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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

SciTech Connect

Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000°C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120{degree}C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

SciTech Connect

A process for making hydraulic cements from spent oil shale is described in this paper. Inexpensive cement is needed to grout abandoned in-situ retorts of spent shale for subsidence control, mitigation of leaching, and strengthening the retorted mass in order to recover oil from adjacent pillars of raw shale. A hydraulic cement was produced by heating a 1:1 mixture of Lurgi spent shale and CaCO{sub 3} at 1000 C for one hour. This cement would be less expensive than ordinary portland cement and is expected to fulfill the above requirements.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

China's Cement Production:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimation of CO Estimation of CO 2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties Jing Ke, Michael McNeil, Lynn Price, Nina Zheng Khanna, Nan Zhou Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Reprint version of journal article published in "Energy Policy", Volume 57, Pages 172-181, June 2013 January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6329E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any

6

Synthesis of belite cement clinker of high hydraulic reactivity  

SciTech Connect

This study is concerned with the increase of the cooling rate of belite clinker, by using the water quenching for the chemical stabilization of reactive belite, which improves the hydraulic properties of this clinker. The addition of adequate mineralizers, as NaF and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, contributes to the improvement of the clinker properties obtained at low burning temperature. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of this clinker. The samples were analyzed by means of a scanning electronic microscope connected with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer to detect the composition of the belite phase and its morphology. Physical and mechanical properties of this clinker cement were determined. The results show that the belite clinker obtained at 1150 {sup o}C, with lime saturation factor 0.67, is characterized by a great hydraulic reactivity, similar to that of the ordinary alite clinker. The addition of 2% of NaF and the water quenching improved the chemical, mineralogical and structural properties, while improving the cement hydraulic properties.

Kacimi, Larbi [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: kacimi20002000@yahoo.fr; Simon-Masseron, Angelique [Laboratoire des Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, CNRS UMR 7016, Universite de Haute-Alsace, 3, rue Alfred-Werner, F-68093 Mulhouse cedex (France)], E-mail: A.Simon@univ-mulhouse.fr; Salem, Souria [Departement d'Architecture, Faculte de Genie Civile, USTO-Oran (Algeria)], E-mail: zinaisalem@yahoo.fr; Ghomari, Abdelhamid [Departement de Chimie, U.A.I.B., Route de Belahcel, Mostaganem (Algeria)], E-mail: belkey@hotmail.com; Derriche, Zoubir [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes, Departement de Chimie, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, B.P. 1505, El-M'nouar, U.S.T. Oran (Algeria)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Exergy analysis of cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, cement production in Greece has been examined using the exergy analysis methodology. The major goal of the modern cement and concrete production industry is the minimisation of energy costs and environmental effects. The rational management of raw materials and energy requires analytical decision making tools that will provide the necessary information for the identification of possible improvements in the life cycle of a product. The second law of Thermodynamics allows for the evaluation of the irreversibility and the exergetic performance of a process. The analysis involves assessment of energy and exergy input at each stage of the cement production process. The chemical exergy of the reaction is also calculated and taken into consideration. It is found that 50% of the exergy is being lost even though a big amount of waste heat is being recovered.

C. Koroneos; G. Roumbas; N. Moussiopoulos

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andOther Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Glass Fibre Reinforced Cement and Gypsum Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

6 October 1970 research-article Glass Fibre Reinforced Cement and Gypsum Products A. J. Majumdar Glass fibre reinforced cements and gypsum plaster...discontinuous and irregular. The dispersion of glass fibre in the matrix is not easy. When chopped...

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P, K, Mehta Civil Engineering

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 to 40% of the oil shale, and explosively rubblizing andCEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Cementing temperatures for deep-well production liners  

SciTech Connect

Temperature of cement is an important factor in properly cementing deep well production liners, yet current methods of determining cement temperatures do not account for all variables. In this paper a computer model predicts temperatures of cement while pumping and while waiting on cement, compares computed and measured temperatures, defines the importance of certain cementing variables on temperatures, and provides an explanation of difficulties encountered while cementing liner tops.

Wooley, G.R.; Galate, J.W.; Giussani, A.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement to an increase of AF use from 8.7% to 20.9% of the total energy consumption. 2. One of the alternative fuels used cement industry produces about 3.3 billion tonnes of cement annually. Cement production is energy

Columbia University

14

India's cement industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions  

SciTech Connect

Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's cement sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. Analysis shows that in the twenty year period, 1973 to 1993, productivity in the aluminum sector increased by 0.8% per annum. An econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's cement sector has been biased towards the use of energy and capital, while it has been material and labor saving. The increase in productivity was mainly driven by a period of progress between 1983 and 1991 following partial decontrol of the cement sector in 1982. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency in the sector. Their analysis shows that the Indian cement sector is moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use. However, substantial further energy savings and carbon reduction potentials still exist.

Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOVT PERMEABILITY GAS RESERVOIR PRODUCTION USING LARGE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES A Thesis by STEPHEN ALLEN HOLDITCH Approved as to style and content by: ( airman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Me er) (Member) (Membe r) (Member) (Member...) August 1970 111 ABSTRACT Low Permeability Gas Reservoir Production Using Large Hydraulic Fractures. (August 1970) Stephen Allen Holditch, B. S. , Texas ARM University Directed by: Dr, R. A. Morse There has been relatively little work published...

Holditch, Stephen A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

An investigation of productivity increases from hydraulic fracturing treatments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN INVESTIGATION OF PRODUCTIVITY INCREASES FROM HYDRAULIC FRACTURING TREATMENTS A Thesis b7 Robert Joe Boriskie Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1963 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF PRODUCTIVITY INCREASES FROM HYDRAULIC FRACTURING TREATMENTS A Thesis Robert Joe Boriskie Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee...

Boriskie, Robert Joe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Special Cements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the production of expansive cements ettringite formation is used and the most popular ... ’s complex is added to Portland cement. Ettringite structure is discussed.

Wieslaw Kurdowski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

ANALYSIS OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELLS IN THE HAYNESVILLE SHALE USING SCALING METHODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELLS IN THE HAYNESVILLE SHALE USING. INTRODUCTION Before the advent of hydraulic fracturing technology and hor- izontal drilling, the Haynesville

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

19

10 - Assessing the environmental impact of conventional and ‘green’ cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: With the current focus on sustainability, it is necessary to evaluate cement’s environmental impact properly, especially when developing new ‘green’ concrete types. Therefore, this chapter investigates the available literature on every process involved during the production of cement and its alternatives. A detailed study of ordinary Portland cement’s environmental impacts is followed by an assessment of improvement potentials which can be achieved with the use of supplementary cementitious materials. Finally, the environmental impacts of alternative binders such as sulfoaluminate or magnesia cements as well as alkali activated binders are studied.

G. Habert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions from electricity consumption. This paper examinesmainly from electricity consumption for cement production,CO 2 emissions from electricity consumption are usually

Ke, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Investigation of benefit of using coal wastes in cement production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste disposal in coal preparation plants leads to serious environmental problems. These wastes usually contain about 20% carbon, and the composition of the remaining ash is similar to clay. Addition of these wastes to cement clinker raw material utilises carbon as a source of energy. In this investigation, the effect of addition of these waste materials to the raw materials used in cement manufacture is studied. Ordinary type II cement and sulphoaluminate cement may be produced from the wastes. Mechanical strength, chemical and phase analysis, setting time and particle size distribution of the cement were studied. The results of the experiments show that an addition of about 3% of the coal wastes to the raw materials used in cement manufacture produces cements with good quality. Further, energy consumption may be reduced by up to 15%.

A. Sarrafi; M.R. Izadpanah; A. Ebrahimi; A.I. Mansouri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Technology roadmapping for mature industries: 2010â??2050 global cement product roadmap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the use of a technology roadmap to create a holistic picture of the movement in a mature industry. Not only does it also help the cement manufacturers in mature and emerging markets, but also balances between market pull and technology push at a commercialised scale. The roadmap concept can assist any organisation to address three key strategic questions: where the company aims to go, where the status quo of the company and how the company will achieve its strategic intent goals. Thus, in this research, we illustrate the evolution of cement product from present to 2050 through the existing industrial literature, analysing forces, trends, impacts and developing a global cement product roadmap. The roadmap covers a wide range of cement products.

Tugrul U. Daim; Nuttavut Intarode

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

Wagner, J.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A. [Construction Technology Labs., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Evaluation of cement production using a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect

There are several primary conclusions which can be reached and used to define research required in establishing the feasibility of using PFBC-derived materials as cement feedstock. 1. With appropriate blending almost any material containing the required cement-making materials can be utilized to manufacture cement. However, extensive blending with multiple materials or the use of ash in relatively small quantities would compromise the worth of this concept. 2. The composition of a potential feedstock must be considered not only with respect to the presence of required materials, but just as significantly, with respect to the presence and concentration of known deleterious materials. 3. The processing costs for rendering the feedstock into an acceptable composition and the energy costs associated with both processing and burning must be considered. It should be noted that the cost of energy to produce cement, expressed as a percentage of the price of the product is higher than for any other major industrial product. Energy consumption is, therefore, a major issue. 4. The need for conformance to environmental regulations has a profound effect on the cement industry since waste materials can neither be discharged to the atmosphere or be shipped to a landfill. 5. Fifth, the need for achieving uniformity in the composition of the cement is critical to controlling its quality. Unfortunately, certain materials in very small concentrations have the capability to affect the rate and extent to which the cementitious compound in portland cement are able to form. Particularly critical are variations in the ash, the sulfur content of the coal or the amount and composition of the stack dust returned to the kiln.

DeLallo, M.; Eshbach, R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hydraulic testing of accelerator-production-of-tritium rod bundles  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic tests have been performed on small pitch-to-diameter-ratio rod bundles using light water (1.7 < P/D < 1.17, and d = 3.175 mm). Flows cover the range from greater-than-nominal Reynolds numbers (fully turbulent) to low-speed laminar flows. Differential pressure measurements were made across the support plates holding the rod bundles, across the rod bundles, and across the entire assembly. Flow rates, temperatures, and gauge pressures also were measured. The data from these hydraulic tests have been compared to correlating literature for tightly pitched rod bundles. The prototypic geometry of these tests did not compare directly to any geometry found in the literature because of the variety of subchannels along the outer wall of the rod bundle. Under that constraint, there was excellent comparison of the rod-bundle friction factor with those factors given in the literature. The results show a large range of the Reynolds number over which the flow is in transition from laminar to turbulent (e.g., 580 < Re{sub Tr} < 13,000). Also presented is the comparison of the overall rung pressure drop to a solution based on hydraulic-resistance handbook calculations.

Spatz, T.L.; Siebe, D.A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

29

Fully coupled fluid flow and geomechanics in the study of hydraulic fracturing and post-fracture production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work addresses the poroelastic effect on the processes involved in hydraulic fracturing and post-fracture production using a finite element based fully coupled poroelastic model… (more)

Aghighi, Mohammad Ali

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

PRODUCTION OF LOW-ENERGY, 100% BY-PRODUCT CEMENT UTILIZING COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ever-increasing quantity of by-products generated from burning coal in the production of electricity has brought about the need for new areas of utilization. This… (more)

Rust, David E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

SciTech Connect

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

32

Effectiveness of the top-down nanotechnology in the production of ultrafine cement (~220?nm)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present investigation is dealing with the communition of the cement particle to the ultrafine level (?220 nm) utilizing the bead milling process, which is considered as a top-down nanotechnology. During the grinding of the cement particle, ...

Byung-Wan Jo, Sumit Chakraborty, Ki Heon Kim, Yun Sung Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

MECS 2006 - Cement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Cement More Documents & Publications Cement (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Glass Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS)...

34

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the coal-dominated energy mix. We note that China’sof final energy consumption and fuel mix of China’s cement

Ke, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hydraulic Fracturing in Particulate Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For more than five decades, hydraulic fracturing has been widely used to enhance oil and gas production. Hydraulic fracturing in solid materials (e.g., rock) has… (more)

Chang, Hong

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the production costs of all waste- burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 abatement using the calcium looping cycle. Energy Environ.the CO 2 captured by the calcium looping system, use of the16. Flow diagram of calcium-looping CO 2 capture and cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type of high-heat or pyroprocessing kiln used today is theis decarbonated in the pyroprocessing stage (main reaction:water (H 2 O) during pyroprocessing (e.g. , ,in a cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Alex Benson Cement Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with steel balls which grind mix into a fine powder -> Final Cement Product Associated Air Pollution: o From health effects Relative News; o "EPA Clamps down on Cement Plant Pollution" http.4 million dollars for violating the Clean Air Act and 2 million dollars for pollution controls #12

Toohey, Darin W.

40

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Resource Saving Technologies in Cement Industry.1:87–94. Blue World Crete. 2012. Technology. Available atOakey. 2009. CO 2 Capture Technologies for Cement Industry.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Performance of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Currently, several candidates for secondary waste immobilization at the Hanford site in the State of Washington, USA are being considered. To demonstrate the durability of the product in the unsaturated Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the site, a series of tests have been performed one of the candidate materials using the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) system. The material that was tested was the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) granular product and the granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix. The FBSR product is composed primarily of an insoluble sodium aluminosilicate matrix with the dominant phases being feldspathoid minerals mostly nepheline, sodalite, and nosean. The PUF test method allows for the accelerated weathering of materials, including radioactive waste forms, under hydraulically unsaturated conditions, thus mimicking the open-flow and transport properties that most likely will be present at the IDF. The experiments show a trend of decreasing tracer release as a function of time for several of the elements released from the material including Na, Si, Al, and Cs. However, some of the elements, notably I and Re, show a steady release throughout the yearlong test. This result suggests that the release of these minerals from the sodalite cage occurs at a different rate compared with the dissolution of the predominant nepheline phase.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Rod, Kenton A.; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Christopher F.; Pierce, Eric M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Oil Shale Energy and Oil Shale Mineralsand Other Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.15 3.3.4. Calcareous Oil Shale as an Alternative Raw

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Evidence of Reopened Microfractures in Production Data of Hydraulically Fractured Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracture complexity, that may have been opened or reopened during the hydraulic fracturing operation. The main objective of this work is to investigate the role of fracture complexity in resolving the apparent SSV discrepancy and to illustrate whether...

Apiwathanasorn, Sippakorn

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic {beta}-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability.

Chen, Ying-Liang [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Ko, Ming-Sheng [Institute of Mineral Resources Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chunghsiao E. Rd., Taipei City 10608, Taiwan (China); Lai, Yi-Chieh [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, No. 200, Chung-Pei Rd., Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Chang, Juu-En, E-mail: juuen@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambuja Cements Limited Ambuja Cements Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited Place Mumbai, India Zip 400 021 Sector Biomass Product Indian cement company. the company installed a 24MW biomass based captive electric generating stations that will provide electricity to Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limitedâ€(tm)s (“GACL”) facility in Ropar, Punjab. References Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited is a company located in Mumbai, India . References ↑ "Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gujarat_Ambuja_Cements_Limited&oldid=346290

46

Method for directional hydraulic fracturing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for directional hydraulic fracturing using borehole seals to confine pressurized fluid in planar permeable regions, comprising: placing a sealant in the hole of a structure selected from geologic or cemented formations to fill the space between a permeable planar component and the geologic or cemented formation in the vicinity of the permeable planar component; making a hydraulic connection between the permeable planar component and a pump; permitting the sealant to cure and thereby provide both mechanical and hydraulic confinement to the permeable planar component; and pumping a fluid from the pump into the permeable planar component to internally pressurize the permeable planar component to initiate a fracture in the formation, the fracture being disposed in the same orientation as the permeable planar component.

Swanson, David E. (West St. Paul, MN); Daly, Daniel W. (Crystal, MN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cementation Patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contributions vary in quality, but any...solid bed-rock by cementation...sedimentary rocks covered include...strata ofthe rock record...petroleum reservoir in which...microenvironmental permeability alone. Large...cements in sandstones, kinds ofsilicifica-tion...fabrics, porosity development...

GERALD M. FRIEDMAN

1988-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is decarbonated in the pyroprocessing stage (main reaction:and water (H 2 O) during pyroprocessing ( e.g. , in a cement

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Thermal-hydraulic design of the target/blanket for the accelerator production of tritium conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design was developed for the target/blanket system of an accelerator-based system to produce tritium. The target/blanket system uses clad tungsten rods for a spallation target and clad lead rods as a neutron multiplier in a blanket surrounding the target. The neutrons produce tritium in {sup 3}He, which is contained in aluminum tubes located in the decoupler and blanket regions. This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic design of the target, decoupler, and blanket developed for the conceptual design of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project, and demonstrates there is adequate margin in the design at full power operation.

Willcutt, G.J.E. Jr.; Kapernick, R.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Chapter 9 - Hydraulic Pumps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter provides an overview of hydraulic-powered downhole pumps, which are powered by a stream of high pressure power fluid supplied by a power fluid (PF) pump at the surface and sent to a downhole pump or pump engine. Hydraulic pumps are basically of two types—piston downhole pumps that are similar to beam down-hole pumps, and jet downhole pumps that reduce the pressure on the formation by high-speed power fluid flow through the throat of a venturi or jet pump nozzle-diffuser combination. Hydraulic pumps can be used to remove liquids from gas wells. A skid-mounted hydraulic pump can be used to kick off a gas well and then be moved to another well for testing, production, or longer term de-watering. Hydraulic pumping is generally not depth limited, and deviated or crooked wells do not present problems. Hydraulic reciprocating pumps can produce a low bottomhole pressure. A jet pump may require a fluid height over the pump of 20% of submergence. A jet pump is more trouble-free than a reciprocating hydraulic pump and can tolerate some solids in the production. Fairly high rates of more than several hundred bbls/day are possible. In general, hydraulic systems are not rate limited when removing liquids from gas wells.

James Lea; Henry Nickens; Michael Wells

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Ca0-Sio 2 ratio) no akermanite was formed, and 6-C 2S*,treatment. large amounts of akermanite, Ca MgSi o , a non-days which Minerals present a Akermanite shows the long-term

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the production costs of all waste- burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The proposed fixation of sludge in cement at the Feed Materials Production Center  

SciTech Connect

The Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), located near Cincinnati, Ohio, is a government-owned facility. Westinghouse Materials Company of Ohio (WMCO) is the prime contractor to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the FMPC. DOE has entered into a Consent Agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) to remediate the FMPC site. A project known as the Environmental Remedial Action (ERA) Project was created to accomplish the task of remediating the site. The majority of the estimated $2-billion ERA Project was broken into five smaller manageable subtasks called operable units.'' Each operable unit is handled as a project with its own project manager/engineer. Due to the project's complexity and stringent completion dates, DOE and WMCO have devised a project management philosophy to ensure the successful completion of the ERA Project. This paper will discuss the ERA project and the development needs to accomplish this project. In particular, development of processes for the treatment of waste sludges for Operable Units 1 and 4 will be discussed. Operable Units 2 sludges will be treated in a similar fashion to Operable Unit 1 if it is determined these sludges need treatment. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Gimpel, R.F.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Suspensions in hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

Suspensions or slurries are widely used in well stimulation and hydraulic fracturing processes to enhance the production of oil and gas from the underground hydrocarbon-bearing formation. The success of these processes depends significantly upon having a thorough understanding of the behavior of suspensions used. Therefore, the characterization of suspensions under realistic conditions, for their rheological and hydraulic properties, is very important. This chapter deals with the state-of-the-art hydraulic fracturing suspension technology. Specifically it deals with various types of suspensions used in well stimulation and fracturing processes, their rheological characterization and hydraulic properties, behavior of suspensions in horizontal wells, review of proppant settling velocity and proppant transport in the fracture, and presently available measurement techniques for suspensions and their merits. Future industry needs for better understanding of the complex behavior of suspensions are also addressed. 74 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

Shah, S.N. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 per system per year. Algae biomass fuels are predicted toalgae oils suitable for manufacture of high-grade plastics, transport fuel,algae are grown at a facility next to the cement plant to be harvested, dried, and then used as fuel

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the production costs of all waste-burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Hydraulic Fracturing (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Vermont prohibits hydraulic fracturing or the collection, storage, or treatment of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing

60

Cement, Ceramics, and Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cement and its applications as concrete (a composite of cement and aggregate) are known throughout the world. The most common cement used today is Portland, named after the gray rock of Portland, Eng...

O. V. Roussak; H. D. Gesser

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cement, Ceramics, and Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cement and its applications as concrete (a composite of cement and aggregate) is known throughout the world. The most common cement used today is Portland, named after the grey rock of Portland, Engl...

H. D. Gesser

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Ultrasonic sludge disintegration for enhanced methane production in anaerobic digestion: effects of sludge hydrolysis efficiency and hydraulic retention time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrolysis of waste activated sludge (WAS) has been regarded as the rate limiting step of anaerobic sludge digestion. Therefore, in this study, the ... effect of ultrasound and hydraulic residence time during sludge

Dong-Jin Kim; Jonghak Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ettringite and calcium sulfoaluminate cement: investigation of water content by near-infrared spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement is a sulfate-based binder whose high-performance hydraulic behavior depends on the rapid formation of ettringite, when grinded clinker is hydrated in presence of gypsum. Ettringite

Daniela Gastaldi; Fulvio Canonico; Enrico Boccaleri

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements Portland Cement Association Logo The Portland Cement Association has committed to a 10% reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per ton of cementitious product produced or sold from a 1990 baseline by 2020. The industry will achieve this goal and foster further reductions by end users of their product through the implementation of a 3-part program that focuses on the production process, the product cement manufacturers produce, and application of the product. Reductions from the first two elements of this plan will contribute to achieving the 10% reduction goal. While reductions from the product application element will not count towards the goal, the CO2-reduction benefits of cement and concrete use could be even more significant than those achieved through manufacturing

65

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Environmental Advantages. Available at http://www.ceratechinc.com/environmental- advantages.asp Cross, D., J. Stephens, J. Vollmer. 2005. Structural Applications of 100 Percent Fly Ash Concrete. 2005 World of Coal Ash (WOCA), Lexington, Kentucky, USAApril...://recocement.com/ Roskos, C., D. Cross, M. Berry, J. Stephens. 2011. Identification and Verification of Self-Cementing Fly Ash Binders for ?Green? Concrete. 2011 World of Coal Ash (WOCA) Conference ? May 9-12, 2011 in Denver CO, USA. Available at www.flyash.info/2011...

Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

Mike L. Laue

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production instantly reaches the current world best practice energyworld best practice and implement aggressive energy efficiency and carbon reduction measures in all cement productionenergy intensity of China’s cement production would reach current world

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Capture of green-house carbon dioxide in Portland cement  

SciTech Connect

A novel process has been developed to sequester green-house carbon dioxide produced by the cement industry in precast cement products. Typically, 10--24 wt % of CO{sub 2} produced by calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering of the cement may be captured. The carbonation process also cures the cement paste within minutes into hard bodies. The process maintains high pH conditions during curing, to allow conventional steel reinforcement of concrete. The process will save time and money to the cement industry, and at the same time, help them to comply with the Clean Air Act by sequestering the green-house carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.; Knox, L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Problems in squeeze cementing  

SciTech Connect

For the past half century, work has been carried out to improve squeeze cementing. During the course of time, new techniques, equipment, cement and cement additives were introduced. Work is still underway to improve squeeze cementing. Basic concept of squeeze cementing, understanding the problems, planning for a squeeze job and then later testing of the job help in achieving the goal. Solutions were offered to some common problems, whereas many regional problems need time to time study and effort. Squeezing long perforations in highly permeable sand has always been a problem, for which some techniques were presented.

