremiah; Elangovan, Arumugasamy; Wu, Xiangfa; Akhatov, Iskander; Payne, Scott; Moore, Jayma; Boudjouk, Philip; Pederson, Larry; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Transition-Metal Hydrides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics A new type of electrochromic hydride material has interesting and unusual properties. Thin Ni-Mg films, for example, are mirror-like in appearance and have very low visible transmittance. On exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films become transparent. The transition is believed to result from formation of nickel magnesium hydride, Mg2NiH4. Switchable mirrors based on rare earth hydrides were discovered in 1996 at Vrije University in the Netherlands, Rare earth-magnesium alloy films were subsequently found to be superior to the pure lanthanides in maximum transparency and mirror-state reflectivity by Philips Laboratories. The newer transition-metal types which use less expensive and less reactive materials were discovered at LBNL. This has now become a very active area of study with a network of researchers.

47

Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Polymer Backbone Dynamics in Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Based Lithium and Sodium Polyether-ester-sulfonate Ionomers  

SciTech Connect

Polymer backbone dynamics of single ion conducting poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based ionomer samples with low glass transition temperatures (Tg) have been investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Experiments detecting 13C with 1H decoupling under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions identified the different components of the polymer backbone (PEO spacer and isophthalate groups) and their relative mobilities for a suite of lithium- and sodium-containing ionomer samples with varying cation contents. Variable temperature (203-373 K) 1H-13C cross-polarization MAS (CP-MAS) experiments also provided qualitative assessment of the differences in the motions of the polymer backbone components as a function of cation content and identity. Each of the main backbone components exhibit distinct motions, following the trends expected for motional characteristics based on earlier Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering and 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements. Previous 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation measurements focused on both the polymer backbone and cation motion on the nanosecond timescale. The studies presented here assess the slower timescale motion of the polymer backbone allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the polymer dynamics. The temperature dependences of 13C linewidths were used to both qualitatively and quantitatively examine the effects of cation content and identity on PEO spacer mobility. Variable contact time 1H-13C CP-MAS experiments were used to further assess the motions of the polymer backbone on the microsecond timescale. The motion of the PEO spacer, reported via the rate of magnetization transfer from 1H to 13C nuclei, becomes similar for T ? 1.1 Tg in all ionic samples, indicating that at similar elevated reduced temperatures the motions of the polymer backbones on the microsecond timescale become insensitive to ion interactions. These results present an improved picture, beyond those of previous findings, for the dependence of backbone dynamics on cation density (and here, cation identity as well) in these amorphous PEO-based ionomer systems.

Roach, David J. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dou, Shichen [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Colby, Ralph H. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: • Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. • The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. • Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. • The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. • The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (“Milk of Magnesia”) and magnesium oxide. • We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Chapter 16 - Lithium Battery Energy Storage: State of the Art Including Lithium–Air and Lithium–Sulfur Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lithium, the lightest and one of the most reactive of metals, having the greatest electrochemical potential (E0 = ?3.045 V), provides very high energy and power densities in batteries. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (containing an intercalation negative electrode) have conquered the markets for portable consumer electronics and, recently, for electric vehicles. The electrolyte is usually based on a lithium salt in organic solution. Thin-film batteries use solid oxide or polymer electrolytes. As lithium metal reacts violently with water and can thus cause ignition, modern lithium-ion batteries use carbon negative electrodes and lithium metal oxide positive electrodes. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries should not be confused with nonrechargeable lithium primary batteries (containing metallic lithium). This chapter covers all aspects of lithium battery chemistry that are pertinent to electrochemical energy storage for renewable sources and grid balancing.

Peter Kurzweil

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

SECONDARY BATTERIES – LITHIUM RECHARGEABLE SYSTEMS | Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rechargeable lithium batteries have conquered the markets for portable consumer electronics and, recently, for electric vehicles. Lithium, the lightest and one of the most reactive of metals, having the greatest electrochemical potential (E°=–3.045 V), provides very high energy and power densities in batteries. As lithium metal reacts violently with water and can ignite into flame, modern lithium-ion batteries use carbon negative electrode and lithium metal oxide positive electrode. The electrolyte is usually based on a lithium salt in organic solution. Thin-film batteries use solid oxide or polymer electrolytes. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (containing an intercalation negative electrode) should not be confused with nonrechargeable lithium primary batteries (containing metallic lithium). This article outlines energy storage in lithium batteries, basic cell chemistry, positive electrode materials, negative electrode materials, electrolytes, and state-of-charge (SoC) monitoring.

P. Kurzweil; K. Brandt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Synthesis of poly(ethylene-oxide)/nanoclay solid polymer electrolyte for all solid-state lithium/sulfur battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, a number of related investigations have described the use of polymer/nanoclay composites in SPE [16–18...]. As a layered host, nanoclays can provide a large interfacial contact area, which improves the ...

Yongguang Zhang; Yan Zhao; Denise Gosselink; P. Chen

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Hydride Capabilities PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

54

Visualization of Charge Distribution in a Lithium Battery Electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution in Thin-Film Batteries. J. Electrochem. Soc.of Lithium Polymer Batteries. J. Power Sources 2002, 110,for Rechargeable Li Batteries. Chem. Mater. 2010, 15. Padhi,

Liu, Jun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A rapid method for the determination of lithium transference numbers  

SciTech Connect

Lithium ion-conducting polymer electrolytes are of increasing interest for use in lithium-polymer batteries. Lithium transference numbers, the net fraction of current carried by lithium in a cell, are key figures of merit for potential lithium battery electrolytes. The authors describe the Electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) method for the determination of lithium ion transference numbers (T{sub Li}). The work presented is a proof-of-concept of the application of the ENMR method to lithium ion transference measurements for several different lithium salts in gelled electrolytes. The NMR method allows accurate determination of T{sub Li} values, as indicated by the similarity of T{sub Li} in the gelled electrolytes to those in aqueous electrolyte solutions at low salt concentration. Based on calculated tradeoffs of various experimental parameters, they also discuss some conclusions concerning the range of applicability of the method to other electrolytes with lower lithium mobility.

Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Dai, H.; Sanderson, S.; Davey, J.; Uribe, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Electronics Materials and Device Research Group

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water, and Lithium-Sulfur Batteries, April 2013 Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air,...

57

Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zircaloy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this work is to develop the means of pre-hydriding unirradiated Zircaloy cladding such that a high concentration, or rim, of hydrides is formed at the cladding outside diameter.

58

Crack propagation in hydrided zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transmission electron microscope observations of cracks in thin foils of Zircaloy—2 which contains hydride particles have shown that the fracture process is one of linking up satellite cracks in the hydride ph...

G. Östberg

1968-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali metal hydrides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hf for selected alkali metal hydrides, alkaline earth metal hydrides, transition metal hydrides... of binary hydrides based on alkali metals, alkaline earth ... Source:...

60

Influence of additives on the thermal behavior of nickel/metal hydride battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study discusses the thermal behavior of the 6.5 Ah cylinder Ni/MH hydride battery with 0.5 wt% ytterbium oxide (...2O3...) in nickel electrode and 1.0 wt% super absorbent polymer (SAP) in hydrogen-storage al...

Kai Yang; Jin Jing An; Shi Chen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Lithium ion conducting electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* B) Study the effect of electrolyte nanostructuring on dendrite formation in symmetric cells. * C) Study the effect of electrolyte nanostructuring on dendrite formation in full...

63

Fracture Initiation Due to Hydrides in Zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In hydride-forming metals, the presence of hydrides can sometimes lead to brittle fracture. Zirconium is a hydride-forming metal that forms the basis of a number of alloys used in CANDUTM nuclear reactors. Under ...

M. P. Puls; B. W. Leitch; W. R. Wallace

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrides for Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage George Thomas, Consultant Sandia National Laboratories G. J. Thomas Efficient onboard hydrogen storage is a critical enabling technology for the use of hydrogen in vehicles * The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which densifies the fuel. - This is particularly true for hydrogen because of its lower energy density relative to hydrocarbon fuels. * Storage methods result in additional weight and volume above that of the fuel. How do we achieve adequate stored energy in an efficient, safe and cost-effective system? G. J. Thomas However, the storage media must meet certain requirements: - reversible hydrogen uptake/release - lightweight - low cost - cyclic stability - rapid kinetic properties - equilibrium properties (P,T) consistent

65

Activated Aluminum Hydride Hydrogen Storage Compositions - Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Activated Aluminum Hydride Hydrogen Storage Compositions Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This...

66

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities...

67

Recent developments in hydrogen storage applications based on metal hydrides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal hydrides have been commercialized for battery applications for more than 8 years. In case of storage applications, metal hydrides were extensively evaluated in combination with combustion engines. The relatively low gravimetric energy density of hydride tanks based on low temperature metal hydrides prevented the commercial use of that technology. Recently, lasting progress in the PEM fuel cell technology offers chances for metal hydride storage systems mainly for low power applications, but also for niche markets. The paper describes promising projects on metal hydride storage technology and gives an outlook about improvements of both the metal hydride alloy performance and the performance of metal hydride storage tanks.

V. Güther; A. Otto

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Comprehensive Thermodynamics of Nickel Hydride Bis(Diphosphine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermodynamics of Nickel Hydride Bis(Diphosphine) Complexes: A Predictive Model through Computations. Comprehensive Thermodynamics of Nickel Hydride Bis(Diphosphine) Complexes: A...

69

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydride fueled BWRs. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:Fueled PWR Cores. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:1489–Hydride Fueled LWRs. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Nitrogen-Doped Graphene-Rich Catalysts Derived from Heteroatom Polymers for Oxygen Reduction in Nonaqueous Lithium–O2 Battery Cathodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, we present a synthesis approach for nitrogen-doped graphene-sheet-like nanostructures via the graphitization of a heteroatom polymer, in particular, polyaniline, under the catalysis of a cobalt species using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (...

Gang Wu; Nathan H. Mack; Wei Gao; Shuguo Ma; Ruiqin Zhong; Jiantao Han; Jon K. Baldwin; Piotr Zelenay

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

71

Synthesis and Characterization of Polymer Nanocomposites for Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer nanocomposites are used in a variety of applications due to their good mechanical properties. Specifically, better performance of lithium ion batteries and thermal interface material can be obtained by using conductive materials and polymer...

Park, Wonchang

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuelcladdings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H 2 from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t 1 ? 2 potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the ? - Zr H 1.5 phase. The measured H 2 desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

M. Díaz; A. González-González; J. S. Moya; B. Remartínez; S. Pérez; J. L. Sacedón

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Method to predict relative hydriding within a group of zirconium alloys under nuclear irradiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An out-of-reactor method for screening to predict relative in-reactor hydriding behavior of zirconium-based materials is disclosed. Samples of zirconium-based materials having different compositions and/or fabrication methods are autoclaved in a relatively concentrated (0.3 to 1.0M) aqueous lithium hydroxide solution at constant temperatures within the water reactor coolant temperature range (280 to 316 C). Samples tested by this out-of-reactor procedure, when compared on the basis of the ratio of hydrogen weight gain to oxide weight gain, accurately predict the relative rate of hydriding for the same materials when subject to in-reactor (irradiated) corrosion. 1 figure.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Levy, I.S.; Trimble, D.J.; Lanning, D.D.; Gerber, F.S.

1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

Walker, Franklin E. (18 Shadow Oak Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Wire Wrapped Hexagonal Pin Arrays for Hydride Fueled PWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT

Diller, Peter

76

Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof  

SciTech Connect

In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S. (Tampa, FL); Niemann, Michael U. (Venice, FL); Goswami, D. Yogi (Tampa, FL); Stefanakos, Elias K. (Tampa, FL)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated hydride generation-cryotrapping...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beds... Laboratories Hydride DevelopmentHydride Development for Hydrogen Storagefor Hydrogen Storage Karl Gross Sandia... using light-weight reversible hydrides The lack of a...

79

Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

80

Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries Speaker(s): Guoying Chen Date: October 25, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Venkat Srinivasan Safety problems associated with rechargeable lithium batteries are now well recognized. Recent spectacular fires involving cell phones, laptops, and (here at LBNL) AA cells have made the news. These events are generally caused by overcharging and subsequent development of internal shorts. Before these batteries can be used in vehicle applications, improvement in cell safety is a must. We have been active in the area of lithium battery safety for many years. For example, a versatile, inexpensive overcharge protection approach developed in our laboratory, uses an electroactive polymer to act as a reversible, self-actuating, low resistance internal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

California: Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity, Wins R&D 100 Award  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Working with Nextval, Inc., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a Conducting Polymer Binder for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries.

82

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries Technology available for licensing: Inexpensive, electrochemically active phosphate compounds with high functionality for...

83

Lithium Insertion into Anatase Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lithium Insertion into Anatase Nanotubes ... Improving the Performance of Titania Nanotube Battery Materials by Surface Modification with Lithium Phosphate ...

V. Gentili; S. Brutti; L.J. Hardwick; A.R. Armstrong; S. Panero; P.G. Bruce

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Design and simulation of lithium rechargeable batteries  

SciTech Connect

Lithium -based rechargeable batteries that utilize insertion electrodes are being considered for electric-vehicle applications because of their high energy density and inherent reversibility. General mathematical models are developed that apply to a wide range of lithium-based systems, including the recently commercialized lithium-ion cell. The modeling approach is macroscopic, using porous electrode theory to treat the composite insertion electrodes and concentrated solution theory to describe the transport processes in the solution phase. The insertion process itself is treated with a charge-transfer process at the surface obeying Butler-Volmer kinetics, followed by diffusion of the lithium ion into the host structure. These models are used to explore the phenomena that occur inside of lithium cells under conditions of discharge, charge, and during periods of relaxation. Also, in order to understand the phenomena that limit the high-rate discharge of these systems, we focus on the modeling of a particular system with well-characterized material properties and system parameters. The system chosen is a lithium-ion cell produced by Bellcore in Red Bank, NJ, consisting of a lithium-carbon negative electrode, a plasticized polymer electrolyte, and a lithium-manganese-oxide spinel positive electrode. This battery is being marketed for consumer electronic applications. The system is characterized experimentally in terms of its transport and thermodynamic properties, followed by detailed comparisons of simulation results with experimental discharge curves. Next, the optimization of this system for particular applications is explored based on Ragone plots of the specific energy versus average specific power provided by various designs.

Doyle, C.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Better Lithium-Ion Batteries Are On The Way From Berkeley Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-Ion Lithium-Ion Batteries A Better Lithium-ion Battery on the Way Simulations Reveal How New Polymer Absorbs Eight Times the Lithium of Current Designs September 23, 2011 Paul Preuss, +1 510 486 6249, paul_preuss@lbl.gov traditional-new.jpg At left, the traditional approach to composite anodes using silicon (blue spheres) for higher energy capacity has a polymer binder such as PVDF (light brown) plus added particles of carbon to conduct electricity (dark brown spheres). Silicon swells and shrinks while acquiring and releasing lithium ions, and repeated swelling and shrinking eventually break contacts among the conducting carbon particles. At right, the new Berkeley Lab polymer (purple) is itself conductive and continues to bind tightly to the silicon particles despite repeated swelling and shrinking.

86

Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery  

SciTech Connect

A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

Knosp, Bernard (Neuilly-sur-Seine, FR); Bouet, Jacques (Paris, FR); Jordy, Christian (Dourdan, FR); Mimoun, Michel (Neuilly-sur-Marne, FR); Gicquel, Daniel (Lanorville, FR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

88

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

Wednesday, October 17th Bourns A265 1:40-2:30pm To realize the next generation rechargeable lithium batteries, it is critical to use novel electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including rechargeable batteries, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, photovoltaic devices, and water lithium batteries, it is critical to use novel electrode materials with higher lithium storage capacity. In this presentation, a number of novel lithium battery electrode materials including silicon anode, tin anode

90

Lithium batteries for pulse power  

SciTech Connect

New designs of lithium batteries having bipolar construction and thin cell components possess the very low impedance that is necessary to deliver high-intensity current pulses. The R D and understanding of the fundamental properties of these pulse batteries have reached an advanced level. Ranges of 50--300 kW/kg specific power and 80--130 Wh/kg specific energy have been demonstrated with experimental high-temperature lithium alloy/transition-metal disulfide rechargeable bipolar batteries in repeated 1- to 100-ms long pulses. Other versions are designed for repetitive power bursts that may last up to 20 or 30 s and yet may attain high specific power (1--10 kW/kg). Primary high-temperature Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} pulse batteries (thermal batteries) are already commercially available. Other high-temperature lithium systems may use chlorine or metal-oxide positive electrodes. Also under development are low-temperature pulse batteries: a 50-kW Li/SOCl{sub 2} primary batter and an all solid-state, polymer-electrolyte secondary battery. Such pulse batteries could find use in commercial and military applications in the near future. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Redey, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Encapsulated Metal Hydride for Hydrogen Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentration feed stock, not for low concentration � Hydrogen economy will need hydrogen recovery from lowEncapsulated Metal Hydride for Hydrogen Separation (Formerly Separation Membrane Development) DOE Hydrogen Program 2003 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation L. Kit Heung, Jim Congdon Savannah River Technology

92

Ductility Evaluation of As-Hydrided and Hydride Reoriented Zircaloy-4 Cladding under Simulated Dry-Storage Condition  

SciTech Connect

Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage expose cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to normal operation in-reactor and pool storage under these conditions. Radial hydrides could precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. As a means of simulating this behavior, unirradiated hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples were fabricated by a gas charging method to levels that encompass the range of hydrogen concentrations observed in current used fuel. Mechanical testing was carried out by the ring compression test (RCT) method at various temperatures to evaluate the sample s ductility for both as-hydrided and post-hydride reorientation treated specimens. As-hydrided samples with higher hydrogen concentration (>800 ppm) resulted in lower strain before fracture and reduced maximum load. Increasing RCT temperatures resulted in increased ductility of the as-hydrided cladding. A systematic radial hydride treatment was conducted at various pressures and temperatures for the hydrided samples with H content around 200 ppm. Following the radial hydride treatment, RCTs on the hydride reoriented samples were conducted and exhibited lower ductility compared to as-hydrided samples.

Yan, Yong [ORNL] [ORNL; Plummer, Lee K [ORNL] [ORNL; Ray, Holly B [ORNL] [ORNL; Cook, Tyler S [ORNL] [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hydride embrittlement in ZIRCALOY-4 plate; Part 2: Interaction between the tensile stress and the hydride morphology  

SciTech Connect

The effect of an applied tensile stress on the hydrides morphology in ZIRCALOY-4 was studied. To this end, the residual stresses around the hydride caused by the hydride precipitation was first evaluated. Considering the disability to predict hydride transformation stresses by ordinary macroscopical mechanical calculation in previous studies, X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations were carried out to quantify the microstructural evolution in hydrided ZIRCALOY-4. The residual microstrains and microstresses in the matrix and around the hydride were thus estimated. The big discrepancy between the results and the existing studies were explained by the major self-accommodation of phase transformation deformation remaining inside the hydrides and the local plastic accommodation of ZIRCALOY-4. In order to study the stress effect on hydride orientation and to estimate the hydride orientation threshold stresses, hydrogen was introduced into the specimens under tensile stress. A quantitative technique was used to evaluate the susceptibility to perpendicular hydride formation under the influence of texture, residual stresses, and externally applied tensile stresses, following an improved approach that had been first developed by Sauthoff and then applied to Zr-H system by Puls. Both analytical and experimental results indicate that the threshold stress for producing perpendicular hydrides varies with the microstructural features, the yield strength, and the residual stresses.

Bai, J.B.; Prioul, C.; Francois, D. (Ecole Centrale Paris, Chatenay-Malabry (France)); Ji, N. (ENSAM, Paris (France)); Gilbon, D. (C.E.N. Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Lithium Supply Grows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Military-requirements are of course classified, but there is general speculation that lithium is required for the thermonuclear reactions. ...

1955-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water, and Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

96

Method to predict relative hydriding within a group of zirconium alloys under nuclear irradiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An out-of-reactor method for screening to predict relative in-reactor hydriding behavior of zirconium-bsed materials is disclosed. Samples of zirconium-based materials having different composition and/or fabrication are autoclaved in a relatively concentrated (0.3 to 1.0M) aqueous lithium hydroxide solution at constant temperatures within the water reactor coolant temperature range (280.degree. to 316.degree. C.). Samples tested by this out-of-reactor procedure, when compared on the basis of the ratio of hydrogen weight gain to oxide weight gain, accurately predict the relative rate of hyriding for the same materials when subject to in-reactor (irradiated) corrision.

Johnson, Jr., A. Burtron (Richland, WA); Levy, Ira S. (Kennewick, WA); Trimble, Dennis J. (Kennewick, WA); Lanning, Donald D. (Kennewick, WA); Gerber, Franna S. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

K. McCoy

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities  

SciTech Connect

We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab; Ciovati, G.; / /Jefferson Lab; Wu, G.; /Argonne

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

Bowman Jr, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A. [Institute for Energy Technology (IFE)] [Institute for Energy Technology (IFE); Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V [University of the Western Cape, South Africa] [University of the Western Cape, South Africa; Pollet, Dr. B.G. [University of the Western Cape, South Africa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Proposed Virtual Center for Excellence for Metal Hydride Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virtual Center for Excellence for Metal Hydride Development Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mathematical modelling of a metal hydride hydrogen storage system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In order for metal hydride hydrogen storage systems to compete with existing energy storage technology, such as gasoline tanks and batteries, it is important to… (more)

MacDonald, Brendan David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony hydrides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Sb(V) were the only hydride-forming species found... WATERS BY HYDRIDE GENERATION ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY Water-Resources Investigations Report 03... Prior to the...

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium hydrides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and complete processing... facility for hydride research 12;BNL Current Research in Hydrogen Storage Complex metal hydride ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and...

104

LANL/PNNL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrides and New Concepts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LANLPNNL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrides and New Concepts for Hydrogen Storage LANLPNNL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrides and New Concepts for Hydrogen Storage...

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon hydrides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 4 Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage Darlene K. Slattery and Michael D. Hampton Summary: Complex Hydrides for...

106

Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July-09 Improve cathode utilization in dry full cells. Accomplished by technology transfer to Seeo, Inc. Objectives *Synthesis of dry block copolymer electrolytes for...

107

Synthesis and electrochemical characterisation of electrospun lithium titanate ultrafine fibres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lithium acetate dihydrate (>99.0 %, Sigma-Aldrich ... %, Sigma-Aldrich) were used for the synthesis of Li4Ti5O12. PVP (Aldrich, M w = 3.6 × 105) was used as the base polymer for the electrospinn...

C. P. Sandhya; Bibin John; C. Gouri

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Argonne, Western Lithium to develop lithium carbonate for multiple...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory as a step toward the commercialization of lithium carbonate from the Company's Kings Valley Lithium Project located in Humboldt County, Nevada, USA. Under the agreement,...

109

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nano-engineering of magnesium hydride for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The destabilization of magnesium hydride (MgH"2) by solid-state reaction with Si in a nanoscale under vacuum was studied. The nanostructured Si films were deposited on the nanocrystalline MgH"2/Mg composite substrate by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD). ... Keywords: Destabilization, Magnesium hydride, Microstructure, Nano-engineering, Silicon

J. Bystrzycki; T. P?oci?ski; W. Zieli?ski; Z. Winiewski; M. Polanski; W. Mróz; Z. Bojar; K. J. Kurzd?owski

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Polyaniline-modified cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-graphene oxide-sulfur nanocomposites with enhanced performance for lithium-sulfur batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conductive polymer coatings can boost the power storage capacity of lithium-sulfur batteries. We report here on the design and ... polyaniline (PANI)-modified cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-graphene oxide ...

Yongcai Qiu; Wanfei Li; Guizhu Li; Yuan Hou; Lisha Zhou; Hongfei Li…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Irradiation is known to have a significant impact on the properties and performance of Zircaloy cladding and structural materials (material degradation processes, e.g., effects of hydriding). This UFD study examines the behavior and performance of unirradiated cladding and actual irradiated cladding through testing and simulation. Three capsules containing hydrogen-charged Zircaloy-4 cladding material have been placed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Irradiation of the capsules was conducted for post-irradiation examination (PIE) metallography. Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of

113

Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

Steyert, W.A.; Olsen, C.E.

1980-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

Steyert, William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Olsen, Clayton E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus having a first substrate having (1) a cavity, (2) one or more resistive heaters, and (3) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen; a second substrate having (1) an outlet valve comprising a pressure relief structure and (2) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen, wherein said second substrate is coupled to said first substrate forming a sealed volume in said cavity; a metal hydride material contained within said cavity; and a gas distribution system formed by coupling a microfluidic interconnect to said pressure relief structure. Additional apparatuses and methods are also disclosed.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

Pairing in dense lithium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of valence electrons. Here we report the results of first-principles calculations, indicating that lithium, the band structure of which is largely free-electron-like at ordinary densities, does ... b.c.c.) becomes unstable to a pairing of the ions. Once paired, lithium possesses an even number of electrons per primitive cell which, although not sufficient, is ...