Toor, I.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assessment of halite-cemented reservoir zones  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the techniques used to identify the presence and distribution of halite-cemented layers in a sandstone oil reservoir. The distribution of these layers in the wells was found by matching the core data with two independent halite identifiers from the well logs. Numerical well models were used to assess the dimensions and spatial distribution of the halite-cemented layers. Multiple simulation runs in which the spatial distribution, the dimensions, and the vertical permeability were varied resulted in a stochastic model that best matched the production history. Gas and water coning are retarded by the halite-cemented layers if the perforations are properly located.

Huurdeman, A.J.M.; Floris, F.J.T.; Lutgert, J.E. (TNO Inst. of Applied Geoscience (NL)); Breunese, J.N. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands (NL)); Al-Asbahl, A.M.S. (Ministry of Oil and Mineral Resources (YE))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a method by which microseismic events can be discriminated/detected that correspond to only the portion of the hydraulic fracture that contains the proppant material and can be expected to be conductive to the flow of oil and gas. July 3, 2013 Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Figure 1: A graph of ionic conductivity as a function of temperature for the anti-perovskite Li3OCl. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Applications: Oil and gas production Geophysical exploration Benefits: Tracks the disposition of material in a hydraulic fracturing

72

Advanced Hydraulic Wind Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems ... Keywords: wind, tide, energy, power, hydraulic

Jack A. Jones; Allan Bruce; Adrienne S. Lam

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Hydraulic fracturing-1  

SciTech Connect

This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Two-dimensional computational simulation of eccentric annular cementing displacements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1 etudes et Productions Schlumberger...cementing of an oil well. The...in the far field. The narrow...Etudes et Productions Schlumberger...cementing of an oil well. The...can expect a cumulative error of size...design in a field setting. Thus...certain heavy oils in porous media......

S. Pelipenko; I. A. Frigaard

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the production costs of all waste-burning cement kilns, andthree cement plants are burning waste fuels. Beijing Cementof waste; the plant is burning solid waste from the chemical

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cement (2010 MECS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Cement Sector (NAICS 327310) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

77

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Monitoring hydraulic fracture growth: Laboratory experiments  

SciTech Connect

The authors carry out small-scale hydraulic fracture experiments to investigate the physics of hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory experiments are combined with time-lapse ultrasonic measurements with active sources using both compressional and shear-wave transducers. For the time-lapse measurements they focus on ultrasonic measurement changes during fracture growth. As a consequence they can detect the hydraulic fracture and characterize its shape and geometry during growth. Hence, this paper deals with fracture characterization using time-lapse acoustic data. Hydraulic fracturing is used in the oil and gas industry to stimulate reservoir production.

Groenenboom, J.; Dam, D.B. van

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SALTSTONE FORMULATED USING 1Q11, 2Q11 AND 3Q11 TANK 50 SLURRY SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Saltstone formulation work requested by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing Saltstone samples for fresh property analysis and hydraulic conductivity measurements using actual Tank 50 salt solution rather than simulated salt solution. Samples of low level waste salt solution collected from Tank 50H during the first, second, and third quarters of 2011 were used to formulate the Saltstone samples. The salt solution was mixed with premix (45 wt % slag, 45 wt % fly ash, and 10 wt % cement), in a ratio consistent with facility operating conditions during the quarter of interest. The fresh properties (gel, set, bleed) of each mix were evaluated and compared to the recommended acceptance criteria for the Saltstone Production Facility. ASTM D5084-03, Method C was used to measure the hydraulic conductivity of the Saltstone samples. The hydraulic conductivity of Saltstone samples prepared from 1Q11 and 2Q11 samples of Tank 50H is 4.2E-9 cm/sec and 2.6E-9 cm/sec, respectively. Two additional 2Q11 and one 3Q11 sample were not successfully tested due to the inability to achieve stable readings during saturation and testing. The hydraulic conductivity of the samples made from Tank 50H salt solution compare well to samples prepared with simulated salt solution and cured under similar conditions (1.4E-9 - 4.9E-8 cm/sec).

Reigel, M.; Nichols, R.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

80

Hydraulic fracturing accelerates coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect

Methane production from deep coal seams that never will be mined requires hydraulic fracturing for faster, optimal recovery. Since this can be a complex process, proper formation evaluation beforehand is essential, according to this paper.

Holditch, S.A. (Texas A and M Univ. (US)); Ely, J.W.; Semmelbeck, M.E.; Carter, R.H. (S.A. Holditch and Associates (US)); Hinkel, J.J.; Jeffrey, R.G. Jr. (Dowell Schlumberger (US))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view. These evaluations also determined which configurations and options do not appear to be feasible at the current time.

C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which resulted in the formation of ettringite on hydration.noted that formation of ettringite from C3A contributes tomade the formation of ettringite possible in the hydrated

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature. Due to high energy and materials costs, such atreatment. The high costs of materials and energy involvedearlier, the high costs of materials and energy involved

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

°C, large quantities of akermanite, CazMgSiz07, were formed.to be converted to akermanite ( which is not cementitious)shale, the formation of akermanite (the non-cementitious

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Investigation of the Effect of Non-Darcy Flow and Multi-Phase Flow on the Productivity of Hydraulically Fractured Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has recently been the completion of choice for most tight gas bearing formations. It has proven successful to produce these formations in a commercial manner. However, some considerations have to be taken into account to design...

Alarbi, Nasraldin Abdulslam A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} at the Dragon Products, Inc. Cement Plant located in Thomaston, Maine. 1990 Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect

The background and process of the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} are described. The Scrubber was developed for Dragon Cement Plant in Thomaston, Maine and facilitates a number of process improvements. The exhaust gas is scrubbed of SO{sub 2} with better than 90% efficiency. The kiln dust is cleaned of alkalines and so can be returned to kiln feed instead of dumped to landfill. Potassium sulfate in commercial quantity and purity can be recovered. Distilled water is recovered which also has commercial potential. Thus, various benefits are accrued and no waste streams remain for disposal. The process is applicable to both wet and dry process cement kilns and appears to have potential in any industry which generates acidic gaseous exhausts and/or basic solid or liquid wastes.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect cement penetration Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: of carbonation of cement-based products. The process of carbonation and the rate of carbonation penetration... were very important factors that affect rate of...

88

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

Fred Sabins

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

Experimental verification of dimensional analysis for hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

The authors have derived model laws that relate experimental parameters of a physical model of hydraulic fracture propagation to the prototype parameters. Correct representation of elastic deformation, fluid friction, crack propagation, and fluid leakoff forms the basis of the scaling laws. For tests at in-situ stress, high fluid viscosity and low fracture toughness are required. Tests on cement blocks agreed with the scale laws based on elastic behavior.

Pater, C.J. de; Weijers, L. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Cleary, M.P.; Quinn, T.S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Barr, D.T.; Johnson, D.E. (Resources Engineering Systems, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

Cement report - CEC format 110611  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9E 9E Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Daniel Olsen, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, Aimee McKane Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

93

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Effect of Proppant Size and Concentration on Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in Shale Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracture conductivity in ultra-low permeability shale reservoirs is directly related to well productivity. The main goal of hydraulic fracturing in shale formations is to create a network of conductive pathways in the rock which increase...

Kamenov, Anton

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydraulic Fracture Optimization with a Pseudo-3D Model in Multi-layered Lithology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing is a technique to accelerate production and enhance ultimate recovery of oil and gas while fracture geometry is an important aspect in hydraulic fracturing design and optimization. Systematic design procedures are available...

Yang, Mei

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities By Jared Sagoff * April 25, 2008 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - When Argonne materials scientists Arun Wagh and Dileep Singh initially developed Ceramicrete®, a novel phosphate cement that stabilizes radioactive waste streams, they did not immediately recognize that with one or two extra ingredients, the cement could solve another problem in the nuclear complex. In the course of the development of the Ceramicrete technology, Wagh and Singh formed a multilayered collaboration among Argonne, the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia, and Ceradyne Boron Products LLC. This international scientific partnership created an unusually efficient nuclear shield that blocks the neutrons and gamma rays

98

Hydraulic Institute Member Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As the developer of the universally acclaimed ANSI/HI Pump Standards, a key reference for pump knowledge and end-user specifications, the Hydraulic  nstitute (HI) provides its members with timely...

99

History and some potentials of oil shale cement  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of oil shale as a cement component is discussed. It was investigated in America and Europe during World War I. Additional development occurred in Western Europe, Russia, and China during the 1920s and 1930s. World War II provided further development incentives and a relatively mature technology was in place in Germany, Russia, and China prior to 1980. The utilization of oil shale in cement has taken a number of different paths. One approach has been to utilize the energy in the oil shale as the principal source for the cement plant and to use the combusted shale as a minor constituent of the plant's cement product. A second approach has been to use the combusted shale as a class C or cementitious fly-ash component in portland cement concrete. Other approaches utilizing eastern oil shale have been to use the combusted oil shale with additives as a specialty cement, or to cocombust the oil shale with coal and utilize the sulfur-rich combustion product.

Knutson, C.F.; Smith, R.P.; Russell, B.F. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hydraulic fracturing and geothermal energy development in Japan  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a review of research and development on geothermal energy extraction in Japan especially on hydraulic fracturing. First recent geothermal developments in Japan are outlined in Part I. An increase in the production rate of geothermal wells may be highly dependent on the geothermal well stimulation technology based on hydraulic fracturing. The hydraulic fracturing technique must be developed also for geothermal energy to be extracted from hot, dry rock masses. In Part II, the research on hydraulic fracturing and field application are reviewed.

Abe, H.; Suyama, J.; Takahashi, H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

102

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

SciTech Connect

China's cement industry, which produced 1,388 million metric tons (Mt) of cement in 2008, accounts for almost half of the world's total cement production. Nearly 40% of China's cement production is from relatively obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the remainder from more modern rotary kiln cement plants, including plants equipped with new suspension pre-heater and pre-calciner (NSP) kilns. Shandong Province is the largest cement-producing Province in China, producing 10% of China's total cement output in 2008. This report documents an analysis of the potential to improve the energy efficiency of NSP kiln cement plants in Shandong Province. Sixteen NSP kiln cement plants were surveyed regarding their cement production, energy consumption, and current adoption of 34 energy-efficient technologies and measures. Plant energy use was compared to both domestic (Chinese) and international best practice using the Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-Cement). This benchmarking exercise indicated an average technical potential primary energy savings of 12% would be possible if the surveyed plants operated at domestic best practice levels in terms of energy use per ton of cement produced. Average technical potential primary energy savings of 23% would be realized if the plants operated at international best practice levels. Energy conservation supply curves for both fuel and electricity savings were then constructed for the 16 surveyed plants. Using the bottom-up electricity conservation supply curve model, the cost-effective electricity efficiency potential for the studied cement plants in 2008 is estimated to be 373 gigawatt hours (GWh), which accounts for 16% of total electricity use in the 16 surveyed cement plants in 2008. Total technical electricity-saving potential is 915 GWh, which accounts for 40% of total electricity use in the studied plants in 2008. The fuel conservation supply curve model shows the total technical fuel efficiency potential equal to 7,949 terajoules (TJ), accounting for 8% of total fuel used in the studied cement plants in 2008. All the fuel efficiency potential is shown to be cost effective. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction potential associated with cost-effective electricity saving is 383 kiloton (kt) CO{sub 2}, while total technical potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction from electricity-saving is 940 ktCO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials associated with fuel-saving potentials is 950 ktCO{sub 2}.

Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Wang, Lan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

104

Prediction of effects of hydraulic fracturing using reservoir and well flow simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method to predict and evaluate effects of hydraulic fracturing jobs by using reservoir and well flow numerical simulation. The concept of the method i5 that steam production rate at the operating well head pressure is predicted with different fracture conditions which would be attained by the hydraulic fracturing jobs. Then, the effects of the hydraulic fracturing is evaluated by comparing the predicted steam production rate and that before the hydraulic fracturing. This course of analysis will suggest how large fracture should be created by the fracturing job to attain large enough increase in steam production at the operating condition and the best scheme of the hydraulic fracturing job.

Mineyuki Hanano; Tayuki Kondo

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

Kinoshita, Hajime, E-mail: h.kinoshita@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Carro-Mateo, Beatriz [The Public University of Navarra, C/Esquíroz, 30 trasera, Pamplona 31007 (Spain)] [The Public University of Navarra, C/Esquíroz, 30 trasera, Pamplona 31007 (Spain); Marchand, Geraldine [The National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)] [The National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Collier, Nick [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Milestone, Neil [Industrial Research Ltd., 69 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt, 5040 (New Zealand)] [Industrial Research Ltd., 69 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt, 5040 (New Zealand)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Chapter 9 - Hydraulic pumping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The hydraulic pumping system takes liquid (water or oil) from a liquid reservoir on the surface, puts it through a reciprocating multiplex piston pump or horizontal electrical submersible pump to increase the pressure, and then injects the pressurized liquid (power fluid) down-hole through a tubing string. At the bottom of the injection tubing string, the power fluid is directed into the nozzle of a jet pump or to the hydraulic engine of a piston pump, both of which have been set well below the producing fluid level. The surface injection pressures normally range from approximately 2000 psi up to 4000 psi, with some going up to but rarely above 4500 psi. An electric motor, diesel engine, or gas engine is used to drive the multiplex pump. The fundamental operating principle of subsurface hydraulic pumps is Pascal's Law, postulated by Blaise Pascal in 1653. This principle makes it possible to transmit pressure from the surface by means of a liquid-filled tubing string to any given point below the surface. The chapter further highlights applications to dewatering wells-gas and coal bed methane, limitations of other forms of lift, advantages of hydraulic pumping, disadvantages of hydraulic pumping, and different types of operating systems.

James F. Lea; Henry V. Nickens; Mike R. Wells

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

Garrett-Price, B.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterMonitoring during hydraulic fracturing using the TG-2 well,fracture processes in hydraulic fracturing, Quarterly Report

Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hydraulic Fracturing Poster | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Fracturing Poster Hydraulic Fracturing Poster Educational poster graphically displaying the key components of hydraulic fracturing. Teachers: If you would like hard...

111

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterMonitoring during hydraulic fracturing using the TG-2 well,fracture processes in hydraulic fracturing, Quarterly Report

Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks Mingjie Chen Keywords: Hydraulic fracturing Fractal dimension Surrogate model Optimization Global sensitivity a b s t r a c t Hydraulic fracturing has been used widely to stimulate production of oil, natural gas

Lu, Zhiming

116

Chapter 9 - Hydraulic Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter covers the following topics: Features of hydraulic turbines; Early history and development; Efficiency of various types of turbine; Size of the various turbine types; The Pelton wheel turbine and controlling its speed; Energy losses; Reaction turbines; The Francis and the Kaplan turbines; Calculation of performance; Effect of size on the performance of hydraulic turbines; Cavitation and its avoidance; Calculation of the various specific speeds of turbines; The Wells turbine- Design and performance variables; Tidal power turbines- The SeaGen tidal turbine and its operational principles.

S.L. Dixon; C.A. Hall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hydraulic Hybrid Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Hybrid Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Hydraulic Hybrid Systems Name Hydraulic Hybrid Systems Address 320 N. Railroad Ave Place Loveland, Colorado Zip 80537 Sector Vehicles Product hydraulic hybrid system for light-duty vehicles Year founded 2008 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 303-519-4144 Website http://www.hydraulichybridsyst Coordinates 40.394833°, -105.0758931° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.394833,"lon":-105.0758931,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Investigation of Created Fracture Geometry through Hydraulic Fracture Treatment Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Successful development of shale gas reservoirs is highly dependent on hydraulic fracture treatments. Many questions remain in regards to the geometry of the created fractures. Production data analysis from some shale gas wells quantifies a much...

Ahmed, Ibraheem 1987-

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Design of High Viscosity Cement Gun for Vertebroplasty:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure for treating spine. Cement leakage is problem occurring from usage of low viscosity bone cements. High viscosity bone cements… (more)

Gupta, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

INTERPRETATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING PRESSURE IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulic fracturing has been used in most oil and gas wells to increase production by creating fractures that extend from the wellbore into the formation.… (more)

Kim, Gun Ho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to provide an assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants with special emphasis on heat recovery applications. Exhaust gases in the cement industry which are suitable for heat recovery range in temperature from about 400 to 1300 K, are generally dusty, may be highly abrasive, and are often heavily laden with alkalies, sulfates, and chlorides. Particulates in the exhaust streams range in size from molecular to about 100 ..mu..m in diameter and come from both the raw feed as well as the ash in the coal which is the primary fuel used in the cement industry. The major types of heat-transfer equipment used in the cement industry include preheaters, gas-to-air heat exchangers, waste heat boilers, and clinker coolers. The most important gas-side fouling mechanisms in the cement industry are those due to particulate, chemical reaction, and corrosion fouling. Particulate transport mechanisms which appear to be of greatest importance include laminar and turbulent mass transfer, thermophoresis, electrophoresis, and inertial impaction. Chemical reaction mechanisms of particular importance include the deposition of alkali sulfates, alkali chlorides, spurrite, calcium carbonate, and calcium sulfate. At sufficiently low temperatures, sulfuric acid and water can condense on heat exchanger surfaces which can cause corrosion and also attract particulates in the flow. The deleterious effects of gas-side fouling in cement plants are due to: (1) increased capital costs; (2) increased maintenance costs; (3) loss of production; and (4) energy losses. A conservative order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the cost of gas-side fouling in US cement plants is $0.24 billion annually.

Marner, W.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) in mortars of white cement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study white cement CEM I-52.5 and white limestone cement CEM II-LL, A and B, with 15% and 25% limestone substitution, were studied. The way delayed ettringite forms, due to exposure to high temperatures (50 °C) and external sulphate attacks, was examined in the mortar samples. The mortars were immersed at 50 °C for 180 days in: (a) a saturated Ca(OH)2 solution and (b) a 5% Na2SO4 solution. During the experiment’s duration, the mortar samples were being observed visually on a regular basis while their expansion was estimated on a weekly basis by measuring the change of length with a micrometer. At the end of the experiment, the mortar samples’ compressive strength was determined and the deterioration products were identified through means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDAX), Thermogravimetry (TG) and Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Concluding it is evident that the amount of ettringite is proportional to the C3A content of cement. Sulphates amount in cement is the controlling factor for heat induced ettringite formation since when they are consumed the reaction stops. On the other hand in the case of external sulphate attack another important controlling factor is the compressive strength of the cement; the higher compressive strength the lower the risk of expansion. Finally, in the case of external sulphate attack, limestone, when added to cement, was proved to enhance the durability against sulphates attack when compared to a cement of the same class.

M. Katsioti; N. Patsikas; P. Pipilikaki; N. Katsiotis; K. Mikedi; M. Chaniotakis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

125

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

126

Measurements of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rates from different brands of cement used in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......these radionuclides in large amounts of waste products used in the cement manufacturing, like phosphogypsum, coal fly ash, shale ash, some rare minerals and so on. Fly ash is obtained from coal-fired power plants and certainly contains......

S. A. Mujahid; A. Rahim; S. Hussain; M. Farooq

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrous portland cements Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability of Concrete Construction Tarun R. Naik, F.ASCE1 Summary: , a greenhouse gas GHG ; production of one ton of portland cement produces about one ton of CO2 and other...

128

A synergistic approach to optimizing hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

Combining measurement, simulation, and imaging technologies into an integrated program can help operators achieve the best hydraulic fracture treatment possible. Hydrocarbon production can be significantly increased when fractures are extended to the planned length, and fracturing fluid is retained within the zone of interest. Fractures that break out of zone increase the risk of excess water production with the hydrocarbon. Consequently, the ability to select suitable operational parameters for hydraulic fracturing is critical to job success. An evaluation of formation properties and potential barriers to hydraulic fracturing can be made with three-dimensional (3D) simulation to integrate data taken from wireline logs, waveform sonic logs, and microfrac measurements. In-situ stress orientation is determined by use of a downhole extensometer, oriented cores, anelastic strain recovery (ASR) measurements, and borehole imaging logs. Sidewall cores can be taken perpendicular to wellbore walls without distorting the borehole or the core taken; orientation of the cores can be determined with imaging logs run after coring. Natural fractures can be viewed with a downhole video camera lowered into the well on fiberoptic cable. Effectiveness of fracture treatments may be evaluated with various gamma ray logging techniques production logs comparing expected production to actual zonal contribution. Refined procedures that result from after-frac analysis can be used to plain field development for optimal reservoir drainage.

Kessler, C.; Venditto, J.; McMechan, D.; Edwards, P.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Tilmeter hydraulic fracture imaging enhancement project: Progress repeort  

SciTech Connect

Over half of all oil & gas production wells drilled in the United States depend upon hydraulic fracturing to sustain or enhance production. However, there is no existing technology that allows detailed near-surface imaging of these hydraulically-driven fractures at depths greater than about 5000 feet. To image hydraulic fractures in the 8000`-10,000` depth range, we are currently redesigning tiltmeter tools in order to deploy the instruments deeper to escape the cultural/natural surface noise that often masks the hydrofrac signal. With nearly noise-free data, we should be in a better position to separate the earth-tide signal from the tiltmeter signal and investigate fine-scale hydraulic fracturing processes.

Castillo, D.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wright, C.A.; Conant, R.A. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

New Strong Cement Materials: Chemically Bonded Ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specimens (58-60). The crystalline cement mineral tobermorite...has developed a cement waste form in which a slurry ofcement...additives is mixed with a waste solution. The "grout...Scintific Basr for Nuclear Waste Mangement VIII, vol...

DELLA M. ROY

1987-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

131

NETL Releases Hydraulic Fracturing Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National Energy Technology Laboratory has released a technical report on the results of a limited field study that monitored a hydraulic fracturing operation in Greene County, PA.

132

Cement advanced furnace and process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a suspension shaft furnace for producing discrete cement clinkers from discrete pellets of cement-forming batch materials which are gravity-migrated therethrough. It comprises a vertical furnace housing enclosing a top pellet-feeding and preheating zone comprising an elongate vertical shaft section opening into an intermediate fluidized bed section comprising fuel inlet conduits, an air-permeable clinker-impermeable support; a lower clinker-cooling section beneath the fluidized bed section; clinker-discharge means communicating between the fluidized bed section and the cooling section and air inlet means.

Litka, A.F.; Cohen, S.M.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

134

August 22, 2012 (v. 5) Summary of Studies Related to Hydraulic Fracturing Conducted by USGS Water Science Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

August 22, 2012 (v. 5) Summary of Studies Related to Hydraulic Fracturing Conducted by USGS Water and hydraulic fracturing on groundwater and surface-water quantity and quality and ecosystems. "On ­ Maps related to oil and gas production and hydraulic fracturing are included in the USGS Fact Sheet

135

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

136

Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump  

SciTech Connect

The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE GROUTS AND VAULT CONCRETES  

SciTech Connect

The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone. Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement (dry premix) to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of three types of saltstone and two vault concretes. The saltstone formulations included saltstone premix batched with (1) Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), (2) Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), and (3) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60). The vault concrete formulations tested included the Vault 1/4 concrete and two variations of the Vault 2 concrete (Mix 1 and Mix 2). Wet properties measured for the saltstone formulations included yield stress, plastic viscosity, wet unit weight, bleed water volume, gel time, set time, and heat of hydration. Hydraulic and physical properties measured on the cured saltstone and concrete samples included saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention, compressive strength, porosity, particle density, and dry bulk density. These properties were determined following a minimum 28 day curing period. Additional testing of the three saltstone formulations was conducted following a minimum 90 day curing period. The compressive strength of each saltstone and concrete material was measured at approximately 14, 28, 56, and 90 days. Recommended hydraulic property values for each saltstone grout and the vault concretes are provided. The hydraulic properties provided for each material include the saturated hydraulic conductivity, dry bulk density, particle density, and porosity. In addition, water retention data are presented for each material along with the van Genuchten transport parameters as determined using the RETC code.