J. B. Neaton; N. W. Ashcroft

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Solid polymer electrolyte from phosphorylated chitosan  

SciTech Connect

Recently, the need of secondary battery application continues to increase. The secondary battery which using a liquid electrolyte was indicated had some weakness. A solid polymer electrolyte is an alternative electrolytes membrane which developed in order to replace the liquid electrolyte type. In the present study, the effect of phosphorylation on to polymer electrolyte membrane which synthesized from chitosan and lithium perchlorate salts was investigated. The effect of the component’s composition respectively on the properties of polymer electrolyte, was carried out by analyzed of it’s characterization such as functional groups, ion conductivity, and thermal properties. The mechanical properties i.e tensile resistance and the morphology structure of membrane surface were determined. The phosphorylation processing of polymer electrolyte membrane of chitosan and lithium perchlorate was conducted by immersing with phosphoric acid for 2 hours, and then irradiated on a microwave for 60 seconds. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan derived from shrimp shells was obtained around 75.4%. Relative molecular mass of chitosan was obtained by viscometry method is 796,792 g/mol. The ionic conductivity of chitosan membrane was increase from 6.33 × 10{sup ?6} S/cm up to 6.01 × 10{sup ?4} S/cm after adding by 15 % solution of lithium perchlorate. After phosphorylation, the ionic conductivity of phosphorylated lithium chitosan membrane was observed 1.37 × 10{sup ?3} S/cm, while the tensile resistance of 40.2 MPa with a better thermal resistance. On the strength of electrolyte membrane properties, this polymer electrolyte membrane was suggested had one potential used for polymer electrolyte in field of lithium battery applications.

Fauzi, Iqbal, E-mail: arcana@chem.itb.ac.id; Arcana, I Made, E-mail: arcana@chem.itb.ac.id [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Research Groups, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

Cathode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

American Lithium Energy Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithium Energy Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Lithium Energy Corp Place: San Marcos, California Zip: 92069 Product: California-based developer of lithium ion...

120

Anisotropic behavior and rupture of hydrided Zircaloy-4 sheets  

SciTech Connect

In a French pressurized water reactor (PWR), most of the structural parts of the fuel assembly consist of zirconium alloys (ZIRCALOY-2). The mechanical behavior of ZIRCALOY-4 sheets is investigated at room temperature. The effect of hydride precipitation on the mechanical behavior and on the rupture mechanism is also studied, in the range from 200 to 1,200 wt ppm hydrogen and for different stress triaxialities. It is shown that the material exhibits a strong anisotropy die to its pronounced texture, and that its mechanical properties depend on the strain rate. Hydride precipitation appears to have no effect on the anisotropy or on the strain-rate sensitivity, in the range from 10{sup {minus}4} to 10{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The main effect of hydrogen is the reduction of the ductility and of crack resistance. The ductile rupture mechanism is studied, focusing on the stage of damage nucleation by hydride fracture. Observations during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in situ tests show that hydrides allow the transmission of slip, which occurs in ZIRCALOY-4 grains. Hydrides can also deform, together with surrounding zirconium matrix. Damage appears after a plastic-strain yield of about 14 to 25 pct. Fracture occurs first on intergranular hydrides. Fracture of transgranular hydrides is observed only prior to failure, for higher plastic strains.

Grange, M.; Besson, J.; Andrieu, E.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Batteries - EnerDel Lithium-Ion Battery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles EnerDel lithium-ion battery The EnerDel Lithium-Ion Battery The EnerDel/Argonne lithium-ion battery is a highly reliable and extremely safe device that is lighter in weight, more compact, more powerful and longer-lasting than the nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries in today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The battery is expected to meet the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium's $500 manufacturing price criterion for a 25-kilowatt battery, which is almost a sixth of the cost to make comparable Ni-MH batteries intended for use in HEVs. It is also less expensive to make than comparable Li-ion batteries. That cost reduction is expected to help make HEVs more competitive in the marketplace and enable consumers to receive an immediate payback in

123

Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer electrolytes Title Diffusion coefficients in trimethyleneoxide containing comb branch polymer electrolytes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2004 Authors Liu, Gao, Craig L. Reeder, Xiaoguang Sun, and John B. Kerr Journal Solid State Ionics Volume 175 Pagination 781-783 Keywords comb branch polyethers, conductivity, lithium battery, polymer electrolytes, salt diffusion coefficient, trimethylene oxide Abstract This paper reports on a new comb branch polymer based on trimethylene oxide (TMO) side chains as a polymer electrolyte for potential application in lithium metal rechargeable batteries. The trimethylene oxide (TMO) units are attached to the side chains of a polyepoxide ether to maximize the segmental motion. Lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt was used to formulate the polymer electrolyte with the new TMO containing polymers. The new polymer electrolytes show improved salt diffusion coefficients (Ds) and conductivity at ambient and subambient temperature compare to the ethylene oxide (EO) counterpart, whereas performance at high temperature (85 °C) remains the same or is actually worse for salt diffusivity.

124

Process for production of a metal hydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Novel Hydride Transfer Catalysis for Carbohydrate Conversions  

SciTech Connect

5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), an important versatile sugar derivative has been synthesized from glucose using catalytic amounts of CrCl2 in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidizolium chloride. Glycerol and glyceraldehyde were tested as sugar model compounds. Glycerol is unreactive and does not interfere with glucose conversion. Glyceraldehyde is reactive and does interfere with glucose conversion in competitive experiments. MnCl2 or FeCl2 catalyze dehydration of glyceraldehyde dimer to form compound I, a cyclic hemiacetal with an exocyclic double bond. Upon aqueous work-up I forms pyruvaldehyde. CrCl2 or VCl3 further catalyze a hydride transfer of I to form lactide. Upon aqueous work-up lactide is converted to lactic acid.

Holladay, John E.; Brown, Heather M.; Appel, Aaron M.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

126

Polymer Electrolyte and Polymer Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generally the polymer electrolyte of the polymer battery is classified into two kinds of the electrolyte: One is a dry-type electrolyte composed of a polymer matrix and...21.1. Fig....

Toshiyuki Osawa; Michiyuki Kono

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries October 17, 2011 - 10:42am Addthis Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? Through licensing and collaborative work, Energy Department-sponsored research can yield great economic benefits and help bring important new products to market. The Energy Department funds cutting-edge research on a broad range of topics ranging from advanced battery construction to the modeling of industrial processes and supercomputer simulation of supernovae. But this research is not only about furthering our understanding of the world around

128

Metal Hydride Chemical Heat Pumps for Industrial Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydriding alloys are intermetallic absorbent compounds which have the remarkable quality of absorbing very large quantities of hydrogen gas per unit volume of metallic powder. The absorption and desorption of hydrogen are exothermic and endothermic...

Ally, M. R.; Rebello, W. J.; Rosso, M. J., Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

130

Delayed hydride cracking behavior for ZIRCALOY-2 tubing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The delayed hydride cracking (DHC) behavior for ZIRCALOY-2 tubing was characterized at temperatures ranging from 93 °C to 288 °C. Testing was performed on the three types of pressure tubes that were used in th...

F. H. Huang; W. J. Mills

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electrocatalysts for Nonaqueous Lithium–Air Batteries:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrocatalysts for Nonaqueous Lithium–Air Batteries: Status, Challenges, and Perspective. Electrocatalysts for Nonaqueous Lithium–Air Batteries: Status, Challenges,...

132

Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of dynamics in poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium polyether-ester-sulfonate ionomers  

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the dynamics of poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium sulfonate ionomer samples that have low glass transition temperatures. 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the bulk polymer and lithium ions, respectively, were measured and analyzed in samples with a range of ion contents. The temperature dependence of T1 values along with the presence of minima in T1 as a function of temperature enabled correlation times and activation energies to be obtained for both the segmental motion of the polymer backbone and the hopping motion of lithium cations. Similar activation energies for motion of both the polymer and lithium ions in the samples with lower ion content indicate that the polymer segmental motion and lithium ion hopping motion are correlated in these samples, even though their respective correlation times differ significantly. A divergent trend is observed for correlation times and activation energies of the highest ion content sample with 100% lithium sulfonation due to the presence of ionic aggregation. Details of the polymer and cation dynamics on the nanosecond timescale are discussed and complement the findings of X-ray scattering and Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments.

Roach, David J. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Dou, Shichen [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Colby, Ralph H. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of a metal hydride electrode waste treatment process  

SciTech Connect

Manufacturing residues of metal hydride electrodes for nickel - metal hydride batteries were chemically processed to recover the metal part and heat treated for the organic part. Chemical recovery yielded Ni-Co alloy after electrolysis of the solution and hydroxides of other metal, mainly rare earths. The organic part, pyrolyzed at 700 C, led to separation between carbon and fluorinated matter. Infrared coupling at the output of the pyrolysis furnace was used to identify the pyrolysis gases.

Bianco, J.C.; Martin, D.; Ansart, F.; Castillo, S.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process  

SciTech Connect

The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

Rueben L. Gutierrez

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Composite Polymer Electrolytes Based on Poly(ethylene glycol) and Hydrophobic Fumed Silica: Dynamic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilized in electrolyte processing. Introduction Rechargeable lithium batteries employing solid elec electrolytes based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO).1 Solid polymer electrolytes can potentially eliminate battery* Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695

Raghavan, Srinivasa

136

Lithium Ion Accomplishments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium ion Battery Commercialization Lithium ion Battery Commercialization Johnson Controls-Saft Advanced Power Solutions, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Johnson Controls-Saft (JCS) will supply lithium-ion batteries to Mercedes for their S Class Hybrid to be introduced in October 2009. Technology developed with DOE support (the VL6P cell) will be used in the S Class battery. In May 2006, the Johnson Controls-Saft Joint Venture was awarded a 24 month $14.4 million contract by the DOE/USABC to develop a 40kW Li ion HEV battery system offering improved safety, low temperature performance, and cost. JCS has reported a 40% cost reduction of the 40kW system being developed in their DOE/USABC contract while maintaining performance. Lithium Ion Battery Material Commercialization Argonne National Laboratory has licensed cathode materials and associated processing

137

Solid-state lithium battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

OBSERVATIONS IN REACTIVITY BETWEEN BH CONTAINING COMPOUNDS AND ORGANOMETALLIC REAGENTS: SYNTHESIS OF BORONIC ACIDS, BORONIC ESTERS, AND MAGNESIUM HYDRIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reaction of BH 3 :THF with magnesium hydride byproduct. A.It was also observed that magnesium hydride can partiallyACIDS, BORONIC ESTERS, AND MAGNESIUM HYDRIDES A dissertation

Clary, Jacob William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

140

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

142

LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

HEDL-TME 78-15 HEDL-TME 78-15 uc-20 LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS Hanf ord Engineering Development Laboratory -~ - - , . .. . D.W. Jeppson J.L. Ballif W.W. Yuan B.E. Chou - - - . - . - -- r - N O T l C E n ~ h u mpon w prepared as an account of work iponrored by the United States Government. Neither the Unitcd States nor the United Stater Department of Energy. nor any of their employees, nor any of then contractor^, subcontractors. or their employees, maker any warranty, cxprcu or Implied. or anumcs any legal liability or rcrponabllity for the accuracy. cornplctcncs or uvfulnes of any information. apparatus, product or p r o a s ditclorcd. or rcpments that its u s would not infringe pnvatcly owned nghts. April 1978 HANFORD ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY

143

Electron-donor dopant, method of improving conductivity of polymers by doping therewith, and a polymer so treated  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymers with conjugated backbones, both polyacetylene and polyaromatic heterocyclic types, are doped with electron-donor agents to increase their electrical conductivity. The electron-donor agents are either electride dopants made in the presence of lithium or dopants derived from alkalides made in the presence of lithium. The dopants also contain a metal such as cesium and a trapping agent such as a crown ether.

Liepins, R.; Aldissi, M.

1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

Batch polymerization of styrene and isoprene by n-butyl lithium initiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-20). Analysis of products consists of determining the point at which no free lithium alkyl remains. Thus if a butyl lithium initiated polymerization were terminated with water, butane would be evolved as long as the initiator were present. The butane...? agent were evaporated under a hood. Finally the polymer. was dried in a vacuum oven at about 50'C and under a vacuum of 30 inches of gg for about 30 hours. The weight of polymer formed was determined by final weighing. 25 The monomer conversion...

Hasan, Sayeed

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Synthesis and characterization of metal hydride/carbon aerogel composites for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two materials currently of interest for onboard lightweight hydrogen storage applications are sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH4), a complex metal hydride, and carbon aerogels (CAs), a light porous material connected by several spherical nanoparticles. ...

Kuen-Song Lin; Yao-Jen Mai; Su-Wei Chiu; Jing-How Yang; Sammy L. I. Chan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Characterization and High Throughput Analysis of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage by Steven James BarceloMetal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage by Steven James BarceloCo-chair Efficient hydrogen storage is required for fuel

Barcelo, Steven James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate David A. Scrymgeour and Venkatraman Gopalan Department of Materials Science, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. The contributions to the domain- wall energy from polarization

Gopalan, Venkatraman

149

Opening of a Post Doctoral Position Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opening of a Post Doctoral Position Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications in connection with the « Fast, reliable and cost effective boron hydride based high capacity solid state hydrogen storage materials» project co

150

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lithium Nearly everybody knows about lithium Nearly everybody knows about lithium - a light, silvery alkali metal - used in rechargeable batteries powering everything from laptops to hybrid cars. What may not be so well known is the fact that researchers hoping to harness the energy released in fusion reactions also have used lithium to coat the walls of donut-shaped tokamak reactors. Lithium, it turns out, may help the plasmas fueling fusion reactions to retain heat for longer periods of time. This could improve the chances of producing useful energy from fusion. en COLLOQUIUM: The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) http://www.pppl.gov/events/colloquium-lithium-tokamak-experiment-ltx

151

Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SANDIA REPORT SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-0786 Unlimited Release Printed February 2012 Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Lennie Klebanoff Director, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Jay Keller Deputy Director, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

152

14 - Hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Hydrogen storage technologies are playing a significant and critical role in the so-called ‘hydrogen economy’: they are used to buffer primary energy sources for time-delayed end-uses. The purpose of this chapter is to review the main hydrogen storage processes and materials, with a special emphasis on chemical storage (metal and chemical hydrides). First, the main hydrogen processes (physical, chemical, electrochemical, geological) are reviewed. Then, reversible hydrogen storage in hydride-forming metals and intermetallics is discussed. Basic principles (thermodynamic properties, sorption mechanisms, kinetics) are presented and the properties of the main materials are listed and compared. Irreversible hydrogen storage in the main classes of chemical hydrides is then described. In the last section, specifications for automotive and stationary applications are reviewed and discussed.

P. Millet

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Brittle fracture induced by hydrides in zircaloy-4  

SciTech Connect

Zircaloy-4 is used as a cladding material in the nuclear industry for fuel elements. Its mechanical properties can be drastically affected by the presence of hydrides, which form when hydrogen content exceeds the terminal solid solubility. This change often manifests itself as a reduction in ductility (elongation and reduction in area), coupled with the evolution of the fracture mode from ductile microvoid nucleation and coalescence to intergranular fracture. It has been found, at room temperature, that Zircaloy-4 undergoes a ductile to brittle transition when the hydrogen content (hydride volume fraction) in the specimen is higher than some critical value depending on the microstructure and the hydride morphology. Heat treatment of the material can shift the transition end point from 1050 ppm wt H for the stress-relieved state to 100-150 ppm wt H for the {beta} treated state, thus strongly suggesting that there may be some relationship between the microstructure (grain size and shape) and the ductile-brittle transition. It has also been reported that for the same hydriding condition, the hydrogen absorption rate is higher for the stress-relieved and recrystallized states and lower for the {beta} treated state. This phenomenon is very important for engineering applications because it is related to the determination of the safe life. Insufficient attention has been drawn to the quantitative evaluation and the modelization of the influence of the microstructure on the ductile-brittle transition in hydrided Zircaloy-4, though there has been some general research on the boundary structural effect on intergranular fracture. The present authors attempt to modelize this influence by an upper-limit model using the results of image analysis on the microstructures and tensile tests on hydrided sheet specimens.

Bai, J.B.; Francois, D.; Prioul, C. (Lab. MSS/MAT CNRS URA 850, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (FR)); Lansiart, S. (CEA/DTA/CEREM/DTM/SRMA, C.E. Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions  

SciTech Connect

Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup ?}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Li, Xiang [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States)] [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

First-principles study on lithium amide for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fundamental properties of lithium amide LiNH2, which is fully hydrogenated phase of lithium nitride Li3N, have been investigated by the first-principles calculations using the ultrasoft pseudopotential method, including the structural, electronic, dielectric, and vibrational properties. The calculated structural parameters agree well with the experimental data except for hydrogen positions. The analyses for the electronic structure and the Born effective charge tensors indicate an ionic feature between Li+ and [NH2]?. The internal bonding of [NH2]? anions is primarily covalent. The internal N-H bending and stretching vibrations of [NH2]? anions yield ?-phonon modes around 1500 and 3400cm?1, respectively. These can be fairly reproduced by the molecular approximation, suggesting a strong internal bonding of [NH2]? anions. The heat of formation for the fully hydriding reaction of Li3N is predicted as ?85kJ?mol H2 which agrees well with the experimental value. Some discussions are also presented for the properties of Li3N.

Kazutoshi Miwa; Nobuko Ohba; Shin-ichi Towata; Yuko Nakamori; Shin-ichi Orimo

2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Effect of radial hydrides on the axial and hoop mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 cladding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of radial hydrides on the mechanical properties of stress-relief annealed Zircaloy-4 cladding was studied. Specimens were firstly hydrided to different target hydrogen levels between 100 and 600 wt ppm and then thermally cycled in an autoclave under a constant hoop stress to form radial hydrides by a hydride reorientation process. The effect of radial hydrides on the axial properties of the cladding was insignificant. On the other hand, the cladding ductility measurements decreased as its radial hydride content increased when the specimen was tested in plane strain tension. A reference hydrogen concentration for radial hydrides in the cladding was defined for assessing the fuel cladding integrity based on a criterion of the tensile strength 600 MPa. The reference hydrogen concentration increased with the specimen (bulk) hydrogen concentration to a maximum of ?90 wt ppm at the bulk concentration ?300 wt ppm H and then decreased towards higher concentrations.

H.C. Chu; S.K. Wu; K.F. Chien; R.C. Kuo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Side Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

even with excess negative capacity, lithium can deposit ifdeposits lithium and reaches cutoff sooner. electrode excessexcess by 10%, an extension of about 0.4 mm is sufficient to prevent the onset of lithium

Tang, Maureen Han-Mei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

Congdon, James W. (Aiken, SC)

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

HYDROGEN STORAGE USINGHYDROGEN STORAGE USING COMPLEX HYDRIDESCOMPLEX HYDRIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Michael D. HamptonDarlene K. Slattery, Michael D. Hampton FL Solar Energy Center, U. of Central FLFL Solar Energy Center, U. of Central FL #12;Objective · Identify a hydrogen storage system that meets the DOEHYDROGEN STORAGE USINGHYDROGEN STORAGE USING COMPLEX HYDRIDESCOMPLEX HYDRIDES Darlene K. Slattery

160

Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. Abstract: Rechargeable lithium metal batteries have much higher energy density than those...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gabano, Ed. , Lithium Batteries, Academic Press, New York,K. V. Kordesch, "Primary Batteries 1951-1976," J. Elec- n ~.Rechargeable Lithium Batteries," J. Electrochem. Soc. , [20

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EERE Partner Testimonials - Phil Roberts, California Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phil Roberts, California Lithium Battery (CalBattery) EERE Partner Testimonials - Phil Roberts, California Lithium Battery (CalBattery) Addthis Text Version The words "Office of...

163

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Newman, "Thermal Modeling of the LithiumIPolymer Battery I.J. Newman, "Thermal Modeling of the LithiumIPolymer Battery

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award February...

165

Lithium-based electrochromic mirrors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LITHIUM-BASED ELECTROCHROMIC MIRRORS Thomas J. Richardson*with pure antimony films. Electrochromic cycling speed andand silver. INTRODUCTION Electrochromic devices that exhibit

Richardson, Thomas J.; Slack, Jonathan L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Physical properties of Li ion conducting polyphosphazene based polymer electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

We report a systematic study of the transport properties and the underlying physical chemistry of some polyphosphazene (PPhz)-based polymer electrolytes. We synthesized MEEP and variants which employed mixed combinations of different length oxyethylene side-chains. We compare the conductivity and ion-ion interactions in polymer electrolytes obtained with lithium triflate and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI) salts added to the polymer. The combination of the lithium imide salt and MEEP yields a maximum conductivity of 8 x 10{sup -5} {Omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at room temperature at a salt loading of 8 monomers per lithium. In one of the mixed side-chain variations, a maximum conductivity of 2 x 10{sup -4} {Omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} was measured at the same molar ratio. Raman spectral analysis shows some ion aggregation and some polymer - ion interactions in the PPhz-LiTFSI case but much less than observed with Li CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}. A sharp increase in the Tg as salt is added corresponds to concentrations above which the conductivity significantly decreases and ion associations appear.

Sanderson, S.; Zawodzinski, T.; Hermes, R.; Davey, J.; Dai, Hongli

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

EMSL - polymers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

polymers en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

168

Ultra compact direct hydrogen fuel cell prototype using a metal hydride hydrogen storage tank for a mobile phone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The small fuel cell is being researched as an alternative power source to the Li-ion battery in mobile phone. In this paper, a direct hydrogen fuel cell system which powers a mobile phone without a supplementary battery is compactly integrated below 25 ml volume at the backside of the phone. The system consists of a small (8 ml) metal hydride hydrogen storage tank with 4 L hydrogen storage or an energy density of ?640 W h/L, a thin air-breathing planar polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack (13.44 cm2 × 3 mm for a volumetric power density of 335 W/L), miniature pressure regulator, and a high efficiency DC–DC voltage converting circuitry. The hydrogen storage tank is packed with the AB5 type metal hydride alloy. The eight-cell air-breathing planar stack (8 ml) is very thin (3 mm) due to a thin flexible printed circuit board current collectors as well as a unique riveting assembly and is capable of a robust performance of 2.68 W (200 mW/cm2). A miniature pressure regulator is compact with fluidic and electrical connections within 4 ml. A miniature DC–DC voltage converter operates at an overall efficiency of 90%. Consequently, the estimated energy density of a fully integrated fuel cell system is 205 W h/L (70.5 W h/kg).

Sung Han Kim; Craig M. Miesse; Hee Bum Lee; Ik Whang Chang; Yong Sheen Hwang; Jae Hyuk Jang; Suk Won Cha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Microstructural study by XRD profile analysis and TEM observations on hydrided recrystallized Zircaloy-4  

SciTech Connect

Zircaloy-4, used as cladding tube material in the nuclear reactors, may become brittle due to the precipitation of hydrides. During hydride formation, the anisotropic misfit strains between hydrides and the hexagonal-close-packed zirconium matrix results in a preferred orientation of the hydride platelets in the anisotropic stress field caused by non-relieved fabrication residual stresses and misfit stresses. To understand the mechanism of rupture and to predict the threshold stresses for hydride stress orientation, it is necessary to study the residual stresses, especially the microstrain caused by crystalline lattice misfit, in a hydrided specimen. The X-ray diffraction profile analysis is very sensitive to all the microstructure evolution in metallic materials. It is a non-destructive and voluminal technique compared with transmission electron microscope observation. The XRD peak broadening can be related closely with the microstrain in case of hydrided Zircaloy-4, because the hydride formation creates in general a great number of dislocations which contributes especially to the diminution of coherent domain size and to the increase of microstrain. To calibrate the internal microstrain due to precipitation effect of hydrided specimens, XRD profile analysis has also been realized on the non-hydrided specimens deformed by uniaxial tension. In this paper the authors restrict to analyzing the results about the recrystallized state, because more informations about the anisotropic elasticity, plasticity, thermal expansion, neutron diffraction measurement and the crystallographic texture results are available.

Bai, J.B. (Lab. MSS/MAT, CNRS URA 850, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (FR)); Gilbon, D. (LM3, CNRS URA 1219, ENSAM, 151 Bd. de l'Hopital, 75013 Paris (FR)); Lebrun, J.L. (CEA/DTA/CEREM/DTM/SRMA, C.E. Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Poly(vinylidenefluoride)-hexafluoropropylene–methyl N-methylpyrrolidinium-N-acetate trifluoromethanesulfonylimide–lithium trifluoromethanesulfonylimide gel electrolytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New polymer-ionic liquid-lithium salt gel electrolytes (PILGEs) were prepared using poly(vinylidenefluoride)-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (PVdF(HFP)), methyl N-methylpyrrolidinium-N-acetate trifluoromethanesulfonimide ([MMEPyr][TFSI]), and lithium trifluoromethanesulfonylimide (LiTFSI) in order to investigate the effects of ionic liquids containing an ester group on the electrochemical properties of polymer gel electrolytes. Free standing ionic gels consisting of PVdF(HFP), [MMEPyr][TFSI], and LiTFSI were prepared in a range of weight ratio of polymer/[MMEPyr][TFSI]/LiTFSI = 1/2/0.1 ? 1. Ionic conductivities for the prepared \\{PILGEs\\} were measured with changing temperature and weight ratio of LiTFSI and the obtained values were found to be reasonable (10?4 S cm?1) over the operating temperatures.