Dixon, K; John Harbour, J; Mark Phifer, M

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

138

Characterizing hydraulically fractured reservoirs using induced microearthquakes  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing is a common method employed to increase the production of oil and gas fields. Recently, there has been increased interest in monitoring the microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing as a means of obtaining data to characterize reservoir changeS induced by the injection. Two types of microearthquakes have been observed during hydraulic fracturing. Tensile events have been observed and modeled as the parting of the surfaces of a fracture. A majority of the events observed have been shear-slip events, where two sides of a fault plane slip parallel to each other but in opposite directions. The locations of the microearthquakes can be analyzed to determine regions where significant seismic energy was released, which presumably are regions where injected fluid penetrated into the rock along pre-existing fractures or zones of weakness. The spatial patterns in the locations can be analyzed to fine regions where events cluster along planes, which are interpreted to be the dominant fluid flow paths. Imaging methods can also be applied to the travel time and waveform data to obtain direct evidence for the locations of the fractures or fracture zones. 27 refs., 2 figs.

Fehler, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Definition: Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cement Bond Log A representation of the integrity of the cement job, especially whether the cement is adhering solidly to the outside of the casing. The log is typically obtained from one of a variety of sonic-type tools. The newer versions, called cement evaluation logs, along with their processing software, can give detailed, 360-degree representations of the integrity of the cement job, whereas older versions may display a single line representing the integrated integrity around the casing.[1] Related Terms Acoustic Logs References ↑ Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

140

Recover Power with Hydraulic Motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anywhere liquid pressure is reduced across a throttling device, there is a potential application for a hydraulic power recovery motor (HPRM). Cost of power makes HPRM's attractive with recoveries as small as 25 hp on a continuous basis. When...

Brennan, J. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Environmental Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...their environmental impacts, which has been published...the hydrogeological impacts of oil and gas development...Chafin, 1994), not fracking. Watson and Bachu...Frontiers Ecology Environment. 2011. 9( 9): 503...R. Environmental Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing...

Richard Jackson

142

Numerical simulation of hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING A Thesis by JOSEPH BARNES WARNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Maj or Subj ect...: Petroleum Engineering NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING A Thesis by JOSEPH BARNES WARNER Approved as to style and content by: S. A. Holditch (Chairman of Committee) D. D. Van Fleet (member) J. E. Russell (m be ) W. D. Von onten ( ead...

Warner, Joseph Barnes

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Relationship Between Engineering Properties, Mineralogy, and Microstructure in Cement-Based Hydroceramic Materials Cured at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. I. Introduction CEMENT is universally used in the construction of oil and geothermal wells. Cement

Bentz, Dale P.

144

Biochemical response of Cupressus sempervirens to cement dust: Yields and chemical composition of its essential oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effects of cement dust on the yield and chemical composition of the essential oil were investigated in Cupressus sempervirens. Exposure to cement dust resulted in significant increase in the essential oil yields. Significant factory distance-related changes in qualitative and quantitative composition of the essential oil were observed. Increasing pollution with dust increased the content of monoterpene hydrocarbons concomitant to increase of ?-pinene, suggesting a redirection of the secondary metabolism of C. sempervirens towards biosynthesis of monoterpenes. By contrast, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons were strongly reduced. These results provide an overall picture of the different response of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to air pollution caused by cement dust. They also reveal the suitability of using C. sempervirens in the creation of green areas around cement factories and encourage the use of dusted plants as potential source of valuable natural products.

Karim Hosni; Imed Hassen; Yacine M’Rabet; Hervé Casabianca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effect of halloysite nanoclay on mechanical properties, thermal behavior and microstructure of cement mortars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many studies have targeted the application of clay in cement composites and declared some enhancement on the properties of concrete. However there is little knowledge on nanoclays and their effect on the mechanical properties and durability of cement composites. Halloysite nanoclay is one of the subcategories of nanoclay that has been undeservedly ignored in the production of cement composites. Chemically, the outer surface of the halloysite nanotubes has properties similar to SiO2 while the inner cylinder core is related to Al2O3 which together may improve the cement matrix. In this study the mechanical properties, flowability, thermal behavior and durability of mortars containing 1, 2, 3% halloysite nanoclay were studied. Compressive strength and gas permeability of samples with 3% and 2% nanoclay were improved up to 24% and 56%, respectively. SEM, XRD, DSC tests were carried out to investigate the microstructure and chemical composition change in samples with halloysite nanoclay.

Nima Farzadnia; Abang Abdullah Abang Ali; Ramazan Demirboga; Mohammed Parvez Anwar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Development of Property-Transfer Models for Estimating the Hydraulic Properties of Deep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Property-Transfer Models for Estimating the Hydraulic Properties of Deep Sediments. #12;Development of Property-Transfer Models for Estimating the Hydraulic Properties of Deep Sediments-USGS World Wide Web: http://www.usgs.gov/ Any use of trade, product, or firm names in this publication

147

Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass. Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass. Abstract: About 1800...

148

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flash distillation waste heat power generation demonstrationAdvanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement PlantsCement Ltd. also installed waste heat recovery equipment on

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fracture model for cemented aggregates  

A mechanisms-based fracture model applicable to a broad class of cemented aggregates and, among them, plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) composites, is presented. The model is calibrated for PBX 9502 using the available experimental data under uniaxial compression and tension gathered at various strain rates and temperatures. We show that the model correctly captures inelastic stress-strain responses prior to the load peak and it predicts the post-critical macro-fracture processes, which result from the growth and coalescence of micro-cracks. In our approach, the fracture zone is embedded into elastic matrix and effectively weakens the material's strength along the plane of the dominant fracture.

Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Thompson, Darla G.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Ionita, Axinte; Shunk, Devin; Lewis, Matthew W.; Lawson, Joe C.; Kale, Sohan; Koric, Seid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Hydraulic Hybrid Fleet Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydraulic Hybrid Fleet Vehicle Testing How Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicles Work Hydraulic hybrid systems can capture up to 70% of the kinetic energy that would otherwise be lost during...

151

INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT, MONTICELLO, SOUTH CAROLINA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Letters INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,12091 INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,transient data from a hydraulic fracturing experiment have

Narasimhan, T.N.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hydraulic Fracturing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Fracturing Hydraulic Fracturing Jump to: navigation, search More info on OpenEI Oil and Gas Gateway Federal Environmental Statues Federal Oil and Gas Statutes Oil and Gas Companies United States Oil and Gas Boards International Oil and Gas Boards Other Information Fracking Regulations by State Wells by State Fracking Chemicals Groundwater Protection Related Reports A Perspective on Health and Natural Gas Operations: A Report for Denton City Council Just the Fracking Facts The Politics of 'Fracking': Regulating Natural Gas Drilling Practices in Colorado and Texas Addressing the Environmental Risks from Shale Gas Development Water Management Technologies Used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers Methane contamination of drinking wateraccompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing

153

Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA); Arnold, Don W. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Neyer, David W. (Castro Valley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

WITTEKIND WD

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

155

Imaging Hydraulic Fractures: Source Location Uncertainty Analysis At The UPRC Carthage Test Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing gas and oil production. High-resolution seismic imaging of the fracture geometry and fracture growth process is the key in determining optimal spacing and location of ...

Li, Yingping

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Design and analysis of hydraulically driven actuation system For a parabolic solar trough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents Katarina Popovic's contribution to the design of hydraulic cylinder actuation system for day to day solar trough sun tracking, a semester long project within 2.752 Development of Mechanical Products ...

Popovi?, Katarina, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A New Analytical Method to Quantify Residual Fluid Cleanup in Hydraulic Fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of factors contribute to reduce the production benefits from hydraulic fracturing, including inefficient fluid design, poor proppant selection and or, the inability of fracture fluid to degrade and flow back after treatment. Undegraded...

Zarrin, Tahira

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

Ma, Xiaodan

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

159

Risk assessment of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing fluid spills in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast-paced growth in natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale has fueled intense debate over the risk of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing and the shale gas extraction process at large. While several ...

Fletcher, Sarah Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Portland Cement Association Since its founding in 1916, the Portland Cement Association has had the same mission: "Improve and expand the uses of portland cement and concrete." The Cement Sustainability Initiative Coordinated by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) helps the cement industry address the challenges of sustainable development. The business leaders of a group of major cement companies lead the initiative. The GHG Protocol Initiative Coordinated in 1998 by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and the World Resources Institute, the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative (GHG Protocol) develops internationally-accepted accounting and reporting standards for greenhouse gas emissions from companies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydraulic Fracturing in Michigan Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing in Michigan Integrated Assessment #12;Agenda · Welcome and introduction and timeline · Panel presentation and discussion · Facilitated Q & A · Closing remarks #12;Hydraulic Fracturing · Leverages resources IA BENEFITS Benefits of Integrated Assessment #12;Key Points: · Hydraulic Fracturing (HF

Kamat, Vineet R.

162

Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving interfaces Anthony Peirce Department Mitchell (UBC) · Ed Siebrits (SLB, Houston) #12;2 Outline · What is a hydraulic fracture? · Scaling Fluid Proppant #12;6 An actual hydraulic fracture #12;7 HF experiment (Jeffrey et al CSIRO) #12;8 1D

Peirce, Anthony

163

Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APRIL 2013 Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California: A WAsteWAteR And WAteR QuAlity Pe | Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California Wheeler Institute for Water Law & Policy Center for Law #12;Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California | 3Berkeley law | wheeler InstItute for water law

Kammen, Daniel M.

164

Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving interfaces Anthony Peirce Department Siebrits (SLB, Houston) #12;2 Outline · What is a hydraulic fracture? · Mathematical models of hydraulic fracture · Scaling and special solutions for 1-2D models · Numerical modeling for 2-3D problems

Peirce, Anthony

165

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plantsquantities of low grade waste heat from the kilns or clinkerthere is significant effect of waste heat recovery on dioxin

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hydraulic Pulse Drilling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE 0 4/13/2004 Final Report Author: J. Kolle Hunter/Theimer 4/13/2004 Document No.: TR- 053 HydroPulse(tm) Drilling Final Report Prepared by J.J. Kolle April 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Development Agreement No. DE-FC26-FT34367 Tempress Technologies, Inc. 18858 - 72 ND Ave S. Kent, WA 98032 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

167

The evolution of an applied hydraulic fracture project, Frontier Formation Moxa Arch, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This paper demonstrates a methodical approach in the implementation of current hydraulic fracturing technologies. Specific examples illustrating the evolution of a consistent reservoir/hydraulic fracturing interpretation are presented in a case history of three GRI-Industry Technology Transfer wells. Detailed modeling of these project wells provided an overall reservoir and hydraulic fracture description that was consistent with respect to all observations. Based on identification of the fracturing mechanisms occurring, the second and third project wells show the capabilities of real-time diagnostics in the implementation of hydraulic fracture treatments. By optimizing the pad volume and fluid integrity to avoid premature screenouts, significant cost savings and improved proppant placement were achieved. The production and pressure build-up response in the first project well verifies the overall interpretation of the reservoir/hydraulic fracture model and provides the basis for eliminating the use of moderate strength/higher cost proppant over sand in low permeability/higher closure stress environments.

Harkrider, J.D.; Aud, W.W.; Cipolla, C.L.; Hansen, J.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Thermal stability of certain hydrated phases in systems made using portland cement. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As part of the study of hydraulic-cement system for use in possible underground isolation of nuclear wastes, this study was made to determine the temperature stability of ettringite and chloroaluminate. Either or both of these phases may be expected in a hydraulic cement system depending on the presence of salt (NaCl). The study of ettringite was made using 15 mixtures that contained portland cement, plaster, 2 levels of water, and in some mixtures, 1 of 6 pozzolans (3 fly ashes, 1 slag, a silica fume, a natural pozzolan), plus a 16th mixture with anhydrous sodium sulfate replacing plaster (CaSO4 . 1/2H20). Specimens were made and stored at 23, 50, and 75 C or 23, 75, and 100 C (all four temperatures in one case) for periodic examination by x-ray diffraction for phase compositiion and ettringite stability, and testing for compressive strength and restrained expansion. A more limited study of the stability of chloroaluminate was made along the same lines using fewer mixtures, salt instead of plaster, and higher temperatures plus some pressure. It was found that while some ettringette was decomposed at 75 C, depending on the composition of the mixture, all ettringite was undetectable by x-ray diffraction at 100 C, usually within a few days. The evidence indicates that the ettringite became amorphous and no significant test phases formed in its place. Since there was no corresponding loss in strength or reduction in volume, this loss of ettringite crystallinity was considered to be damaging. Based on much more limited data, chloroaluminate was found to decompose between 130 C at 25 psi and 170 C at 100 psi; no significant phases replaced it.

Buck, A.D.; Burkes, J.P.; Poole, T.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hydraulic conductivity of shaly sands  

SciTech Connect

The effects of clays on the hydraulic conductivity of a sandstone are analyzed by considering a simple clay coating structure for the sand grains. In the model, silicate insulating nuclei are uniformly surrounded by charged clay particles. The total charge on the clays is compensated by a counterion density Q{sub v}. Assuming a capillary flow regime inside this granular model a Kozeny-Carman type equation has been derived, expressing its intrinsic permeability k in terms of a porosity-tortuosity factor {phi}{sup (m{minus}0.5)} and of the parameter Q{sub v}. The power-law derived expression shows that k decreases with the amount of clay, not only because a high Q{sub v} implies a narrowing of the pore channels, but also because it modifies the hydraulic tortuosity of the medium. This new equation has been statistically tested with extensive petrophysical laboratory data for different types of shaly sandstones.

Lima, O.A.L. de [PPPG/Federal Univ. of Bahia, Salvador Bahia (Brazil)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hydraulic fracturing in a naturally fractured reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing of wells in naturally fractured reservoirs can differ dramatically from fracturing wells in conventional isotropic reservoirs. Fluid leakoff is the primary difference. In conventional reservoirs, fluid leakoff is controlled by reservoir matrix and fracture fluid parameters. The fluid leakoff rate in naturally fractured reservoirs is typically excessive and completely dominated by the natural fractures. This paper presents several field examples of a fracture stimulation program performed on the naturally fractured Devonia carbonate of West Texas. Qualitative pressure decline analysis and net treating pressure interpretation techniques were utilized to evaluate the existence of natural fractures in the Devonian Formation. Quantitative techniques were utilized to assess the importance of the natural fractures to the fracturing process. This paper demonstrates that bottomhole pressure monitoring of fracture stimulations has benefits over conducting minifrac treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs. Finally, the results of this evaluation were used to redesign fracture treatments to ensure maximum productivity and minimize costs.

Britt, L.K.; Hager, C.J.; Thompson, J.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

GCFR thermal-hydraulic experiments  

SciTech Connect

The thermal-hydraulic experimental studies performed and planned for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) core assemblies are described. The experiments consist of basic studies performed to obtain correlations, and bundle experiments which provide input for code validation and design verification. These studies have been performed and are planned at European laboratories, US national laboratories, Universities in the US, and at General Atomic Company

Schlueter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Dalle Donne, M.; Gat, U.; Fenech, H.; Hanson, D.; Hudina, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Sulfate impurities from deicing salt and durability of Portland cement mortar  

SciTech Connect

This thesis reports research on the effects of calcium sulfate in halite on Portland cement durability. Much has been published about sulfate ions causing expansion reactions in Portland cement concrete, on scaling caused by sodium chloride, and the participation of magnesium sulfate in seawater attack. However, little work has been done on the influence of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate solutions as they are found combined in natural halite. Durability studies were conducted using brines containing different amounts of gypsum as an impurity. Damage mechanisms, reaction products and pore structure changes were evaluated. 16 refs., 27 figs., 7 tabs.

Schluter, M.C.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microwave processing of cement and concrete materials – towards an industrial reality?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Each year a substantial body of literature is published on the use of microwave to process cement and concrete materials. Yet to date, very few if any have lead the realisation of a commercial scale industrial system and is the context under which this review has been undertaken. The state-of the–art is evaluated for opportunities, and the key barriers to the development of new microwave-based processing techniques to enhance production, processing and recycling of cement and concrete materials. Applications reviewed include pyro-processing of cement clinker; accelerated curing, non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E), and end-of-life processing including radionuclide decontamination.

Adam Buttress; Aled Jones; Sam Kingman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Definition: Hydraulic Conductivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conductivity Conductivity Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Hydraulic Conductivity Hydraulic conductivity is a physical property which measures the ability of the material to transmit fluid through pore spaces and fractures in the presence of an applied hydraulic gradient. Darcy's Law defines the hydraulic conductivity as the ratio of the average velocity of a fluid through a cross-sectional area (Darcy's velocity) to the applied hydraulic gradient.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Hydraulic conductivity, symbolically represented as, is a property of vascular plants, soil or rock, that describes the ease with which a fluid (usually water) can move through pore spaces or fractures. It depends on the intrinsic permeability of the material and on the degree of

175

Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as well as heat evolution abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to examine the applicability of the dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) to measure cement paste rheology, and to identify cement and mineral/chemical admixture incompatibilities...

Jang, Se Hoon

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissionsand energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop a novel, zeolite-containing lightweight, high temperature, high pressure geothermal cement, which will provide operators with an easy to use, flexible cementing system that saves time and simplifies logistics.

178

Hydraulic fracturing and shale gas extraction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the past decade the technique of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has been improved so much that it has become a cost effective method… (more)

Klein, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Geomechanical review of hydraulic fracturing technology .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulic fracturing as a method for recovering unconventional shale gas has been around for several decades. Significant research and improvement in field methods have been… (more)

Arop, Julius Bankong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hydraulic fracture mechanism in unconsolidated formations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Most models developed for hydraulic fracturing in unconsolidated sands are based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) and tensile fracture (Mode I fracture). However, in… (more)

Hosseini, Seyed Mehran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

182

High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Temperature Cements High Temperature Cements Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High Temperature Cements Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

183

Sisal fiber-reinforced cement composite with Portland cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the partial replacement of Portland cement (PC) by combination of metakaolin (MK) and nanoclay (NC) in sisal fiber-reinforced cement composites by studying the microstructure, mechanical behavi...

Jianqiang Wei; Christian Meyer

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Master Thesis: Simulation of plastic deformation in cemented carbide inserts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master Thesis: Simulation of plastic deformation in cemented carbide inserts Background Sandvik in cemented carbide, high-speed steel and other hard materials such as diamond, cubic boron nitride in cemented carbide inserts will be performed using the FEM software Ansys and AdvantEdge. The work

Haviland, David

185

Successful Alternatives to Conventional Cement Designs in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Since mid-1981, 36 wells have been cemented in the Williston Basin with a cementing system diametrically opposed to conventional cementing designs used for bonding across massive salt members. Since implementation, along with the use of relaxed invert emulsion oil mud, not one casing problem has arisen in the wells where these systems were used.

Bryant, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Use of waste gypsum to replace natural gypsum as set retarders in portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The present study is focused on clarifying the influence of waste gypsum (WG) in replacing natural gypsum (NG) in the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). WG taken from slip casting moulds in a ceramic factory was formed from the hydration of plaster of paris. Clinker and 3-5 wt% of WG was ground in a laboratory ball mill to produce cement waste gypsum (CMWG). The same procedure was repeated with NG to substitute WG to prepare cement natural gypsum (CMNG). The properties of NG and WG were investigated via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)/thermogravimetric (TG) to evaluate the properties of CMNG and CMWG. The mechanical properties of cement were tested in terms of setting time, flexural and compressive strength. The XRD result of NG revealed the presence of dihydrate while WG contained dihydrate and hemihydrate. The content of dihydrate and hemihydrates were obtained via DSC/TG, and the results showed that WG and NG contained 12.45% and 1.61% of hemihydrate, respectively. Furthermore, CMWG was found to set faster than CMNG, an average of 15.29% and 13.67% faster for the initial and final setting times, respectively. This was due to the presence of hemihydrate in WG. However, the values obtained for flexural and compressive strength were relatively the same for CMNG and CMWG. Therefore, this result provides evidence that WG can be used as an alternative material to NG in the production of OPC.

Chandara, Chea; Azizli, Khairun Azizi Mohd [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Ahmad, Zainal Arifin [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: zainal@eng.usm.my; Sakai, Etsuo [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, 2-12-1 Meguro-ku, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hydraulic Geometry: Empirical Investigations and Theoretical Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Geometry: Empirical Investigations and Theoretical Approaches B.C. Eatona, a Department are determined by the channel shape, gradient and a flow resistance parameter. A review of the literature Geomorphology April 21, 2010 #12;the research on downstream hydraulic geometry has focussed on the factors

Eaton, Brett

190

Ocean Thermal Gradient Hydraulic Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the probable life of the earth, only...low-pressure steam turbines pSrhaps hun-dreds...con-ventional hydraulic turbine under gravity flow...horizontally and the remaining available energy...through a hydraulic turbine to generatepower...between the liquid and gas-eous phases, with...

Earl J. Beck

1975-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Grundfos HVAC OEM Efficient water hydraulics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact Hydro Block for Heat Pumps Hydraulic solution for small Heat Pump Systems p condensor Heating Future opportunities for heat pumps Grundfos Compact Hydro block Composite Design for Heat Pumps hydraulics Available today: Compact Hydro Block for integration High degree of pre-design Most important

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

192

DEVELOPMENT OF THE HELICAL REACTION HYDRAULIC TURBINE Final Technical Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF THE HELICAL REACTION HYDRAULIC TURBINE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HELICAL REACTION HYDRAULIC TURBINE Final Technical Report (DE-FGO1-96EE 15669) Project Period: 7/1/96 - 6/30/98 For submission to: The US Department of Energy, EE-20 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Attn: Mr. David Crouch Prepared by: Dr. Alexander Gorlov, PI MIME Department Northeastern University Boston, MA 02115 August, 1998 DISCLAIMER T h i s nport,was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

193

Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using Thermo-hydro-mechanical Analysis with Brittle Damage Model by Finite Element Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Better understanding and control of crack growth direction during hydraulic fracturing are essential for enhancing productivity of geothermal and petroleum reservoirs. Structural analysis of fracture propagation and impact on fluid flow is a...

Min, Kyoung

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...also probe the texture and extent of anisotropic structures within cement paste at micrometer length...nanocomposites: Concrete, bone, and shale . J Am Ceram Soc 90 : 2677 – 2692 . 19...elasticity of an isotropic aggregate of anisotropic cubic crystals . J Appl Mech 21 : 135...

Roland J.-M. Pellenq; Akihiro Kushima; Rouzbeh Shahsavari; Krystyn J. Van Vliet; Markus J. Buehler; Sidney Yip; Franz-Josef Ulm

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Glass Fibres for Cement Reinforcement [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

21 January 1980 research-article Glass Fibres for Cement Reinforcement [and Discussion...Ubbelohde G. Manfre The development of glass fibre compositions having sufficient alkali...resistance were used in an initial evaluation of glass compositions, which were then further...

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing in Oil Sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is a widely used and e cient technique for enhancing oil ... for analyzing hydraulic fracturing in rocks, are in general not satisfactory for oil ...

2008-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

Finite element modeling of hydraulic fracturing in 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 22, 2013 ... Two examples of hydraulic fracturing are given. when the pressure buildup ... Hydraulic fracturing is the coupled dynamics of frac- ture and ?uid ...

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

198

Seismic Studies of a Massive Hydraulic Fracturing Experiment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a Massive Hydraulic Fracturing Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Studies of a Massive Hydraulic Fracturing...

199

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydraulics and Well Testing of...

200

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir DOE Geothermal Peer Review...

202

Hydraulic Institute Mission and Vision:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Institute Mission and Vision: Institute Mission and Vision: Vision: To be a global authority on pumps and pumping systems. Mission: To be a value-adding resource to member companies and pump users worldwide by: * Developing and delivering comprehensive industry standards. * Expanding knowledge by providing education and tools for the effective application, testing, installation, operation and maintenance of pumps and pumping systems. * Serving as a forum for the exchange of industry information. The Hydraulic Institute is a non-profit industry (trade) association established in 1917. HI and its members are dedicated to excellence in the engineering, manufacture, and application of pumping equipment. The Institute plays a leading role in the development of pump standards in North America and worldwide. HI

203

The U.S. DOE Exploration & Production R&D Program DOE Sponsored...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 Sustainable Management of Flowback Water during Hydraulic Fracturing of Marcellus Shale for Natural Gas Production (DE-FE0000975) ......

204

Testing sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations  

SciTech Connect

Recommended practices for testing sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations are outlined as developed by the Task Group on Evaluation of Hydraulic Fracturing Sand under the API Subcommittee on Evaluation of Well Completion Materials. The tests recommended were developed to improve the quality of frac sand delivered to the well site, and are for use in evaluating certain physical properties of sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations. The tests suggested enable users to compare physical characteristics of various sands and to select materials most useful for such applications. Parameters to be tested include turbidity, clay and soft particle content, crush resistance, and mineralogic analysis.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Reply to Davies: Hydraulic fracturing remains a possible mechanism for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTER Reply to Davies: Hydraulic fracturing remains a possible mechanism for observed methane mechanisms were leaky gas well casings and the possibility that hydraulic fracturing might generate new- knowledged the possibility of hydraulic fracturing playing a role. Is it possible that hydraulic fracturing

Jackson, Robert B.

207

Hydraulic Fracturing Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Hydraulic Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Hydraulic Fracturing Technology Hydraulic Fracturing Technology Image taken from "Shale Gas: Applying Technology to Solve America's Energy Challenges," NETL, 2011. Image taken from "Shale Gas: Applying Technology to Solve America's Energy Challenges," NETL, 2011. Hydraulic fracturing is a technique in which large volumes of water and sand, and small volumes of chemical additives are injected into low-permeability subsurface formations to increase oil or natural gas flow. The injection pressure of the pumped fluid creates fractures that enhance gas and fluid flow, and the sand or other coarse material holds the fractures open. Most of the injected fluid flows back to the wellbore and is pumped to the surface.

208

Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

Paillet, Frederick I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hydraulic fractur ing--also called hy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fractur ing--also called hy drofracking or frack ing--is a process where large volumes) is an aquatic invasive spe cies listed on the USDA's federal noxious weeds list (http:// www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health

Goodman, Robert M.

210

Hydraulic Institute and TAPPI forge standards partnership  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Hydraulic Institute (HI) and the Technical Association of Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) are partnering to provide their memberships with a direct link to purchase pump standards specific to pumps installed or required in the pulp and paper industry.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping/observation densities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of transport and design and operation of ground- water remediation systems, are crucially dependent transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping/observation densities, Water Resour. Res., 49, 7311

Barrash, Warren

212

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

213

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 23 (1988) 1976-1980 Drying shrinkage of expansive cements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of strength-contributing substances, and formation of potentially deleterious products such as ettringite-type expansive cement is ettringite (C6AS3H32)t. C4A3Sin Type K, CA and C12A7in Type M, and C3A in Type S, are the sources of reactive alumina required for the formation of ettringite. Type K is the most widely used

Mobasher, Barzin

215

New Strong Cement Materials: Chemically Bonded Ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Silica fume 0.2 2.89 3.3 Slag 8 14.2 Sand 150-1180 28.5 55.7 Steel 710-2000...28); 83-01 is made with basaltic sand. tSee (27). tSee (40). (pH 12...cement and 30% 28 days 38 15 11,000 30 21 sand Natura weathering (U.K.) for 36 13...

DELLA M. ROY

1987-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends October 29, 2013 - 1:15pm Addthis Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Learn more To learn more about this research, read the full report, An Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells. Full report on NETL's website. As we meander down the sidewalk, how many of us give more than a passing thought to the cement underfoot? For the most part, it's just another flat surface, a means to an end, whether it leads us to a coffee shop, book store, or parking lot. But when it's puckered, chipped, or crumbling, we certainly think about its need for repair.

217

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

SciTech Connect

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Bond Log Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cement Bond Log Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.8585 centUSD 8.5e-4 kUSD 8.5e-7 MUSD 8.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 1.25125 centUSD 0.00125 kUSD 1.25e-6 MUSD 1.25e-9 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 3.00300 centUSD 0.003 kUSD 3.0e-6 MUSD 3.0e-9 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 0.35 days9.582478e-4 years 8.4 hours 0.05 weeks 0.0115 months / job

219

The development of a system to optimise production costs around complex electricity tariffs / R. Maneschijn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rising South African electricity prices and reduced sales following the 2008 economic recession have led cement manufacturers to seek ways to reduce production costs. Prior… (more)

Maneschijn, Raynard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Durability and microstructure characteristics of alkali activated coal bottom ash geopolymer cement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many studies have focused on the production of mortar and concrete without cement. This is referred to as geopolymer mortar or concrete. This paper discusses the effect of alkali oxides (Na2O = 8, 12, 16 wt.% and SiO2 = 0, 4, 8, 12 wt.%) on compressive strength, microstructure and durability of circulating fluidized bed combustion coal bottom ash (CBA) geopolymer cements (GC). Durability and morphology tests were carried out through heating and freezing tests. The highest compressive strength (25.83 MPa) was achieved at Na2O wt.% = 12, SiO2 wt.% = 8. The optimum atomic ratios for a compact microstructure were obtained for Si/Al between 3.5 and 4 and Si/Na close to 0.5. Following the sintering, the main reaction products (N-A-S-H gel) became more amorphous at 800 °C, attaining Si/Al and Si/Na atomic ratios of 4.54 and 0.98. Sodium carbonate formation was observed at 800 °C. Also, the strength loss of GC was only 6.77% after 30 freeze-thaw cycles. The results show that durable geopolymer concrete without cement can be produced by using waste bottom coal ash. Therefore, the production of geopolymer concrete has a high environmental impact, decreasing waste material in addition to global warming.

?lker Bekir Topçu; Mehmet U?ur Toprak; Tayfun Uyguno?lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

An investigation of cement mortar thermal storage characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage characteristics of solid cement mortar cylinders. Two var1a- tions 1nvolving mechanically induced porosity were also investigated. Rocks, a commonly used sensible heat storage material, were tested to prov1de a reference for the cement... mortar. A numer1cal model, analogous to program available for rock bed storage systems, simulating the cement mortar cylinder storage section was developed. Heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the experimental data for use in the model...

Davis, Glenn Baker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Opportunities in the U.S. Cement Industry, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, September 1999 (PDF 330 KB) Download Acrobat Reader Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost-Saving Opportunities for Cement Making, an ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, January 2004 (PDF 471 KB). Download Acrobat Reader This report presents information on the opportunities for energy and cost savings in a cement plant and assists energy and plant managers to strategically manage energy. Energy and Emission Reduction Opportunities for the Cement Industry, BCS,

223

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effect of alkalis and sulfates on Portland cement systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effect of the sulfates and alkalis on the durability of Portland cement systems was investigated through a series of cube and prism mixes. Durability… (more)

Halaweh, Mahmoud

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Power Generation by Waste Heat of the Kiln in NingguoPure Low Temperature & Waste Heat in Beijing Cement Ltd. ;flash distillation waste heat power generation demonstration

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Annual report, January 1993-April 1994  

SciTech Connect

The production of natural gas from coal typically requires stimulation in the form of hydraulic fracturing and, more recently, cavity completions. The results of hydraulic fracturing treatments have ranged from extremely successful to less than satisfactory. The purpose of this work is to characterize common and potential fracturing fluids in terms of coal-fluid interactions to identify reasons for less than satisfactory performance and to ultimately devise alternative fluids and treatment procedures to optimize production following hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory data reported herein has proven helpful in designing improved hydraulic fracturing treatments and remedial treatments in the Black Warrior Basin. Acid inhibitors, scale inhibitors, additives to improve coal relative permeability to gas, and non-damaging polymer systems for hydraulic fracturing have been screened in coal damage tests. The optimum conditions for creating field-like foams in the laboratory have been explored. Tests have been run to identify minimum polymer and surfactant concentrations for applications of foam in coal. The roll of 100 mesh sand in controlling leakoff and impairing conductivity in coal has been investigated. The leakoff and proppant transport of fluids with breaker has been investigated and recommendations have been made for breaker application to minimize damage potential in coal. A data base called COAL`S has been created in Paradox (trademark) for Windows to catalogue coalbed methane activities in the Black Warrior and San Juan Basins.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wang, L. , 2008. Alternative fuel using and waste materialPolicy Research on Alternative Fuels for Cement Industry incement and using alternative fuels in the cement kiln. There

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Political History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion Across the West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Political History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion AcrossPolitical History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion Acrosss use of the hydraulic fracturing development process.

Forbis, Robert E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Acoustic Emission in a Fluid Saturated Hetergeneous Porous Layer with Application to Hydraulic Fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responses during hydraulic fracturing, and aid developmentFracture Monitoring Hydraulic fracturing is a method forfluids" used for hydraulic fracturing, the above frequencies

Nelson, J.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESS MEASUREMENTS IN A DEEP BOREHOLE AT THE STRIPA TEST MINE, SWEDEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

u l y 2 , 1 9 8 1 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESSI nun LBL-12478 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESSthe calculated stress. n HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EQUIPMENT AND

Doe, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

233

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

234

Communication Electric polarization in carbon fiber-reinforced cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication Electric polarization in carbon fiber-reinforced cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung Abstract Electric polarization induced an increase of the measured electrical resistivity of carbon fiber of the cement paste through the use of carbon fibers that were more crystalline, the increase of the fiber

Chung, Deborah D.L.

235

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners...

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

Cleary, M.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Sizing of a hot dry rock reservoir from a hydraulic fracturing experiment  

SciTech Connect

Hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs do not lend themselves to the standard methods of reservoir sizing developed in the petroleum industry such as the buildup/drawdown test. In a HDR reservoir the reservoir is created by the injection of fluid. This process of hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock usually involves injection of a large volume (5 million gallons) at high rates (40BPM). A methodology is presented for sizing the HDR reservoir created during the hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir created during a recent fracturing experiment is sized using the techniques presented. This reservoir is then investigated for commercial potential by simulation of long term power production. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Zyvoloski, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The Hydraulic Institute: Who We Are  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Institute: Hydraulic Institute: Who We Are The Global Authority on Pumps and Pumping Systems As the developer of the universally acclaimed ANSI/HI Pump Standards, a key reference for pump knowledge and end-user specifications, the Hydraulic Institute (HI) provides its members with timely and essential resources for the advancement of their pump industry businesses. HI is also an indispensable asset for business intelligence, professional development, and pump industry leadership and advocacy, serving as the unequivocal voice of the North American pump industry since its inception in 1917. The Institute has become the industry resource for cutting- edge educational programs, critical industry reports, business-enhancing services, and a myriad of opportunities

239

Hydraulic characterization of hydrothermally altered Nopal tuff  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the mechanics of variably saturated flow in fractured-porous media is of fundamental importance to evaluating the isolation performance of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository for the Yucca Mountain site. Developing that understanding must be founded on the analysis and interpretation of laboratory and field data. This report presents an analysis of the unsaturated hydraulic properties of tuff cores from the Pena Blanca natural analog site in Mexico. The basic intent of the analysis was to examine possible trends and relationships between the hydraulic properties and the degree of hydrothermal alteration exhibited by the tuff samples. These data were used in flow simulations to evaluate the significance of a particular conceptual (composite) model and of distinct hydraulic properties on the rate and nature of water flow.

Green, R.T.; Meyer-James, K.A. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Rice, G. [George Rice and Associates, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Universal asymptotic umbrella for hydraulic fracture modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents universal asymptotic solution needed for efficient modeling of hydraulic fractures. We show that when neglecting the lag, there is universal asymptotic equation for the near-front opening. It appears that apart from the mechanical properties of fluid and rock, the asymptotic opening depends merely on the local speed of fracture propagation. This implies that, on one hand, the global problem is ill-posed, when trying to solve it as a boundary value problem under a fixed position of the front. On the other hand, when properly used, the universal asymptotics drastically facilitates solving hydraulic fracture problems (both analytically and numerically). We derive simple universal asymptotics and comment on their employment for efficient numerical simulation of hydraulic fractures, in particular, by well-established Level Set and Fast Marching Methods.

Linkov, Aleksandr M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Bucknell Hydraulic Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Flume Hydraulic Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Bucknell Hydraulic Flume Overseeing Organization Bucknell University Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 9.8 Beam(m) 1.2 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on personnel requirements Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.7 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2.7 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Various sensors available on a test-by-test basis Available Sensors Flow, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Integrated Display/Graphics Microsoft Windows based systems

242

Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production is obtained from proved reserves but the determinants of the scale of production in the industry and country components of the world total are many and complex with some unique to the individual com...

D. C. Ion

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

244

Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

245

Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

The hydraulic conductivity of chopped sorghum forage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZL Kn H, Hg Hs ? H4 Hs ? H 6 Ln Hn+ & Q = flow rate L = layer thickness H = hydrostatic head Figure 3. Constnnt hend permenmeter for n mnterini mnde up of lngers of verging conductiviifes. 10 K is the hydraulic conductivity of a layer... will henceforth be called simply the hydraulic conductivity, K) was calculated using the equation. Q~XL A H7-Hi (Eq. 6) where H7-Hi is the head difference between the first and seventh pressure taps. Darcy's law, which is valid only for laminar flow...

Custer, Micheal Hugh

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Annual report, November 1991-December 1992  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the work is to characterize common and potential fracturing fluids in terms of coal-fluid interactions to identify reasons for less than satisfactory performance and to ultimately devise alternative fluids and treatment procedures to optimize production following hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory data reported herein has proven helpful in designing improved hydraulic fracturing treatments and remedial treatments in the Black Warrior Basin. Acid inhibitors, scale inhibitors, additives to improve coal relative permeability to gas, and non-damaging polymer systems for hydraulic fracturing have been screened in coal damage tests. The optimum conditions for creating field-like foams in the laboratory have been explored. Tests have been run to identify minimum polymer and surfactant concentrations for applications of foam in coal. The roll of 100 mesh sand in controlling leakoff and impairing conductivity in coal has been investigated.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

SciTech Connect

The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

Mike L. Laue

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Effectiveness of microseismic monitoring for optimizing hydraulic fracturing in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has fundamentally changed the oil and gas industry in the past 10 years. Bakersfield, California provides a unique case study because steam injection, a type of hydraulic fracturing, has been used there ...

Alampi, Ann M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Simulation of Hydraulic Fractures and their Interactions with Natural Fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the stimulated reservoir volume during hydraulic fracturing is important to geothermal and petroleum reservoir stimulation. The interaction between a hydraulic fracture and pre-existing natural fractures exerts significant control...

Sesetty, Varahanaresh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Investigation of valve plate in water hydraulic axial piston motor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper has introduced the developments of water hydraulic axial piston equipments. According to the effects of physico-chemical properties of water on water hydraulic components, a novel valve plate for water

Song-Lin Nie Ph.D; Zhuang-Yun Li…

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Solid-phase synthesis of high-alumina cements by high-temperature treatment on the surface of molten cast iron  

SciTech Connect

The use of block and monolithic concreting technology in the construction of thermal power plants together with the technical and economic advantages arising from the use of high-alumina cements in the production of refractory concretes have made the development of new methods for the production of high-alumina cement clinkers mandatory. To this end the authors of this paper study the kinetics of synthesis of such clinkers obtained by their firing on the surface of molten cast iron as the heat transfer agent. Among the results presented are a structural and quantitative analysis of the clinker along with phase and activation energy studies.

Fedorov, N.F.; Gavrilov, A.P.; Ivanov, N.I.; Khalina, O.M.

1986-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

Quantitative supersonic flow visualization by hydraulic analogy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hydraulic analogy, which forms the basis for the phics. current investigation, can be used to study supersonic gas flows with great ease by means of a water table. As a result of the analogy, water heights in free surface water flow correspond...

Rani, Sarma Laxminarasimha

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

SciTech Connect

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Acoustic-emission monitoring during hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that microseismic events or acoustic emissions associated with hydraulic fracturing are recorded with a borehole seismic tool in a deviated well during multirate injection, shut-in, and flowback. The event locations indicate that fracture orientation, length, and height are compatible with regional stress directions and estimates of the fracture size that are based on pressure decline.

Stewart, L. (Schlumberger-Doll Research (US)); Cassell, B.R. (Schlumberger Wireline Services (US)); Bol, G.M. (Nederlanse Aardolie Mij. B.V. (NL))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Optimizing bit hydraulics increases penetration rate  

SciTech Connect

At some point, rate of penetration depends as much or more on hydraulics as on bit weight and rotary speed. An easy-to-follow graphical technique shows how to maximize ROP at the rig by finding the optimum pressure drop through the bit and the highest possible crossflow velocity.

Robinson, L.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 257271 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 257­271 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum of the cement formed, the maturation of petroleum in the interbedded shales likely postdates cementation. q 1998 of partially cemented petroleum reservoirs may help in constraining the physical character of a reservoir

258

Effect of Elevated Curing Temperature on Early Hydration and Microstructure of Composite Cements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Elevated Curing Temperature on Early Hydration and Microstructure of Composite Cements J, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG, UK Abstract The heat of hydration of a number of composite cement systems has of composite cements based on the partial replacement of Portland cement by waste materials has become

Sheffield, University of

259

Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Identifying Improvement Potentials in Cement Production with Life Cycle Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Average heat contribution from waste, excluding petcoke, is 18% (4) (see Supporting Information S3 for waste types). ...

Michael Elias Boesch; Stefanie Hellweg

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

IOWA INSTITUTE OF HYDRAULIC RESEARCH COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES IOWA INSTITUTE OF HYDRAULIC RESEARCH COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY This report of the activities of the Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research (IIHR) covers the period July 1997 international initiatives included the effectuation of cooperative agreements with Danish Hydraulic Institute

Stanier, Charlie

263

Describing bond graph models of hydraulic components in Modelica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss an object oriented description of bond graph models of hydraulic components by means of the unified modeling language Modelica. A library which is still under development is briefly described and models of some standard hydraulic components are given for illustration. In particular we address the modeling of hydraulic orifices.

W. Borutzky; B. Barnard; J.U. Thoma

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

HYDRAULIC STIMULATION OF NATURAL FRACTURES AS REVEALED BY INDUCED MICROEARTHQUAKES,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1- HYDRAULIC STIMULATION OF NATURAL FRACTURES AS REVEALED BY INDUCED MICROEARTHQUAKES, CARTHAGE, December, 2001 Manuscript # 01066 LAUR# 01-1204 #12;Hydraulic Stimulation of Natural Fractures -2- ABSTRACT We have produced a high-resolution microseismic image of a hydraulic fracture stimulation

265

Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM Elizaveta Gordeliy of hydraulic fractures in an elastic medium. With appropriate enrichment, the XFEM resolves the Neumann(h) accuracy. For hydraulic fracture problems with a lag separating the uid front from the fracture front, we

Peirce, Anthony

266

Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface Victor C. Tsai Seismological Laboratory consider a hydraulic fracture problem in which the crack grows parallel to a free surface, subject to fully components. ^· Non-dimensionalized ·. 1 Introduction Hydraulic fracture has been studied for many years

267

Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns Alexander Rozhko Thesis September 2007 #12;ii Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns Abstract. The mechanical role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns was studied both

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface Victor C. Tsai Seismological Laboratory consider a hydraulic fracture problem in which the crack grows parallel to a free surface, subject to fully components. wall Wall shear stress. ^· Non-dimensionalized ·. 1 Introduction Hydraulic fracture has been

269

Sustained Storage and Transport of Hydraulic Gold Mining Sediment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustained Storage and Transport of Hydraulic Gold Mining Sediment in the Bear River, California L deposits of hydraulic gold mining sediment remain in main channels of the Bear River more than 100 years- sic model of sediment transport in a symmet- rical wave that is based on hydraulic mining sediment

James, L. Allan

270

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million metric tons of carbon equivalents (MMTCE) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2003" data, energy-related CO2 emissions for the cement industry were 8.3 MMTCE in 2002, and process-related CO2 emissions were approximately 11.4 MMTCE for a total of 19.7 MMTCE. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2000-2025. The AEO2003 reflects data and information available as of

271

Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

272

Microstructure of tricalcium silicate and Portland cement systems at middle periods of hydration-development of Hadley grains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of the microstructure of C3S paste and a Portland cement paste was studied between 7 and 24 h by means of backscattered electrons in a field-emission SEM. The course of hydration was measured by isothermal calorimetry. While the abundant occurrence of Hadley grains (hollow-shells) in Portland cement systems is well documented from a number of SEM and other microscopy studies, some earlier reports have noted that Hadley grains do not form in C3S or alite paste alone. This report shows evidence of Hadley grains in C3S paste, and follows their development from middle to late hydration stages. At around 10 h the microstructure with respect to Hadley grains were seen to develop in a very similar manner in C3S and cement. In both systems, a narrow gap often developed between the receding anhydrous cores and layer of reaction product enveloping the cores. By 1 day, Hadley grains had continued to develop only in the cement paste, where they became a prominent feature. Only small ‘hollowed-out’ hydration shells were observed in the C3S paste by 1 day. These were presumably reminiscences of the small gapped Hadley grains seen at the earlier hydration stages.

K.O. Kjellsen; B. Lagerblad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Microstructure of tricalcium silicate and Portland cement systems at middle periods of hydration-development of Hadley grains  

SciTech Connect

The development of the microstructure of C{sub 3}S paste and a Portland cement paste was studied between 7 and 24 h by means of backscattered electrons in a field-emission SEM. The course of hydration was measured by isothermal calorimetry. While the abundant occurrence of Hadley grains (hollow-shells) in Portland cement systems is well documented from a number of SEM and other microscopy studies, some earlier reports have noted that Hadley grains do not form in C{sub 3}S or alite paste alone. This report shows evidence of Hadley grains in C{sub 3}S paste, and follows their development from middle to late hydration stages. At around 10 h the microstructure with respect to Hadley grains were seen to develop in a very similar manner in C{sub 3}S and cement. In both systems, a narrow gap often developed between the receding anhydrous cores and layer of reaction product enveloping the cores. By 1 day, Hadley grains had continued to develop only in the cement paste, where they became a prominent feature. Only small 'hollowed-out' hydration shells were observed in the C{sub 3}S paste by 1 day. These were presumably reminiscences of the small gapped Hadley grains seen at the earlier hydration stages.

Kjellsen, K.O. [Norcem A.S, Heidelberg Cement Group, N-3950 Brevik (Norway)]. E-mail: knut.kjellsen@norcem.no; Lagerblad, B. [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

275

Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect

The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E. [Montana State University, MT (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

277

Hydraulic fracturing slurry transport in horizontal pipes  

SciTech Connect

Horizontal-well activity has increased throughout the industry in the past few years. To design a successful hydraulic fracturing treatment for horizontal wells, accurate information on the transport properties of slurry in horizontal pipe is required. Limited information exists that can be used to estimate critical deposition and resuspension velocities when proppants are transported in horizontal wells with non-Newtonian fracturing gels. This paper presents a study of transport properties of various hydraulic fracturing slurries in horizontal pipes. Flow data are gathered in three transparent horizontal pipes with different diameters. Linear and crosslinked fracturing gels were studied, and the effects of variables--e.g., pipe size; polymer-gelling-agent concentration; fluid rheological properties; crosslinking effects; proppant size, density, and concentrations; fluid density; and slurry pump rate--on critical deposition and resuspension velocities were investigated. Also, equations to estimate the critical deposition and resuspension velocities of fracturing gels are provided.