Ki-Sub Kim; Seul Bee Lee; Hyunjoo Lee; Hoon Sik Kim; Youngwoo Lee; Kwangsoo Kwack

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

SECONDARY BATTERIES – LITHIUM RECHARGEABLE SYSTEMS – LITHIUM-ION | Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need to increase the specific energy and energy density of secondary batteries has become more urgent as a result of the recent rapid development of new applications, such as electric vehicles (EVs), load leveling, and various types of portable equipments, including cellular phones, personal computers, camcorders, and digital cameras. Among various types of secondary batteries, rechargeable lithium-ion batteries have been used in a wide variety of portable equipments due to their high energy density. Many researchers have contributed to develop lithium-ion batteries, and their contributions are reviewed from historical aspects onward, including the researches in primary battery with metal lithium anode, and secondary battery with metal lithium negative electrode. Researches of new materials are still very active to develop new lithium-ion batteries with higher performances. The researches of positive and negative electrode active materials and electrolytes are also reviewed historically.

J. Yamaki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Success Stories: Solid Electrolyte Lithium Ion Batteries - Seeo, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Electrolyte May Usher in a New Generation of Solid Electrolyte May Usher in a New Generation of Rechargeable Lithium Batteries For Vehicles With sky rocketing gasoline prices and exploding laptops, there could not have been a better time for a new rechargeable battery breakthrough. Enter Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) nanostructured polymer electrolyte (NPE). NPE is a solid electrolyte designed for use in rechargeable lithium batteries. The unique material was developed by LBNL researchers Nitash Balsara, Hany Eitouni, Enrique Gomez, and Mohit Singh and licensed to startup company Seeo Inc. in 2007. With solid financial backing from Khosla Ventures, located in Menlo Park, California, and an impressive scientific team recruited from LBNL, University of California, Berkeley, and the battery industry, Seeo is now

173

Cation Transport in Polymer Electrolytes: A Microscopic Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A microscopic theory for cation diffusion in polymer electrolytes is presented. Based on a thorough analysis of molecular dynamics simulations on PEO with LiBF$_4$ the mechanisms of cation dynamics are characterised. Cation jumps between polymer chains can be identified as renewal processes. This allows us to obtain an explicit expression for the lithium ion diffusion constant D_{Li} by invoking polymer specific properties such as the Rouse dynamics. This extends previous phenomenological and numerical approaches. In particular, the chain length dependence of D_{Li} can be predicted and compared with experimental data. This dependence can be fully understood without referring to entanglement effects.

A. Maitra; A. Heuer

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydriding and dehydriding characteristics of LiBH{sub 4} and transition metals-added magnesium hydride  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Hydriding reaction curves under 12 bar H{sub 2}, and dehydriding reaction curves under 1.0 bar H{sub 2}, at 593 K at the 1st cycle for MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti and MgH{sub 2}. Highlights: ? Addition of Ni, LiBH{sub 4}, and Ti to MgH{sub 2} to increase reaction rates. ? Sample preparation by reactive mechanical grinding. ? At n = 2, the sample absorbed 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}. ? Analysis of rate-controlling step for dehydriding of the sample at n = 3. - Abstract: In this study, MgH{sub 2} was used as a starting material instead of Mg. Ni, Ti, and LiBH{sub 4} with a high hydrogen-storage capacity of 18.4 wt% were added. A sample with a composition of MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The activation of MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti was completed after the first hydriding–dehydrding cycle. The hydriding rate decreases as the temperature increases due to the decrease in the driving force for the hydriding reaction. At the 1st cycle, the sample desorbs 1.45 wt% H for 10 min, 2.54 wt% H for 20 min, 3.13 wt% H for 30 min, and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 1.0 bar H{sub 2}. At the 2nd cycle, the sample absorbs 3.84 wt% H for 5 min, 3.96 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}. MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti after reactive mechanical grinding contained MgH{sub 2}, Mg, Ni, TiH{sub 1.924}, and MgO phases. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni, LiBH{sub 4}, and Ti is considered to create defects on the surface and in the interior of Mg (to facilitate nucleation), and to reduce the particle size of Mg (to shorten diffusion distances of hydrogen atoms). The formation of Mg{sub 2}Ni during hydriding–dehydriding cycling increases the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the sample.

Song, Myoung Youp, E-mail: songmy@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research Center, Engineering Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Young Jun; Lee, Seong Ho [Department of Materials Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hye Ryoung [Faculty of Applied Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbongdong, Bukgu, Gwangju, 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Preparation and X-Ray diffraction studies of curium hydrides  

SciTech Connect

Curium hydrides were prepared by reaction of curium-248 metal with hydrogen and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Several of the syntheses resulted in a hexagonal compound with average lattice parameters of a/sub 0/ = 0.3769(8) nm and c/sub 0/ = 0.6732(12) nm. These products are considere to be CmH/sub 3//sup -//sub 8/ by analogy with the behavior of lanthanide-hydrogen and lighter actinide-hydrogen systems. Face-centered cubic products with an average lattice parameter of a/sub 0/ = 0.5322(4) nm were obtained from other curium hydride preparations. This parameter is slightly smaller than that reported previously for cubic curium dihydride, CmH /SUB 2-x/ (B.M. Bansal and D. Damien. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Lett. 6 603, 1970). The present results established a continuation of typical heavy trivalent lanthanidelike behavior of the transuranium actinide-hydrogen systems through curium.

Gibson, J.K.; Maire, R.G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Behavior and rupture of hydrided Zircaloy-4 tubes and sheets  

SciTech Connect

Zirconium alloys are used as structural parts in the nuclear fuel assembly. The mechanical behavior and rupture mechanisms of ZIRCALOY-4 guide tubes and sheet containing 150 to 1,200 wt ppm hydrogen have been investigated at room temperature. Sheets were notched to study the influence of geometrical defects on rupture. It is shown that hydrides strengthened the material, as maximum stresses sustained by the material are increased with increasing hydrogen contents. On the other hand, ductility is reduced. The material also exhibits a strong anisotropy due to its pronounced texture. Metallographic examinations have shown that damage by hydride cracking is a continuous process that starts after the onset of necking. Notches reduce ductility. A modified Gurson-Tvergaard model was used to represent the material behavior and rupture. Numerical simulation using the finite element method demonstrates the strong influence of plastic anisotropy on the behavior of structures and rupture modes.

Prat, F.; Besson, J. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Evry (France); Grange, M. [Framatome Nuclear Fuel, Lyon (France); Andrieu, E. [ENSCT, Toulouse (France). Lab. Materiaux

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Thermomechanics of hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: modeling and analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermodynamically consistent mathematical model for hydrogen adsorption in metal hydrides is proposed. Beside hydrogen diffusion, the model accounts for phase transformation accompanied by hysteresis, swelling, temperature and heat transfer, strain, and stress. We prove existence of solutions of the ensuing system of partial differential equations by a carefully-designed, semi-implicit approximation scheme. A generalization for a drift-diffusion of multi-component ionized "gas" is outlined, too.

Tomas Roubicek; Giuseppe Tomassetti

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

180

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Title Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1089E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Anders, André, Jonathan L. Slack, and Thomas J. Richardson Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 1 Date Published 08/2003 Call Number LBNL-1089E Abstract Proof-of-principle gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have been investigated. In contrast to conventional electrochromic approaches, hydrogen is stored (at low concentration) in the gas volume between glass panes of the insulated glass units (IGUs). The elimination of a solid state ion storage layer simplifies the layer stack, enhances overall transmission, and reduces cost. The cyclic switching properties were demonstrated and system durability improved with the incorporation a thin Zr barrier layer between the MnNiMg layer and the Pd catalyst. Addition of 9% silver to the palladium catalyst further improved system durability. About 100 full cycles have been demonstrated before devices slow considerably. Degradation of device performance appears to be related to Pd catalyst mobility, rather than delamination or metal layer oxidation issues originally presumed likely to present significant challenges.

182

Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.

Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electrical Properties of Hydrides and Deuterides of Zirconium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrical properties of hydrides and deuterides of zirconium have been investigated between 1.1 and 410°K. The metallic nature of these materials is evident in the fact that for compositions approaching ZrH2, the hydride is a better conductor than is high-purity zirconium. Above ?150°K the electrical resistivity exhibits an interesting upturn, which arises from scattering from the optical-model lattice vibrations. Excellent fits to the ideal-resistivity data are obtained with a simple additive combination of Grüneisen and Howarth-Sondheimer functions for the respective acoustical- and optical-mode scattering contributions. The corresponding acoustical- and optical-mode characteristic temperatures are in good accord with expectations based on earlier inelastic neutron scattering data. Moreover, the optical-mode characteristic temperature exhibits the expected hydride-deuteride isotope shift of 2. The observed Hall coefficients are large in magnitude (much greater than for pure Zr), and indicate majority hole conduction for the fcc ? phase and majority electron conduction for the face-centered tetragonal ? phase. The thermoelectric power also changes from positive to negative with increasing hydrogen concentration in the range ZrH1.5-ZrH2.

P. W. Bickel and T. G. Berlincourt

1970-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic hydrides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(2002) 1080-703902.50 Summary: for arsenic species using hydride generation and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The detec- tion limit for As... by ASP Estimation of...

185

LANL/PNNL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrides and New Concepts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LANLPNNL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrides and New Concepts for Hydrogen Storage * Thermodynamics * Kinetics * Recycle * WeightVolume Capacity * Durability Investigate...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - annulus metal hydride Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Metal hydride applications span a wide variety of tech nologies eg energy conversion... chemical compressors and hydrogen storage A knowledge of heat and...

187

Thermodynamics of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications using first principles calculations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Metal hydrides are promising candidates for H2 storage, but high stability and poor kinetics are the important challenges which have to be solved for vehicular… (more)

Kim, Ki Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Influence of an oxide layer on the hydride embrittlement in Zircaloy-4  

SciTech Connect

Hydrid embrittlement of zirconium and its alloy has been studied extensively. The common techniques used to hydride the specimens are electro-chemical and gaseous ones. During this operation, especially for cases of long duration, an oxide layer would form on the surface of specimens. The present paper reports on some evidence for the influence of this layer on the hydride embrittlement in Zircaloy-4. Tensile tests with or without this layer were performed on hydrided specimens. Metallographic and fractographic analyses were carried out in order to examine the fracture nature of this layer. An analysis based on the fracture mechanics was also proposed.

Bai, J.B. (Ecole Centrale de Paris, Chatenay Malabry (France). Lab. MSS/MAT)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Lattice Dynamics of Dense Lithium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report low-frequency high-resolution Raman spectroscopy and ab-initio calculations on dense lithium from 40 to 200 GPa at low temperatures. Our experimental results reveal rich first-order Raman activity in the metallic and semiconducting phases of lithium. The computed Raman frequencies are in excellent agreement with the measurements. Free energy calculations provide a quantitative description and physical explanation of the experimental phase diagram only when vibrational effect are correctly treated. The study underlines the importance of zero-point energy in determining the phase stability of compressed lithium.

F. A. Gorelli; S. F. Elatresh; C. L. Guillaume; M. Marqués; G. J. Ackland; M. Santoro; S. A. Bonev; E. Gregoryanz

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Lithium System Operation Dan Lev and David Stein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium System Operation Dan Lev and David Stein March 1, 2011 (or Lithium tank for dummies) 1 #12 for Ordering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 9 Lithium Handling 52 9.1 Glove Box for Ordering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 9.2 Lithium Cleaning

191

Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices  

SciTech Connect

An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hydride blisters Formation, Characterization and Effect on the Fracture of Zircaloy-4 Cladding Tubes Under Reactivity Initiated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

failure in 1983[2], when an axial crack developed in a CANDU pressure tube following an array of hydride

193

Y-12 lithium-6 production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fusion materials on August 12, 1953. The explosion was quickly determined to be a thermonuclear-like test and was also believed to contain lithium. Y-12 chemists and engineers...

194

Air breathing lithium power cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cell suitable for use in a battery according to one embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; a stabilized zirconia electrolyte for selective oxygen anion transport; a molten salt electrolyte; and a lithium-based anode. A cell suitable for use in a battery according to another embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; an electrolyte; a membrane selective to molecular oxygen; and a lithium-based anode.

Farmer, Joseph C.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Solid-State Gadolinium-Magnesium Hydride Optical Switch R. Armitage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state electrochromic device. With positive polarization of the hydride electrode, the visible reflectance approaches 35 and reflecting states. Keywords: gadolinium-magnesium; electrochromic hydride; optical switching device. 2 #12;A conventional electrochromics5 . Optical switching has also been demonstrated by varying the H content

196

Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hydride precipitation and its influence on mechanical properties of notched and unnotched Zircaloy-4 plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydride formation and its influence on the mechanical performance of hydrided Zircaloy-4 plates containing different hydrogen contents were studied at room temperature. For the unnotched plate samples with the hydrogen contents ranging from 25 to 850 wt. ppm, the hydrides exerted an insignificant effect on the tensile strength, while the ductility was severely degraded with increasing hydrogen content. The fracture mode and degree of embrittlement were strongly related to the hydrogen content. When the hydrogen content reached a level of 850 wt. ppm, the plate exhibited negligible ductility, resulting in almost completely brittle behavior. For the hydrided notched plate, the tensile stress concentration associated with the notch tip facilitated the hydride accumulation at the region near the notch tip and the premature crack propagation through the hydride fracture during hydriding. The final brittle through-thickness failure for this notched sample was mainly attributed to the formation of a continuous hydride network on the thickness section and the obtained very high hydrogen concentration (estimated to be 1965 wt. ppm).

Zhiyang Wang; Ulf Garbe; Huijun Li; Robert P. Harrison; Karl Toppler; Andrew J. Studer; Tim Palmer; Guillaume Planchenault

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Lithium Technology Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Lithium Technology Corporation Place Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania Zip PA 19462 Sector Vehicles Product Pennsylvania-based lithium secondary battery company manufacturing rechargeable batteries for plug-in and hybrid vehicles and for custom military and industrial applications. References Lithium Technology Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lithium Technology Corporation is a company located in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania . References ↑ "Lithium Technology Corporation" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lithium_Technology_Corporation&oldid=348412"

199

Hydride-phase formation and its influence on fatigue crack propagationbehavior in a Zircaloy-4 alloy  

SciTech Connect

The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of delta zirconium hydride ( -ZrH2) in the bulk, and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a pre-existing fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation were investigated. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip was measured using neutron diffraction. The combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are discussed.

Garlea, Elena [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Choo, H. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, G Y [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Clausen, B [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brown, D. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Park, Jae-Sung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Getting metal-hydrides to do what you want them to  

SciTech Connect

With the discovery of AB/sub 5/ compounds, intermetallic hydrides with unusual properties began to be developed (H dissociation pressures of one to several atmospheres, extremely rapid and reversible adsorption/desorption very large amounts of H adsorbed). This paper reviews the factors that must be controlled in order to modify these hydrides to make them useful. The system LaNi/sub 5/ + H/sub 2/ is used as example. Use of AB/sub 5/ hydrides to construct a chemical heat pumps is discussed. Results of a systematic study substituting Al for Ni are reported; the HYCSOS pump is described briefly. Use of hydrides as hydrogen getters (substituted ZrV/sub 2/) is also discussed. Finally, possible developments in intermetallic hydride research in the 1980's and the hydrogen economy are discussed. 10 figures. (DLC)

Gruen, D.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Stress-induced reorientation of hydrides and mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stress-induced reorientation of hydrides and its effect on the stress–strain response of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes were investigated. The reorientation of hydrides along the radial direction was most pronounced if the tube was cooled from 300 to 200 °C under circumferential loading. Reorientation occurred much less frequently at either higher (cooled from 400 to 300 °C) or lower (cooled from 200 to 100 °C) temperature range. The population of radial hydrides in R43H7 (which was cooled from 400 to 300 °C and maintained at 300 °C for 7 h) increased drastically during annealing at 300 °C, suggesting time dependent stress-aided dissolution of circumferential hydrides and reprecipitation of radial hydrides. The drastic decrease of the strength and the complete loss of the ductility were observed in R32AC and R43H7.

S.I. Hong; K.W. Lee

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

T: T: Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly, MA; Bridgeport Brass, Adrian, MI and Seymour, Chicago, IL CT; National Guard Armory, 0: Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the attached radiological survey data (Attachments 1 through 3) and an appropriate authority review, the following properties are being authorized for remedial action. It should be noted that the attached survey data are for designation purposes only and that Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) should conduct appropriate comprehensive characterization studies to determine the extent'and magnitude of contamination on properties. Site Location Priority Former Bridgeport Brass Co. (General Motors) Adrian, MI Low Former Bridgeport Brass Co.

203

Electrochemical process and production of novel complex hydrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of using an electrochemical cell to generate aluminum hydride (AlH.sub.3) is provided. The electrolytic cell uses a polar solvent to solubilize NaAlH.sub.4. The resulting electrochemical process results in the formation of AlH.sub.3. The AlH.sub.3 can be recovered and used as a source of hydrogen for the automotive industry. The resulting spent aluminum can be regenerated into NaAlH.sub.4 as part of a closed loop process of AlH.sub.3 generation.

Zidan, Ragaiy

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect

Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Deprotonative metallation of ferrocenes using mixed lithium-zinc and lithium-cadmium combinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). It is pertinent to mention that lithium bases were previously used to deprotonate the acetal 3, albeit at lower1 Deprotonative metallation of ferrocenes using mixed lithium-zinc and lithium-cadmium combinations on the web Xth XXXXXXXXX 200X DOI: 10.1039/b000000x A mixed lithium-cadmium amide and a combination

Boyer, Edmond

206

Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

Khalil Amine

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

207

Synthesis, characterization and reactivity of several rhenium hydride complexes. A study of the role of metal hydrides in organometallic reactions  

SciTech Connect

The mechanistic role of transition metal hydrides in organometallic reactions has been studied using several low valent, electron rich rhenium complexes. The reaction ReH[sub 7](PPh[sub 3])[sub 2] with indene has been found to yield products that are [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 9]H[sub 7]ReH[sub 2](PPh[sub 3])[sub 2] and ([eta][sup 5]-C[sub 9]H[sub 11])ReH[sub 2](PPh[sub 3])[sub 2], respectively. The mechanism proposed for the formation of these two products consists of several metal to ring hydride migrations, and the activation parameters for one of the migrations have been obtained. Hydride migrations are prevalent in the subsequent chemistry of ([eta][sup 5]-C[sub 9]H[sub 11])ReH[sub 2](PPh[sub 3])[sub 2], as well as in the similar complex ([eta][sup 4]-C[sub 9]H[sub 12])ReH[sub 3](PPh[sub 3])[sub 2]. The complex ([eta][sup 4]-C[sub 4]H[sub 5]S)ReH[sub 2](PPh[sub 3])[sub 2] has been synthesized and structurally characterized in an attempt to model the interaction of thiophene with a metal hydride surface which is presumably present during typical hydrodesulfurization conditions. The thermolysis of ([eta][sup 4]-C[sub 4]H[sub 5]S)ReH[sub 2](PPh[sub 3])[sub 2] in the presence of PMe[sub 3] has been found to yield free tetrahydrothiophene and the cyclometallated Re(PMe[sub 3])[sub 4](PPH[sub 2]C[sub 6]H[sub 4]), while photolysis with excess PMe[sub 3] yields a mixture of organometallic products in which the thiophene ligand has undergone C-S bond cleavage. Products have been identified that contain an S-bound 1-butene-1-thiolate ligand, an [eta][sup 3]-allyl bound 1-butene-1-thiolate ligand, an ethylthioketene ligand and an S-bound 1-butanethiolate ligand, all of which represent the first such homogeneous transformations of thiophene. The photochemical ligand exchange reactions and the observed H/D exchange catalysis (between a deuterated solvent and a protio substrate) of CpReH[sub 2](PPh[sub 3])[sub 2] have been studied in detail.

Rosini, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Novel Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

We have been investigating three primary areas related to lithium ion battery electrolytes. First, we have been investigating the thermal stability of novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, in particular borate based salts. Second, we have been investigating novel additives to improve the calendar life of lithium ion batteries. Third, we have been investigating the thermal decomposition reactions of electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

Lucht, Brett L

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Polymer Brushes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DOLAN, A.K., EFFECT OF EXCLUDED VOLUME ON POLYMER DISPERSANT ACTION, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON SERIES...prop-erties of a tagged subset of chain units. One example is the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies by Blum and co-workers...

S. T. MILNER

1991-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S; Niemann, Michael U; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

214

ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

215

Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions  

SciTech Connect

Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. • Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. • Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

Kobayashi, Yoji [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Li, Zhaofei [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hirai, Kei [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tassel, Cédric [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8302 (Japan); Loyer, François [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226 Université de Rennes 1-CNRS, équipe CSM, Bât. 10B, Campus de Beaulieu, 263, Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Ichikawa, Noriya [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Abe, Naoyuki [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takafumi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Shimakawa, Yuichi [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); and others

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fabrication methods for low impedance lithium polymer electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for fabricating an electrolyte-electrode composite suitable for high energy alkali metal battery that includes mixing composite electrode materials with excess liquid, such as ethylene carbonate or propylene carbonate, to produce an initial formulation, and forming a shaped electrode therefrom. The excess liquid is then removed from the electrode to compact the electrode composite which can be further compacted by compression. The resulting electrode exhibits at least a 75% lower resistance.

Chern, Terry Song-Hsing (Midlothian, VA); MacFadden, Kenneth Orville (Highland, MD); Johnson, Steven Lloyd (Arbutus, MD)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fabrication methods for low impedance lithium polymer electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for fabricating an electrolyte-electrode composite suitable for high energy alkali metal battery that includes mixing composite electrode materials with excess liquid, such as ethylene carbonate or propylene carbonate, to produce an initial formulation, and forming a shaped electrode therefrom. The excess liquid is then removed from the electrode to compact the electrode composite which can be further compacted by compression. The resulting electrode exhibits at least a 75% lower resistance.

Chern, T.S.; MacFadden, K.O.; Johnson, S.L.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

219

Development of Polymer Electrolytes for Advanced Lithium Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cycle life * Partners: * ANL, ALS (at LBNL) and NCEM (at LBNL) Objectives * A) Develop cost-effective method for creating nanoporous separators. * B) Study the effect of...

220

Polymer Electrolytes for High Energy Density Lithium Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrolyte Channels 10 nm For ion conduction Li cathode Hard matrix For mechanical support Dendrite (1 m) Decouple the mechanical and electrical properties...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a ceramic-ceramic composite electrolyte is provided containing lithium nitride and lithium phosphate. The ceramic-ceramic composite is also preferably annealed and exhibits an activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

Kumar, Binod (Dayton, OH); Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G. (Fairborn, OH)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kg/m3) ! ef excess capacity of lithium foil ! rcn density ofU I read * ef ! excess capacity of lithium foil read * rcn !lx,f6.3,' ef, excess capacity of lithium foil' &/lx,f6.1,'

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Kim, Jaekook (Naperville, IL)

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Significant influence of insufficient lithium on electrochemical performance of lithium-rich layered oxide cathodes for lithium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With an aim to broaden the understanding of the factors that govern electrochemical performance of lithium-rich layered oxide, the influences of insufficient lithium on reversible capacity, cyclic stability and rate capability of the oxide as cathode of lithium ion battery are investigated in this study. Various concentrations of lithium precursor are introduced to synthesize a target composition Li[Li0.13Ni0.30Ni0.57]O2, and the resulting products are characterized with inductively coupled plasma spectrum, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. The results indicate that the lithium content in the resulting oxide decreases with reducing the concentration of lithium precursor from 10wt%-excess lithium to stoichiometric lithium, due to insufficient compensation for lithium volatilization during synthesis process at high temperature. However, all these oxides still exhibit typically structural and electrochemical characteristics of lithium-rich layered oxides. Interestingly, with decreasing the Li content in the oxide, its reversible capacity increases due to relatively higher content of active transition-metal ions, while the cyclic stability degrades severely because of structural instability induced by higher content of Mn3+ ions and deeper lithium extraction.

Xingde Xiang; Weishan Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Thin-film Lithium Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin-Film Battery with Lithium Anode Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division Thin-Film Lithium Batteries Resources with Additional Information The Department of Energy's 'Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed high-performance thin-film lithium batteries for a variety of technological applications. These batteries have high energy densities, can be recharged thousands of times, and are only 10 microns thick. They can be made in essentially any size and shape. Recently, Teledyne licensed this technology from ORNL to make batteries for medical devices including electrocardiographs. In addition, new "textured" cathodes have been developed which have greatly increased the peak current capability of the batteries. This greatly expands the potential medical uses of the batteries, including transdermal applications for heart regulation.'

227

Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Thin film rechargeable lithium batteries using ceramic electrolyte and cathode materials have been fabricated by physical deposition techniques. The lithium phosphorous oxynitride electrolyte has exceptional electrochemical stability and a good lithium conductivity. The lithium insertion reaction of several different intercalation materials, amorphous V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, amorphous LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and crystalline LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} films, have been investigated using the completed cathode/electrolyte/lithium thin film battery.

Dudney, N. J.; Bates, J. B.; Lubben, D.

1995-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

228

Conductive Polymers  

SciTech Connect

Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

Bohnert, G.W.

2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

Imaging Lithium Air Electrodes | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Imaging Reveals Lithium Distribution in Lithium-Air Electrodes Neutron Imaging Reveals Lithium Distribution in Lithium-Air Electrodes Agatha Bardoel - January 01, 2013 Image produced by neutron-computed tomography. The next step in revolutionizing electric vehicle capacity Research Contacts: Hassina Bilheux, Jagjit Nanda, and S. Pannala Using neutron-computed tomography, researchers at the CG-1D neutron imaging instrument at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have successfully mapped the three-dimensional spatial distribution of lithium products in electrochemically discharged lithium-air cathodes. Lithium-air chemistry promises very high-energy density that, if successful, would revolutionize the world of electric vehicles by extending their range to 500 miles or more. The high-energy density comes from

230

Solid solution lithium alloy cermet anodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal-ceramic composite ("cermet") has been produced by a chemical reaction between a lithium compound and another metal. The cermet has advantageous physical properties, high surface area relative to lithium metal or its alloys, and is easily formed into a desired shape. An example is the formation of a lithium-magnesium nitride cermet by reaction of lithium nitride with magnesium. The reaction results in magnesium nitride grains coated with a layer of lithium. The nitride is inert when used in a battery. It supports the metal in a high surface area form, while stabilizing the electrode with respect to dendrite formation. By using an excess of magnesium metal in the reaction process, a cermet of magnesium nitride is produced, coated with a lithium-magnesium alloy of any desired composition. This alloy inhibits dendrite formation by causing lithium deposited on its surface to diffuse under a chemical potential into the bulk of the alloy.

Richardson, Thomas J.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hydride embrittlement in ZIRCALOY-4 plate; Part 1: Influence of microstructure on the hydride embrittlement in ZIRCALOY-4 at 20[degree]C and 350[degree]C  

SciTech Connect

The hydride embrittlement in ZIRCALOY-4 was studied at room temperature and 350 C. Sheet tensile specimens of two fabrication routes in the stress-relieved, recrystallized, and [beta]-treated states were hydrided with or without tensile stress. It was found generally that the effect on strength of increasing hydrogen content was not important. However, for the tensile tests at room temperature, there is a ductile-brittle transition when the hydrogen content is higher than a certain threshold. The prior thermomechanical treatment shifts this transition considerably. In situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests, fractography, and fracture profile observations were carried out to determine the fracture micromechanisms and the microscopic processes. At 20 C, the fracture surfaces are characterized by voids and secondary cracks for low and medium hydrogen contents and by intergranular cracks and decohesion through the continuous hydride network for high hydrogen contents. This phenomenon disappears at 350 C, and the hydrogen seems to exert no more influence on the fracture micromechanism even for very high hydrogen contents (up to 1,500 wt ppm). A full-coverage model is proposed to estimate the critical hydrogen content that makes ZIRCALOY-4 totally brittle. The effect of microstructure on hydride embrittlement in different metallurgical states is thus explained according to the modeling. Special attention is devoted to relating the micromechanisms and the modeling in order to propose the possible measures needed to limit the hydride embrittlement effect.

Bai, J.B.; Prioul, C.; Francois, D. (Ecole Centrale Paris, Chatenay-Malabry (France))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Mechanism of Ion Transport in Solid Polymer Electrolytes Dr. Janna K. Maranas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. of Chemical Engineering, Penn State College of Engineering Lithium ion batteries used in cell phonesMechanism of Ion Transport in Solid Polymer Electrolytes Dr. Janna K. Maranas Associate Professor Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Penn State College of Engineering Kan-Ju Lin Ph.D. Candidate, Dept

Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

233

Model for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel Claddings: A Status Report on Current Model Capabilities Model for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel Claddings: A Status Report on Current Model Capabilities The report demonstrates a meso-scale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride precipitation in the cladding of used fuels during long-term dry-storage. While the Zr-based claddings (regarded as a barrier for containment of radioactive fission products and fuel) are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service in the reactor. The amount of hydrogen that the cladding picks up is primarily a function of the exact chemistry and microstructure of the claddings and reactor operating conditions, time-temperature history, and

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium hydrides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicine 26 KV-tOOJHfe Metallurgy Department Summary: .3. Developaent of a Hydride Based Fuel Cell 32 4.4. Materials Research for Fuel Cell Application .. 33 4.5. Thin... . The...

235

Laves phase hydrogen storage alloys for super-high-pressure metal hydride hydrogen compressors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ti-Cr- and Ti-Mn-based alloys were prepared to be low- and high-pressure stage metals for a double-stage super-high-pressure metal hydride hydrogen compressor. Their crystallographic characteristics and hydrogen

Xiumei Guo; Shumao Wang; Xiaopeng Liu; Zhinian Li; Fang Lü; Jing Mi; Lei Hao…

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Safe Use of Sodium Hydride on Scale: The Process Development of a Chloropyrimidine Displacement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Safe Use of Sodium Hydride on Scale: The Process Development of a Chloropyrimidine Displacement ... Global Pharmaceutical Commercialization, Merck Manufacturing Division, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065 ... This article is part of the Safety of Chemical Processes 11 special issue. ...

Jamie M. McCabe Dunn; Alicia Duran-Capece; Brendan Meehan; James Ulis; Tetsuo Iwama; Guy Gloor; George Wong; Evan Bekos

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Structure of the novel ternary hydrides Li4Tt2D (Tt = Si and Ge)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structures of novel Li4Tt2D (Tt = Si and Ge) ternary hydrides were solved using neutron powder diffraction data. All hydrogen atoms were found to occupy Li6-octahedral interstices.

Wu, H.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Formation and Characterization of Hydride Blisters in Zircaloy-4 Cladding Tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a CANDU Zircaloy-2 pressure tube along an array of hydride blisters on the external surface is the material that replaced Zircaloy-2 alloy for pressure tubes in the CANDU reactors. In all these studies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

239

Transparent lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...computers). Typically, a battery is composed of electrode...nanotubes (5, 7), graphene (11), and organic...is not suitable for batteries, because, to our knowledge...production of 30-inch graphene films for transparent electrodes...rechargeable lithium batteries . Nature 414 : 359 – 367...

Yuan Yang; Sangmoo Jeong; Liangbing Hu; Hui Wu; Seok Woo Lee; Yi Cui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Photogeneration of Hydride Donors and Their Use Toward CO2 Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Despite substantial effort, no one has succeeded in efficiently producing methanol from CO2 using homogeneous photocatalytic systems. We are pursuing reaction schemes based on a sequence of hydride-ion transfers to carry out stepwise reduction of CO2 to methanol. We are using hydride-ion transfer from photoproduced C-H bonds in metal complexes with bio-inspired ligands (i.e., NADH-like ligands) that are known to store one proton and two electrons.

Fujita,E.; Muckerman, J.T.; Polyansky, D.E.

2009-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Viscosity of polymer solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity of polymer solutions ... Abstracts for Volume 5A, Number 2. This program contains three components: "Density of Liquids", "Viscosity of Liquids", and "Viscosity of Polymer Solutions". ...

Gary L. Bertrand

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities  

SciTech Connect

Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

\\{WS8e4\\} - EFFECT OF HYDRIDES ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ZIRCALOY-4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT In order to better understand the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 by hydrides and the ductile-brittle transition on this alloy, Zircaloy-4 sheet tensile specimens in the stress-relieved, recrystallized and ? treated states were hydrided (10 to 1500 ppm wt H) and then tested at two temperatures (20°C, 350°C). Metallographic and fractographic analyses were carried out to determine the fracture micro-mechanisms. The results showed that, at 20°C, Zircaloy-4 undergoes a significant ductile to brittle transition for high hydrogen contents. Heat treatment shifts this transition (to zero elongation) considerably, from 1050 ppm wt H for the stress-relieved state to less than 250 ppm wt H for the ? treated state. However, at 350°C, Zircaloy-4 remains ductile up to hydrogen content higher than 1100 ppm wt. At 20°C, the fracture surfaces are characterized by voids and secondary cracks for low and medium hydrogen contents, and by intergranular crack and decohesion through the continuous hydride network for high hydrogen content. A model based on image analysis and hydride embrittlement micro-mechanism observations is used to calculate the upper-limit hydrogen content which makes Zircaloy-4 totally brittle. The difference between the mechanical behaviors of stress-relieved and recrystallized states is also explained. KEYWORDS Zircaloy-4, hydride embrittlement, ductile-brittle transition, cracked-hydride voids.

J.B. BAI; C. PRIOUL; D. FRANÇOIS

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Fracture of Hydrided Zircaloy-4 Sheet under Through-Thickness Crack Growth Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The failure of thin-wall components such as fuel cladding may be caused by crack initiation on the component surface and subsequent crack growth through its thickness. This study has determined the fracture toughness of hydrided cold-worked stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet subject to through-thickness crack growth at 25 deg. C. The experimental approach utilizes a novel procedure in which a narrow linear strip of brittle hydride blister across the specimen width creates a well-defined pre-crack upon initial loading. The subsequent crack growth resistance is then characterized by four-point bending of the specimen and an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. At room temperature, the through-thickness fracture toughness (K{sub Q}) is sensitive to the orientation of the hydride platelets, and K{sub Q} {approx_equal} 25 MPavm for crack growth through a mixed in-plane/out-of-plane hydride field. In contrast, K{sub Q} is much higher ({approx_equal} 75 MPavm) when the hydride platelets are oriented predominantly in the plane of the sheet (and therefore normal to both the crack plane and the crack growth direction). The implication of these fracture toughness values to the fracture strain behavior of hydrided Zircaloy-4 under through-thickness crack growth conditions is illustrated. (authors)

Raynaud, P.A.; Koss, D.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Motta, A.T. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chan, K.S. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development of a lithium hydride powered hydrogen generator for use in long life, low power PEM fuel cell power supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies a hybrid PEM fuel cell system for use in low power, long life sensor networks. PEM fuel cells offer high efficiency and environmental friendliness but have not been widely adopted due to cost, reliability, ...

Strawser, Daniel DeWitt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Synthesis and structural properties of lithium titanium oxide powder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, lithium titanium oxide material has gained renewed interest in electrodes for lithium ion rechargeable batteries. We investigated the influence of excess Li on the structural characteristics of lithium ...

Soo Ho Kim; Kwang Hoon Lee; Baek Seok Seong…

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

High purity lithium iron phosphate/carbon composites prepared by using secondary lithium source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Various lithium salts including lithium carbonate, lithium hydroxide, lithium acetate and lithium citrate were used as secondary lithium sources for the synthesis of lithium iron phosphate/carbon composites with cheap iron sources in the form of Fe and FePO4. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and constant-current charge–discharge tests. The results showed that lithium carbonate derived product generated a high purity LiFePO4 phase with high tap densities. Furthermore, satisfactory electrochemical performance with an initial discharge capacity of 146.1 mAh g? 1 at 0.5 C rate and good capacity retention of 95.2% after 50 cycles were achieved.

Jinhan Yao; Xiaohui Wang; Pinjie Zhang; Jianbo Wang; Jian Xie; Kondo-Francois Aguey-Zinsou; Chun'An Ma; Lianbang Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Lithium borate cluster salts as novel redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium-ion cells.  

SciTech Connect

Redox shuttle is a promising mechanism for intrinsic overcharge protection in lithium-ion cells and batteries. Two lithium borate cluster salts are reported to function as both the main salt for a nonaqueous electrolyte and the redox shuttle for overcharge protection. Lithium borate cluster salts with a tunable redox potential are promising candidates for overcharge protection for most positive electrodes in state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells.

Chen, Z.; Liu, J.; Jansen, A. N.; Casteel, B.; Amine, K.; GirishKumar, G.; Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity  

SciTech Connect

The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ? 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ? 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space between alkaline metal hydrides (AmH), Alkaline earth metal hydrides (AeH2), alane (AlH3), transition metal (Tm) hydrides (TmHz, where z=1-3) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The effort started first with variations of known alanates and subsequently extended the search to unknown compounds. In this stage, the FPM techniques were developed and validated on known alanate materials such as NaAlH4 and Na2LiAlH6. The coupled predictive methodologies were used to survey over 200 proposed phases in six quaternary spaces, formed from various combinations of Na, Li Mg and/or Ti with Al and H. A wide range of alanate compounds was examined using SSP having additions of Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe. A number of compositions and reaction paths were identified having H weight fractions up to 5.6 wt %, but none meeting the 7.5 wt%H reversible goal. Similarly, MSP of alanates produced a number of interesting compounds and general conclusions regarding reaction behavior of mixtures during processing, but no alanate based candidates meeting the 7.5 wt% goal. A novel alanate, LiMg(AlH4)3, was synthesized using SBP that demonstrated a 7.0 wt% capacity with a desorption temperature of 150°C. The deuteride form was synthesized and characterized by the Institute for Energy (IFE) in Norway to determine its crystalline structure for related FPM studies. However, the reaction exhibited exothermicity and therefore was not reversible under acceptable hydrogen gas pressures for on-board recharging. After the extensive studies of alanates, the material class of emphasis was shifted to borohydrides. Through SBP, several ligand-stabilized Mg(BH4)2 complexes were synthesized. The Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 complex was found to change behavior with slightly different synthesis conditions and/or aging. One of the two mechanisms was an amine-borane (NH3BH3) like dissociation reaction which released up to 16 wt %H and more conservatively 9 wt%H when not including H2 released from the NH3. From FPM, the stability of the Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 compound was found to increase with the inclusion of NH3 groups in the inner-Mg coordination

Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

250

Lithium Metal Oxide Electrodes For Lithium Cells And Batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Kim, Jaekook (Naperville, IL)

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Oakbrook, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

252

Documentation of Hybrid Hydride Model for Incorporation into Moose-Bison and Validation Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride ?-ZrH1.5 precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. In this work, a model to numerically simulate hydride precipitation at the microstructural scale, in a wide variety of Zr-based claddings, under dry-storage conditions is being developed. It will be used to aid in the evaluation of the mechanical integrity of used fuel rods during dry storage and transportation by providing the structural conditions from the microstructural scale to the continuum scale to engineering component scale models to predict if the used fuel rods will perform without failure under normal and off-normal conditions. The microstructure, especially, the hydride structure is thought to be a primary determinant of cladding failure, thus this component of UFD’s storage and transportation analysis program is critical. The model development, application and validation of the model are documented and the limitations of the current model are discussed. The model has been shown to simulate hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding with correct morphology, thermodynamics and kinetics. An unexpected insight obtained from simulations hydride formation in Zircaloy-4 is that small (sub-micron) precipitates need to order themselves to form the larger hydrides typically described as radially-reoriented precipitates. A limitation of this model is that it does not currently solve the stress state that forms dynamically in the precipitate or matrix surrounding the precipitate. A method to overcome the limitations is suggested and described in detail. The necessary experiments to provide key materials physics and to validate the model are also recommended.

Veena Tikare; Philippe Weck; Peter Schultz; Blythe Clark; John Mitchell; Michael Glazoff; Eric Homer

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications Presentation given by...

254

Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

255

Electrolytes - R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial Behavior of Electrolytes Electrolytes - R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial Behavior of Electrolytes 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

256

Manipulating the Surface Reactions in Lithium Sulfur Batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manipulating the Surface Reactions in Lithium Sulfur Batteries Using Hybrid Anode Structures. Manipulating the Surface Reactions in Lithium Sulfur Batteries Using Hybrid Anode...

257

Interface Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium Ion Batteries. Interface Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract: Li-rich, Mn-rich...

258

Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. Abstract: Functionalized graphene sheets (FGS)...

259

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective...

260

Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials 2013 DOE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

15eswise2012p.pdf More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte...

262

Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...

263

Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

15eswise2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte...

264

New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt concentration polarization New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt concentration polarization...

265

Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition via Self-Healing Electrostatic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrostatic Shield Mechanism . Abstract: Lithium metal batteries are called the “holy grail” of energy storage systems. However, lithium dendrite growth in these...

266

Effects of Carbonate Solvents and Lithium Salts on Morphology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency of Lithium Electrode. Abstract: The application of lithium (Li) metal anode in rechargeable batteries is hindered by Li dendrite growth during Li deposition and...

267

High-capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes. High-capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes. Abstract: A substantial effort worldwide has been...

268

5th International Conference on Polymer Batteries and Fuel Cells - PBFC-5 -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Conference Goals Organizers Sponsors Speakers Program Posters Registration Hotels Breakfast/Dinner Options Maps and Transportation to Argonne Bus Schedule Contact Us Chicago skyline Battery research Argonne APS 5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON POLYMER BATTERIES AND FUEL CELLS (PBFC-5) PBFC 2011 August 1 - 5, 2011 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois USA About the Conference It is a great pleasure for the organizing committee of the 5th International Conference on Polymer Batteries and Fuel Cells (PBFC-5, PBFC-2011) to invite all who are interested in materials for and systems based on lithium polymer, lithium-ion, metal-air, and flow batteries, and proton-exchange membrane and alkaline-exchange membrane fuel cells to attend PBFC-5. Read more.

269

Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable lithium metal batteries have much higher energy density than those of lithium ion batteries using graphite anode. Unfortunately, uncontrollable dendritic lithium growth inherent in these batteries (upon repeated charge/discharge cycling) and limited Coulombic efficiency during lithium deposition/striping has prevented their practical application over the past 40 years. With the emerging of post Li-ion batteries, safe and efficient operation of lithium metal anode has become an enabling technology which may determine the fate of several promising candidates for the next generation of energy storage systems, including rechargeable Li-air battery, Li-S battery, and Li metal battery which utilize lithium intercalation compounds as cathode. In this work, various factors which affect the morphology and Coulombic efficiency of lithium anode will be analyzed. Technologies used to characterize the morphology of lithium deposition and the results obtained by modeling of lithium dendrite growth will also be reviewed. At last, recent development in this filed and urgent need in this field will also be discussed.

Xu, Wu; Wang, Jiulin; Ding, Fei; Chen, Xilin; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Block copolymer electrolytes for lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

connecting to the solid-state lithium battery. c. An opticalbattery (discounting packaging, tabs, etc. ) demonstrate the advantage of the solid-state

Hudson, William Rodgers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

LITHIUM-BASED ELECTROCHROMIC MIRRORS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

870 870 rd Presented at the 203 Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, April 28-30, 2003 in Paris, France and published in the Proceedings. Lithium-Based Electrochromic Mirrors Thomas J. Richardson and Jonathan L. Slack Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory April 2003 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs, Office of Building Research and Standards of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. LITHIUM-BASED ELECTROCHROMIC MIRRORS Thomas J. Richardson* and Jonathan L. Slack Building Technologies Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720, USA

273

Dynamic modeling and simulation of hydrogen supply capacity from a metal hydride tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current study presents a modeling of a LaNi5 metal hydride-based hydrogen storage tank to simulate and control the dynamic processes of hydrogen discharge from a metal hydride tank in various operating conditions. The metal hydride takes a partial volume in the tank and, therefore, hydrogen discharge through the exit of the tank was driven by two factors; one factor is compressibility of pressurized gaseous hydrogen in the tank, i.e. the pressure difference between the interior and the exit of the tank makes hydrogen released. The other factor is desorption of hydrogen from the metal hydride, which is subsequently released through the tank exit. The duration of a supposed full load supply is evaluated, which depends on the initial tank pressure, the circulation water temperature, and the metal hydride volume fraction in the tank. In the high pressure regime, the duration of full load supply is increased with increasing circulation water temperature while, in the low pressure regime where the initial amount of hydrogen absorbed in the metal hydride varies sensitively with the metal hydride temperature, the duration of full load supply is increased and then decreased with increasing circulation water temperature. PID control logic was implemented in the hydrogen supply system to simulate a representative scenario of hydrogen consumption demand for a fuel cell system. The demanded hydrogen consumption rate was controlled adequately by manipulating the discharge valve of the tank at a circulation water temperature not less than a certain limit, which is increased with an increase in the tank exit pressure.

Ju-Hyeong Cho; Sang-Seok Yu; Man-Young Kim; Sang-Gyu Kang; Young-Duk Lee; Kook-Young Ahn; Hyun-Jin Ji

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Title X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50574 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Baker Farangis, Jonathan L. Slack, Ponnusamy Nachimuthu, Rupert C. C. Perera, Nobumichi Tamura, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Journal of Alloys and Compounds Volume 356-357 Start Page 204 Pagination 204-207 Date Published 08/2003 Keywords A. hydrogen storage materials, NEXAFS, thin film s; C. EXAFS, x-ray diffraction Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large changes in both reflectance and transmittance on exposure to hydrogen gas. Changes in electronic structure and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic in situ transmission mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Mg K-edge and Ni, Co, and Ti L-edge spectra reflect both reversible and irreversible changes in the metal environments. A significant shift in the nickel L absorption edge shows it to be an active participant in hydride formation. The effect on cobalt and titanium is much less dramatic, suggesting that these metals act primarily as catalysts for formation of magnesium hydride.

276

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Title Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Liu Journal Journal of the Electrochemical Society Volume 160 Start Page A849 Issue 6 Pagination A849 - A855 Date Published 01/2013 ISSN 0013-4651 Abstract Pure tin (Sn) nanoparticles can be cycled in stable and high gravimetric capacity (>500 mAh/g) with a polyfluorene-type conductive polymer binder in composite electrodes. Crystalline Sn nanoparticles (<150 nanometers, nm) were used as anode materials in this study. The average diameter of Sn secondary particles is 270 nm, calculated based on BET surface area. The composite electrodes contain a conductive polymer binder that constitutes 2% to 10% of the material, without any conductive additives (e.g., acetylene black). The electrode containing the 5% conductive binder showed the best cycling performance, with a reversible capacity of 510 mAh/g. Crystallinity of Sn particles gradually degrades during cycling, and pulverization of particles was observed after long-term cycling, leading to the capacity fade. The conductive polymer binder shows advantages over other conventional binders, such as Poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) binders, because it can provide electrical conductivity and strong adhesion during Sn volume change.

277

Nuclear quantum effects in water exchange around lithium and fluoride ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ classical and ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of nuclear quantum fluctuations on the structure and the water exchange dynamics of aqueous solutions of lithium and fluoride ions. While we obtain reasonably good agreement with experimental data for solutions of lithium by augmenting the Coulombic interactions between the ion and the water molecules with a standard Lennard-Jones ion-oxygen potential, the same is not true for solutions of fluoride, for which we find that a potential with a softer repulsive wall gives much better agreement. A small degree of destabilization of the first hydration shell is found in quantum simulations of both ions when compared with classical simulations, with the shell becoming less sharply defined and the mean residence time of the water molecules in the shell decreasing. In line with these modest differences, we find that the mechanisms of the exchange processes are unaffected by quantization, so a classical description of these reaction...

Wilkins, David M; Dang, Liem X

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Jeff Chamberlain on Lithium-air batteries  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Jeff Chamberlain, technology transfer expert at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries. More information at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/batteries090915.html

Chamberlain, Jeff

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Jeff Chamberlain on Lithium-air batteries  

SciTech Connect

Jeff Chamberlain, technology transfer expert at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries. More information at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/batteries090915.html

Chamberlain, Jeff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Discovery of pre-galactic lithium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... so these combined in nuclear reactions to make deuterium, helium-3, helium-4 and lithium-7, production of heavier elements being aborted by the absence of stable nuclei at ... other hand, is totally destroyed in matter cycled through stars, and helium-3 and lithium-7 can be both created and destroyed, so that the net effect of stellar ...

Bernard Pagel

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

URANIUM METAL POWDER PRODUCTION, PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION ANALYSIS, AND REACTION RATE STUDIES OF A HYDRIDE-DEHYDRIDE PROCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmosphere to reduce sample oxidation .................................................................................................. 13 12 Aluminum oxide crucible located at the bottom of the hydride-dehydride rig. ... 14 13 Furnace and furnace... at 60 minutes, 5psig, 250?C hydride, 325?C dehydride ................................................................................................... 30 27 Rotary kiln designed at ORNL for use in voloxidation...

Sames, William

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

calculation method and provide insights for the next step research of advanced additives. 5 Pristine Lithium uptake Lithium removal Lithium anodes - Instantaneous...

283

Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Li-Rich Layered Oxides for Lithium Batteries. Nano Lett. 13,O 2 Cathode Material in Lithium Ion Batteries. Adv. Energysolvent decomposition in lithium ion batteries: first-

Lin, Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Aliovalent titanium substitution in layered mixed Li Ni-Mn-Co oxides for lithium battery applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicates that some of the excess lithium is indeed presentneither the presence of excess lithium on 3b sites nor ansamples not containing excess lithium. To minimize kinetic

Kam, Kinson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

How should findings on antisuicidal effects of lithium be integrated into practical treatment decisions?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Beyond its prophylactic efficacy lithium has demonstrated possibly specific antisuicidal effects. Lithium significantly reduces the high excess mortality of patients with affective disorders. Appropriate lithium ...

Prof.Dr.med. B. Müller-Oerlinghausen

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - au-implanted lithium niobate Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lithium niobate crystals Summary: O-doped lithium niobate crystals C. L. Sonesa Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton... lithium niobate crystals induced by...

287

Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development : palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests.  

SciTech Connect

We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom (Savannah River National Labs, Aiken, SC)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducting polymer electrochromic devices using ionicelectrochemical cells and electrochromic devices, including

Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz, John; Newman, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Doubly Excited States in Lithium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Doubly and triply excited states of lithium are considered in an effort to identify the energy levels responsible for the several narrow lines present in the optical spectrum of that element which are not classifiable in the normal singly excited spectra of that atom. Since most of these states are coupled to continuum states through the electrostatic interaction of the electrons and will thus have extremely short lifetimes, a majority of the multiply excited states can be excluded from consideration in identifying these narrow lines. The observed narrow spectral lines can be plasuibly identified on the basis of screening-theory estimates of the energies.