Shah, S.N.; Lord, D.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

Hals, Kjetil M D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hydraulic fracturing in tight, fissured media  

SciTech Connect

Large volumes of natural gas are found in tight, fissured reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing can enhance recovery, but many complications, such as pressure-sensitive or accelerated leakoff, damage, and complex fracturing, arise during treatment of such reservoirs. This paper reports that special procedures generally should be considered during breakdown and fracturing of these reservoirs. In addition, the use of alternative stimulation strategies may be beneficial.

Warpinski, N.R. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

BEST-Cement for China | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BEST-Cement for China BEST-Cement for China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BEST-Cement Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Partner: Energy Research Institute, China Cement Association, China Building Materials Academy, Shandong University, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Foundation, Dow Chemical Company Sector: Energy Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: china.lbl.gov/research/industry/benchmarking/best-cement/best-cement-c Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Investigation of the formation of a Portland Cement plant detached plume  

SciTech Connect

A gaseous and particulate-source emissions sampling program was conducted at a Portland Cement production plant in Rapid City, South Dakota. The study was conducted to determine the cause of the formation of an opaque detached plume from the plants' dry process kiln. The instack opacity of the emissions was less than 10% while the opacity of the plume five to ten stack diameters from the mouth of the stack was in excess of 40%, thus giving an appearance of a detached plume. The sampling and analysis program included particulate emissions measurements, particle sizing and composition, and measurements of gaseous and particle ammonia, chloride, fluoride, and sulfur dioxide. Extensive process materials sampling and analysis were also conducted. Based on the resulting data, one conclusion is that the opaque detached plume is the result of ammonium chloride particles formed by the reaction of gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid. It was also found that the ammonia in the cement plant was generated from the shale portion of the raw products when the raw product was passed through the heat exchanger.

Cheney, J.L.; Knapp, K.T.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Transient and Pseudosteady-State Productivity of Hydraulically Fractured Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulation method is used in this work to solve the problem of transient and pseudosteady-state flow of fluid in a rectangular reservoir with impermeable boundaries. Development and validation of the numerical solution for various well-fracture...

Lumban Gaol, Ardhi

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Energetic valorization of SRF in dedicated plants and cement kilns and guidelines for application in Greece and Cyprus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A debate is still open on issues of waste to energy methodologies aiming to answer to questions of particular relevance, such as whether the concept of SRF/RDF production can be applied directly to MSW through the Mechanical–Biological Treatment (MBT) process, when selective collection acts as a virtual pre-treatment of the same, or if the use of SRF/RDF as alternative fuel in cement kilns is the most sustainable solution. In this study, two scenarios were analyzed and compared: (a) the use of SRF in a new dedicated thermal plant for electricity production and (b) the use of SRF as an alternative fuel in an existing cement plant. The comparative assessment was based on principles of Sustainable Waste Management embracing technical and cost issues, environmental protection, industrial ecology and symbiosis. The application of SWOT analysis showed that the use of SRF in cement kilns is more sustainable compared to its use in a new dedicated plant for electricity production.

M.C. Samolada; A.A. Zabaniotou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Laboratory evaluation of performance and durability of polymer grouts for subsurface hydraulic/diffusion barriers. Informal report, October 1993--May 1994  

SciTech Connect

Contaminated soils, buried waste and leaking underground storage tanks pose a threat to the environment through contaminant transport. One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier. Subsurface barriers increase the performance of waste disposal sites by providing a low permeability layer that can reduce percolation water migration into the waste site, minimize surface transport of contaminants, and reduce migration of volatile species. Also, a barrier can be constructed to envelop the site or plume completely, there by containing the contaminants and the potential leakage. Portland cement grout curtains have been used for barriers around waste sites. However, large castings of hydraulic cements result invariably in cracking due to shrinkage, thermal stresses induced by the hydration reactions, and wet-dry cycling prevalent at and sites. Therefore, improved, low permeability, high integrity materials are under investigation by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development, Integrated Demonstrations and Programs. The binders chosen for characterization include: an acrylic, a vinylester styrene, bitumen, a polyester styrene, furfuryl alcohol, and sulfur polymer cement. These materials cover broad ranges of chemical and physical durability, performance, viscosity, and cost. This report details the results of laboratory formulation, testing, and characterization of several innovative polymer grouts. An appendix containing a database of the barrier materials is at the end of this report.

Heiser, J.H.; Milian, L.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography  

SciTech Connect

In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objectives: To create an Enhanced Geothermal System on the margin of the Cosofield through the hydraulic, thermal, and/or chemical stimulation of one or more tight injection wells; To increase the productivity of the Cosofield by 10 MWe; To develop and calibrate geomechanical, geochemical, and fluid flow models in order to extend the Coso/EGS concepts to wherever appropriate tectonic and thermal conditions apply.

287

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems NREL's Fleet Test and Evaluation Team conducts performance evaluations of hydraulic hybrid drive systems in delivery vehicles. Because hydraulic hybrids feature highly efficient regenerative braking systems and "engine off at idle" capabilities, they are ideal for parcel delivery applications where stop-and-go traffic is common. Hydraulic hybrid systems can capture up to 70% of the kinetic energy that would otherwise be lost during braking. This energy drives a pump, which transfers hydraulic fluid from a low-pressure reservoir to a high-pressure accumulator. When the vehicle accelerates, fluid in the high-pressure accumulator moves to the lower-pressure reservoir, which drives a motor and provides extra torque. This process can improve the vehicle's fuel economy

288

Technological Advances in Hydraulic Drive Trains for Wind Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reliability of frequency converters is a major concern for wind turbines. ChapDrive AS has built and tested a hydraulic drive train for variable speed wind turbines which includes a synchronous generator that is connected to the grid without the use of a frequency converter. The hydraulic drive train consists of a hydraulic pump, a variable displacement hydraulic motor, and a synchronous generator, which enables rotor speed control while maintaining synchronous speed of the generator. It has been proven that the hydraulic drive train and the ChapDrive Control system are able to absorb fluctuations in the wind speed and maintain a constant power output without the use of frequency converters. The hydraulic drive train and the ChapDrive Control system has been modeled analytically and compared to measurements, demonstrating a good agreement between simulations and measurements.

K.E.Thomsen; O.G. Dahlhaug; M.O.K. Niss; S.K. Haugset

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cooling Tower Energy Conservation Through Hydraulic Fan Drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fan Drive Eliminates These Problems from the Drive Train. The electric motor is at ground level; close coupled to a hydraulic pump, filters and oil reservoir. Hydraulic lines bring oil flow to the lightweight hydraulic motor mounted at the fan... Tower Fan Drives Are Many: It removes the hazard of costly fan wrecks and shaft coupling breakage. It eliminates gearbox maintenance, breakdown or replacement. The electric motor is mounted with the reservoir and pump at ground level for ease...

Dickerson, J.

290

Expansion-contraction cycles for cement optimized as a function of additives  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was carried out to investigate the addition of specific additives to cement in order to eliminate the micro-fractures and micro-annuli that cause gas migration. The experiments performed monitored the change in the cement slurry pressure during the setting of the cement. During the setting period of the cement, two time cycles of cement expansion and contraction were observed. This is due to the individual contributions of each part of the cement mixture. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final optimum concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally, where the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized for the best final cement results. By utilizing the correct amount of Anchorage Clay, XC-Polymer, Ironite Scavenger, Ultrafine cement and Synthetic Rubber powder in a class G mixture at a given temperature and confining pressure, an impermeable cement mixture can be obtained. The correct amount of Synthetic Rubber used for cyclic pressure reduction is a function of cement setting temperature and pressure as well as the elastic properties of the rubber. By using laboratory testing at different pressure and temperature with different rubber concentrations and elastic properties, it is estimated that the entire annulus can have an impermeable cement from surface to total depth. The difference in temperature and pressure with depth dictates the concentration and elastic properties of the rubber as the required expansion and contraction changes with depth.

Talabani, S.; Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems [Heat Transfer and Fluid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Hydraulic Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Accelerator Driven Test Facility Target Accelerator Driven Test Facility Target. Click on image to view larger

292

Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Enhanced Geothermal System on the margin of the Coso field through the hydraulic, thermal, andor chemical stimulation of one or more tight injection wells; to increase the...

293

Hydraulically refueled battery employing a packed bed metal particle electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary zinc air cell, or another selected metal air cell, employing a spouted/packed metal particle bed and an air electrode. More specifically, two embodiments of a cell, one that is capable of being hydraulically recharged, and a second that is capable of being either hydraulically or electrically recharged. Additionally, each cell includes a sloped bottom portion to cause stirring of the electrolyte/metal particulate slurry when the cell is being hydraulically emptied and refilled during hydraulically recharging of the cell.

Siu, Stanley C. (Castro Valley, CA); Evans, James W. (Piedmont, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Application of the directional hydraulic fracturing at Berezovskaya Mine  

SciTech Connect

The paper analyzes the experimental research of the directional hydraulic fracturing applied for weakening of rocks at Berezovskaya Mine (Kuznetsk Coal Basin) in 2005-2006.

Lekontsev, Y.M.; Sazhin, P.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Institute for Mining

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Experimental investigation of geomechanical aspects of hydraulic fracturing unconventional formations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Understanding the mechanisms that govern hydraulic fracturing applications in unconventional formations, such as gas-bearing shales, is of increasing interest to the petroleum upstream industry. Among… (more)

Alabbad, Emad Abbad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

An examination of state regulations of hydraulic fracturing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As hydraulic fracturing gains popularity in the energy industry, the state of Texas finds itself in a very advantageous position. With multiple regions which could… (more)

Perkins, Adam Reed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

SciTech Connect: Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

VA at www.ntis.gov. Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects in Plate Type Nuclear Research Reactors Turbulent flow coupled with heat transfer is investigated for a...

298

Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) Facilities Sprinkler System Hydraulic Calculations  

SciTech Connect

The attached calculations demonstrate sprinkler system operational water requirements as determined by hydraulic analysis. Hydraulic calculations for the waste storage buildings of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), T Plant, and Waste Receiving and Packaging (WRAP) facility are based upon flow testing performed by Fire Protection Engineers from the Hanford Fire Marshal's office. The calculations received peer review and approval prior to release. The hydraulic analysis program HASS Computer Program' (under license number 1609051210) is used to perform all analyses contained in this document. Hydraulic calculations demonstrate sprinkler system operability based upon each individual system design and available water supply under the most restrictive conditions.

KERSTEN, J.K.

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

Hydraulically refueled battery employing a packed bed metal particle electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary zinc air cell, or another selected metal air cell, employing a spouted/packed metal particle bed and an air electrode is described. More specifically, two embodiments of a cell, one that is capable of being hydraulically recharged, and a second that is capable of being either hydraulically or electrically recharged. Additionally, each cell includes a sloped bottom portion to cause stirring of the electrolyte/metal particulate slurry when the cell is being hydraulically emptied and refilled during hydraulically recharging of the cell. 15 figs.

Siu, S.C.; Evans, J.W.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Principal Investigator Peter Rose Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah Project...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

302

SciTech Connect: Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

with experimental data from the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop. The computational results for the High Flux Isotope Reactor core system provide a...

303

Hydraulic HEV Fuel Consumption Potential | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Consumption Potential Hydraulic HEV Fuel Consumption Potential 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

304

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS? Ania Morvannoua , Nicolas-equilibrium model, preferential flow path, vertical flow constructed wetlands INTRODUCTION Constructed wetlands (CWs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

305

Characteristics of hemp fabric reinforced nanoclay–cement nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cement eco-nanocomposites reinforced with hemp fabric (HF) and nanoclay platelets (Cloisite 30B) are fabricated and investigated in terms of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, physical and mechanical properties. Results indicated that the mechanical properties generally increased as a result of the addition of nanoclay into the cement matrix with HF. An optimum replacement of ordinary Portland cement with 1 wt% nanoclay decreased the porosity and also significantly increased the density, flexural strength and fracture toughness of HF-reinforced nanocomposite. The microstructural results indicate that the nanoclay behaves not only as a filler to improve the microstructure, but also as an activator to promote the pozzolanic reaction and thus improved the adhesion with hemp fabric. The failure micromechanisms and energy dissipative processes in HF-reinforced cement composite and HF-reinforced nanocomposite are discussed in terms of microstructural observations. These cement eco-nanocomposites can provide new insights for the development of new ‘environmental-friendly nanomaterials’ for building applications such as the construction of sandwich panels, ceilings and roofs.

A. Hakamy; F.U.A. Shaikh; I.M. Low

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Uncertainty in the maximum principal stress estimated from hydraulic fracturing Measurements due to the presence of the induced fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reopening during hydraulic fracturing stress determinations.Laboratory study of hydraulic fracturing pressure data?Howevaluation of hydraulic fracturing stress measurement

Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-fu; Stephansson, Ove

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy conservation potential of Portland cement particle size distribution control, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of Phase 2 are to determine the feasibility of using cements with controlled particle size distributions (CPSD cements) in practical concrete applications, and to refine our estimates of the potential energy savings that may ensue from such use. The work in Phase 2 is divided into two main tasks, some parts of which will be carried out simultaneously: Task 1 will continue cement paste studies to optimize cement performance similar to those of Phase 1, but with particular emphasis on gypsum requirements, blended cements, and water-reducing admixtures. This task will also include preparation of sufficient CPSD cements for use in all Phase 2 work. Task 2 will be a comprehensive examination of the properties of concretes made with CPSD cements. This will include optimization of concrete mix designs to obtain the best possible performance for practical applications of both portland and blended cements. The effects of chemical admixtures and curing temperature variations will also be determined.

Helmuth, R.A; Whiting, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2008 is used as the fuel price in the fuel conservationprices and average fuel prices for Shandong’s cementCurve (FCSC) with average fuel price for the studied cement

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Monitoring the ettringite formation in cement paste using low field T2-NMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work we study the transverse relaxation time evolution of water molecules confined inside cement paste during the hydration process. The cement paste under study was manufactured with different water-to-cement ratios and using two types of cement: gray cement (CEM I 52.5 R) having a high content of magnetic impurities and white cement (CEM I 52.5 N) with lower amount of magnetic impurities. The two cement types were chosen in order to better distinguish the surface contribution to the relaxation process. On this basis a relationship between porosity evolution ettringite formation and the transverse relaxation time evolution was established. It was also observed that the increase in the water-to-cement ratio better reveals the ettringite formation.

Alexandra Pop; Codruta Badea; Ioan Ardelean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminate cements hydration Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTRODUCTION Many entities currently use fly ash in portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements... Transportation & Development and Louisiana State University incorporating...

313

Rapid setting of portland cement by greenhouse carbon dioxide capture  

SciTech Connect

Following the work by Berger et al. on rapid setting of calcium silicates by carbonation, a method of high-volume capture of CO{sub 2} in portland cement has been developed. Typically, 10--24 wt. % of CO{sub 2} produced by the calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering, may be captured, and the set cement acquires most of its full strength in less than a day. The approach will have economic advantages in fabrication of precast structures, in emergency development of infrastructure during natural disasters, and in defense applications. Moreover, it will help the cement industry comply with the Clean Air Act of 1990 by sequestering the greenhouse carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Knox, L.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.

Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H. (and others)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Relating horsepower to drilling productivity  

SciTech Connect

Many technological advancements have been made in explosive products and applications over the last 15 years resulting in productivity and cost gains. However, the application of total energy (engine horsepower) in the majority of rotary drilling technology, has remained virtually unchanged over that period. While advancements have been made in components, efficiency, and types of hydraulic systems used on drills, the application of current hydraulic technology to improve drilling productivity has not been interactive with end users. This paper will investigate how traditional design assumptions, regarding typical application of horsepower in current rotary drill systems, can actually limit productivity. It will be demonstrated by numeric analysis how changing the partitioning of available hydraulic energy can optimize rotary drill productivity in certain conditions. Through cooperative design ventures with drill manufacturers, increased penetration rates ranging from 20% to 100% have been achieved. Productivity was increased initially on some rigs by careful selection of optional hydraulic equipment. Additional gains were made in drilling rates by designing the rotary hydraulic circuit to meet the drilling energies predicted by computer modeling.

Givens, R.; Williams, G.; Wingfield, B.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Sulfur dioxide oxidation and plume formation at cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

Results of source sampling at the Glens Falls cement kiln in Glens Falls, N.Y., are reported for sulfur oxides, ammonia, hydrochloric acid, oxygen, and moisture content. The origin of a detached, high-opacity, persistent plume originating from the cement kiln stack is investigated. It is proposed that this plume is due to ammonium salts of SOx and sulfuric acid that have been formed in condensed water droplets in the plume by the pseudocatalytic action of ammonia. (1 diagram, 1 graph, 22 references, 7 tables)

Dellinger, B.; Grotecloss, G.; Fortune, C.R.; Cheney, J.L.; Homolya, J.B.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Annual report, June 1990-October 1991  

SciTech Connect

The production of natural gas coal typically requires stimulation in the form of hydraulic fracturing. The results of hydraulic fracturing treatments have ranged from highly successful to less than satisfactory. The approach in the work has been to experimentally evaluate parameters that pertain to coal fluid interactions during hydraulic fracturing and post-frac production and then apply the findings to the selection of fracturing fluids and treatment design. Evaluated parameters include leakoff through cleats, pressure drops through cleated slots with slurries, proppant transport, conductivity, and coal matrix damage due to fracturing fluids. Some conclusions from the work include (1) 100 mesh sand alone can control leakoff through cleats; (2) coal faces alone do not increase pressure drop through fractures with slurries; (3) restrictions approaching 2 proppant diameters are required to see pressure increases; (4) borate fluid pH's of 9.5 are required for transport; (5) mixed proppant conductivities of 100 mesh and 16/30 can be 50% lower than the larger proppant; (6) guar based fracturing fluids can cause up to 90% permeability damage to the coal matrix; (7) HEC containing foams provide the best cleanup in the laboratory (only 10 to 30% damage and have shown excellent results in field trials); and (8) expanded use of COMPAS is recommended to document field results.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Creation and Impairment of Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in Shale Formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing is the key to the success of many shale gas and shale oil reservoirs. The main objectives of hydraulic fracturing in shale are to create artificial fracture networks that are conductive for oil and gas flow...

Zhang, Junjing

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions CSIRO CSS TCP Detournay (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

Peirce, Anthony

320

Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions SANUM Conference (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

Peirce, Anthony

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996  

SciTech Connect

This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Application of a 3D hydraulic-fracturing simulator for design of acid-fracturing treatments  

SciTech Connect

Field experience during 1989--90 shows that application of a 3D hydraulic-fracturing simulator increases success of acid-fracturing well treatments. Fracture extension can be limited to the oil-bearing pay, maximum lateral extension can be realized within the height constraint, and acid/rock contact time can be increased by a factor of between 3 and 30. Oil-production response can be improved over other stimulation designs while water-production response can be limited. These methods have been applied in mature waterfloods of the Permian Basin and Cedar Creek anticline.

Morgenthaler, L.N. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Roberts, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Research Needs Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its

326

Conceptual design and cost analysis of hydraulic output unit for 15 kW free-piston Stirling engine. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A long-life hydraulic converter with unique features was conceptually designed to interface with a specified 15 kW(e) free-piston Stirling engine in a solar thermal dish application. Hydraulic fluid at 34.5 MPa (5000 psi) is produced to drive a conventional hydraulic motor and rotary alternator. Efficiency of the low-maintenance converter design was calculated at 93.5% for a counterbalanced version and 97.0% without the counterbalance feature. If the converter were coupled to a Stirling engine with design parameters more typical of high-technology Stirling engines, counterbalanced converter efficiency could be increased to 99.6%. Dynamic computer simulation studies were conducted to evaluate performance and system sensitivities. Production costs of the complete Stirling hydraulic/electric power system were evaluated at $6506 which compared with $8746 for an alternative Stirling engine/linear alternator system.

White, M.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Acoustic Emission in a Fluid Saturated Hetergeneous Porous Layer with Application to Hydraulic Fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Model of Hydraulic Fracture With an Induced Low Velocityand L. R. Meyer, 1988. Fracture Detectin Using P- Wave andof a Vertical Hydraulic Fracture, Earth Sciences Division,

Nelson, J.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric hydraulic fracture Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydraulic fracture Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: asymmetric hydraulic fracture Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Self-potential...

329

Method for valve seating control for an electro-hydraulic engine valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Valve lift in an internal combustion engine is controlled by an electro-hydraulic actuation mechanism including a selectively actuable hydraulic feedback circuit.

Sun, Zongxuan (Plymouth, MN)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

LMR thermal hydraulics calculations in the US  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of thermal hydraulics computer codes have been developed by various organizations in the US. These codes cover an extensive range of purposes from within-assembly-wise pin temperature calculations to plant wide transient analysis. The codes are used for static analysis, for analysis of protected anticipated transients, and for analysis of a wide range of unprotected transients for the more recent inherently safe LMR designs. Some of these codes are plant-specific codes with properties of a specific plant built into them. Other codes are more general and can be applied to a number of plants or designs. These codes, and the purposes for which they have been used, are described.

Dunn, F.E.; Malloy, D.J.; Mohr, D.

1987-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

331

CSP Plant Thermal-hydraulic Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the frame of the development of new solar plants and their innovative components, our research activities focus on theoretical elaborations and simulation to support basic design and assistance to manufacturing. The aim is to describe the use of Relap5 code [1] for analyzing the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a CSP Plant based on parabolic through collectors. Here a fluid dynamic simulation of the Test Plant, situated at Casaccia Research Center, will be evaluated. For the first simulation, the filling and draining phase of the circuit has been considered. It has been simulated a time period corresponding to the plant starting with the switch on of the pump, the filling of the circuit, a steady state condition and the pump switching off until the complete draining of the circuit. This studies have been performed in different collectors configurations and different logics of the operation valves in order to define the better system control and the better operating procedure.

V. Russo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Long-term monitoring of microleakage of dental cements by radiochemical diffusion  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive /sup 14/C sucrose was found to be an ideal marker for microleakage because it did not penetrate tooth tissue, dental cement, or mounting resin. The main finding is that the adhesive cements--the glass-ionomer and polycarboxylate--are significantly more effective at preventing microleakage than are the traditional phosphate cements--silicate and zinc phosphate. The differences can be as high as two orders of magnitude. The adhesive cements provide almost perfect and reliable seals. By contrast, the nonadhesive cements are erratic sealants with most of the restorations leaking.

Powis, D.R.; Prosser, H.J.; Wilson, A.D.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Suspension process for cement synthesis. Final report, November 1986-March 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Research Institute has initiated a program to develop an advanced gas-fired cement synthesis process which will markedly reduce product processing time, lower maintenance and initial capital costs, minimize alkali sulfate formation, and mitigate greenhouse gaseous emissions compared to conventional cement pyroprocessing technology. In the advanced process, pellets of agglomerated batch enter at the top of a vertical shaft and fall in counterflow with the combustion gases. During this time, which is of order a few seconds and an order of magnitude less than the state-of-the-art kiln process, the pellets heat-up, dry, calcine and are partially clinkered. They land on a fixed bed where clinkering is completed and heat is recovered from the pellets to the counter-flowing combustion air. Energy input to the process is through the direct combustion of natural gas in the clinkering and calcining zones of the shaft. This report describes the work performed in the first phase of the development program. Flow stability, batch agglomeration, and clinkering tests were performed to validate the process concept. An interim economic analysis comparing likely commercial installation options to the state-of-the-art process was made.