J. D. Garcia and J. E. Mack

1965-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Method and composition in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a silica network  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A silica embedded metal hydride composition and a method for making such a composition. The composition is made via the following process: A quantity of fumed silica is blended with water to make a paste. After adding metal hydride particles, the paste is dried to form a solid. According to one embodiment of the invention, the solid is ground into granules for use of the product in hydrogen storage. Alternatively, the paste can be molded into plates or cylinders and then dried for use of the product as a hydrogen filter. Where mechanical strength is required, the paste can be impregnated in a porous substrate or wire network.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Nanoporous polymer electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nanoporous polymer electrolyte and methods for making the polymer electrolyte are disclosed. The polymer electrolyte comprises a crosslinked self-assembly of a polymerizable salt surfactant, wherein the crosslinked self-assembly includes nanopores and wherein the crosslinked self-assembly has a conductivity of at least 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 S/cm at 25.degree. C. The method of making a polymer electrolyte comprises providing a polymerizable salt surfactant. The method further comprises crosslinking the polymerizable salt surfactant to form a nanoporous polymer electrolyte.

Elliott, Brian (Wheat Ridge, CO); Nguyen, Vinh (Wheat Ridge, CO)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Material Change: Bringing Lithium Production Back to America | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Material Change: Bringing Lithium Production Back to America A Material Change: Bringing Lithium Production Back to America A Material Change: Bringing Lithium Production Back to America June 29, 2012 - 5:34pm Addthis The Rockwood Lithium manufacturing facility in Kings Mountain, North Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Rockwood Lithium. The Rockwood Lithium manufacturing facility in Kings Mountain, North Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Rockwood Lithium. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Between 1980 and 2009, the global demand for lithium has tripled. This metal is a key material in a number of growing industries -- including advanced vehicle batteries and consumer electronics. But more specifically, lithium-ion batteries are a vital component in electric vehicles and other rechargeable batteries for consumer electronics, and are used to produce

293

Lithium-cation conductivity and crystal structure of lithium diphosphate  

SciTech Connect

The electrical conductivity of lithium diphosphate Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been measured and jump-like increasing of ionic conductivity at 913 K has been found. The crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction at 300–1050 K. At 913 K low temperature triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.8261(4) Å, b=5.2028(4) Å, c=13.3119(2) Å, ?=104.372(6)°. The migration maps of Li{sup +} cations based on experimental data implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. It was found that lithium cations in both low- and high temperature forms of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} migrate in three dimensions. Cross sections of the migrations channels extend as the temperature rises, but at the phase transition point have a sharp growth showing a strong “crystal structure – ion conductivity” correlation. -- Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} at 950 K. Red balls represent oxygen atoms; black lines show Li{sup +} ion migration channels in the layers perpendicular to [001] direction. Highlights: • Structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction. • At 913 K triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one. • The migration maps of Li{sup +} implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. • Cross sections of the migrations channels at the phase transition have a sharp growth.

Voronin, V.I., E-mail: voronin@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics Urals Branch RAS, S.Kovalevskoy Street 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sherstobitova, E.A. [Institute of Metal Physics Urals Branch RAS, S.Kovalevskoy Street 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Blatov, V.A., E-mail: blatov@samsu.ru [Samara Center for Theoretical Materials Science (SCTMS), Samara State University, Ac.Pavlov Street 1, 443011 Samara (Russian Federation); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Shekhtman, G.Sh., E-mail: shekhtman@ihte.uran.ru [Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry Urals Branch RAS, Akademicheskaya 20, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Saft Lithium — Silver Chromate Battery Performances of the LI 210 Type  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After being involved in lithium power sources research since 1964, SAFT perfected in 1970 a new couple: lithium...

G. Lehmann; M. Broussely; P. Lenfant

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The influence of hydride blisters on the fracture of Zircaloy-4 O.N. Pierron a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.elsevier.com/locate/jnucmat Journal of Nuclear Materials 322 (2003) 21­35 #12;hydrogen embrittlement [15]. Such an effect becomes, and radiation damage [1]. As the cladding undergoes oxidation with the associated hydrogen pickup, the total amount of hydrogen increases, and hydride precipitates form pref- erentially near the outer (cooler

Motta, Arthur T.

296

Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickel-metal hydride batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickel-metal hydride batteries Peyman Taheri in batteries with orthotropic thermal conductivities, where the heat generation is due to irreversible of the battery thermal behavior with modest numerical effort. The accuracy of the proposed model is tested

Bahrami, Majid

297

Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickelemetal hydride batteries during fast charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickelemetal hydride batteries during fast to investigate transient thermal behavior of NiMH batteries. The thermal model uses integral transformation 2013 Available online 25 June 2013 Keywords: Battery thermal management Battery thermal model Fast

Bahrami, Majid

298

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films T. J. Richardsona@lbl.gov Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic

299

Project Profile: Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, is collaborating with Curtin University (CU) to evaluate new metal hydride materials for thermal energy storage (TES) that meet the SunShot cost and performance targets for TES systems.

300

Observations of proton beam enhancement due to erbium hydride on gold foil targets  

SciTech Connect

Recent theoretical work suggests that the conversion efficiency from laser to protons in laser irradiated thin foil experiments increases if the atomic mass of nonhydrogen atoms on the foil rear surface increases. Experiments were performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility to observe the effect of thin foils coated with erbium hydride on the conversion efficiency from laser to protons. Gold foils with and without the rear surface coated with ErH{sub 3} were irradiated using the ultrashort pulse, 40 TW Callisto laser. An argon-ion etching system was used to remove naturally occurring nanometer thick surface layer contaminants from the hydride. With the etcher, gold with ErH{sub 3} showed a 25% increase in the conversion efficiency to protons above 3.4 MeV relative to contaminants, where C{sup +4} and H{sup +} were the dominant ion species. No difference in the ion signal was observed without first cleaning the hydrides. Simulations using the hybrid PIC code, LSP, revealed that the increase due to erbium hydride versus contaminants is 37% for protons above 3 MeV.

Offermann, D. T.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Freeman, R. R. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Applied Science, University of California Davis, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Foord, M. E.; Hey, D.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Sanchez, J. J.; Shen, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Espada, L. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Chen, C. D. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

First Principles Studies of Phase Stability and Reaction Dynamics in Complex Metal Hydrides  

SciTech Connect

Complex metal hydrides are believed to be one of the most promising materials for developing hydrogen storage systems that can operate under desirable conditions. At the same time, these are also a class of materials that exhibit intriguing properties. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to study the fundamental properties of these materials.

Chou, Mei-Yin

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage Darlene K. Slattery and Michael D. Hampton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at a temperature of less than 100 o C in order to be compatible with fuel cells and must have an installed hydrogen have reported the discovery of a number of catalysts that improve the reversing of the hydrogen release the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of sodium aluminum hydride. Mechanical incorporation of the catalyst

303

Evaluation of Protected Metal Hydride Slurries in a H2 Mini-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Protected Metal Hydride Slurries in a H2 Mini- Grid TIAX, LLC Acorn Park Cambridge_MERIT_REVIEW_MAY2003 2 Introduction Hydrogen Mini-Grid Concept Distributed FCPS utilizing a H2 Mini-Grid can provide waste heat can be used for hot water or space heating in buildings (i.e. "cogen") Distributed FCPS

304

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

305

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

306

Argonne Transportation - Lithium Battery Technology Patents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awarded Lithium Battery Technology Patents Awarded Lithium Battery Technology Patents "Composite-structure" material is a promising battery electrode for electric vehicles Argonne National Laboratory has been granted two U.S. patents (U.S. Pat. 6,677,082 and U.S. Pat. 6,680,143) on new "composite-structure" electrode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Electrode compositions of this type are receiving worldwide attention. Such electrodes offer superior cost and safety features over state-of-the-art LiCoO2 electrodes that power conventional lithium-ion batteries. Moreover, they demonstrate outstanding cycling stability and can be charged and discharged at high rates, making them excellent candidates to replace LiCoO2 for consumer electronic applications and hybrid electric vehicles.

307

Rotation, inflation, and lithium in the Pleiades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapidly rotating cool dwarfs of the Pleiades are rich in lithium relative to their slowly rotating counterparts. Motivated by observations of inflated radii in young, active stars, and by calculations showing that radius inflation inhibits pre-main sequence (pre-MS) Li destruction, we test whether this pattern could arise from a connection between stellar rotation rate and radius inflation on the pre-MS. We demonstrate that pre-MS radius inflation can efficiently suppress lithium destruction by rotationally induced mixing, and that the net effect of inflation and rotational mixing is a pattern where rotation correlates with lithium abundance for $M_{*} {\\rm M}_{\\odot}$, similar to the empirical trend in the Pleiades. Next, we adopt different prescriptions for the dependence of inflation on rotation, and compare their predictions to the Pleiades lithium/rotation pattern. A connection between rotation and radius inflation naturally and generically reproduces the important qualitative features of this patte...

Somers, Garrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Layered electrodes for lithium cells and batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium metal oxide compounds of nominal formula Li.sub.2MO.sub.2, in which M represents two or more positively charged metal ions, selected predominantly and preferably from the first row of transition metals are disclosed herein. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds have a layered-type structure, which can be used as positive electrodes for lithium electrochemical cells, or as a precursor for the in-situ electrochemical fabrication of LiMO.sub.2 electrodes. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds of the invention may have additional functions in lithium cells, for example, as end-of-discharge indicators, or as negative electrodes for lithium cells.

Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Kahaian, Arthur J. (Chicago, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Side Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.8 V vs. lithium suggests Tafel kinetics, but the bend in? a gives the slope of the Tafel region, k eff affects itsincreases, the slope of the Tafel region remains constant,

Tang, Maureen Han-Mei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Rechargeable Plastic Li-Ion Battery," Lithium Batteryion battery developed at Bellcore in Red Bank, NJ.1-6 The experimental prototYpe cell has the configuration: Li

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

312

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

313

Predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide (LiI) in the first excited A-state is investigated for molecules in the gas phase and embedded in helium nanodroplets, using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. In the gas phase, the transient Li+ and LiI+ ion signals feature damped oscillations due to the excitation and decay of a vibrational wave packet. Based on high-level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of LiI and simulations of the wave packet dynamics, the exponential signal decay is found to result from predissociation predominantly at the lowest avoided X-A potential curve crossing, for which we infer a coupling constant V=650(20) reciprocal cm. The lack of a pump-probe delay dependence for the case of LiI embedded in helium nanodroplets indicates fast droplet-induced relaxation of the vibrational excitation.

Schmidt, H; Stienkemeier, F; Bogomolov, A S; Baklanov, A V; Reich, D M; Skomorowski, W; Koch, C P; Mudrich, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electrode for a lithium cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a positive electrode for an electrochemical cell or battery, and to an electrochemical cell or battery; the invention relates more specifically to a positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell or battery when the electrode is used therein. The positive electrode includes a composite metal oxide containing AgV.sub.3O.sub.8 as one component and one or more other components consisting of LiV.sub.3O.sub.8, Ag.sub.2V.sub.4O.sub.11, MnO.sub.2, CF.sub.x, AgF or Ag.sub.2O to increase the energy density of the cell, optionally in the presence of silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrode and to improve the power capability of the cell or battery.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Glass for sealing lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions resistant to corrosion by lithium cell electrolyte and having an expansion coefficient of 45 to 85 x 10/sup -70/C/sup -1/ have been made with SiO/sub 2/, 25 to 55% by weight; B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 5 to 12%; Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 12 to 35%; CaO, 5 to 15%; MgO, 5 to 15%; SrO, 0 to 10%; and La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0 to 5%. Preferred compositions within that range contain 3 to 8% SrO and 0.5 to 2.5% La/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

Leedecke, C.J.

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

316

Reducing Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine Kerry Klein 1 , Linda Gaines 2 1 New West Technologies LLC, Washington, DC, USA 2 Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA KEYWORDS Mineral extraction, zinc, silica, strategic metals, Imperial Valley, lithium ion batteries, electric- drive vehicles, battery recycling ABSTRACT Following a 2009 investment of $32.9 billion in renewable energy and energy efficiency research through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, President Obama in his January 2011 State of the Union address promised deployment of one million electric vehicles by 2015 and 80% clean energy by 2035. The United States seems poised to usher in its bright energy future,

317

Sorption of lithium from a geothermal brine by pelletized mixed aluminum-lithium hydrous oxides  

SciTech Connect

An inorganic ion exchanger was evaluated by the Bureau of Mines for recovering lithium from geothermal brines. The ion exchanger or sorbent was mixed hydrous oxide of aluminum and lithium that had been dried at 100 C. The dried precipitate was pelletized with a sodium silicate binder to improve flow rates in sorption tests. The sorbent was loaded to 2 mg Li/g of pellets and sorption from the solution was independent of the concentrations of Ca, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Manganese and zinc were sorbed by the pellets but did not suppress lithium sorption. Lithium was desorbed with water, but none of the washing solutions investigated removed entrained brine without stripping lithium. The complex nature of the sorption mechanisms is discussed.

Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fabrication of carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite by sol-gel method for anode in lithium ion battery  

SciTech Connect

Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT-C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method followed by a carbonization process. Silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes (Si-CNT) nanohybrids were produced by a wet-type beadsmill method. To obtain Si-CNT nanocomposites with spherical morphologies, a silica precursor (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS) and polymer (PMMA) mixture was employed as a structure-directing medium. Thus the Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer microspheres were prepared by an acid catalyzed sol-gel method. Then a carbon precursor such as polypyrrole (PPy) was incorporated onto the surfaces of pre-existing Si-CNT/silica-polymer to generate Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer-PPy microspheres. Subsequent thermal treatment of the precursor followed by wet etching of silica produced Si-CNT-C microcapsules. The intermediate silica/polymer must disappear during the carbonization and etching process resulting in the formation of an internal free space. The carbon precursor polymer should transform to carbon shell to encapsulate remaining Si-CNT nanocomposites. Therefore, hollow carbon microcapsules containing Si-CNT nanocomposites could be obtained (Si-CNT-C). The successful fabrication was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These final materials were employed for anode performance improvement in lithium ion battery. The cyclic performances of these Si-CNT-C microcapsules were measured with a lithium battery half cell tests. - Graphical Abstract: Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT-C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method. Highlights: > Polymeric microcapsules containing Si-CNT transformed to carbon microcapsules. > Accommodate volume changes of Si NPs during Li ion charge/discharge. > Sizes of microcapsules were controlled by experimental parameters. > Lithium storage capacity and coulombic efficiency were demonstrated. > Use of sol-gel procedure as intermediate reaction.

Bae, Joonwon, E-mail: joonwonbae@gmail.com [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yong-In City 446-712, Gyeong-Gi Province (Korea, Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Direct Evidence of Lithium-Induced Atomic Ordering in Amorphous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evidence of Lithium-Induced Atomic Ordering in Amorphous TiO2 Nanotubes . Direct Evidence of Lithium-Induced Atomic Ordering in Amorphous TiO2 Nanotubes . Abstract: In this paper,...

320

Promises and Challenges of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Promises and Challenges of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition-Metal Layered-Oxide Cathodes Promises and Challenges of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition-Metal Layered-Oxide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

322

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

323

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Wednesday, 27 February 2013 00:00 Our way of life is deeply...

324

Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in Mixed MnTi Oxides. Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in Mixed MnTi Oxides. Abstract: Mixed...

325

Microplasticity and fatigue of some magnesium-lithium alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cyclic stress-strain curves have been obtained for a series of magnesium-lithium alloys with lithium contents up to 12. 5wt%. The ... hardening exponents for stresses leading to failure in excess of 104...cycles ...

R. E. Lee; W. J. D. Jones

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Lithium-ion batteries having conformal solid electrolyte layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid solid-liquid electrolyte lithium-ion battery devices are disclosed. Certain devices comprise anodes and cathodes conformally coated with an electron insulating and lithium ion conductive solid electrolyte layer.

Kim, Gi-Heon; Jung, Yoon Seok

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nature of Bridging Bonds in Lithium and Potassium Acetate Dimers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structures of lithium and potassium acetates were studied by the RHF/6-31G*...3COOLi)2 and (CH3COOK)2 are electrostatic in nature. The bridging lithium bond is intermediate between hydrogen and ionic, ... of ...

I. A. Panteleev; S. G. Semenov; D. N. Glebovskii

328

Loading of emulsions stacks with aqueous solutions of lithium acetate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been shown that thick pellicles can be loaded with lithium acetate solutions still maintaining all the desirable geometrical ... purpose of the method, that of introducing lithium atoms in the emulsion, th...

D. H. Davis; R. Levi Setti; M. Raymund; G. Tomasini

1962-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Lithium carbide is prospective material for breeder of fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that lithium carbide is a prospective material for breeder of fusion reactor. The lithium carbide equivalent dose rate reaches...?5...Sv/h) one minute after the irradiation with fusion reactor neutron...

M. V. Alenina; V. P. Kolotov; Yu. M. Platov

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Electrolytes - R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Electrolytes - R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial Behavior of Electrolytes Interfacial Behavior of Electrolytes...

331

Methods for making lithium vanadium oxide electrode materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making vanadium oxide formulations is presented. In one method of preparing lithium vanadium oxide for use as an electrode material, the method involves: admixing a particulate form of a lithium compound and a particulate form of a vanadium compound; jet milling the particulate admixture of the lithium and vanadium compounds; and heating the jet milled particulate admixture at a temperature below the melting temperature of the admixture to form lithium vanadium oxide.

Schutts, Scott M. (Menomonie, WI); Kinney, Robert J. (Woodbury, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Capture of carbon dioxide over porous solid adsorbents lithium silicate, lithium aluminate and magnesium aluminate at pre-combustion temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capturing process for carbon dioxide over porous solid adsorbents such as ... resonance (NMR), and surface area. The capturing of carbon dioxide over lithium silicate, lithium aluminate, ... as exposure time,...

P. V. Korake; A. G. Gaikwad

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Use of Lithium Hexafluoroisopropoxide as a Mild Base for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of Lithium Hexafluoroisopropoxide as a Mild Base for Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Olefination The weak base lithium 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropoxide (LiHFI) is shown to be highly effective of base-sensitive substrates, leading to the discovery that lithium 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropoxide (Li

334

RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR By SCOTT RUSSELL WAITUKAITIS A Thesis Submitted: #12;Abstract I describe a study of Faraday rotation in a hot lithium vapor. I begin by dis- cussing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3 The Lithium Oven and Solenoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Theoretical Framework

Cronin, Alex D.

335

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBXM 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBX­M 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University; OUTLINE 1. Mini­conference on Lithium walls and low recycling regime. 2. PBX­M Capabilities. 3. Motivation "Lithium covered walls and low recycling regimes in toka­ maks". APS meeting, October 23­27, 2000, Quebec

Zakharov, Leonid E.

336

Mechanism of Acylation of Lithium Phenylacetylide with a Weinreb Amide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the excess lithium acetylide and a 1:3 (alkox- ide-rich) mixed tetramer. The stabilities of the mixedMechanism of Acylation of Lithium Phenylacetylide with a Weinreb Amide Bo Qu and David B. CollumVersity, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 dbc6@cornell.edu ReceiVed June 14, 2006 Additions of lithium phenylacetylide

Collum, David B.

337

Lithium Ion Batteries DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103163  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Ion Batteries DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103163 LiMn1Ã?xFexPO4 Nanorods Grown on Graphene Sheets for Ultrahigh- Rate-Performance Lithium Ion Batteries** Hailiang Wang, Yuan Yang, Yongye Liang, Li-Feng Cui cathode materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries (LIBs) owing to their high capacity, excellent

Cui, Yi

338

Mechanical Properties of Lithium-Ion Battery Separator Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical Properties of Lithium-Ion Battery Separator Materials Patrick Sinko B.S. Materials Science and Engineering 2013, Virginia Tech John Cannarella PhD. Candidate Mechanical and Aerospace and motivation ­ Why study lithium-ion batteries? ­ Lithium-ion battery fundamentals ­ Why study the mechanical

Petta, Jason

339

Lithium intercalated graphite : experimental Compton profile for stage one  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-301 Lithium intercalated graphite : experimental Compton profile for stage one G. Loupias, J différence des profils Compton est compatible avec un transfert total de l'électron de conduction du lithium électronique due à l'insertion. Abstract. 2014 Electron momentum distribution of the first stage lithium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Lithium Niobate Devices in Switching and Multiplexing [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

28 September 1989 research-article Lithium Niobate Devices in Switching and Multiplexing...Thylen Integrated-optics devices in lithium niobate have reached a significant maturity...in fibre-optic transmission systems, lithium niobate devices currently offer the only...

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

LITHIUM--2002 46.1 By Joyce A. Ober  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recycling operation in Trail, British Columbia, Canada. Another ToxCo subsidiary, Ozark Fluorine Specialties, the concentration of the brine increases through solar evaporation to 6,000 ppm lithium. When the lithium chloride carbonate production. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were important sources of lithium concentrates

342

Evaporated Lithium Surface Coatings in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: (1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; (2) suppression of ELMs; (3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; (4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges: (5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; (6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; (7) reduced SOL plasma density; and (8) reduced edge neutral density. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

Kugel, H. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Mansfield, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Bell, M. G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Allain, J. P. [Purdue University; Gates, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kallman, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaye, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Menard, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Mueller, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ono, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Paul, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle; Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ross, P. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Schneider, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Soukhanovskii, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Stevenson, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Timberlake, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wampler, W. R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Zakharov, L. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaporated Lithium Surface Coatings in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: 1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; 2) suppression of ELMs; 3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; 4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges; 5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; 6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; 7) reduced SOL plasma density; and 8) reduced edge neutral density.

Kugel, H. W.; Mansfield, D.; Maingi, R.; Bel, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Allain, J. P.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.

2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

344

Evaporated lithium surface coatings in NSTX.  

SciTech Connect

Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: (1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; (2) suppression of ELMs; (3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; (4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges; (5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; (6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; (7) reduced SOL plasma density; and (8) reduced edge neutral density.

Zakharov, L. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Gates, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Menard, J. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Maingi, R. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schneider, H. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Mueller, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Wampler, William R.; Roquemore, A. L. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kallman, Jeffrey K. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Sabbagh, S. (Columbia University, New York, NY); LeBlanc, B. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Raman, R. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Ono, M. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Wilgren, J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Allain, J.P. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Timberlake, J. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Stevenson, T. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Ross, P. W. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Majeski, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kugel, Henry W. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Skinner, C. H. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Gerhardt, S. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Paul, S. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Bell, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kaye, S. M. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kaita, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Soukhanovskii, V. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Bell, Michael G. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Mansfield, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent developments on bulk-heterojunction polymer photovoltaic diodes will be presented, focusing on the mechanism of charge generation, low bandgap polymers for increased photon...

Janssen, René

346

Nickel-Metal-Hydride Batterie--High Energy Storage for Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freedomcar & Vehicle Technologies Program Freedomcar & Vehicle Technologies Program Nickel-Metal-Hydride Batteries - High Energy Storage for Electric Vehicles Background The key to making electric vehicles (EVs) practical is the development of batteries that can provide performance comparable with that of con ventional vehicles at a similar cost. Most EV batteries have limited energy storage capabili ties, permitting only relatively short driving distances before the batteries must be recharged. In 1991, under a coopera tive agreement with The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) initiated development of nickel- metal-hydride (NiMH) battery technology and established it as a prime mid-term candidate for use in EVs. DOE funding has been instru

347

Aluminum Hydride - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Jason Graetz (Primary Contact), James Wegrzyn Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Building 815 Upton, NY 11973 Phone: (631) 344-3242 Email: graetz@bnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop onboard vehicle storage systems using aluminum hydride that meets all of DOE's targets for proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles. Produce aluminum hydride material with a hydrogen * storage capacity greater than 9.7% gravimetric (kg-H 2 /kg) and 0.13 kg-H 2 /L volumetric. Develop practical and economical processes for *

348

Pressure Acceleration of Hydride Formation on a Cobalt(I) Macrocycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Acceleration of Hydride Formation via Pressure Acceleration of Hydride Formation via Proton Binding to a Cobalt(I) Macrocycle Etsuko Fujita, James F. Wishart, and Rudi van Eldik Inorg. Chem. 41, 1579-1583 (2002) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The effect of pressure on proton binding to the racemic isomer of the cobalt(I) macrocycle, CoL+ (L = 5,7,7,12,14,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-4,11-diene), has been studied for a series of proton donors using pulse radiolysis techniques. The second-order rate constants for the reaction of CoL+ with proton donors decrease with increasing pKa of the donor acid, consistent with a reaction occurring via proton transfer. Whereas the corresponding volumes of activation (DVý) are rather small and negative for all acids (proton donors) with pKa values below 8.5, significantly larger negative

349

Magnetic moment of atomic lithium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bound-state relativistic contributions to the gJ factor of ground-state atomic lithium are calculated and compared with the experimental value gJ(Li)ge=1-(8.9±0.4)×10-6, where ge is the free-electron g factor. This comparison is taken as the basis for judging the accuracy of several different Li wave functions taken from the literature. Most of these wave functions give agreement with the experimental value within the experimental uncertainty. A more precise experimental measurement would be desirable in order to provide a more stringent test. A wave function of the restricted Hartree-Fock type, however, leads to a value which is in disagreement with the experimental value. This is attributed to the inability of the restricted Hartree-Fock function to account for the exchange polarization of the 1s2 core electrons; the latter are found to contribute about -1.2 × 10-6 to gJ(Li)ge, or about 13% of the total relativistic correction. In addition to the dominant relativistic corrections of order ?2, radiative corrections (order ?3), and nuclear-mass corrections (order ?2mM) are also calculated. An isotopic shift gJ(Li6)gJ(Li7)=1+3.0×10-11 is predicted. The experimental measurements for Li are not yet precise enough to test these higher-order corrections.

Roger A. Hegstrom

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A New Method for Quantitative Marking of Deposited Lithium via Chemical Treatment on Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Method for Quantitative Marking of Deposited Lithium via Chemical Treatment on Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Cells Yvonne Krämer*[a] , Claudia Birkenmaier[b] , Julian Feinauer[a,c] , Andreas*[e] and Thomas Schleid[f] Abstract: A novel approach for the marking of deposited lithium on graphite anodes from

Schmidt, Volker

351

Radioluminescent polymer lights  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of radioluminescent light sources where the tritium is located on the aryl-ring in a polymer has been demonstrated with deuterium/tritium substitution. This report discusses tests, results, and future applications of radioluminescent polymers. 10 refs. (FI)

Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Designer carbons as potential anodes for lithium secondary batteries  

SciTech Connect

Carbons are the material of choice for lithium secondary battery anodes. Our objective is to use designed synthesis to produce a carbon with a predictable structure. The approach is to pyrolyze aromatic hydrocarbons within a pillared clay. Results from laser desorption mass spectrometry, scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and small angle neutron scattering suggest that we have prepared disordered, porous sheets of carbon, free of heteroatoms. One of the first demonstrations of template-directed carbon formation was reported by Tomita and co-workers, where polyacrylonitrile was carbonized at 700{degrees}C yielding thin films with relatively low surface areas. More recently, Schwarz has prepared composites using polyfurfuryl alcohol and pillared clays. In the study reported here, aromatic hydrocarbons and polymers which do not contain heteroatoms are being investigated. The alumina pillars in the clay should act as acid sites to promote condensation similar to the Scholl reaction. In addition, these precursors should readily undergo thermal polymerization, such as is observed in the carbonization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.; Thiyagarajan, P. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES  

SciTech Connect

Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Systems Modeling, Simulation and Material Operating Requirements for Chemical Hydride Based Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

Research on ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) has shown it to be a promising material for chemical hydride based hydrogen storage. AB was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. A new systems concept based on augers, ballast tank, hydrogen heat exchanger and H2 burner was designed and implemented in simulation. In this design, the chemical hydride material was assumed to produce H2 on the augers itself, thus minimizing the size of ballast tank and reactor. One dimensional models based on conservation of mass, species and energy were used to predict important state variables such as reactant and product concentrations, temperatures of various components, flow rates, along with pressure, in various components of the storage system. Various subsystem components in the models were coded as C language S-functions and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. The control variable AB (or alane) flow rate was determined through a simple expression based on the ballast tank pressure, H2 demand from the fuel cell and hydrogen production from AB (or alane) in the reactor. System simulation results for solid AB, liquid AB and alane for both steady state and transient drive cycle cases indicate the usefulness of the model for further analysis and prototype development.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

GLASSY STATES OF ADSORBED FLEXIBLE POLYMERS AND SPREAD POLYMER "MONOLAYERS"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1269 GLASSY STATES OF ADSORBED FLEXIBLE POLYMERS AND SPREAD POLYMER "MONOLAYERS" K. KREMER* Exxon mechanism for the dynamics of irreversibly adsorbed polymers. We argue that glass-like states can exist near of polymer adsorbed ' ' and the thickness of the adsorbed layer 2-7. While the results of the different

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

Lithium-based Technologies | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-based Technologies Lithium-based Technologies Lithium-based Technologies Y-12's 60 years of rich lithium operational history and expertise make it the clear choice for deployment of new lithium-based technologies and capabilities. There is no other U.S. site, government or commercial, that comes close to the breadth of Y-12's lithium expertise and capabilities. The Y-12 National Security Complex supplies lithium, in unclassified forms, to customers worldwide through the DOE Office of Science, Isotope Business Office. Historically, the typical order of 6Li was only gram quantities used in research and development. However, over the past three years demand has increased steadily with typical orders of around 10-20 kg each. Such increase in demand is a direct result of the use of

358

Lithium Surface Coatings for Improved Plasma Performance in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and frequent benefits from lithium coatings applied to plasma facing components. Lithium pellet injection on NSTX introduced lithium pellets with masses 1 to 5 mg via He discharges. Lithium coatings have also been applied with an oven that directed a collimated stream of lithium vapor toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. Lithium depositions from a few mg to 1 g have been applied between discharges. Benefits from the lithium coating were sometimes, but not always seen. These improvements sometimes included decreases plasma density, inductive flux consumption, and ELM frequency, and increases in electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement and periods of MHD quiescence. In addition, reductions in lower divertor D, C, and O luminosity were measured.

Kugel, H W; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaye, S; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Draft of M2 Report on Integration of the Hybrid Hydride Model into INL’s MBM Framework for Review  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. This document demonstrates a basic hydride precipitation model that is built on a recently developed hybrid Potts-phase field model that combines elements of Potts-Monte Carlo and the phase-field models (Homer et al., 2013; Tikare and Schultz, 2012). The model capabilities are demonstrated along with the incorporation of the starting microstructure, thermodynamics of the Zr-H system and the hydride formation mechanism.

Tikare, Veena; Weck, Philippe F.; Schultz, Peter A.; Clark, Blythe; Michael Glazoff; Eric Homer

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nanostructured lithium-aluminum alloy electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.  

SciTech Connect

Electrodeposited aluminum films and template-synthesized aluminum nanorods are examined as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. The lithium-aluminum alloying reaction is observed electrochemically with cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cycling in lithium half-cells. The electrodeposition reaction is shown to have high faradaic efficiency, and electrodeposited aluminum films reach theoretical capacity for the formation of LiAl (1 Ah/g). The performance of electrodeposited aluminum films is dependent on film thickness, with thicker films exhibiting better cycling behavior. The same trend is shown for electron-beam deposited aluminum films, suggesting that aluminum film thickness is the major determinant in electrochemical performance regardless of deposition technique. Synthesis of aluminum nanorod arrays on stainless steel substrates is demonstrated using electrodeposition into anodic aluminum oxide templates followed by template dissolution. Unlike nanostructures of other lithium-alloying materials, the electrochemical performance of these aluminum nanorod arrays is worse than that of bulk aluminum.

Hudak, Nicholas S.; Huber, Dale L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Lithium pellet production (LiPP): A device for the production of small spheres of lithium  

SciTech Connect

With lithium as a fusion material gaining popularity, a method for producing lithium pellets relatively quickly has been developed for NSTX. The Lithium Pellet Production device is based on an injector with a sub-millimeter diameter orifice and relies on a jet of liquid lithium breaking apart into small spheres via the Plateau-Rayleigh instability. A prototype device is presented in this paper and for a pressure difference of {Delta}P= 5 Torr, spheres with diameters between 0.91 < D < 1.37 mm have been produced with an average diameter of D= 1.14 mm, which agrees with the developed theory. Successive tests performed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory with Wood's metal have confirmed the dependence of sphere diameter on pressure difference as predicted.

Fiflis, P.; Andrucyzk, D.; McGuire, M.; Curreli, D.; Ruzic, D. N. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

An Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Based on a Graphene Anode and a Lithium Iron Phosphate Cathode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Based on a Graphene Anode and a Lithium Iron Phosphate Cathode ... To the best of our knowledge, complete, graphene-based, lithium ion batteries having performances comparable with those offered by the present technology are rarely reported; hence, we believe that the results disclosed in this work may open up new opportunities for exploiting graphene in the lithium-ion battery science and development. ... A full Li-ion battery (Figure 4a) is obtained by coupling the Cu-supported graphene nanoflake anode with a lithium iron phosphate, LiFePO4, that is, a cathode commonly used in commercial batteries. ...

Jusef Hassoun; Francesco Bonaccorso; Marco Agostini; Marco Angelucci; Maria Grazia Betti; Roberto Cingolani; Mauro Gemmi; Carlo Mariani; Stefania Panero; Vittorio Pellegrini; Bruno Scrosati

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Muon Spin Relaxation Studies of Lithium Nitridometallate Battery Materials: Muon Trapping and Lithium Ion Diffusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Muon Spin Relaxation Studies of Lithium Nitridometallate Battery Materials: Muon Trapping and Lithium Ion Diffusion ... The muons themselves are quasi-static, most probably located in a 4h site between the [Li2N] plane and the Li(1)/Ni layer. ... The initial fall in ? results from an increase in muon hopping as the temperature is raised, while the subsequent rise originates from an increasing proportion of trapped and therefore static muons. ...

Andrew S. Powell; James S. Lord; Duncan H. Gregory; Jeremy J. Titman

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

Lithium: Will Short Supply Constrain Energy Technologies?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...developments have improved the storage capacity and lifetime...century. Utility electric storage-a projected 1000 units...parts per million are pumped to the surface, concentrated...area currently being pumped. Kunasz says that the...recovering lithium from seawater, although few geologists...

ALLEN L. HAMMOND

1976-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Nanocarbon Networks for Advanced Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

His research focuses on energy storage and conversion with batteries, fuel cells, and solar cells. ... As an important type of secondary battery, lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have quickly dominated the market for consumer electronics and become one of key technologies in the battery industry after their first release by Sony Company in the early 1990s. ...

Sen Xin; Yu-Guo Guo; Li-Jun Wan

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

366

Rechargeable thin-film lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable thin-film batteries consisting of lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have been fabricated and characterized. These include Li-TiS{sub 2}, Li-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Li-Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cells with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V, respectively. The realization of these robust cells, which can be cycled thousands of times, was possible because of the stability of the amorphous lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride. This material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46}and a conductivity at 25 C of 2 {mu}S/cm. The thin-film cells have been cycled at 100% depth of discharge using current densities of 5 to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. Over most of the charge-discharge range, the internal resistance appears to be dominated by the cathode, and the major source of the resistance is the diffusion of Li{sup +} ions from the electrolyte into the cathode. Chemical diffusion coefficients were determined from ac impedance measurements.

Bates, J.B.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Dudney, N.J.; Luck, C.F.; Yu, X.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Rechargeable thin films batteries with lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have been fabricated and characterized. The cathodes include TiS{sub 2}, the {omega} phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and the cubic spinel Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V, respectively. The development of these robust cells, which can be cycled thousands of times, was possible because of the stability of the amorphous lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride. This material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46} and a conductivity at 25 C of 2 {mu}S/cm. Thin film cells have been cycled at 100% depth of discharge using current densities of 2 to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. The polarization resistance of the cells is due to the slow insertion rate of Li{sup +} ions into the cathode. Chemical diffusion coefficients for Li{sup +} ions in the three types of cathodes have been estimated from the analysis of ac impedance measurements.

Bates, J. B.; Gruzalski, G. R.; Dudney, N. J.; Luck, C. F.; Yu, X.

1993-11-00T23:59:59.000Z

368

NSTX plasma response to lithium coated divertor  

SciTech Connect

NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma-facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Z(eff) and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, < 0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Kugel, H. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, M. G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Allain, J. P. [Purdue University; Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ding, S. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Plasma Physics, Hefei, China; Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jaworski, M. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kallman, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaye, S. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Maqueda, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Mansfield, D.K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Mueller, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Nygren, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Paul, S. F. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Raman, R [University of Washington, Seattle; Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Schneider, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Soukhanovskii, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Taylor, C. N. [Purdue University; Timberlake, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wampler, W. R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Zakharov, L. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Electrothermal Analysis of Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the electrothermal analysis and testing of lithium ion battery performance. The objectives of this report are to: (1) develop an electrothermal process/model for predicting thermal performance of real battery cells and modules; and (2) use the electrothermal model to evaluate various designs to improve battery thermal performance.

Pesaran, A.; Vlahinos, A.; Bharathan, D.; Duong, T.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Sulfonated polyphenylene polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved sulfonated polyphenylene compositions, improved polymer electrolyte membranes and nanocomposites formed there from for use in fuel cells are described herein. The improved compositions, membranes and nanocomposites formed there from overcome limitations of Nafion.RTM. membranes.

Cornelius, Christopher J. (Albuquerque, NM); Fujimoto, Cy H. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickner, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research  

SciTech Connect

Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

An automated hydride generation-cryogenic trapping-ICP-MS system for measuring inorganic and methylated Ge, Sb and As species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An automated hydride generation-cryogenic trapping-ICP-MS system for measuring inorganic of both flow injection and batch hydride generation and couples it to an automated cryogenic trapping unit with detection by ICP-MS. The Teflon cryogenic trap was packed with 10 cm of SE-30 5% Chromosorb W-HP 80­100 mesh

Canberra, University of

373

ReaxFFMgH Reactive Force Field for Magnesium Hydride Systems Sam Cheung, Wei-Qiao Deng, Adri C. T. van Duin, and William A. Goddard III*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReaxFFMgH Reactive Force Field for Magnesium Hydride Systems Sam Cheung, Wei-Qiao Deng, Adri C. TFFMgH) for magnesium and magnesium hydride systems. The parameters for this force field were derived from fitting to quantum chemical (QM) data on magnesium clusters and on the equations of states for condensed phases

van Duin, Adri

374

Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates and Low Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates and LowRechargeable lithium batteries are known for their highBecause lithium ion batteries are especially susceptible to

Chen, Guoying

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

STUDIES ON TWO CLASSES OF POSITIVE ELECTRODE MATERIALS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linden, D. , Handbook of Batteries. 2nd ed. 1995, New York:rechargeable lithium batteries. Nature, 2001. 414(6861): p.of rechargeable lithium batteries, I. Lithium manganese

Wilcox, James D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

SURFACE RECONSTRUCTION AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF STOICHIOMETRIC LAYERED CATHODE MATERIALS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CATHODE MATERIALS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES Feng Lin, 1*As shown in Figure 2, in lithium-metal half-cells, capacitypredominantly occurs along the lithium diffusion channels,

Lin, Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures.

Hobson, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

STUDIES ON TWO CLASSES OF POSITIVE ELECTRODE MATERIALS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

around 3.5 M. A slight excess of lithium (5%) was used tothat there is a slight excess of lithium in materials withto the formation of a lithium excess surface material (Li 1+

Wilcox, James D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Flexible graphene-based lithium ion batteries with ultrafast charge and discharge rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flexible graphene-based lithium ion batteries with ultrafast charge and...and flexible lithium ion battery made from graphene foam, a three-dimensional...and flexible lithium ion battery made from graphene foam, a three-dimensional...

Na Li; Zongping Chen; Wencai Ren; Feng Li; Hui-Ming Cheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Stress fields in hollow core–shell spherical electrodes of lithium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...core-shell spherical electrodes of lithium ion batteries Yingjie Liu 1 Pengyu Lv...System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering...structure design of electrodes of lithium ion batteries. lithium ion battery...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Phase Behavior in Asymmetric Polymer Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lithium and diphenyl ethylene reacted exothermically, so they were added together slowly in the presence of excess

Nedoma, Alisyn Jenise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Lithium/magnesium, lithium/sodium, and to a lesser extent, potassium/magnesium ratios in calcium carbonate tufa columns provide a fingerprint for distinguishing tufa columns formed from thermal spring waters versus those formed from non-thermal spring waters. These ratios form the basis of the Mg/Li, Na/Li, and K/Mg fluid geothermometers commonly used in geothermal exploration, which are based on the fact that at elevated temperatures, due to mineral-fluid equilibria, lithium

383

Synthesis of lithium intercalation materials for rechargeable battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lithium-based oxides (LiMOx, where M=Ni, Co, Mn) are attractive for electrode materials, because they are capable of reversibly intercalating lithium ions for rechargeable battery without altering the main unit. We developed a novel solution-based route for the synthesis of these lithium intercalation oxides, using acetates or oxides as precursors for lithium, manganese, nickel, and cobalt, respectively with proper organic solvents. The evolution of crystal structure of these materials was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Further analysis of LiMn2O4 samples were carried out using impedance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. These studies indicate that this synthetic route, without using expensive alkoxides of sol–gel process, produces high-quality lithium-based oxides useful for cathode in lithium-ion rechargeable battery.

S. Nieto-Ramos; M.S. Tomar

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride Mixtures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermodynamic guidelines for the prediction of hydrogen Thermodynamic guidelines for the prediction of hydrogen storage reactions and their application to destabilized hydride mixtures Hydrogen Storage & Nanoscale Modeling Group Ford Motor Company Don Siegel dsiegel2@ford.com Phys. Rev. B 76, 134102 (2007) 1 Acknowledgements C. Wolverton V. Ozolins Computation Northwestern UCLA J. Yang A. Sudik Experiments Ford Ford 2 Computational Methodology * Atomistic computer simulations based on quantum mechanics (Density Functional Theory) * First-principles approach: - Only empirical input are crystal structure and fundamental physical constants - VASP code - PAW potentials - PW91 GGA - Temperature-dependent thermodynamic contributions evaluated within harmonic approximation * "Direct method" for construction of dynamical matrix

385

Method and apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes. [stored as uranium hydride in a block of copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas is stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forms at a significantly lower temperature).

McMullen, J.W.; Wheeler, M.G.; Cullingford, H.S.; Sherman, R.H.

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Positron binding to alkali-metal hydrides: The role of molecular vibrations  

SciTech Connect

The bound vibrational levels for J=0 have been computed for the series of alkali-metal hydride molecules from LiH to RbH, including NaH and KH. For all four molecules the corresponding potential-energy curves have been obtained for each isolated species and for its positron-bound complex (e{sup +}XH). It is found that the calculated positron affinity values strongly depend on the molecular vibrational state for which they are obtained and invariably increase as the molecular vibrational energy content increases. The consequences of our findings on the likelihood of possibly detecting such weakly bound species are briefly discussed.

Gianturco, Franco A.; Franz, Jan; Buenker, Robert J.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Pichl, Lukas; Rost, Jan-Michael; Tachikawa, Masanori; Kimura, Mineo [Department of Chemistry and INFM, University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Fachbereich C-Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstrasse 20, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer St. 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Graduate School of Science, Yokohama-city University, Seto 22-2, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulateurs au lithium Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

au lithium Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accumulateurs au lithium Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ACCUMULATEUR LECTRIQUE...

388

Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2011 DOE...

389

Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries...

390

Insights into the morphological changes undergone by the anode in the lithium sulphur battery system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, the morphological changes of the anode surface in lithium sulphur cell, during early cycling, were simulated using symmetrical lithium electrode cells… (more)

Yalamanchili, Anurag

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition with Self-Aligned Nanorod Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with Self-Aligned Nanorod Structure. Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition with Self-Aligned Nanorod Structure. Abstract: Suppressing lithium (Li) dendrite growth is one of the most...

392

STUDIES ON TWO CLASSES OF POSITIVE ELECTRODE MATERIALS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 H 3 O 2 Li·2H 2 O (lithium acetate, Sigma Aldrich), and HThe iron nitrate and lithium acetate were combined with the

Wilcox, James D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Lithium: Measurement of Young's Modulus and Yield Strength  

SciTech Connect

The Lithium Collection Lens is used for anti-proton collection. In analyzing the structural behavior during operation, various material properties of lithium are often needed. properties such as density, coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressability, etc.; are well known. However, to the authors knowledge there is only one published source for Young's Modulus. This paper reviews the results from the testing of Young's Modulus and the yield strength of lithium at room temperature.

Ryan P Schultz

2002-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Theory of Hydride-Proton Transfer (HPT) Carbonyl Reduction by [Os(III)(tpy)(Cl)(NH=CHCH3)(NSAr)  

SciTech Connect

Quantum mechanical analysis reveals that carbonyl reduction of aldehydes and ketones by the imine-based reductant cis-[Os{sup III}(tpy)(Cl)(NH?CHCH{sub 3})(NSAr)] (2), which is accessible by reduction of the analogous nitrile, occurs by hydride-proton transfer (HPT) involving both the imine and sulfilimido ligands. In carbonyl reduction, water or alcohol is necessary to significantly lower the barrier for proton shuttling between ligands. The ?N(H)SAr group activates the carbonyl group through hydrogen bonding while the ?NC(H)CH{sub 3} ligand delivers the hydride.

Ess, Daniel H.; Schauer, Cynthia; Meyer, Thomas J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Facile synthesis of mesoporous lithium titanate spheres for high rate lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lithium titanate is synthesized from titanium isopropoxide and lithium acetate solution under hydrothermal environment and calcinations. Introducing acidized carbon black during synthesis can produce mesoporous Li4Ti5O12. The crystalline structure and morphological observation of the as-synthesized mesoporous Li4Ti5O12 are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The mesoporous structure can be directly observed through BEI images of the cross-section sample. Besides, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm also displays a hysteresis loop, implying the beneficial evidence of mesoporous structure. The pore size distribution of mesoporous lithium titanate evaluated by BJH model is narrow, and the average size of voids is around 4 nm. It is demonstrated that the electrochemical performance is significantly improved by the mesoporous structure. The mesoporous lithium titanate exhibits a stable capacity of 140 mAhg?1 at 0.5 C. Besides, the reversible capacity at 30 C remains over half of that at 0.5 C. The superior C-rate performance is associated with the mesoporous structure, facilitating lithium transportation ability during cycling.

Yu-Sheng Lin; Jenq-Gong Duh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries > Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single...

397

Lithium/Sulfur Batteries Based on Doped Mesoporous Carbon - Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search LithiumSulfur Batteries Based on Doped Mesoporous Carbon Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About...

398

Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

QC Considerations Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations Review of Oak Ridge process and QC activities by David Wood, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, at the...

399

Sulfur-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Cathodes for Lithium/Sulfur...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Sulfur-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Cathodes for LithiumSulfur Cells Lawrence Berkeley National...

400

Fact #603: December 28, 2009 Where Does Lithium Come From? |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

share of lithium reserves and production by country including Chile, China, Australia, Russia, Argentina, U.S. and Bolivia. For more detailed information, see the table below....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Physically based Impedance Modelling of Lithium-Ion Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this book, a new procedure to analyze lithium-ion cells is introduced. The cells are disassembled to analyze their components in experimental cell housings. Then,… (more)

Illig, Jörg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods P. Ganesh,* , Jeongnim Kim, Changwon...

403

JCESR: Moving Beyond Lithium-Ion | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JCESR: Moving Beyond Lithium-Ion Share Topic Energy Energy usage Energy storage Batteries Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive...

404

Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

methods - Tailored Aqueous Colloids for Lithium-Ion Electrodes (TACLE) B.L. Armstrong et al., U.S. Patent Application No. 13651,270. - Surface charge measurement,...

405

The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lithium titanate oxide in the negative electrode indicate cycle life in excesslithium titanate oxide in the negative electrode indicate cycle life in excess

Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

High capacity nanostructured electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The lithium-ion battery is currently the most widely used electrochemical storage system on the market, with applications ranging from portable electronics to electric vehicles, to… (more)

Seng, Kuok H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Expanded North Carolina Lithium Facility Opens, Boosting U.S...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

plug-in hybrids and other advanced clean energy technologies grows worldwide, rare earth elements and other critical materials, including lithium, are facing increasing global...

408

California: Geothermal Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

technologies that extract battery materials like lithium, manganese, and zinc from geothermal brines. Simbol has the potential to power 300,000-600,000 electric vehicles per...

409

California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

brines in California. Batteries from Brine California: Geothermal Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy Development...

410

Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

411

Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overall Project Goal: To research, develop and demonstrate large format lithium ion cells with energy density > 500 WhL Barriers addressed: - Low energy density - Cost -...

412

Sandia National Laboratories: lithium-ion-based solid electrolyte...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lithium-ion-based solid electrolyte battery Sandia Labs, Front Edge Technology, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Lab, Univ. of California-Los Angeles: Micro Power Source On March...

413

Development of Electrolytes for Lithium-ion Batteries  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Battaglia & J. Kerr (LBNL) * M. Payne (Novolyte) * F. Puglia & B. Ravdel (Yardney) * G. Smith & O. Borodin (U. Utah) 3 3 Develop novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries that...

414

Fundamental Studies of Lithium-Sulfur Cell Chemistry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Studies of Lithium-Sulfur Cell Chemistry PI: Nitash Balsara LBNL June 17, 2014 Project ID ESS224 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

415

Robust Polymer Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Robust Polymer Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation Robust Polymer Composite Membranes for Hydrogen Separation polymercompositemembranes.pdf More Documents & Publications...