Zappa, O.L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective: January 30, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective: January 30, 2012 Revised: May 8 for special applications to composite pavements as shown and described on the Drawings and in this Special as required; 5. Constructing the composite pavement on a prepared subgrade, or subbase, without forms. 6

335

Leaching induced concentration profiles in the solid phase of cement  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the solid phase of portland cement specimens by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry before and after leaching provided elemental profiles within the cement. Releases of potassium were calculated from the solid phase profiles and were compared to releases determined from leachate analyses of potassium and cesium-137. The fraction of potassium released in the leachate was found to correlate closely to that of cesium-137 under varying time and temperature conditions, despite the different manner in which each was originally contained in the cement. Agreement was obtained among potassium releases as determined from the solid, potassium in the leachate and cesium-137 in the leachate. These correlations allowed the use of potassium as an analog for cesium-137 in cement. Profiles of potassium in the solid showed varying degrees of depletion. A specimen, sectioned immediately after leaching for 471 days, showed complete removal of potassium to 9 mm depth from the specimens surface. From 9 mm to the center of the specimen, an apparently linear increase in concentration was observed. Specimens that had been air dried prior to sectioning had profiles that were produced by evaporative transport of dissolved species toward the surface. Carbonation of the surface appears to have retarded migration of the dissolved material. This prevented it from reaching the outer edge and resulted in increased potassium concentrations several mm inside the surface. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

St Andrews, University of

337

Diagenesis in halite-cemented source rocks, Middle Devonian, Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect

Porosity in Dawson Bay carbonates is halite plugged and the formation is sandwiched between thick units of bedded halite. The presence of displacive halite crystals within fine-grained carbonates (implying sediment plasticity during halite emplacement) and uncompacted organic-rich, carbonate-poor stromatolites indicate halite cementation occurred at an early stage. Also, halite cementation must have been completed prior to porosity loss in overlying bedded halites. By comparison with Holocene/Pleistocene bedded halites, this cementation occurred with only tens of meters of overburden. Early complete halite cementation should have converted Dawson Bay carbonates into virtually a closed system and greatly curtailed or inhibited organic-matter maturation within them Organic-rich carbonates occur immediately below Dawson Bay evaporites as rocks containing an anomalously abundant benthos (stromatoporoids, brachiopods) or as a more restricted facies, lacking megafossils or containing gastropods. Some restricted carbonates contain more than 2% extractable organic carbon. The n-alkane, pentacyclic triterpane, nonrearranged sterane and disterane distributions suggest two distinct populations of samples are present. Biomarker distributions are difficult to interpret in terms of estimating organic maturity because of source rock environmental factors (hypersalinity), but appear to be inconsistent with the geological prognosis that these source rocks would have been isolated early in their diagenesis. The problem of how kerogens can be altered in an apparently closed system has yet to be resolved.

Kendall, A.C. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (England)); Abbott, G.D.; D'Elia, V.A.A. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons  

SciTech Connect

This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503  

SciTech Connect

During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Extension and replacement of aspalt cement with sulphur  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deformation were performed on selected combinations of aggregate, asphalt and sulphur. Three different methods of incorpora- ting the mixture ingredients were studied. Based upon results of the screening and characterization tests, relationships between... Selection of Analysis Methods . Selection of Materials Characterization Tests CHAPTER IV. TASK B: DEVELOPMENT OF SULPHUR EXTENDED ASPHALT SYSTEMS Selection of Mixture Composition and Experimental Design Variables . Sulphur Selection Asphalt Cement...

Pickett, Daniel Ernest

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY, ELECTRON PROBE MICROANALYSIS, AND NMR OF TOLUENE WASTE IN CEMENT.  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron X-ray microtomography shows vesicular structures for toluene/cement mixtures, prepared with 1.22 to 3.58 wt% toluene. Three-dimensional imaging of the cured samples shows spherical vesicles, with diameters ranging from 20 to 250 {micro}m; a search with EPMA for vesicles in the range of 1-20 {micro}m proved negative. However, the total vesicle volume, as computed from the microtomography images, accounts for less than 10% of initial toluene. Since the cements were cured in sealed bottles, the larger portion of toluene must be dispersed within the cement matrix. Evidence for toluene in the cement matrix comes from {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, which shows a reduction in chain silicates with added toluene. Also, {sup 2}H NMR of d{sub 8}-toluene/cement samples shows high mobility for all, toluene and thus no toluene/cement binding. A model that accounts for all observations follows: For loadings below about 3 wt%, most toluene is dispersed in the cement matrix, with a small fraction of the initial toluene phase separating from the cement paste and forming vesicular structures that are preserved in the cured cement. Furthermore, at loadings above 3 wt%, the abundance of vesicles formed during toluene/cement paste mixing leads to macroscopic phase separation (most toluene floats to the surface of the cement paste).

BUTLER,L.G.

1999-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High precision earthquake locations and subsurface velocity structure provide potential insights into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir management. We analyze 16 years of seismicity to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously

343

KJRR-FAI Hydraulic Flow Testing Input Package  

SciTech Connect

The INL, in cooperation with the KAERI via Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA), undertook an effort in the latter half of calendar year 2013 to produce a conceptual design for the KJRR-FAI campaign. The outcomes of this effort are documented in further detail elsewhere [5]. The KJRR-FAI was designed to be cooled by the ATR’s Primary Coolant System (PCS) with no provision for in-pile measurement or control of the hydraulic conditions in the irradiation assembly. The irradiation assembly was designed to achieve the target hydraulic conditions via engineered hydraulic losses in a throttling orifice at the outlet of the irradiation vehicle.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; D.B. Chapman

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hydraulic fracturing technology: Technology evaluation report and application analysis report  

SciTech Connect

Two pilot-scale demonstrations of the hydraulic fracturing technology for enhancing the permeability of contaminated silty clays have been evaluated under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The hydraulic fracturing technology was demonstrated in 1991 and 1992 at a extraction site in Oak Brook, Illinois, and at a bioremediation site near Dayton, Ohio. The technology was jointly developed by the University of Cincinnati (UC) and the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory. Tests were also conducted at UC Center Hill Solid and Hazardous Waste Research (Center Hill) Facility by UC. These tests were conducted to determine the factors affecting soil vapor flow through sand-filled hydraulic fractures.

Banerjee, P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Numerical techniques for coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic reactor calculations  

SciTech Connect

The solution of coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic nuclear reactor calculations is achieved through an iterative procedure that treats the components of the calculations in a relatively decoupled fashion. This entails an alternation between the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic components of the calculation while using the most recent estimates of the neutron cross sections, as determined by the thermal-hydraulic feedback relationships. Although this decoupled approach is typically convergent, it has been demonstrated that the rate of convergence is quite inconsistent. As a result of these limitations, an effort has been directed toward the development of numerical techniques that more closely approximate a truly coupled solution.

Betts, C.M.; Kulas, M.M.; Klein, A.C. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Heat transfer and hydraulic resistance in a short plane-parallel duct with artificially roughened walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental heat transfer and hydraulic resistance data are correlated by means of dimensionless relationships.

V. G. Pavlovskii; Yu. M. Dedusenko

1969-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

An implicit level set method for modeling hydraulically driven fractures Anthony Peirce a,*, Emmanuel Detournay b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An implicit level set method for modeling hydraulically driven fractures Anthony Peirce a the relevant tip asymptotics in hydraulic fracture simulators is critical for the accuracy and stability for a propagating hydraulic fracture. A number of char- acteristics of the governing equations for hydraulic

Peirce, Anthony

348

Self-Tuning Fuzzy Control of Switched Reluctance Motor Directly-driven Hydraulic Press  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For hydraulic press presenting the advantage of force and speed range, hydraulic press is widely used in metal forming process. However, conventional hydraulic press has inefficient energy due to the requirement of motor continuously running regardless ... Keywords: fuzzy logic control, hydraulic press, switched reluctant motor

Shuguo Wei; Shengdun Zhao; Jianming Zheng

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fuel Economy Comparisons of Series, Parallel and HMT Hydraulic Hybrid Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery to store energy, and electric motor/generators for energy conversion, a hydraulic hybrid power-train stores energy in hydraulic accumulators and uses hydraulic pump/motors for energy conversion. Hydraulic of these architectures and validates these features. Using a Toyota Prius like engine and chassis as common factors, fuel

Li, Perry Y.

350

Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Reporting,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Reporting, Monitoring, Protection Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Reporting, Monitoring, Protection April 18, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis Washington, DC -Two data collection tools specifically developed for hydraulic fracturing are available to help regulatory agencies monitor drilling and completion operations and enhance environmental protection. Developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) and FracFocus chemical disclosure registry provide a way for industry professionals, regulatory agencies and the general public to more easily access information on oil and natural gas activities. These reporting and

351

Microsoft Word - S0212500_HydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update January 2006 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier-November 2005 Update January 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello PRB-November 2005 Update January 2006 Doc. No. S0212500 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................

352

Microsoft Word - S0212500_HydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update January 2006 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 DOE-LM/GJ1086-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-01 Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier-November 2005 Update January 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello PRB-November 2005 Update January 2006 Doc. No. S0212500 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................

353

Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S, and Flegal AR 2008. Mercury in the San Francisco Estuary.may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in Sancontaminants such as ele- mental mercury and cyanide used in

Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Operational and maintenance manual, 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

SciTech Connect

The 100 ton hydraulic trailer is used to remove the mitigation pump from Tank 241SY101. This manual explains how to inspect, operate, and maintain the trailer in a state of readiness.

Koons, B.M.

1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Compressed air piping, 241-SY-101 hydraulic pump retrieval trailer  

SciTech Connect

The following Design Analysis was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company to determine pressure losses in the compressed air piping installed on the hydraulic trailer for the 241-SY-101 pump retrieval mission.

Wilson, T.R.

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

in Hydraulics 3-6 3.0 Cavitation Damage Testing 3-9 4.0 Summary of Existing Pump Test Facilities, Research 3-14 Facilities, and Instrumentation Section 4 Review of Pump...

357

Turbine efficiency test on a large hydraulic turbine unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flow rate measurements are the most difficult part of efficiency tests on prototype hydraulic turbines. Among the numerous flow rate measurement methods ... the Winter Kennedy method is preferred for measurin...

ZongGuo Yan; LingJiu Zhou; ZhengWei Wang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Stress measurements in rock salt using hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing was applied in horizontal drillholes in the Salado salt formation near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Testing took place approximately 650 m below surface in order to support the design of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense activities of the United States. Hydraulic fracturing was performed primarily to determine whether the virgin in situ stress state at the WIPP site is isotropic and whether the magnitudes of the the virgin in situ stresses correspond to the weight of the overburden. Beyond these limited objectives, measurements are being analyzed to evaluate the usefulness of hydraulic fracturing in salt formations in general. Such measurements are desirable to determine stresses induced by mining and to monitor time-dependent stress changes around underground excavations in salt masses. Hydraulic fracturing measurements are also relevant to the evaluation of allowable pressures before fracturing is induced in pressurized boreholes and storage caverns.

Wawersik, W.R.; Stone, C.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

1112323-danimer-abstract-hydraulic-fractures | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have significant impact on the industry as the NFT process could be applicable on 40% of hydraulic fracturing treatments in the U.S. The process is applicable on wells that...

360

Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring: A Jonah Field Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing involves the injection of a fluid to fracture oil and gas reservoirs, and thus increase their permeability. The process creates numerous microseismic events, which can be used to monitor subsurface ...

Seher, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A PKN Hydraulic Fracture Model Study and Formation Permeability Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is an important method used to enhance the recovery of oil and gas from reservoirs, especially for low permeability formations. The distribution of pressure in fractures and fracture geometry are needed to design conventional...

Xiang, Jing

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

Numerical Investigation of Interaction Between Hydraulic Fractures and Natural Fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of a naturally-fractured reservoir is a challenge for industry, as fractures can have complex growth patterns when propagating in systems of natural fractures in the reservoir. Fracture propagation near a natural fracture (NF...

Xue, Wenxu

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project will provide the first ever formal evaluation of fracture and fracture flow evolution in an EGS reservoir following a hydraulic stimulation.

364

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pipe · Air Rotary Drilling Rig · Hydraulic Rotary Drilling Rig ­ Barite/Bentonite infused drilling muds A "Thumper Truck" #12;Rigging Up #12;Drilling · The Drill String ­ Diesel Powered ­ Drilling Bit ­ Drilling

Jiang, Huiqiang

365

Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Reporting,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Reporting, Monitoring, Protection Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Reporting, Monitoring, Protection April 18, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis Washington, DC -Two data collection tools specifically developed for hydraulic fracturing are available to help regulatory agencies monitor drilling and completion operations and enhance environmental protection. Developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) and FracFocus chemical disclosure registry provide a way for industry professionals, regulatory agencies and the general public to more easily access information on oil and natural gas activities. These reporting and

366

A Coupled Nanoindentation/SEM-EDS Study on Low Water/Cement Ratio Portland Cement Paste: Evidence for C-S-H/Ca(OH)[subscript 2] Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low water/cement ratio (w/c=0.20) hydrated Portland cement paste was analyzed by grid-indentation coupled with ex situ scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (SEM-EDS) analysis at each indentation ...

Chen, Jeffrey J.

367

INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

67006 67006 INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP APPLICATIONS FINAL REPORT FY 1999 M.L. Allan and A.J. Philippacopoulos November 1999 Prepared for: Office of Geothermal Technologies United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Materials and Chemical Sciences Division DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agenc:y of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makers any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use

368

A hydraulic model study of the gray reef dam spillway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A HYDRAULIC MODEL STUDY OF THE GRAY REEF DAM SPILLWAY A Thesis by ALI AKHTAR QURAISHI Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE January 1961 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A HYDRAULIC MODEL STUDY OF THE GRAY REEF DAM SPILLWAY A Thesis ALI AKHTAR QURAISHI Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Comm' e Head of the Depa ment January 1961 ACKNOWLEDGMENT...

Quraishi, Ali Akhtar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Long-term hydraulic properties of subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LONG-TERM HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF SUBSURFACE FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS A Thesis by GLENN ALLEN TURNER Submitted to the Office of Graduate studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1994 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering LONG-TERM HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF SUBSURFACE FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS by GLENN ALLEN TURNER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfdlment of the requirements for the degree...

Turner, Glenn Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

Comparison of methods for determining soil hydraulic characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Soil cores were centrifuged and the redistribution of water was measured as change in weight with time. Inconsistent results and limited data obtained with this method, consequently, prevented ade- quate conclusions from being made. Hydraulic... storage capacity of a soil is determined by infiltration, redistribution and drainage processes which also rely on knowledge of soil moisture movement. Three approaches used to determine the relevant hydraulic properties utitilized in describing soil...

Byrd Humphreys, Kathryn

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Subchannel thermal-hydraulic modeling of an APT tungsten target rod bundle  

SciTech Connect

The planned target for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) neutron source consists of an array of tungsten rod bundles through which D{sub 2}O coolant flows axially. Here, a scoping analysis of flow through an APT target rod bundle was conducted to demonstrate that lateral cross-flows are important, and therefore subchannel modeling is necessary to accurately predict thermal-hydraulic behavior under boiling conditions. A local reactor assembly code, FLOWTRAN, was modified to model axial flow along the rod bundle as flow through three concentric heated annular passages.

Hamm, L.L.; Shadday, M.A. Jr.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs DOE Industrial Materials of the Future Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) is a crosscutting activity of the Industrial Technologies Program. The mission of IMF is to lead a national effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials, for the Industries of the Future. ENERGY STAR Focus for Cement Manufacturing The U.S. cement manufacturers and EPA work together in an ENERGY STAR Focus on energy efficiency within the industry. Participating companies work with EPA to institute or improve their corporate energy management programs and the energy performance of their operations. Through ENERGY STAR, EPA provides tools to gauge plant and program energy performance, a forum for elevating energy management in the industry, and recognition for superior

375

The impact of cement parameters on Delayed Ettringite Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) in concrete is likely to lead to swelling and cracking in structures which have undergone early age heating to a temperature of over 65 °C. Application of a method that accelerates this process has made it possible to study the impact of cement properties on DEF. For two temperatures reached by the concrete (75 °C or 85 °C), the study considers a domain defined by the sulphate content [2.6–3.6%], the alkali content [0.5–1%] and the Blaine specific area [3330–4635 cm2/g] of the cement. The impact of these parameters and the interactions between them on swelling are discussed. Monitoring of the dynamic elastic modulus of the concretes shows that this property may be reduced by DEF, but that it may increase again once the swelling process has ceased, probably due to the gradual filling of voids by ettringite formed under conditions of limited supersaturation.

A. Pavoine; X. Brunetaud; L. Divet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Carbon emissions reductions for a specific new cement plant:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5346 5346 Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 July 2000 This work was supported by the Climate Policies and Program Division, Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 ii iii Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division

377

Hard x-ray nanotomography of amorphous aluminosilicate cements.  

SciTech Connect

Nanotomographic reconstruction of a sample of low-CO{sub 2} 'geopolymer' cement provides the first three-dimensional view of the pore structure of the aluminosilicate geopolymer gel, as well as evidence for direct binding of geopolymer gel onto unreacted fly ash precursor particles. This is central to understanding and optimizing the durability of concretes made using this new class of binder, and demonstrates the value of nanotomography in providing a three-dimensional view of nanoporous inorganic materials.

Provis, J. L.; Rose, V.; Winarski, R. P.; van Deventer, J. S. J. (Advanced Photon Source); ( CNM)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar  

SciTech Connect

Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John [School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Exponential coefficient plots for identifying cement channels from temperature logs  

SciTech Connect

One technique for identifying a cement channel in such a well is to inject cold water or diesel fuel for a period of time, followed by recording shut-in temperature profiles after the injection ceases. Qualitative judgements are made from the appearance of these profiles in order to confirm the existence of a channel. Alternatively, by processing the temperature logs mathematically, an exponential coefficient may be calculated and plotted against depth. This exponential coefficient plot is very responsive to the presence of cold fluid in a cement channel, and confirms a channel's existence quantitatively and conclusively. This paper discusses use of such a mathematical relationship in a predictive fashion for identifying injection zones. Methods are given for deriving and plotting the exponential coefficients from temperature logs of a well placed on cold fluid injection. Three examples are presented on the application of exponential coefficient plots to actual field logs for confirmation of suspected channels and for assessment of the uniformity of cement bonding.

Barnette, J.C.; Lanuke, E.W.; Carlson, N.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Study of cementing practices applied to the shallow casing in offshore wells  

SciTech Connect

Survey information shows annular gas flow associated with cementing defects to be a major problem in shallow casing strings offshore as well as in other cemented strings in oil and gas wells. The gas flow hazard to safety, environment, and economics could be reduced by an aggressive program keyed to prevent gas migration. The program components are: (1) historical data base; (2) training; (3) research of cement hydration in a long, thin column; and (4) development of logging-surveillance devices.

Martinez, J.; McDonald, W.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

'The Overriding Demand for Energy Conservation in the Cement Industry' An Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and argillaceous materials such as limestone and clay or shale into an intermediate fused material called clinker, which is subse quently ground together with a small amount of gypsum. Portland cement is the principal material produced by the U. S. cement..., energy con sumption pe r ton of cement produced dropped overall by 10 percent, despite considerably higher electric power requirements for pollution control and coal-handling facilities. It is significant that the industry has rapidly con verted its...

Spellman, L. U.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Formation of ettringite in Portland cement/calcium aluminate cement/calcium sulfate ternary system hydrates at lower temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To explore the formation of ettringite at lower temperatures in the Portland cement/calcium aluminate cement/calcium sulfate ternary system hydrates, the effect of calcium sulfate variety on the setting time of the ternary system and the strength development of its mortars at 0, 5, 10 and 20 °C were investigated. The formation of ettringite was further analyzed using XRD and ESEM. The results show that, as temperature increases, both initial and final setting time are shortened and that compressive and flexural strength are enhanced. In particular, mortars with anhydrite develop higher strength between 0 and 10 °C but lower strength at 20 °C than those with hemihydrate. Further, pastes with anhydrite set faster than those with hemihydrate. It is also found that both the formation rate and amount of ettringite are sensitive to temperature and calcium sulfate variety.

Linglin Xu; Peiming Wang; Guofang Zhang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - african portland cement Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ex... materials produced in rotary kilns are portland cement, quicklime and expanded shale (lightweight) aggregate... is discussed later in this report as a concern when using...

385

Identifying demand market participation opportunities available in cement plants / Izak Daniël Krüger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??South African cement manufacturers are under financial pressure. Sales have declined due to the 2008 recession and electricity costs have tripled from 2005 to 2012.… (more)

Krüger, Izak Daniël

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash blended cement Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLSM mixture utilized... . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... investigation. Two additional ash ......

387

Characterization of cement from a well at Teapot Dome Oil Field: Implications for geological sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wellbores represent the weakest link in terms of CO2 storage permanence. As a result, special attention to the numerous existing wells that perforate storage formations is needed. The pre-injection condition of the cement can influence the rate (and type) of alteration by the injected CO2 plume. The condition of the existing well cement depends on a variety of factors including wellbore/formation and wellbore/brine interactions as well as the composition and type of cement placed in the well (i.e. type of admixtures used, water/solids ratio, sulfate resistant mixes, etc.). In this paper, the details of recovering wellbore cement from an older well to determine pre-injection seal integrity are described. Petrographical and chemical analyses are presented for samples of cement that were retrieved from a 19-year-old well at Teapot Dome in Wyoming. Examination revealed that the retrieved cement had altered as a result of original slurry composition and with respect to the local downhole wellbore environment. Although samples were obtained from a single well, significant differences were observed in their alteration and condition. Sulfate attack resulted in abundant ettringite formation in a cement sample taken adjacent to the Wall Creek sandstone (3060 ft), while cement taken adjacent to the Tensleep formation (5478 ft) was decalcified and enriched in magnesium, owing to reaction of calcium hydroxide in the cement with the dolomitic formation.

George W. Scherer; Barbara Kutchko; Niels Thaulow; Andrew Duguid; Bryant Mook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Azure. Alternative Fuel Use in the Cement Sector in ShandongAlternative fuels ..6 Resource potential for alternative fuel use in Shandong

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Development waste heat recovery World Wide FundTaishan Cement Works Waste Heat Recovery and Utilisation forPlant’s Low Temperature Waste Heat Power Generation Project.

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report of cement industry waste heat power generation. ChinaWorrell et al. , 2001). Waste heat recovery (WHR) poweradoption and utilization of waste heat recovery (WHR) power

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” Proceedings of

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.for Improving Energy Efficiency, Reducing Pollution and

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydration kinetics of cements by Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Application to Portland-cement-derived endodontic pastes  

SciTech Connect

Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) of {sup 1}H nuclei is used to monitor the maturation up to 30 days of three different endodontic cement pastes. The 'Solid-liquid' separation of the NMR signals and quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times allow one to follow the formation of chemical compounds and the build-up of the nano- and subnano-structured C-S-H gel. {sup 1}H populations, distinguished by their different mobilities, can be identified and assigned to water confined within the pores of the C-S-H gel, to crystallization water and Portlandite, and to hydroxyl groups. Changes of the TD-NMR parameters during hydration are in agreement with the expected effects of the different additives, which, as it is known, can substantially modify the rate of reactions and the properties of cementitious pastes. Endodontic cements are suitable systems to check the ability of this non-destructive technique to give insight into the complex hydration process of real cement pastes.