416

Batteries - Beyond Lithium Ion Breakout session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEYOND LITHIUM ION BREAKOUT BEYOND LITHIUM ION BREAKOUT Breakout Session #1 - Discussion of Performance Targets and Barriers Comments on the Achievability of the Targets * 1 - Zn-Air possible either w/ or w/o electric-hybridization; also possible with a solid electrolyte variant * 2 - Multivalent systems (e.g Mg), potentially needing hybrid-battery * 3 - Advanced Li-ion with hybridization @ cell / molecular level for high-energy and high- power * 4 - MH-air, Li-air, Li-S, all show promise * 5 - High-energy density (e.g. Na-metal ) flow battery can meet power and energy goals * 6 - Solid-state batteries (all types) * 7 - New cathode chemistries (beyond S) to increase voltage * 8 - New high-voltage non-flammable electrolytes (both li-ion and beyond li-ion) * 9 - Power to energy ratio of >=12 needed for fast charge (10 min)  So liquid refill capable

417

Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor of a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0lithium and lithia, from the precursor. A cell and battery are also disclosed incorporating the disclosed positive electrode.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Li, Naichao (Croton on Hudson, NY)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

418

Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor thereof a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0.5lithium and lithia, from the precursor. A cell and battery are also disclosed incorporating the disclosed positive electrode.

Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Kang, Sun-Ho (Naperville, IL); Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

419

Expanding argon plasma interacting with lithium surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this thesis, the interaction between Ar Plasma and lithium is studied by Langmuir probe and Spectrometer. We have studied the effects of the applied discharge current, the gas flow rate, the magnetic field on emission spectrum, electron temperature and electron density. The experimental results show that spectrum intensity, electron temperature and electron density all increase with the increasing discharge current, gas flow rate or magnetic field when the other experimental conditions were fixed, and it is also found that the intensity of Li-670.78 nm increases slowly at first and then increases rapidly, at last, it tends to be stable figure at the beginning of experiment. What is more, spectrum of lithium (670.78 nm) is also detected at the first diagnostic window (viewing window).

X. Cao; S. Chen; W. Zhang; X. Xue; M. Lu; C. Wang; J. Wang; F. Gou; D. Yang; Ou Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

High-discharge-rate lithium ion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for a lithium ion battery and process for creating such, comprising higher binder to carbon conductor ratios than presently used in the industry. The battery is characterized by much lower interfacial resistances at the anode and cathode as a result of initially mixing a carbon conductor with a binder, then with the active material. Further improvements in cycleability can also be realized by first mixing the carbon conductor with the active material first and then adding the binder.

Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vincent S; Zheng, Honghe

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

High expansion, lithium corrosion resistant sealing glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO in various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with pin materials of 446 Stainless Steel and Alloy-52 rather than molybdenum, for use in harsh chemical environments, specifically in lithium batteries.

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Lithium-Polysulfide Flow Battery Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In this video, Stanford graduate student Wesley Zheng demonstrates the new low-cost, long-lived flow battery he helped create. The researchers created this miniature system using simple glassware. Adding a lithium polysulfide solution to the flask immediately produces electricity that lights an LED. A utility version of the new battery would be scaled up to store many megawatt-hours of energy.

Zheng, Wesley

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Pitch of a polymer cholesteric  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pitch of a polymer cholesteric ... We report measurements of the cholesteric pitch and twist elastic constant (K22) in monodisperse suspensions of the rodlike virus filamentous bacteriophage fd. ... Cholesteric Pitch of Lyotropic Polymer Liquid Crystals ...

Theo. Odijk

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Deuterium Retention in NSTX with Lithium Conditioning  

SciTech Connect

High (approximate to 90%) deuterium retention was observed in NSTX gas balance measurements both with- and without lithiumization of the carbon plasma-facing components. The gas retained in ohmic discharges was measured by comparing the vessel pressure rise after a discharge to that of a gas-only pulse with the pumping valves closed. For neutral beam heated discharges the gas input and gas pumped by the NB cryopanels were tracked. The discharges were followed by outgassing of deuterium that reduced the retention. The relationship between retention and surface chemistry was explored with a new plasma-material interface probe connected to an in vacuo surface science station that exposed four material samples to the plasma. XPS and TDS analysis demonstrated that binding of D atoms in graphite is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular atoms are weakly bonded in regions near lithium atoms bound to either oxygen or the carbon matrix. This is in contrast to the strong ionic bonding that occurs between D and pure Li. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Allain, J. P. [Purdue University; Blanchard, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kugel, H. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Roquemore, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Soukhanovskii, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Taylor, C. N. [Purdue University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

polymers | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

polymers polymers Dataset Summary Description These data files contain volume, mass, and hardness changes of elastomers and plastics representative exposed to gasoline containing various levels of ethanol. These materials are representative of those used in gasoline fuel storage and dispensing hardware. All values are compared to the original untreated condition. The data sets include results from specimens exposed directly to the fuel liquid and also a set of specimens exposed only to the fuel vapors. Source Mike Kass, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords compatibility elastomers ethanol gasoline plastics polymers Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon plastics_dma_results_san.xlsx (xlsx, 4.9 MiB)

426

Nondestructive Evaluation on Hydrided LWR Fuel Cladding by Small Angle Incoherent Neutron Scattering of Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A non-destructive neutron scattering method was developed to precisely measure the uptake of total hydrogen in nuclear grade Ziraloy-4 cladding. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and H gas. By controlling the initial H gas pressure in the vessel and the temperature profile, target H concentrations from tens of ppm to a few thousands of wppm have been successfully achieved. Following H charging, the H content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method (VHE), by which the samples with desired H concentration were selected for the neutron study. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering (SANIS) were performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge national Laboratory (ORNL). Our study indicates that a very small amount ( 20 ppm) H in commercial Zr cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes for a wide range of H concentration by a nondestructive method. The H distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor, which is determined by calibration process with direct chemical analysis method on the specimen. This scale factor can be used for future test with unknown H concentration, thus provide a nondestructive method for absolute H concentration determination.

Yan, Yong [ORNL; Qian, Shuo [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Plummer, Lee K [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydride-dehydride module within ARIES (Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System)  

SciTech Connect

One of the many requirements placed on the DOE is the reduction of the nuclear stockpile through dismantlement programs. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) has been tasked with the disposition of excess plutonium and other fissile materials. On the list of items containing excess fissile materials are nuclear weapon cores, pits. The Advanced Recovery and integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is the pit disassembly and conversion demonstration line that is being used to gather data to support the design of the full scale pit disassembly and conversion facility. The Hydride Dehydride recycle system is an important element to this program, because it provides these dismantlement programs with a technology for removing plutonium from nuclear weapons without producing large amounts of waste compared to historical processes used in the DOE complex. The Hydride Dehydride recycle process can separate plutonium from other weapons components resulting in an unclassified plutonium metal button. After separation, this button can be stored in long term storage containers or processed to produce plutonium oxide, which will be used by either of the plutonium disposition options, mixed oxide fuel burning in a nuclear reactor or immobilization. Once placed into long term storage containers, either the plutonium metal or plutonium oxide can be inspected by bilateral or international agencies to invoke transparency of the plutonium.

Flamm, B.F.; Isom, G.M.; Nelson, T.O.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mechanical Behavior Studies of Depleted Uranium in the Presence of Hydrides  

SciTech Connect

This project addresses critical issues related to aging in the presence of hydrides (UH{sub 3}) in DU and the subsequent effect on mechanical behavior. Rolled DU specimens with three different hydrogen concentrations and the as-rolled condition were studied. The texture measurements indicate that the hydrogen charging is affecting the initial as-rolled DU microstructure/texture. The macroscopic mechanical behavior suggests the existence of a threshold between the 0 wpmm H and 0.3 wppm H conditions. A VPSC simulation of the macroscopic strain-stress behavior, when taking into account only a texture effect, shows no agreement with the experiment. This suggests that the macroscopic mechanical behavior observed is indeed due to the presence of hydrogen/hydrides in the DU bulk. From the lattice strain variation it can be concluded that the hydrogen is affecting the magnitude and/or the nature of CRSS. The metallography indicates the specimens that underwent the hydrogen charging process, developed large grains and twinning, which were enhanced by the presence of hydrogen. Further studies using electron microscopy and modeling will be conducted to learn about the deformation mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior.

Garlea, E.; Morrell, J. S.; Bridges, R. L.; Powell, G. L.; Brown, d. W.; Sisneros, T. A.; Tome, C. N.; Vogel, S. C.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: • Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. • Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. • The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. • Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. • After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 °C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 ? (1 ? X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ‘ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles’ i.e. 1 ? 3(1 ? X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 ? X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: mkjha@nmlindia.org; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

DSM INVESTS IN MEDICAL POLYMERS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM INVESTS IN MEDICAL POLYMERS ... AS PART OF ITS SHIFT toward the specialty materials business, DSM will acquire Polymer Technology Group (PTG), a privately held maker of biomedical polymers. ... DSM isn’t disclosing the purchase price other than to say it is about 10 times PTG’s annual earnings. ...

MELODY VOITH

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

Long-Living Polymer Electrolytes | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Composite Electrolyte to Stabilize Metallic Lithium Anodes CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...

432

Polyanthra[1,9,8-b,c,d,e][4,10,5-b,c,d,e]bis-[1,6,6a(6a-S) trithia]pentalene-active material for cathode of lithium secondary battery with unusually high specific capacity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polyanthra[1,9,8-b,c,d,e][4,10,5-b,c,d,e]bis-[1,6,6a(6a-S)trithia]pentalene (PABTP) was prepared and investigated as cathode active material for lithium secondary batteries. The organic disulfide polymer was prepared by the direct sulfurization of anthracene and the oxidative coupling polymerization of the sulfide anthracene, characterized by FT-IR, Raman, elemental analysis, XPS and XRD. The polymer was used as cathode active material and the lithium secondary batteries were assembled and tested. The polymer had high specific capacity up to 1500 mAh g?1, which remained the value of 800 mAh g?1 at the 77th cycle, and kept high charge–discharge efficiency of 85% in the whole test.

Z.J. Liu; L.B. Kong; Y.H. Zhou; C.M. Zhan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

OBSERVATIONS IN REACTIVITY BETWEEN BH CONTAINING COMPOUNDS AND ORGANOMETALLIC REAGENTS: SYNTHESIS OF BORONIC ACIDS, BORONIC ESTERS, AND MAGNESIUM HYDRIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aryl bromides and H 2 BN(iPr) 2 Scheme 2.7. Hydroboration oftransfer hydride to BH 2 -N(iPr) 2 Scheme 2.10. Conversionchloride with BH 2 -N(iPr) 2 Scheme 3; Aqueous quench of p-

Clary, Jacob William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Verification and Validation Strategy for Implementation of Hybrid Potts-Phase Field Hydride Modeling Capability in MBM  

SciTech Connect

The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) program has initiated a project to develop a hydride formation modeling tool using a hybrid Potts­phase field approach. The Potts model is incorporated in the SPPARKS code from Sandia National Laboratories. The phase field model is provided through MARMOT from Idaho National Laboratory.

Jason D. Hales; Veena Tikare

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Combustion Processes in the Zr-Co-H2 System and Synthesis of Hydrides of Intermetallic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The researches on Zr2Co, ZrCo, ZrCo2 synthesis and hydriding in a self-propagating hightemperature synthesis — SHS mode are carried out. In IMC — hydrogen systems low temperature (350–500°C) and high temperature ...

H. G. Hakobyan; S. K. Dolukhanyan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of Lithium-Ion and Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries for Plug-In Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Infrastructure and transport requirements, though often generic, were always included. ... vehicles (PHEV), which use electricity from the grid to power a portion of travel, could play a role in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transport sector; however, meaningful GHG emissions redns. ... storage systems in renewable energy plants, as well as power systems for sustainable vehicles, such as hybrid and elec. ...

Guillaume Majeau-Bettez; Troy R. Hawkins; Anders Hammer Strømman

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Ab-initio study of optical response properties of nonstoichiometric lithium-hydride and sodium-fluoride clusters with one- and two-excess electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structural and optical response properties of Li n H n-m and NanF n-m (n = 2-6, m = 1, 2) clusters containin...

V. Bona?i?-Koutecký; J. Pittner; J. Koutecký

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Characterization of Lithium Stearate: Processing Aid for Filled Elastomers  

SciTech Connect

This topical report presents work completed to characterize lithium stearate so a replacement supplier could be identified. Lithium stearate from Alfa Aesar and Chemtura was obtained and characterized along with the current material from Witco. Multiple methods were used to characterize the materials including Karl Fischer, FT-IR, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis.

E. Eastwood; C. Densmore

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

439

Materials Challenges and Opportunities of Lithium Ion Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

His research interests are in the area of materials for lithium ion batteries, fuel cells, and solar cells, including novel synthesis approaches for nanomaterials. ... Lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries with a high theoretical energy density of ?2500 Wh kg–1 are considered as one promising rechargeable battery chemistry for next-generation energy storage. ...

Arumugam Manthiram

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Sol–gel synthesis of sodium and lithium based materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sodium and lithium cobaltates are important materials for thermoelectric and ... the sol–gel synthesis of sodium- and lithium-based materials by using acetate precursors. The produced Na2/3CoO2, Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/...

Sandra Hildebrandt; Andreas Eva…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Lithium treatment reduces morphine self-administration in addict rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Lithium also has been shown to interact with morphine: it can sometimes reduce morphine-induced ... mice7'8 and potentiate morphine analgesia in rats9. We have therefore investigated the possibility that lithium may affect the amount of voluntary ingestion of morphine by addict rats.

MICHAL TOMKIEWICZ; HANNAH STEINBERG

1974-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerator Thruster (LiLFA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerator Thruster (LiLFA) Adam Coulon Princeton University Electric originally came from the MAI (Moscow Aviation Institute) Russia · Many Princeton graduate students have #12;LiLFA Thruster · Lithium vapor ionizes in the electric field · A current evolves in the plasma

Petta, Jason

443

Sedimentation of Knotted Polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the sedimentation of knotted polymers by means of stochastic rotation dynamics, a molecular dynamics algorithm that takes hydrodynamics fully into account. We show that the sedimentation coefficient s, related to the terminal velocity of the knotted polymers, increases linearly with the average crossing number n_c of the corresponding ideal knot. To the best of our knowledge, this provides the first direct computational confirmation of this relation, postulated on the basis of experiments in "The effect of ionic conditions on the conformations of supercoiled DNA. I. sedimentation analysis" by Rybenkov et al., for the case of sedimentation. Such a relation was previously shown to hold with simulations for knot electrophoresis. We also show that there is an accurate linear dependence of s on the inverse of the radius of gyration R_g^-1, more specifically with the inverse of the R_g component that is perpendicular to the direction along which the polymer sediments. When the polymer sediments in a slab, the walls affect the results appreciably. However, R_g^-1 remains to a good precision linearly dependent on n_c. Therefore, R_g^-1 is a good measure of a knot's complexity.

Joonas Piili; Davide Marenduzzo; Kimmo Kaski; Riku Linna

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of evolving electronic and chemical states that, despite advances in material synthesis and structural probes, remain elusive and largely unexplored. At Beamlines 8.0.1 and 9.3.2, researchers studied lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries, respectively, using soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques. The detailed information they obtained about the evolution of electronic and chemical states will be indispensable for understanding and optimizing better battery materials.

446

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Friday, 23 March 2012 13:53 Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds

447

China Lithium Energy Electric Vehicle Investment Group CLEEVIG | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investment Group CLEEVIG Investment Group CLEEVIG Jump to: navigation, search Name China Lithium Energy Electric Vehicle Investment Group (CLEEVIG) Place Beijing, China Zip 100101 Product Beijing-based investment company with a focus on Electric Vehicle R&D. References China Lithium Energy Electric Vehicle Investment Group (CLEEVIG)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. China Lithium Energy Electric Vehicle Investment Group (CLEEVIG) is a company located in Beijing, China . References ↑ "[ China Lithium Energy Electric Vehicle Investment Group (CLEEVIG)]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=China_Lithium_Energy_Electric_Vehicle_Investment_Group_CLEEVIG&oldid=343507

448

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of evolving electronic and chemical states that, despite advances in material synthesis and structural probes, remain elusive and largely unexplored. At Beamlines 8.0.1 and 9.3.2, researchers studied lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries, respectively, using soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques. The detailed information they obtained about the evolution of electronic and chemical states will be indispensable for understanding and optimizing better battery materials.

449

Liquid Lithium WindowlessLiquid Lithium Windowless Targets for High Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the accelerator beam line · No solid confinement structure · In vacuum ­ It's possible due to Li's low vapor/s in vacuum. #12;Why Liquid Lithium? Low Z ( = 3 )---good from nuclear considerations Large working temp compatible with accelerator vacuum (10-4 Pa or 10-6 Torr). 1000 ( ) Local peak temperature can be much

McDonald, Kirk

450

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural method for lithium isotope ratio (7 Li/6 Li) determinations with low total lithium consumption ( lithium from all matrix elements using small volume resin (2 ml/3.4 meq AG 50W-X8) and low volume elution

Weston, Ken

451

17 Years of Lithium Brown Dwarfs 10/21/12Ringberg Brown Dwarfs 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17 Years of Lithium Brown Dwarfs 10/21/12Ringberg Brown Dwarfs 1 #12;The Keck Search for Lithium 10/21/12Ringberg Brown Dwarfs 2 Lithium was not seen in objects which should have been comfortably into the brown "lithium dating". This adjustment in age meant that the inferred mass of PPl 15 rose to near the substellar

Joergens, Viki

452

Abstract--This paper describes experimental results aiming at analyzing lithium-ion batteries performances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years, Saft has been developing a range of lithium ion cells and batteries to cover the full spectrum. To follow such a characteristic, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements on Saft lithium or several cells. II. OVERVIEW OF EXPERIMENT A. Used lithium-ion cells The cells used are lithium-ion Saft

Boyer, Edmond

453

Poly vinyl acetate used as a binder for the fabrication of a LiFePO4-based composite cathode for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper describes a method for the preparation of composite cathodes for lithium ion-batteries by using poly vinyl acetate (PVAc) as a binder. \\{PVAc\\} is a non-fluorinated water dispersible polymer commonly used in a large number of industrial applications. The main advantages for using of this polymer are related to its low cost and negligible toxicity. Furthermore, since the \\{PVAc\\} is water processable, its use allows to replace the organic solvent, employed to dissolve the fluorinated polymer normally used as a binder in lithium battery technology, with water. In such a way it is possible to decrease the hazardousness of the preparation process as well as the production costs of the electrodes. In the paper the preparation, characterization and electrochemical performance of a LiFePO4 electrode based on \\{PVAc\\} as the binder is described. Furthermore, to assess the effect of the \\{PVAc\\} binder on the electrode properties, its performance is compared to that of a conventional electrode employing PVdF-HFP as a binder.

Pier Paolo Prosini; Maria Carewska; Cinzia Cento; Amedeo Masci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product of Chemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6 Electrolyte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of synthetic lithium ethylene dicarbonate. Figure 3.structure of lithium ethylene dicarbonate (A) and dimer (B).of: a. ) synthetic lithium ethylene dicarbonate; b. ) EC

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; Ross Jr., Philip N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Thermal Property Measurements and Enthalpy Calculation of the Lithium Bromide+Lithium Iodide+1,3-Propanediol+Water System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lithium bromide+lithium iodide+1,3-propanediol+water [LiBr/LiI mole ratio=4 and (LiBr+LiI)/HO(CH2)3...OH mass ratio=4] solution is being considered as a potential working fluid for an absorption chiller. Heat...

J.-S. Kim; H.-S. Lee; H. Lee

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The impact of lithium wall coatings on NSTX discharges and the engineering of the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)  

SciTech Connect

Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown the benefits of solid lithium coatings on carbon PFC's to diverted plasma performance, in both L- and H-mode confinement regimes. Better particle control, with decreased inductive flux consumption, and increased electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate were observed. Successive increases in lithium coverage resulted in the complete suppression of ELM activity in H-mode discharges. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD), which will employ the porous molybdenum surface developed for the LTX shell, is being installed on NSTX for the 2010 run period, and will provide comparisons between liquid walls in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) and liquid divertor targets in NSTX. LTX, which recently began operations at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is the world's first confinement experiment with full liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs). All materials and construction techniques in LTX are compatible with liquid lithium. LTX employs an inner, heated, stainless steel-faced liner or shell, which will be lithium-coated. In order to ensure that lithium adheres to the shell, it is designed to operate at up to 500-600 degrees C to promote wetting of the stainless by the lithium, providing the first hot wall in a tokamak to Operate at reactor-relevant temperatures. The engineering of LTX will be discussed. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kugel, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Avasarala, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, M. G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Berzak, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Gransted, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Gray, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jacobson, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kallman, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaye, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kozub, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lepson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Lundberg, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Mansfield, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Paul, S. F. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Pereverzev, G. V. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany; Schneider, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Soukhanovskii, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Strickler, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Stotler, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Timberlake, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Zakharov, L. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Conducting polymer-doped polyprrrole as an effective cathode catalyst for Li-O{sub 2} batteries  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Doped polypyrrole as cathode catalysts for Li-O{sub 2} batteries. • Polypyrrole has an excellent redox capability to activate oxygen reduction. • Chloride doped polypyrrole demonstrated an improved catalytic performance in Li-O{sub 2} batteries. - Abstract: Polypyrrole conducting polymers with different dopants have been synthesized and applied as the cathode catalyst in Li-O{sub 2} batteries. Polypyrrole polymers exhibited an effective catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction in lithium oxygen batteries. It was discovered that dopant significantly influenced the electrochemical performance of polypyrrole. The polypyrrole doped with Cl{sup ?} demonstrated higher capacity and more stable cyclability than that doped with ClO{sub 4}{sup ?}. Polypyrrole conducting polymers also exhibited higher capacity and better cycling performance than that of carbon black catalysts.

Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing [Centre for Clean Energy Technology, School of Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ahn, Hyo-Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Chengyin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, 180 Si-Wang-Ting Road, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Wang, Guoxiu, E-mail: Guoxiu.Wang@uts.edu.au [Centre for Clean Energy Technology, School of Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Surface modifications for carbon lithium intercalation anodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A prefabricated carbon anode containing predetermined amounts of passivating film components is assembled into a lithium-ion rechargeable battery. The modified carbon anode enhances the reduction of the irreversible capacity loss during the first discharge of a cathode-loaded cell. The passivating film components, such as Li.sub.2 O and Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, of a predetermined amount effective for optimal passivation of carbon, are incorporated into carbon anode materials to produce dry anodes that are essentially free of battery electrolyte prior to battery assembly.

Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Kinoshita, Kimio (Cupertino, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITION METAL-MAGNESIUM HYDRIDE FILMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films T. J. Richardson a, *, B. Farangis a , J. L. Slack a , P. Nachimuthu b , R. Pereira b , N. Tamura b , and M. Rubin a a Environmental Energy Technologies Division, b Advanced Light Source, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720, USA *Corresponding author, E-mail address: tjrichardson@lbl.gov Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large changes in both reflectance and transmittance on exposure to hydrogen gas. Changes in electronic structure and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic in situ transmission mode X-ray absorption

460

Quantum Simulation of Helium Hydride in a Solid-State Spin Register  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

\\emph{Ab initio} computation of molecular properties is one of the most promising applications of quantum computing. While this problem is widely believed to be intractable for classical computers, efficient quantum algorithms exist which have the potential to vastly accelerate research throughput in fields ranging from material science to drug discovery. Using a solid-state quantum register realized in a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond, we compute the bond dissociation curve of the minimal basis helium hydride cation, HeH$^+$. Moreover, we report an energy uncertainty (given our model basis) of the order of $10^{-14}$ Hartree, which is ten orders of magnitude below desired chemical precision. As NV centers in diamond provide a robust and straightforward platform for quantum information processing, our work provides several important steps towards a fully scalable solid state implementation of a quantum chemistry simulator.

Ya Wang; Florian Dolde; Jacob Biamonte; Ryan Babbush; Ville Bergholm; Sen Yang; Ingmar Jakobi; Philipp Neumann; Alán Aspuru-Guzik; James D. Whitfield; Jörg Wrachtrup

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FeP precipitates in hydride?vapor phase epitaxially grown InP:Fe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fe?doped InP was grown by hydride?vapor phase epitaxy.Doping levels up to 8×1018 cm?3 were determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Additionally performed photoluminescence measurements revealed a homogeneous distribution of electrically active Fe atoms. From microstructural investigations by analytical transmission electron microscopy spherical?shaped precipitates were detected in plan?view samples. These precipitates with diameters up to 13 nm are homogeneously arranged in the epilayer. For conglomerates of precipitates a distinct enrichment with Fe and P was measured by a comparative energy dispersive x?ray analysis. The lattice plane distances of the precipitates were deduced from the electron diffraction patterns and from high?resolution electron micrographs. A comparison with calculated values for different Fe–P alloys indicates that the precipitates consist mainly of orthorhombic FeP.

M. Luysberg; R. Göbel; H. Janning

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

RF sputtering for controlling dihydride and monohydride bond densities in amorphous silicon hydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicone produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous solicone hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

Jeffery, F.R.; Shanks, H.R.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

463

Startup and Operation of a Metal Hydride Based Isotope Separation Process  

SciTech Connect

Production scale separation of tritium from other hydrogen isotopes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, has been accomplished by several methods. These methods include thermal diffusion (1957--1986), fractional absorption (1964--1968), and cryogenic distillation (1967-present). Most recently, the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP), a metal hydride based hydrogen isotope separation system, began production in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) on April 9, 1994. TCAP has been in development at the Savannah River Technology Center since 1980. The production startup of this semi-continuous gas chromatographic separation process is a significant accomplishment for the Savannah River Site and was achieved after years of design, development, and testing.

Scogin, J.H.; Poore, A.S.