Bortolotti, Villiam, E-mail: villiam.bortolotti@unibo.it [Department DICAM, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, 40131, Bologna (Italy); Fantazzini, Paola [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127, Bologna (Italy); Mongiorgi, Romano [Centre of Biomineralogy, Crystallography and Biomaterials, Department of Earth and Geoenvironmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40127, Bologna (Italy); Sauro, Salvatore [Department of Dental Biomaterials Science Kings College, London Dental Institute at Guy's, King's College and St Thomas' Hospitals, Floor 17 Guy's Tower, Guys Hospital, London Bridge, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, University of Granada, Colegio Maximo, Campus de Cartuja, Granada (Spain); Zanna, Silvano [Centre of Biomineralogy, Crystallography and Biomaterials, Department of Earth and Geoenvironmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40127, Bologna (Italy)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

395

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

396

Behavior of cement mortars containing an industrial waste from aluminium refining: Stability in Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions  

SciTech Connect

The physical and chemical interaction between a solid industrial waste from aluminium refining and saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution, as well as the effects of substituting siliceous sand for the waste on the physical and mechanical properties of mortars were studied. The waste is a solid that contains reactive alumina capable of combining with the calcium hydroxide. These reactions result in stable and insoluble compounds. This alumina, together with the halite (also present in the waste composition), chemically react with a saturated solution of Ca(OH){sub 2}, giving as a main reaction product the so-called Friedel's salt (Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}O{sub 6} {center{underscore}dot} 10 H{sub 2}O). Straetlingite and Si-hydrogarnets were among other products detected. The waste has a high specific surface area. The cement/waste mixtures therefore require a higher quantity of mixing water than cement/sand mixtures. The result is a decrease of the mechanical strengths and an increase of the total porosity. However, a decrease of the average size of the pores occurs, which can have a positive effect on the durability of the final material.

Puertas, F.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.; Vazquez, T.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

DOE's Shale Gas and Hydraulic Fracturing Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale Gas and Hydraulic Fracturing Research Shale Gas and Hydraulic Fracturing Research DOE's Shale Gas and Hydraulic Fracturing Research April 26, 2013 - 11:05am Addthis Statement of Guido DeHoratiis Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology Subcommittees on Energy and Environment. I want to thank the Chairs, Ranking Members and Members of the Subcommittees for inviting me to appear before you today to discuss the critical role that the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, in collaboration with the Department of the Interior (DOI) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is playing to improve the safety and environmental performance of developing our Nation's unconventional oil and natural gas (UOG) resources.

398

MHK Technologies/Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generators THG Generators THG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Ramsey Sound Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The concept of generating energy in this way is made unique by our novel design feature. The generator, devised in 1998, is a hydraulic accumulator system, involving relatively small revolving blades which gather power to a central collector, where electricity is generated. The generator, which is situated under water, is 80 metres square, stands at 15 metres high, and is designed to run for a minimum of ten years without service.

399

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase I:  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase I: J2esearch Program Design Volume 2 EPRI EPRI CS-2323 Volume 2 Project 1884-6 Final Report March 1982 Keywords: Feed Pumps Feed Pump Reliability Feed Pump Hydraulics Feed Pump Design Feed Pump Research Feed Pump Specifications Prepared by Borg-Warner Corporation (Byron Jackson Pump Division and Borg-Warner Research Center) Carson, California and Massa^ f Technology Cambri__ . s ,-T. a a *a_^"nt.- ji^, w « ' jm.m ^j.^M\MMMim^mjii'mmmjmiiiimm\i- " I E CT R I C P 0 W E R R E S E A R C H I N ST ITO T E DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

400

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

On equivalence of thinning fluids used for hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper aims to answer the question: if and how non-Newtonian fluids may be compared in their mechanical action when used for hydraulic fracturing? By employing the modified formulation of the PKN problem we obtain its simple analytical solutions in the cases of perfectly plastic and Newtonian fluids. Since the results for shear thinning fluids are intermediate between those for these cases, the obtained equation for the fracture length suggests a criterion of the equivalence of various shear thinning fluids for the problem of hydraulic fractures. We assume fluids equivalent in their hydrofracturing action, when at a reference time they produce fractures of the same length. The equation for the fracture length translates the equivalence in terms of the hydraulic fracture length and treatment time into the equivalence in terms of the properties of a fracturing fluid (behavior and consistency indices). Analysis shows that the influence of the consistency and behavior indices on the fracture length, particle v...

Linkov, Alexander

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. , 1990. “Utilisation of Waste Heat from the Cement RotaryAdvanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants”a roller mill. Utilizing waste heat from the kiln exhaust,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Microsoft Word - S0162200_VariationHydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJ803-2005 GJ803-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-01 Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Doc. No. S0162200 Page v Contents Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................

404

Microsoft Word - S0162200_VariationHydraulicConductivity-PRB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GJ803-2005 GJ803-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-01 Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier February 2005 Doc. No. S0162200 Page v Contents Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................

405

Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical results are included.

Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 227256 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 227­256 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum-feldspars recovered at various depths from a deep well drilled through a carbonate-cemented sandstone petroleum of a sandstone petroleum xreservoir, Elk Hills, California. Part 2: In situ oxygen and carbon isotopic results

407

Quartz cementation inhibited by crestal oil charge: Miller deep water sandstone,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quartz cementation inhibited by crestal oil charge: Miller deep water sandstone, UK North Sea A. M (Received 15 June 1998; revised 11 February 1999) ABSTRACT: In the Miller Field, diagenetic quartz abundance: quartz cementation, Miller deep water sandstone, North Sea, diagenetic quartz. The Miller Field

Haszeldine, Stuart

408

Carbon 39 (2001) 19952001 Silane-treated carbon fiber for reinforcing cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon 39 (2001) 1995­2001 Silane-treated carbon fiber for reinforcing cement *Yunsheng Xu, D-treated carbon fibers and silane-treated silica fume, relative to the values for cement paste with as-received carbon fibers and as-received silica fume. Silane treatment of fibers and silica fume contributed about

Chung, Deborah D.L.

409

Corrosion of Metals in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi*, J. Hill and N. B. Milestone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes (ILW) in the UK. Cements are used because they are economic, durable and have long-term stability and assess whether the corrosion has any effects on cement durability over extended storage. Background Steel by carbonation. However, in waste encapsulation processes this is not the case as the grouts are enclosed

Sheffield, University of

410

Sr radionuclide in cement: An atomistic modeling study Mostafa Youssef a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Available online xxxx Keywords: Molecular simulation Cement Nuclear waste storage Mechanical properties a b the interaction of each radionuclide with the cement matrix. Understanding on a fundamental level the long-term s t r a c t Cementitious materials are considered to be a waste form for the ultimate disposal

Yildiz, Bilge

411

Improved cement quality and grinding efficiency by means of closed mill circuit modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grinding of clinker is the last and most energy-consuming stage of the cement manufacturing process, drawing on average 40% of the total energy required to produce one ton of cement. During this stage, the clinker particles are substantially reduced...

Mejeoumov, Gleb Gennadievich

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Transient Model for Behavior of Mercury in Portland Cement Kilns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) Bituminous coals (median value of 0.1 ?g/g) typically contain more mercury than petcoke (0.05 ?g/g median) or tires (0.04 ?g/g median), although the range of fuel mercury content is broad. ... Figure 2. Cumulative distribution of mercury in bituminous coal, petcoke, and tires fired at coal-fired power plants(2) and limestone input to cement kilns. ... The kiln used coal and petcoke as primary fuels, while tires were burned in the precalciner. ...

Constance Senior; Christopher J. Montgomery; Adel Sarofim

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Sulfur polymer cement for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1997, the US DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) sponsored a demonstration of the macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). Two mixed wastes were tested--a D006 waste comprised of sheets of cadmium and a D008/D009 waste comprised of lead pipes and joints contaminated with mercury. The demonstration was successful in rendering these wastes compliant with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thereby eliminating one Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) waste stream from the national inventory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Annual report, September 28, 1995--September 27, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The digital fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economic to develop using verticle wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional verticle wells while maintaining verticle communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three verticle wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

Niemeyer, B.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement  

SciTech Connect

Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO{sub 3}, quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite.

Kruger, A.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Assessment and risk analysis of casing and cement impairment in oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, 2000–2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and/or casing impairment. Remedial action is often attempted once...contamination/gas migration investigations, but these types of inspections...annular vent" 20 Cement Squeeze Remedial cementing operation performed...patch", "perf" 34 Top Job Remedial cementing operation used to...

Anthony R. Ingraffea; Martin T. Wells; Renee L. Santoro; Seth B. C. Shonkoff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

419

Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Influence of Vertical Location on Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in the Fayetteville Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is the primary stimulation method within low permeability reservoirs, in particular shale reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing provides a means for making shale reservoirs commercially viable by inducing and propping fracture...

Briggs, Kathryn

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

Massive Hydraulic Fracture of Fenton Hill HDR Well EE-3 | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massive Hydraulic Fracture of Fenton Hill HDR Well EE-3 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Massive Hydraulic Fracture of Fenton Hill HDR...

423

Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Applications for Frequency-Leveraged Piezoelectric Hydraulic Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Olsen, “Axial flow blood pumps,” ASAIO J. Am. Soc. Artif.of a Piezoelectric-hydraulic Pump with Active Valves,” J.Piezoelectric Hydraulic Pump Development,” J. Intell. Mater.

Valdovinos, John

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Work of the Leningrad Metal Factory Industrial Association toward modernizing hydraulic turbines at existing hydroelectric plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. At the present time there are tested, reliable solutions for modernization of different hydraulic turbine ass...

V. M. Malyshev

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Acceptable approaches for beneficial use of cement kiln dust  

SciTech Connect

One beneficial use of cement kiln dust (CKD) is application of CKD to cropland as agricultural lime or fertilizer. However, the EPA has expressed a concern over land application of CKD when the metals constituents in the CKD are above the industry-wide median levels presented in EPA`s Report to Congress on Cement Kiln Dust. Under the Clean Water Act, EPA has established limits for metals concentrations in sewage sludge that is applied to the land for beneficial use of the nitrogen in the sludge. The limits for land application of sewage sludge were established based on the results of exposure risk assessments. A comparison of the median industry-wide metals concentrations in CKD to the metals concentration limits for land application of sewage sludge indicates that all trace metal concentrations IN CKD are below the corresponding sewage sludge land application limit, with the exception of the median level of arsenic from one data set. EPA has determined that land application of CKD with metals concentration limits at or below the industry-wide median concentrations does not pose a significant human cancer or non-cancer health risk. Therefore, with appropriate limits, CKD can be beneficially reused for land application on agricultural land in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment.

Schreiber, R.J.; Smeenk, S.D. [Schreiber, Yonley and Associates, St. Louis, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Demonstration of Mixed Waste Debris Macroencapsulation Using Sulfur Polymer Cement  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed during FY 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Sulfur Polymer Cement Fast-Track System Project. The project is in support of the ``Mercury Working Group/Mercury Treatment Demonstrations - Oak Ridge`` and is described in technical task plan (TTP) OR-16MW-61. Macroencapsulation is the treatment technology required for debris by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Based upon the results of previous work performed at Oak Ridge, the concept of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) for this purpose was submitted to the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). Because of the promising properties of the material, the MWFA accepted this Quick Win project, which was to demonstrate the feasibility of macroencapsulation of actual mixed waste debris stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste acceptance criteria from Envirocare, Utah, were chosen as a standard for the determination of the final waste form produced. During this demonstration, it was shown that SPC was a good candidate for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris, especially when the debris pieces were dry. The matrix was found to be quite easy to use and, once the optimum operating conditions were identified, very straightforward to replicate for batch treatment. The demonstration was able to render LDR compliant more than 400 kg of mixed wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydraulic constraints on photosynthesis in subtropical evergreen broad leaf forest and pine woodland trees of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER Hydraulic constraints on photosynthesis in subtropicalwater transport and photosynthesis represents the trade-offwater transport and photosynthesis to evaluate hydraulic

Jones, Tim J.; Luton, Corene D.; Santiago, Louis S.; Goldstein, Guillermo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer  

SciTech Connect

This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test.

Aftanas, B.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

429

International Space Station power module thermal control system hydraulic performance  

SciTech Connect

The International Space Station (ISS) uses four photovoltaic power modules (PVMs) to provide electric power for the US On-Orbit Segment. The PVMs consist of photovoltaic arrays (PVAs), orbit replaceable units (ORUs), photovoltaic radiators (PVRs), and a thermal control system (TCS). The PVM TCS function is to maintain selected PVM components within their specified operating ranges. The TCS consists of the pump flow control subassembly (PFCS), piping system, including serpentine tubing for individual component heat exchangers, headers/manifolds, fluid disconnect couplings (FQDCs), and radiator (PVR). This paper describes the major design requirements for the TCS and the results of the system hydraulic performance predictions in regard to these requirements and system component sizing. The system performance assessments were conducted using the PVM TCS fluid network hydraulic model developed for predicting system/component pressure losses and flow distribution. Hardy-Cross method of iteration was used to model the fluid network configuration. Assessments of the system hydraulic performance were conducted based on an evaluation of uncertainties associated with the manufacturing and design tolerances. Based on results of the analysis, it was concluded that all design requirements regarding system performance could be met. The hydraulic performance range, enveloping possible system operating parameter variations was determined.

Goldberg, V. [Boeing North American, Inc., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

New fluids help increase effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

It is important to choose the most effective fluid for hydraulic fracturing a particular formation. Fracturing fluids are used to initiate formation parting, extend the fracture into the reservoir, and to transport and distribute proppant. This paper discusses the fundamental of fluid types, viscosifiers, and fluid rheology.

Ebinger, C.D.; Hunt, E.

1989-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

Observations of long period earthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

Waveforms of most seismic events accompanying hydraulic fracturing have been reported to contain clear P and S waves and have fault plane solutions consistent with shear displacement across a fault. This observation is surprising since classical hydraulic fracturing theory predicts the creation of a tensile opening of a cavity in response to fluid pressure. Very small long period events, similar to long period earthquakes observed at volcanoes, were found to occur during four hydraulic fracturing experiments carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Since the long period earthquakes occur in the same region as the shear type events, it is concluded that the unusual character of the long period earthquake waveforms is due to a source effect and not a path effect. The occurrence of long period earthquakes during hydraulic fracturing could indicate tensile fracturing. Many waveforms of these events are identical, which implies that these events represent repeated activation of a given source. A proposed source for these long period events is the sudden opening of a channel that connects two cracks filled with fluid at different pressures. The sizes of the two cracks differ, which causes two or more peaks to appear in the spectra, each peak being associated with one physical dimension of each crack. From the frequencies at which spectral peaks occur, crack lengths are estimated to be between 3 and 20m.

Bame, D.; Fehler, M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine Frank Jepsen, Anders Søborg brake in a wind turbine. Brake torque is determined by friction coefficient and clamp force; the latter brake is one1 of the two independent brake systems in a wind turbine. As a consequence of the gearing

Yang, Zhenyu

433

Studying Hydraulic Fracturing through Time-variant Seismic Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is an important modern technique of exploiting natural gas and oil, in which a high-pressure liquid mixture is injected into a wellbore to create small fractures in order to release fluids such as natural gas and petroleum...

Liu, Qifan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media represented by a DFN Model L. D. Donado, X. Sanchez-Vila, E. Ruiz* & F. J. Elorza** * Enviros Spain S.L. ** UPM #12;Fractured Media Water flows through fractures (matrix basically impervious ­ though relevant to transport) Fractures at all

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

435

DESIGN OF INTELLIGENT HYDRAULIC EXCAVATOR CONTROL SYSTEM BASED ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

according to the engine consumption fuel curve. Transient overload function was designed for deep digging that the auto idle could decrease fuel consumption by 33.33% compared to work in maximum speed of H mode the constant power design method and set 85%~90% of engine power as the hydraulic system adoption power

436

Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton JrSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA z industrial processes, the higher the risk of that ecosystem being impacted by the operation. The associated

437

Water Use for Hydraulic Fracturing: A Texas Sized Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state of Texas could face a 2.7 trillion gallon shortfall of water by 2060. Hydraulic fracturing (HF) requires large amounts of water for each well. Tax incentives should be offered to companies that substitute brackish groundwater for fresh...

LeClere, David

438

Nonlinear State Space Model of a Hydraulic Wind Power Transfer Masoud Vaezi1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear State Space Model of a Hydraulic Wind Power Transfer Masoud Vaezi1 , Majid Deldar1 1, IUPUI. Gearless hydraulic wind power systems are considered as nonlinear models because of some discrete nonlinear governing equations for the elements in the proposed hydraulic wind power configuration. Nonlinear

Zhou, Yaoqi

439

Bacteriological water quality effects of hydraulically dredging contaminated upper Mississippi River bottom sediment.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the 782 WATER QUALITY AFTER HYDRAULIC...Army Corps of Engineers' hydraulic dredge...District, Corps of Engineers (purchase order...788 GRIMES WATER QUALITY AFTER HYDRAULIC...Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment...Committee on Water Quality Cri- teria. U...

D J Grimes

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

On the moving boundary conditions for a hydraulic fracture Emmanuel Detournay a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the moving boundary conditions for a hydraulic fracture Emmanuel Detournay a,b, , Anthony Peirce 2014 Keywords: Hydraulic fractures Speed equation Ill-posedness a b s t r a c t This paper re-examines the boundary conditions at the moving front of a hydraulic fracture when the fluid front has coalesced

Peirce, Anthony

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated December 7, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated December 7, 2011 of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Shale Plays (2010). Tudor Pickering Holt & Co with Reservoir Research Partners, with a thoughtful discussion Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

Manning, Sturt

442

Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM Elizaveta Gordeliy, Anthony Peirce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM Elizaveta Gordeliy August 2012 Accepted 18 August 2012 Available online 15 September 2012 Keywords: XFEM Hydraulic fractures and the Dirichlet to Neumann (DN) map with OĂ°hĂ? accuracy. For hydraulic fracture problems with a lag separating

Peirce, Anthony

443

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated June 23, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated June 23, 2011 of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Shale Plays (2010). Tudor Pickering Holt & Co with Reservoir Research Partners, with a thoughtful discussion Draft Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water

444

Numerical modeling of hydraulic fracture problem in permeable medium using cohesive zone model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of hydraulic fracture problem in permeable medium using cohesive zone model-off dominated. We demonstrate the ability of our cohesive zone model in simulating the hydraulic fracture in all these propagation regimes. Keywords: Hydraulic fracture, Cohesive zone model, Finite element analysis, Hydro

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

445

Implicit level set schemes for modeling hydraulic fractures using the Elizaveta Gordeliy, Anthony Peirce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implicit level set schemes for modeling hydraulic fractures using the XFEM Elizaveta Gordeliy Copyright Ă? 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Hydraulic fractures (HF form 13 July 2013 Accepted 27 July 2013 Available online 20 August 2013 Keywords: XFEM Hydraulic

Peirce, Anthony

446

2006 GeoX Conference, pages 1 to 6 Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 GeoX Conference, pages 1 to 6 Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in limestones using X, France Jacques.Desrues@hmg.inpg.fr ABSTRACT: Hydraulic tension fractures were produced in porous, hydraulic fracture, permeability tensor MOTS-CLĂ?S: microtomographie, fracturation hydraulique, tenseur de

447

Enrichment strategies and convergence properties of the XFEM for hydraulic fracture problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enrichment strategies and convergence properties of the XFEM for hydraulic fracture problems Finite Ele- ment Method (XFEM) for modeling hydraulic fractures (HF), two classes of boundary value energy, is not suitable for modeling hydraulic fractures in which the uid and the fracture fronts

Peirce, Anthony

448

A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application to crack propagation at glacier beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Click Here for Full Article A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application to crack suggest that fluidinduced hydraulic fracture of an ice sheet from its bed sometimes occurs quickly. Citation: Tsai, V. C., and J. R. Rice (2010), A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application

449

International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 44 (2007) 739757 Computer simulation of hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydraulic fractures J. Adachia , E. Siebritsb , A. Peircec,Ă?, J. Desrochesd a Schlumberger Data of hydraulic fracturing models for use in the petroleum and other industries. We discuss scaling laws and the propagation regimes that control the growth of hydraulic fractures from the laboratory to the field scale. We

Peirce, Anthony

450

A Hybrid, Neuro-Genetic Approach to Hydraulic Fracture Treatment Design and Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 36602 A Hybrid, Neuro-Genetic Approach to Hydraulic Fracture Treatment Design and Optimization and novel methodology for optimal design of hydraulic fracture treatments in a gas storage field. What makes very little (almost none) reservoir data availability. Lack of engineering data for hydraulic fracture

Mohaghegh, Shahab

451

Review article Induced seismicity and hydraulic fracturing for the recovery of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review article Induced seismicity and hydraulic fracturing for the recovery of hydrocarbons Richard mining (M 1.0e5.2); (h) geothermal operations (M 1.0e4.6) and (i) hydraulic fracturing for recovery seismicity occurs due to a reduction in effective stress on fault planes. Hydraulic fracturing operations can

Foulger, G. R.

452

Microseismic mapping of a Cotton Valley hydraulic fracture using decimated downhole arrays J.T. Rutledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microseismic mapping of a Cotton Valley hydraulic fracture using decimated downhole arrays J three hydraulic fracture operations in the Cotton Valley gas field of East Texas. Two 48-level, 3 a consortia of operators and service companies conducted an extensive hydraulic fracture imaging demonstration

453

Self-similar solutions for a fractional thin film equation governing hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-similar solutions for a fractional thin film equation governing hydraulic fractures C. Imbert equation governing hydraulic fractures are constructed. One of the boundary con- ditions, which accounts, 35R11, 35C06 Keywords: Hydraulic fractures, higher order equation, thin films, fractional Laplacian

Boyer, Edmond

454

New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas fingerprints of fluids that return to the surface after high volume hydraulic fracturing of unconventional oil the hydraulic fracturing process, resulting in the relative enrichment of boron and lithium in HFFF

Jackson, Robert B.

455

Nonlinear Model Based Coordinated Adaptive Robust Control of Electro-hydraulic Robotic Arms via Overparametrizing Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear Model Based Coordinated Adaptive Robust Control of Electro-hydraulic Robotic Arms via by electrical motors, hydraulic robot arms have a richer nonlinear dynam- ics and stronger couplings among uncertainties only. Simulation and experimental results on a three degree-of-freedom (DOF) hydraulic robot arm

Yao, Bin

456

On-Line Fault Detection and Compensation of Hydraulic Driven Machines Using Modelling Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Line Fault Detection and Compensation of Hydraulic Driven Machines Using Modelling Techniques C purpose of hydraulic driven machines as well as for the compensation of incipient faults where applicable: Modelling, Simulation, Hydraulic motors, Fault detection, Fault Compensation 1. Introduction Model

Thawonmas, Ruck

457

Laboratory sandbox validation of transient hydraulic tomography W. A. Illman,1,3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by geostatistical methods which require numerous measurements. This requires the drilling of numerous boreholes) as well as large-scale (unidirectional flow-through tests) estimates of hydraulic parameters. Results show as large-scale hydraulic parameter data. In addition, we find that the transient hydraulic tomography

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

458

A Hydraulic Capture Application for Optimal Remediation Design K. R. Fowlera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. INTRODUCTION Hydraulic capture methods for remediation attempt to control the direction of ground- water1 A Hydraulic Capture Application for Optimal Remediation Design K. R. Fowlera , C. T. Kelley b , C Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA The goal of a hydraulic capture model for remediation purposes

459

Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J.; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Performance of hydraulic fracturing and matrix acidizing in horizontal wellbores -- Offshore Qatar  

SciTech Connect

Considerable debate in the Middle East has centered upon what was previously felt to be two separate methods of enhancing revenues and daily production; hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. In an effort to maximize return on investment, these two issues have been successfully combined in other areas of the world. In order to establish the suitability of this technology in this area, two horizontal wells with over 3,050m (10,000ft) of lateral section were drilled into the Cretaceous Kharaib formation, overlying the North Field, Offshore Qatar. A massive stimulation program was performed in order to evaluate the most feasible stimulation method from both a technical and economical perspective for further field development considerations.Three propped hydraulic fracturing treatments were performed using 183, 500kg (403, 700lb) of 20/40 mesh sand, and seventeen acid matrix treatments placing over 3,217,250l (850,000gals) of HCL into the lateral sections of both wells. This paper describes the performance, operation and logistical support required to complete this offshore operation with join a minimal time frame. The use of a mobile offshore jack-up platform, whereby a land based fracturing spread was placed onto the deck of a converted drilling rig is described.