1995-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

464

Prediction of a multicenter-bonded solid boron hydride for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A layered solid boron hydride structure (B2H2) consisting of a hexagonal boron network and bridge hydrogen which has a gravimetric capacity of 8wt% hydrogen is predicted. The structural, electronic, and dynamical properties of the proposed structure are investigated using first-principles electronic structure methods. The absence of soft phonon modes confirms the dynamical stability of the proposed structure. Charging the structure significantly softens hydrogen related phonon modes. Boron modes, in contrast, are either hardened or not significantly affected by electron doping. Furthermore, self-doping the structure considerably reduces the energy barrier against hydrogen release. These results suggest that electrochemical charging or self-doping mechanisms may facilitate hydrogen release while the underlying boron network remains intact for subsequent rehydrogenation.

Tesfaye A. Abtew; Bi-ching Shih; Pratibha Dev; Vincent H. Crespi; Peihong Zhang

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

465

LaNi{sub 5}-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula AB{sub (Z-Y)}X{sub (Y)} is disclosed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of Groups 8, 9, and 10 of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, germanium, tin or bismuth. Z is greater than or equal to 4.8 and less than or equal to 6.0. Y is greater than 0 and less than 1. Ternary or higher-order substitutions to the base AB{sub 5} alloys that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption. 16 figs.

Bugga, R.V.; Fultz, B.; Bowman, R.; Surampudi, S.R.; Witham, C.K.; Hightower, A.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

Production of Hydrogen by Electrocatalysis: Making the H-H Bond by Combining Protons and Hydrides  

SciTech Connect

Generation of hydrogen by reduction of two protons by two electrons can be catalysed by molecular electrocatalysts. Determination of the thermodynamic driving force for elimination of H2 from molecular complexes is important for the rational design of molecular electrocatalysts, and allows the design of metal complexes of abundant, inexpensive metals rather than precious metals (“Cheap Metals for Noble Tasks”). The rate of H2 evolution can be dramatically accelerated by incorporating pendant amines into diphosphine ligands. These pendant amines in the second coordination sphere function as protons relays, accelerating intramolecular and intermolecular proton transfer reactions. The thermodynamics of hydride transfer from metal hydrides and the acidity of protonated pendant amines (pKa of N-H) contribute to the thermodynamics of elimination of H2; both of the hydricity and acidity can be systematically varied by changing the substituents on the ligands. A series of Ni(II) electrocatalysts with pendant amines have been developed. In addition to the thermochemical considerations, the catalytic rate is strongly influenced by the ability to deliver protons to the correct location of the pendant amine. Protonation of the amine endo to the metal leads to the N-H being positioned appropriately to favor rapid heterocoupling with the M-H. Designing ligands that include proton relays that are properly positioned and thermodynamically tuned is a key principle for molecular electrocatalysts for H2 production as well as for other multi-proton, multi-electron reactions important for energy conversions. The research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

Bullock, R. Morris; Appel, Aaron M.; Helm, Monte L.

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

467

Lightweight polymer concrete composites  

SciTech Connect

Lightweight polymer concrete composites have been developed with excellent insulating properties. The composites consist of lightweight aggregates such as expanded perlites, multicellular glass nodules, or hollow alumina silicate microspheres bound together with unsaturated polyester or epoxy resins. These composites, known as Insulating Polymer Concrete (IPC), have thermal conductivites from 0.09 to 0.19 Btu/h-ft-/sup 0/F. Compressive strengths, dependent upon the aggregates used, range from 1000 to 6000 psi. These materials can be precast or cast-in-place on concrete substrates. Recently, it has been demonstrated that these materials can also be sprayed onto concrete and other substrates. An overlay application of IPC is currently under way as dike insulation at an LNG storage tank facility. The composites have numerous potentials in the construction industry such as insulating building blocks or prefabricated insulating wall panels.

Fontana, J.J.; Steinberg, M.; Reams, W.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Elegant Way of Strengthening Polymer?Polymer Interface Using Nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elegant Way of Strengthening Polymer?Polymer Interface Using Nanoclay ... In this group, montmorillonite (MMT) nanoclay has been employed in numerous polymer nanocomposite systems because it is environmentally friendly, readily available in large quantities, and its intercalation chemistry has been well studied in comparison with other nanoclays (18-20). ... The detection of this interesting behavior of nanoclays in BIMS rubber has prompted us to initiate a detailed investigation into the tackification mechanism of nanoclay in other general purpose elastomers also. ...

Ganesh C. Basak; K. Dinesh Kumar; Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Anil K. Bhowmick

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

469

Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risø National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

470

Polymer Crowding and Shape Distributions in Polymer-Nanoparticle Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Macromolecular crowding can influence polymer shapes, which is important for understanding the thermodynamic stability of polymer solutions and the structure and function of biopolymers (proteins, RNA, DNA) under confinement. We explore the influence of nanoparticle crowding on polymer shapes via Monte Carlo simulations and free-volume theory of a coarse-grained model of polymer-nanoparticle mixtures. Exploiting the geometry of random walks, we model polymer coils as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor. Accounting for the entropic cost of a nanoparticle penetrating a larger polymer coil, we compute the crowding-induced shift in the shape distributions, radius of gyration, and asphericity of ideal polymers in a theta solvent. With increased nanoparticle crowding, we find that polymers become more compact (smaller, more spherical), in agreement with predictions of free-volume theory. Our approach can be easily extended to nonideal polymers in good solvents and used to model conformations of biopolymers in crowded environments.

Wei Kang Lim; Alan R. Denton

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

471

Metal-Polymer Interactions in a Polymer/Metal Nanocomposite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A poly(t-butyl acrylate)/gold nanocomposite sandwich was annealed to induce diffusion of the gold particles, which was monitored using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Marker motion experiments were also performed to probe particle and polymer mobilities independently. The experiments revealed that particle mobility was decreased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared with the predictions by Stokes-Einstein theory. Diffusion of polymer molecules through a gold particle layer is decreased by a much smaller extent. These results are attributed to bridging between particles arising from slow exchange kinetics of polymer segments at the polymer/metal interface.

Douglas H. Cole; Kenneth R. Shull; L. E. Rehn; P. Baldo

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Lithium-Ion Battery Teacher Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Ion Battery Teacher Workshop Lithium Ion Battery Teacher Workshop 2012 2 2 screw eyes 2 No. 14 rubber bands 2 alligator clips 1 plastic gear font 2 steel axles 4 nylon spacers 2 Pitsco GT-R Wheels 2 Pitsco GT-F Wheels 2 balsa wood sheets 1 No. 280 motor Also: Parts List 3 Tools Required 1. Soldering iron 2. Hobby knife or coping saw 3. Glue gun 4. Needlenose pliers 5. 2 C-clamps 6. Ruler 4 1. Using a No. 2 pencil, draw Line A down the center of a balsa sheet. Making the Chassis 5 2. Turn over the balsa sheet and draw Line B ¾ of an inch from one end of the sheet. Making the Chassis 6 3. Draw a 5/8" x ½" notch from 1" from the top of the sheet. Making the Chassis 7 4. Draw Line C 2 ½" from the other end of the same sheet of balsa. Making the Chassis 8 5. Using a sharp utility knife or a coping saw, cut

473

Novel carbonaceous materials for lithium secondary batteries  

SciTech Connect

Carbonaceous materials have been synthesized using pillared clays (PILCs) as templates. The PILC was loaded with organic materials such as pyrene in the liquid and vapor phase, styrene in the vapor phase, trioxane, ethylene and propylene. The samples were then pyrolyzed at 700 C in an inert atmosphere, followed by dissolution of the inorganic template by conventional demineralization methods. X-ray powder diffraction of the carbons showed broad d{sub 002} peaks in the diffraction pattern, indicative of a disordered or turbostratic system. N{sub 2} BET surface areas of the carbonaceous materials range from 10 to 100 m{sup 2}/g. There is some microporosity (r < 1 nm) in the highest surface area carbons. Most of the surface area, however, comes from a mixture of micro and mesopores with radii of 2--5 nm. Electrochemical studies were performed on these carbons. Button cells were fabricated with capacity- limiting carbon pellets electrodes as the cathode a/nd metallic lithium foil as the anode. Large reversible capacities (up to 850 mAh/g) were achieved for most of the samples. The irreversible capacity loss was less than 180 mAh/g after the first cycle, suggesting that these types of carbon materials are very stable to lithium insertion and de-insertion reactions.

Sandi, G.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.; Johnson, C.S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Polymer Thermodynamics and Chain Structure Polymers display some similarities and some differences with nano-aggregates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for aggregates and by the late Paul Flory of Stanford for polymer coils. Since the spring constant of a polymer of a polymer coil is largely determined by entropy, an individual polymer coil displays an increasing spring an aggregate in nanomaterials and a polymer coil in Polymer Science. The mass-fractal or minimum dimension

Beaucage, Gregory

475

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%; primary aluminum production, 6%; continuous casting, 4%; rubber and thermoplastics, 4%; pharmaceuticals, 294 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production resources, reported production and value of production were withheld from publication to avoid disclosing

476

Chemical Shuttle Additives in Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this program were to discover and implement a redox shuttle that is compatible with large format lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} (NMC) cathode material and to understand the mechanism of redox shuttle action. Many redox shuttles, both commercially available and experimental, were tested and much fundamental information regarding the mechanism of redox shuttle action was discovered. In particular, studies surrounding the mechanism of the reduction of the oxidized redox shuttle at the carbon anode surface were particularly revealing. The initial redox shuttle candidate, namely 2-(pentafluorophenyl)-tetrafluoro-1,3,2-benzodioxaborole (BDB) supplied by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL, Lemont, Illinois), did not effectively protect cells containing NMC cathodes from overcharge. The ANL-RS2 redox shuttle molecule, namely 1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)-2,5-di-tert-butyl-benzene, which is a derivative of the commercially successful redox shuttle 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DDB, 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota), is an effective redox shuttle for cells employing LiFePO{sub 4} (LFP) cathode material. The main advantage of ANL-RS2 over DDB is its larger solubility in electrolyte; however, ANL-RS2 is not as stable as DDB. This shuttle also may be effectively used to rebalance cells in strings that utilize LFP cathodes. The shuttle is compatible with both LTO and graphite anode materials although the cell with graphite degrades faster than the cell with LTO, possibly because of a reaction with the SEI layer. The degradation products of redox shuttle ANL-RS2 were positively identified. Commercially available redox shuttles Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} (Air Products, Allentown, Pennsylvania and Showa Denko, Japan) and DDB were evaluated and were found to be stable and effective redox shuttles at low C-rates. The Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}F{sub 12} is suitable for lithium ion cells utilizing a high voltage cathode (potential that is higher than NMC) and the DDB is useful for lithium ion cells with LFP cathodes (potential that is lower than NMC). A 4.5 V class redox shuttle provided by Argonne National Laboratory was evaluated which provides a few cycles of overcharge protection for lithium ion cells containing NMC cathodes but it is not stable enough for consideration. Thus, a redox shuttle with an appropriate redox potential and sufficient chemical and electrochemical stability for commercial use in larger format lithium ion cells with NMC cathodes was not found. Molecular imprinting of the redox shuttle molecule during solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation likely contributes to the successful reduction of oxidized redox shuttle species at carbon anodes. This helps to understand how a carbon anode covered with an SEI layer, that is supposed to be electrically insulating, can reduce the oxidized form of a redox shuttle.

Patterson, Mary

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

Can mirror matter solve the the cosmological lithium problem?  

SciTech Connect

The abundance of lithium-7 confronts cosmology with a long lasting inconsistency between the predictions of standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with the baryonic density determined from the Cosmic Microwave Background observations on the one hand, and the spectroscopic determination of the lithium-7 abundance on the other hand. We investigated the influence of the existence of a mirror world, focusing on models in which mirror neutrons can oscillate into ordinary neutrons. Such a mechanism allows for an effective late time neutron injection, which induces an increase of the destruction of beryllium-7and thus a lower final lithium-7 abundance.

Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR-7095 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris, France and Sorbonne Universités, Institut Lagrange de Paris, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

478

PROGRESS IN DESIGNING A MUON COOLING RING WITH LITHIUM LENSES.  

SciTech Connect

We discuss particle tracking simulations in a storage ring with lithium lens inserts designed for the six-dimensional phase space cooling of muons by the ionization cooling. The ring design contains one or more lithium lens absorbers for transverse cooling that transmit the beam with very small beta-function values, in addition to liquid-hydrogen wedge-shaped absorbers in dispersive locations for longitudinal cooling. Such a ring could comprise the final component of a cooling system for use in a muon collider. The beam matching between dipole-quadrupole lattices and the lithium lenses is of particular interest.

FUKUI,Y.CLINE,D.B.GARREN,A.A.KIRK,H.G.

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research  

SciTech Connect

The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main divertor heat flux (divertor strike point), the lithium is evaporated from the surface. The evaporated lithium is quickly ionized by the plasma and the ionized lithium ions can provide a strongly radiative layer of plasma ("radiative mantle"), thus could significantly reduce the heat flux to the divertor strike point surfaces, thus protecting the divertor surface. The protective effects of LL have been observed in many experiments and test stands. As a possible reactor divertor candidate, a closed LL divertor system is described. Finally, it is noted that the lithium applications as a PFC can be quite flexible and broad. The lithium application should be quite compatible with various divertor configurations, and it can be also applied to protecting the presently envisioned tungsten based solid PFC surfaces such as the ones for ITER. Lithium based PFCs therefore have the exciting prospect of providing a cost effective flexible means to improve the fusion reactor performance, while providing a practical solution to the highly challenging divertor heat handling issue confronting the steadystate magnetic fusion reactors.

Masayuki Ono

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

480

Photochemical Crosslinking Reactions in Polymers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The post-synthesis modification of polymer properties has very broad applications in industry. It is employed to produce products that are impossible to directly synthesize, modify… (more)

Carbone, Nicholas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydride lithium polymer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Acoustic emission during polymer crystallization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... .G.; part support to L.K.) Acoustic Emission, Special Technical Publication 505, ASTM, Philadelphia, 1971; Grabec, I. & Peterlin, A. J. Polymer Sci. ...

A. Galeski; L. Koenczoel; E. Piorkowska; E. Baer

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

On the structural and impedance characteristics of Li- doped PEO, using n-butyl lithium in hexane as dopant  

SciTech Connect

Nowadays polymer based solid state electrolytes for applications in rechargeable battery systems are highly sought after materials, pursued extensively by various research groups worldwide. Numerous methods are discussed in literature to improve the fundamental properties like electrical conductivity, mechanical stability and interfacial stability of polymer based electrolytes. The application of these electrolytes in Li-ion cells is still in the amateur state, due to low ionic conductivity, low lithium transport number and the processing difficulties. The present work is an attempt to study the effects of Li doping on the structural and transport properties of the polymer electrolyte, poly-ethelene oxide (PEO) (Molecular weight: 200,000). Li doped PEO was obtained by treating PEO with n-Butyllithium in hexane for different doping concentrations. Structural characterization of the samples was done by XRD and FTIR techniques. Impedance measurements were carried out to estimate the ionic conductivity of Li doped PEO samples. It is seen that, the crystallinity of the doped PEO decreases on increasing the doping concentration. XRD and FTIR studies support this observation. It is inferred that, ionic conductivity of the sample is increasing on increasing the doping concentration since less crystallinity permits more ionic transport. Impedance measurements confirm the results quantitatively.

Anand, P. B., E-mail: anandputhirath@gmail.com, E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in; Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: anandputhirath@gmail.com, E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials Department of Physics Cochin University of Science and Technology Cochin 22, Kerala (India)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

483

Lithium-Air Battery: High Performance Cathodes for Lithium-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: Researchers at Missouri S&T are developing an affordable lithium-air (Li-Air) battery that could enable an EV to travel up to 350 miles on a single charge. Today’s EVs run on Li-Ion batteries, which are expensive and suffer from low energy density compared with gasoline. This new Li-Air battery could perform as well as gasoline and store 3 times more energy than current Li-Ion batteries. A Li-Air battery uses an air cathode to breathe oxygen into the battery from the surrounding air, like a human lung. The oxygen and lithium react in the battery to produce electricity. Current Li-Air batteries are limited by the rate at which they can draw oxygen from the air. The team is designing a battery using hierarchical electrode structures to enhance air breathing and effective catalysts to accelerate electricity production.

None

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Photopatterned conjugated polymer electrochromic nanofibers Arvind Kumara  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photopatterned conjugated polymer electrochromic nanofibers on paper Arvind Kumara , Chris Asemotaa. Electrochromic nanofibers of conducting polymer (terthiophene) have been deposited over a conventional paper in electrochromic characters. SEM images of the conducting polymer nanofibers together with the cellulose fibers

Otero, Toribio Fernández

485

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 199598 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production worldwide. The value of domestic lithium production was estimated to be about $115 million in 1996. Two

486

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greases and synthetic rubber production. Salient Statistics--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use. The value of domestic lithium production was estimated to be about $115 million in 1995. Two companies

487

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 205446 (2011) First-principles study of the oxygen evolution reaction of lithium peroxide in the lithium-air battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motivation in seeking batteries with higher specific energies and higher energy den- sities. Metal-air of lithium peroxide in the lithium-air battery Yifei Mo, Shyue Ping Ong, and Gerbrand Ceder* Department) The lithium-air chemistry is an interesting candidate for the next-generation batteries with high specific

Ceder, Gerbrand

488

Materials Go/No-Go Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Go/No-Go Decisions Made Within Materials Go/No-Go Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) In fulfillment of the end of Fiscal Year 2007 Project Milestone on Materials Down-selection Lennie Klebanoff, Director Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA 94551 September/October 2007 1 Acknowledgements The author wishes to acknowledge the contributions of all Principal Investigators within the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) to the work summarized herein. Their names and affiliations are listed below. Especially significant contributions to this document were made by Dr. Ewa Ronnebro (SNL), Dr. John Vajo (HRL), Prof. Zak Fang (U. Utah), Dr. Robert Bowman Jr. (JPL), Prof. David Sholl (CMU) and Prof. Craig Jensen (U. Hawaii). The author thanks Dr.

489

Erroneous Wave Functions of Ciuchi et al for Collective Modes in Neutron Production on Metallic Hydride Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a recent comment (Ciuchi et al., 2012) concerning the theory of collective many body effects on the neutron production rates in a chemical battery cathode. Ciuchi et al employ an inverse beta decay expression that contains a two body amplitude. Only one electron and one proton may exist in the Ciuchi et al model initial state wave function. A flaw in their reasoning is that one cannot in reality describe collective many body correlations with only a two particle wave function. One needs very many particles to describe collective effects. In the model wave functions of Ciuchi et al there are no metallic hydrides, there are no cathodes and there are no chemical batteries. Employing a wave function with only one electron and one proton is inadequate for describing collective metallic hydride surface quantum plasma physics in cathodes accurately.

Widom, A; Larsen, L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Study of integrated metal hydrides heat pump and cascade utilization of liquefied natural gas cold energy recovery system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional cold energy utilization of the liquefied natural gas system needs a higher temperature heat source to improve exergy efficiency, which barricades the application of the common low quality thermal energy. The adoption of a metal hydride heat pump system powered by low quality energy could provide the necessary high temperature heat and reduce the overall energy consumption. Thus, an LNG cold energy recovery system integrating metal hydride heat pump was proposed, and the exergy analysis method was applied to study the case. The performance of the proposed integration system was evaluated. Moreover, some key factors were also theoretically investigated about their influences on the system performance. According to the results of the analysis, some optimization directions of the integrated system were also pointed out.

Xiangyu Meng; Feifei Bai; Fusheng Yang; Zewei Bao; Zaoxiao Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Erroneous Wave Functions of Ciuchi et al for Collective Modes in Neutron Production on Metallic Hydride Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a recent comment (Ciuchi et al., 2012) concerning the theory of collective many body effects on the neutron production rates in a chemical battery cathode. Ciuchi et al employ an inverse beta decay expression that contains a two body amplitude. Only one electron and one proton may exist in the Ciuchi et al model initial state wave function. A flaw in their reasoning is that one cannot in reality describe collective many body correlations with only a two particle wave function. One needs very many particles to describe collective effects. In the model wave functions of Ciuchi et al there are no metallic hydrides, there are no cathodes and there are no chemical batteries. Employing a wave function with only one electron and one proton is inadequate for describing collective metallic hydride surface quantum plasma physics in cathodes accurately.

A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava; L. Larsen

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

492

Effects on the positive electrode of the corrosion of AB{sub 5} alloys in nickel-metal-hydride batteries  

SciTech Connect

Effects of corrosion of MmNi{sub 4.3{minus}x}Mn{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.4}Co{sub x} alloys (where Mm = Ce 50%, La 30%, Nd 15%, Pr 5%) are evaluated in nickel-metal-hydride (Ni-MH) cells. Particularly, it is shown how Al released by the corroded alloys pollutes the positive electrode, which endures a loss of charging efficiency, due to the formation of a hydrotalcite-like phase stabilized with Al. Furthermore, since Al is eluted from the hydride electrode and is completely trapped in the positive active material, the titration of this element in the positive electrode is a powerful technique for quantification of the corrosion of AB{sub 5} alloys in Ni-MH cells.

Bernard, P. [SAFT, Marcoussis (France). Research Dept.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Comparison of H-Mode Plasmas Diverted to Solid and Liquid Lithium Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX. Among the goals was to use lithium recoating to sustain deuterium (D) retention by a static liquid lithium surface, approximating the ability of flowing liquid lithium to maintain chemical reactivity. Lithium evaporators were used to deposit lithium on the LLD surface. Improvements in plasma edge conditions were similar to those with lithiated graphite plasma-facing components (PFCs), including an increase in confinement over discharges without lithiumcoated PFCs and ELM reduction during H-modes. With the outer strike point on the LLD, the D retention in the LLD was about the same as that for solid lithium coatings on graphite, or about two times that achieved without lithium PFC coatings. There were also indications of contamination of the LLD surface, possibly due erosion and redeposition of carbon from PFCs. Flowing lithium may thus be needed for chemically active PFCs during long-pulse operation.

R. Kaita, et. al.

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

494

Synthesis of Nanoscale Lithium-Ion Battery Cathode Materials Using a Porous Polymer Precursor Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" and hydrothermal meth- ods have also been developed and used for this purpose in a number of laboratories. Each processing to produce the desired particle sizes, shapes, and crystallographic defect concentrations

Cui, Yi

495

Lithium and magnetic fields in giants. HD 232862 : a magnetic and lithium-rich giant star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of an unusually high lithium content in HD 232862, a field giant classified as a G8II star, and hosting a magnetic field. With the spectropolarimeters ESPaDOnS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL, we have collected high resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra of three giants : HD 232862, KU Peg and HD 21018. From spectral synthesis we have inferred stellar parameters and measured lithium abundances that we have compared to predictions from evolutionary models. We have also analysed Stokes V signatures, looking for a magnetic field on these giants. HD 232862, presents a very high abundance of lithium (ALi = 2.45 +/- 0.25 dex), far in excess of the theoretically value expected at this spectral type and for this luminosity class (i.e, G8II). The evolutionary stage of HD 232862 has been precised, and it suggests a mass in the lower part of the [1.0 Msun ; 3.5 Msun ] mass interval, likely 1.5 to 2.0 solar mass, at the bottom of the Red Giant Branch. Besides, a time variable Stokes V signature has...

Lèbre, A; Nascimento, J D do; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Kolev, D; Aurière, M; De Laverny, P; De Medeiros, J R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Students race lithium ion battery powered cars in Pantex competition |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

race lithium ion battery powered cars in Pantex competition | race lithium ion battery powered cars in Pantex competition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Students race lithium ion battery powered cars ... Students race lithium ion battery powered cars in Pantex competition Posted By Greg Cunningham, Pantex Public Affairs

497

Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3 Presentation name New Directions in Lithium Ion Electrode In-Line NDE * Low-cost IR laser thickness measurement (can be done in multiple point scans across the web or an entire...

498

Understanding Why Silicon Anodes of Lithium-Ion Batteries Are...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding Why Silicon Anodes of Lithium-Ion Batteries Are Fast to Discharge but Slow to Charge December 02, 2014 Measured and calculated rate-performance of a Si thin-film (70...

499

Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium–Air Battery Electrode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lithium–air battery is one of the most promising technologies among various electrochemical energy storage systems. We demonstrate that a novel air electrode consisting of an unusual hierarchical arrangement of functionalized graphene sheets (with no ...

Jie Xiao; Donghai Mei; Xiaolin Li; Wu Xu; Deyu Wang; Gordon L. Graff; Wendy D. Bennett; Zimin Nie; Laxmikant V. Saraf; Ilhan A. Aksay; Jun Liu; Ji-Guang Zhang

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

500

Lithium sulfide compositions for battery electrolyte and battery electrode coatings  

SciTech Connect

Method of forming lithium-containing electrolytes are provided using wet chemical synthesis. In some examples, the lithium containing electrolytes are composed of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7. The solid electrolyte may be a core shell material. In one embodiment, the core shell material includes a core of lithium sulfide (Li.sub.2S), a first shell of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7, and a second shell including one of .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 or Li.sub.4P.sub.2S.sub.7 and carbon. The lithium containing electrolytes may be incorporated into wet cell batteries or solid state batteries.

Liang, Chengdu; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wujun; Lin, Zhan; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y; Rondinone, Adam J

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z