Edwards, M.G.R.; Pongratz, R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydraulic fracturing: A proven N.O.R.M. disposal method  

SciTech Connect

Since the discovery that many drill cuttings, scales, sludges, and platings contain elevated amounts of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), many companies and regulating authorities have discussed the merits of various disposal methods. This paper covers a process that disposes of NORM and provides isolation of the material from the environment. Disposal of NORM slurry through fracturing an existing depleted sandstone requires careful analysis to optimize a safe and effective design. A radioactivity assay was performed on the NORM before and after slurrification to determine activity concentrations. Tests were conducted on the NORM to proved parameters for the fracture design. The process consists of slurrying the material and keeping the particles suspended in solution until time for well injection. Well injection takes the form of hydraulic fracturing with the material into a deplete zone in the reservoir. Fracturing with the NORM was preceded with a Mini-Frac as a safety precaution to confirm downhole parameters. In conclusion, the philosophy of the process is to take the NORM generated through the exploration and production of oil and gas and place it back into the reservoir from which it came through hydraulic fracturing. This technique is one that helps protect the environment from the possible hazards associated with mismanaged NORM.

Young, S.C. [Halliburton Energy Services, New Orleans, LA (United States); Chambers, D.G. [Halliburton Energy Services, Lafayette, LA (United States); Woods, S.E.; Abernathy, S.E. [Halliburton Energy Services, Duncan, OK (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

A model of the large hydraulic gradient at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, based on hydraulic conductivity contrasts between Cenozoic and Paleozoic rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A MODEL OF THE LARGE HYDRAULIC GRADIENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA TEST SITE, BASED ON HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY CONTRASTS BETWEEN CENOZOIC AND PALEOZOIC ROCKS A Thesis ERIC WILLIAM STROM Submitted to the Offic of Graduate Studies of Texas A.... 4m W&~~ &&go~'~o~~i gp ??g Y, ) 4r y. odtli' ~ 6. A MODEL OF THE LARGE HYDRAULIC GRADIENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA TEST SITE, BASED ON HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY CONTRASTS BETWEEN CENOZOIC AND PALEOZOIC ROCKS A Thesis ERIC WILLIAM STROM...

Strom, Eric William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

464

The integration of water vane pump and hydraulic vane motor for a small desalination system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integration of water vane pump and hydraulic vane motor was introduced in small reverse osmosis (RO) system, in which the hydraulic vane motor was used as energy recovery device. The hydraulic performance and energy consumption of one combination of pump and hydraulic motor were investigated under different operation conditions. This type of integration pump reduces energy cost and simplifies the system setup, thus it could be an alternative choice for small RO desalination system. Our results demonstrated that the improvement of volumetric efficiencies of the pump and the hydraulic motor was the main factor to increase the prototype pump performance.

Yong Lu; Yuanyang Zhao; Gaoxuan Bu; Pengcheng Shu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of O2 in combustion products Excess air used Recommended airtemperature of the air or combustion products and nodules tocombustion products of coal, additional air from various

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Characterization and modeling of the cemented sediment surrounding the Iulia Felix glass  

SciTech Connect

About 1800 years ago a Roman Corbita sunk off the coast of Italy carrying a barrel of glass cullet to the floor of the Adriatic Sea. Samples of glass cullet and the cemented surrounding sediment have been characterized and the reaction between the glass and the sea water saturated with respect to calcite and dolomite has been modeled. Results from characterization and modeling show that the cement phase surrounding the sediment grains is a high-Mg calcite. The origin of the cement phase is likely the reaction between the glass and the sea water to from a Mg-silicate, here modeled as sepiolite.

Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Silvestri, Alberta

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

467

Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study  

SciTech Connect

Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants: Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To achieve that vision, industry leaders jointly define detailed R&D agendas known as roadmaps. ITP relies on roadmap-defined priorities to target cost-shared solicitations and guide development of a balanced R&D portfolio that yields useful results in the near, mid, and long term. Industry Vision & Roadmaps Two documents address the cement industry's challenges and priorities: Vision 2030, which outlines broad goals for the future, and Roadmap 2030, which established the industry's R&D priorities. ITP and the Strategic Development Council, a council of the American Concrete Institute's

471

In What Form is Lime Present in Portland Cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to obtain Si02.33a0, In his conclusions Hebuffat does not consider it of importance whether alit consists of pure Si02.3CaO or a crystalline compound of Si02.2CaO with 3a0 and an aluminate. He says the aluminate in Portland dement can­ not be Al 203.30a..., Erd- meyer, Nev/berry's, Zulkowski, Rebuff at, Meyers, Richardson, Michaelis and Meade• d. Work of the Carbegie Institute of Washington on CaO #Si0 2 series and binary compounds of Al 2°3> Si0 2, MgO, CaO. On the presence of free lime in cement...

Wright, Claude W.

1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Sorption of Selenite and Selenate to Cement Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sorption of selenite and selenate to ettringite (3CaO·Al2O3·3CaSO4·32H2O), “monosulfate” (3CaO·Al2O3·CaSO4·12H2O), and calcium silicate hydrate (C?S?H) was investigated in order to understand Se immobilization by cement in hazardous wastes. ... Selenite is suggested to sorb by surface reactions, and for ettringite, a sorption maximum of 0.03 mol kg-1 was determined. ... Distribution ratios (Rd) for selenite were 0.18, 0.38, and 0.21 m3 kg-1 for ettringite, monosulfate, and C?S?H, respectively. ...

Isabel Baur; C. Annette Johnson

2003-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

473

Patch microstructure in cement-based materials: Fact or artefact?  

SciTech Connect

The appearance of patch microstructure, i.e. broad dense and porous regions separated by sharp and distinct boundaries and occurring randomly in bulk and interfacial transition zones, has been reported previously in various site- and laboratory-mixed concretes and mortars. In this paper, evidence is presented to show that patch microstructure is an artefact of sample preparation and does not reflect the true nature of the hydrated cement paste. The appearance of dense patches comes from paste areas that have been ground and polished beyond the epoxy resin intrusion depth. In a backscattered electron image, pores not filled with epoxy are not visible because the signal is generated from the base or side walls of the pores. A modified method for epoxy impregnation, which can achieve a much deeper epoxy penetration than conventional vacuum impregnation, is presented.

Wong, H.S. [Concrete Durability Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: hong.wong@imperial.ac.uk; Buenfeld, N.R. [Concrete Durability Group, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Solidification/Stabilization of High Nitrate and Biodenitrified Heavy Metal Sludges with a Portland Cement/Flyash System  

SciTech Connect

Pond 207C at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) contains process wastewaters characterized by high levels of nitrates and other salts, heavy metal contamination, and low level alpha activity. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of treating a high-nitrate waste, contaminated with heavy metals, with a coupled dewateriug and S/S process, as well as to investigate the effects of biodenitrification pretreatment on the S/S process. Pond 207C residuals served as the target waste. A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to demonstrate an S/S process that would minimize final product volume without a significant decrease in contaminant stabilization or loss of desirable physical characteristics. The process formulation recommended as a result a previous S/S treatability study conducted on Pond 207C residuals was used as the baseline formulation for this research. Because the actual waste was unavailable due to difficulties associated with radioactive waste handling and storage, a surrogate waste, of known composition and representative of Pond 207C residuals, was used throughout this research. The contaminants of regulatory concern added to the surrogate were cadmium, chromium, nickel, and silver. Product volume reduction was achieved by dewatering the waste prior to S/S treatment. The surrogate was dewatered by evaporation at 60 to 80 C to total solids contents from 43% to 78% by weight, and treated with Portland cement and fly ash. Two cement to flyash ratios were tested, 2:1 and 1:2, by weight. Contaminant leachability testing was conducted with a 0.5 water to pozzolan (the cement/flyash mixture) ratio and both cement to flyash ratios. Each product was tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and for contaminant leachability by the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At the highest solids content achieved by dewatering, 78% solids by weight, the predicted final waste form volume f or Pond 207C residuals after S/S processing was reduced by over 60 A when compared to the baseline process. All tested process formulations produced final waste forms with an average UCS of 100 psi or greater. Percent fixation of Chrome (VI) increased at higher solids contents. Fixation of nickel varied from over 87% to 69%, and cadmium fixation was greater than 99% at every solids content tested. Silver TCLP extract concentrations were below detection limits in all cases except for one anomalous measurement. Final product volume reduction was not achieved with coupled dewatering and S/S processing after biodenitrification pretreatment. The waste slurry became too viscous to mix with reagents after dewatering to approximately 55% solids. Fixation of contaminant constituents and final product UCSs were similar to the results of S/S processing without biodenitrification. Due to the lack of volume reduction, biodenitrification was not successful as a pretreatment for S/S processing under the test conditions of this research.

Canonico, J.S.

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Reporting,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013 8, 2013 Hydraulic Fracturing Data Collection Tools Improve Environmental Reporting, Monitoring, Protection Washington, D.C. -Two data collection tools specifically developed for hydraulic fracturing are available to help regulatory agencies monitor drilling and completion operations and enhance environmental protection. Developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) and FracFocus chemical disclosure registry (http://fracfocus.org/) provide a way for industry professionals, regulatory agencies and the general public to more easily access information on oil and natural gas activities. These reporting and data collection tools have been developed by the Groundwater Protection Council (GWPC) and various states.

476

ROC/RMOTC Hydraulic Pump Test Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXTREME EXTREME PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY, INC. Petroleum Engineers Property Evaluation and Economics Reserves Estimates and Reports Well and Completion Design Reservoir and EOR Studies Expert Witness Testimony Regulatory Permitting Wellsite Management Coalbed Methane Final Report Roc Oil/RMOTC Hydraulic Pump Test For Mr. Bob Cook Roc Oil, Inc. Level 16 100 William Street, Sydney 2011 NSW Australia Office +61 2 8356 2059 Fax +61 2 9380 2066 BCook@rocoil.com.au 29 Oct 2004 159 N. Wolcott, Suite 100 PO Box 490 Casper, WY 82601 USA Phone (307)266-4498 Fax (307)266-4495 Web ExtremePetroTech.com ROC OIL/RMOTC HYDRAULIC PUMP TEST FINAL REPORT Executive Summary Roc Oil (ROC) has a majority interest and acts as Operator in a JV project (Cliff Head) in the Offshore

477

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

SciTech Connect

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

478

Hydraulic fracturing experiments in the Great Northern Coal seam  

SciTech Connect

Two field-scale hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in vertical boreholes on the lease of Munmorah Colliery located south of Newcastle, NSW. The treatments fractured the 3-meter thick, 220-meter deep Great Northern coal seam and were designed to provide a direct comparison between a borate-crosslinked gel and a water treatment. The fracture geometries were mapped during mining of the coal seam. Geologic mapping disclosed a well-defined coal face cleat and systematic full-seam joints perpendicular to bedding and trending NW. The vertical hydraulic fractures extended along the joint and face cleat direction. Evidence that an early slurry stage of fine mesh proppant acted to block off one of two competing parallel fractures was found at one of the mineback sites.

Jeffrey, R.G.; Weber, C.R.; Vlahovic, W.; Enever, J.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

A survey of the causes of surfactant-induced changes in hydraulic conductivity  

SciTech Connect

During the last 10 years, contamination of soil and ground water by crude oil and refined petroleum products has gained national attention as problems have been discovered across the country. Ground water contamination is of special concern, as approximately 50% of all drinking water supplies come from ground water sources. As concern over petroleum contamination in soils has increased, so has interest in new, low-cost, effective methods to remediation petroleum-contaminated soil. One method which has been gaining increased attention over the last few years is the use of surfactants to improve the performance of soil washing and/or soil flushing operations. However, a major concern in the use of surfactants, especially with in situ applications, is that it has long been known that the use of surfactants can result in a significant change in the hydraulic conductivity of porous media, either by changing intrinsic permeability or fluid characteristics.

Tumeo, M.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Hydrology and Hydraulic Properties of a Bedded Evaporite Formation  

SciTech Connect

The Permian Salado Formation in the Delaware Basin of New Mexico is an extensively studied evaporite deposit because it is the host formation for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a repository for transuranic wastes. Geologic and hydrologic studies of the Salado conducted since the mid-1970's have led to the development of a conceptual model of the hydrogeology of the formation that involves far-field permeability in anhydrite layers and at least some impure halite layers. Pure halite layers and some impure halite layers may not possess an interconnected pore network adequate to provide permeability. Pore pressures are probably very close to lithostatic pressure. In the near field around an excavation, dilation, creep, and shear have created and/or enhanced permeability and decreased pore pressure. Whether flow occurs in the far field under natural gradients or only after some threshold gradient is reached is unknown. If far-field flow does occur, mean pore velocities are probably on the order of a meter per hundreds of thousands to tens of millions of years. Flow dimensions inferred from most hydraulic-test responses are subradial, which is believed to reflect channeling of flow through fracture networks, or portions of fractures, that occupy a diminishing proportion of the radially available space, or through percolation networks that are not ''saturated'' (fully interconnected). This is probably related to the directional nature of the permeability created or enhanced by excavation effects. Inferred values of permeability cannot be separated from their associated flow dimensions. Therefore, numerical models of flow and transport should include heterogeneity that is structured to provide the same flow dimensions as are observed in hydraulic tests. Modeling of the Salado Formation around the WIPP repository should also include coupling between hydraulic properties and the evolving stress field because hydraulic properties change as the stress field changes.

BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; ROBERTS,RANDALL M.

2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydraulic cement production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Mathematical modeling of hydraulic fracturing in coal seams  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing of coal seam is considered as a process of development of discontinuities in rock mass elements due to change in hydrogeomechanical situation on filtration of fluid under pressure. Failure is associated with excess of the effective stresses over the rock tension strength. The problem on filtration and failure of massif is solved by the finite-element method using the procedure of fictitious nodal forces.

Olovyanny, A.G. [All Russian Science Research Institute for Mine Surveying, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Circular hydraulic jump in generalized-Newtonian fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We carry out an analytical study of laminar circular hydraulic jumps, in generalized-Newtonian fluids obeying the two-parametric power-law model of Ostwald-de Waele. Under the boundary-layer approximation we obtained exact expressions determining the flow, an implicit relation for the jump radius is derived. Corresponding results for Newtonian fluids can be retrieved as a limiting case for the flow behavior index n=1, predictions are made for fluids deviating from Newtonian behavior.

Rai, Ashutosh; Poria, Swarup

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect

The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Horizontal well will be employed in hydraulic fracturing research  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on 10-well research site, planned to enable more controlled experiments for better definition of hydraulic fracturing. One of the 10 wells will be a near-horizontal well that will monitor microseismic events along its length. The Gas Research Institute (GR) has begun evaluating a low-permeability, gas-bearing sandstone as the target stratum for experiments to be conducted at its hydraulic fracture test site (HFTS). During a 4-year period, GRI will use the HFTS as a field laboratory to conduct multi-disciplinary research projects to assess the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing. As a result of a screening process the Davis sandstone in the Ft. Worth basin has emerged as the tight gas sand which best fits the selected criteria established by GRI and its contractors, GRI says. The Ft. Worth basin is located approximately 50 miles northwest of Ft. Worth. GRI is planning a research well to fully characterize the Davis prior to making a final decision on the location of the HFTS. If data from the research well indicate the Davis sand does not adequately meet selection criteria, other candidates identified in the screening process will be investigated.

Not Available

1991-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

485

Coupling efficiency analysis of hydraulic pressure energy harvesters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic pressure within hydraulic systems referred to as pressure ripple is a high intensity energy source that can be utilized for powering sensor networks. A section of such a system can be modeled as a one dimensional waveguide where the intensity can reach up to 1000 mW/cm2 from a 300 kPa pressure ripple (peak-to-peak acoustic pressure) within a hydraulic system. Hydraulic pressure energy harvesters (HPEH) are devices designed to convert the pressure ripple into electrical energy thereby enabling wireless sensor nodes. HPEH couple the dynamic fluid pressure to a piezoelectric stack which is connected to a harvester circuit to optimize power output. A key aspect of the HPEH design is the fluid-mechanical coupling of the pressure ripple to the stack for maximizing the energy extracted. The efficiency of HPEH device and harvester circuit potential power output can be determined using the volume velocity of the pressure ripple the coupling efficiency of the HPEH and the conversion efficiency of the piezoelectric stack. In this work the coupling efficiency and the power output efficiency of currently developed HPEH devices will be analyzed and compared to modeled efficiency of such devices.

Kenneth Cunefare; Alper Erturk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

The unsaturated hydraulic characteristics of the Bandelier Tuff  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the physical and, unsaturated hydraulic properties of the Bandelier Tuff determined from laboratory measurements made on core samples collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We fit new van Genuchten-type moisture retention curves to this data, which was categorized according to member of the Bandelier Tuff and subunit of the Tshirege Member. Reasonable consistency was observed for hydraulic properties and retention curves within lithologic units, while distinct differences were observed for those properties between units. With the moisture retention data, we constructed vertical profiles of in situ matric suction and hydraulic head. These profiles give an indication of the likely direction of liquid water movement within the unsaturated zone and allow comparison of core-scale and field-scale estimates of water flow and solute transport parameters. Our core-derived transport velocities are much smaller than values estimated from tritium, Cl, and NO{sub 3} contamination found recently in boreholes. The contaminant tracer-derived transport velocities from Los Alamos Canyon are greater than corederived values found for the Otowi Member, and for Mortandad Canyon, greater than core-derived values for that borehole. The significant difference found for Mortandad Canyon suggests that fracture or other fast-path transport may be important there. The relatively small difference between observed and predicted velocities at Los Alamos Canyon may mean that vadose zone transport there occurs by unsaturated matrix flow.

Rogers, D.B.; Gallaher, B.M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Crested Butte, Colorado Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

488

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the permeability and capillary adsorption of cement model microstructures  

SciTech Connect

The lattice Boltzmann method is used to investigate the permeability of microstructures of cement pastes generated using the numerical models CEMHYD3D (Bentz, 1997) and {mu}IC (Bishnoi and Scrivener, 2009). Results are reported as a function of paste water-to-cement ratio and degree of hydration. The permeability decreases with increasing hydration and decreasing water-to-cement ratio in agreement with experiment. However the permeability is larger than the experimental data recorded using beam bending methods (Vichit-Vadakan and Scherer, 2002). Notwithstanding, the lattice Boltzmann results compare favourably with alternate numerical methods of permeability calculation for cement model microstructures. In addition, we show early results for the liquid/vapour capillary adsorption and desorption isotherms in the same model {mu}IC structures. The broad features of the experimental capillary porosity isotherm are reproduced, although further work is required to adequately parameterise the model.

Zalzale, M. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); McDonald, P.J., E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Grinding of cement clinkers : linking multi-scale fracture properties to system chemistry, mineralogy and microstructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing environmental concerns encourage the cement industry to improve its environmental performance, which in turn renews the interest in clinker grinding efficiency. Current knowledge on clinker grinding was built over ...

Wilson, William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Sources of high temperature degradation of cement-based materials : nanoindentation and microporoelastic analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of high temperature exposure on cement-based materials have been under investigation for quite some time, but a fundamental understanding of the sources of high temperature degradation has been limited by ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Thermal and mechanical properties of hemp fabric-reinforced nanoclay–cement nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of nanoclay on thermal and mechanical properties of hemp ... these properties are improved as a result of nanoclay addition. An optimum replacement of ordinary Portland cement with 1 wt% nanoclay is...

A. Hakamy; F. U. A. Shaikh; I. M. Low

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report...

493

Non-Linear Drying Diffusion and Viscoelastic Drying Shrinkage Modeling in Hardened Cement Pastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling with an average diffusion coefficient and with determined viscoelastic parameters from creep tests agreed well compared to the shrinkage data from experiments, indicating that drying shrinkage of cement paste may be considered as a poroviscoelastic...

Leung, Chin K.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

494

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibiotic-loaded cement spacers Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in this study. Sealed Reference Sample Sample Cement Paste 10 mm 10 mm 11.5mm 8mm Plastic Spacers 5 mm... based on Stokes equation actually suggests that some of the...

495

Study by thermogravimetry of the evolution of ettringite phase during type II Portland cement hydration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermogravimetry (TG) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) have been used by the authors as very effective tools to study hydration steps of cements used for solidification/stabilization of tanning wastes. The p...

J. Dweck; P. F. Ferreira da Silva…

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Portland cement mortar modified with latex and fiber glass for thin shell construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with latex and fiber glass as a covering material for thin shell structures. Tests were conducted on various formulations to determine certain physical properties of the modified portland cement. Application techniques were investigated to determine...

Raymond, Jewell Duane

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

An overview of air emission intensities and environmental performance of grey cement manufacturing in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Air emissions generated in grey cement manufacturing originate primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels required to heat the kiln and the chemical reaction of raw materials in the pyroprocessing phase. Gi...

Darren Brown; Rehan Sadiq; Kasun Hewage

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Technological, economic and financial prospects of carbon dioxide capture in the cement industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cement is the second largest anthropogenic emission source, contributing approximately 7% of global CO2 emissions. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technology is considered by the International Energy Agency (IEA) as an essential technology capable of reducing CO2 emissions in the cement sector by 56% by 2050. The study compares CO2 capture technologies for the cement manufacturing process and analyses the economic and financial issues in deploying CO2 capture in the cement industry. Post-combustion capture with chemical absorption is regarded as a proven technology to capture CO2 from the calcination process. Oxyfuel is less mature but Oxyfuel partial capture—which only recycles O2/CO2 gas in the precalciner—is estimated to be more economic than post-combustion capture. Carbonate looping technologies are not yet commercial, but they have theoretical advantages in terms of energy consumption. In contrast with coal-fired power plants, CO2 capture in the cement industry benefits from a higher concentration of CO2 in the flue gas, but the benefit is offset by higher \\{SOx\\} and \\{NOx\\} levels and the smaller scale of emissions from each plant. Concerning the prospects for financing cement plant CO2 capture, large cement manufacturers on average have a higher ROE (return on equity) and lower debt ratio, thus a higher discount rate should be considered for the cost analysis than in power plants. IEA estimates that the incremental cost for deploying CCS to decarbonise the global cement sector is in the range US$350–840 billion. The cost estimates for deploying state-of-the art post-combustion CO2 capture technologies in cement plants are above $60 to avoid each tonne of CO2 emissions. However, the expectation is that the current market can only provide a minority of financial support for CO2 capture in cement plants. Public financial support and/or CO2 utilisation will be essential to trigger large-scale CCS demonstration projects in the cement industry.

Jia Li; Pradeep Tharakan; Douglas Macdonald; Xi Liang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Submicron carbon filament cement-matrix composites for electromagnetic interference shielding  

SciTech Connect

Carbon filaments of diameter 0.1 mm were found to be a much more effective additive than conventional carbon fibers of diameter 10 mm in providing cement pastes capable of electromagnetic interference shielding. With 0.54 vol. % filaments and a shield thickness of 4 mm, a shielding effectiveness of 30 dB was attained at 1--2 GHz. However, the filaments were less effective than the fibers for reinforcing and for providing strain sensing cement-matrix composites.

Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.] [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Results of Laboratory Scale Fracture Tests on Rock/Cement Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

A number of pure cement and cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to a range of compressive loads to form internal fractures. X-ray microtomography was used to visualize the formation and growth of internal fractures in three dimensions as a function of compressive loads. This laboratory data will be incorporated into a geomechanics model to predict the risk of CO2 leakage through wellbores during geologic carbon storage.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z