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1

Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope October 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, and ConocoPhillips will work together to test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits on the Alaska North Slope. The collaborative testing will take place under the auspices of a Statement of Intent for Cooperation in Methane Hydrates signed in 2008 and extended in 2011 by DOE and Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry. The production tests are the next step in both U.S. and Japanese national efforts to evaluate the response of gas hydrate reservoirs to alternative

2

NETL: News Release - Methane Hydrate Production Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of CO2 molecules for methane molecules in the solid-water hydrate lattice, the release of methane gas, and the permanent storage of CO2 in the formation. This field experiment will...

3

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/Hydrates/Exploration priorities for marine gas hydrates, Fire In Thewww.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/Hydrates/

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, Northwestof Depressurization for Gas Production from Gas Hydrate5L-38 Gas Hydrate Thermal Production Test Through Numerical

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE and Maurer Technology are to evaluate the subsurface hydrate occurrence and its production potential. It is anticipated that it will require two to three months from spud...

7

Gas hydrates: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July-September 2007 July-September 2007 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Submitted by: Rice University University of Houston George J. Hirasaki Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory December, 2007 Office of Fossil Energy Table of Contents DOE Methane Hydrate Program Peer Review.................................................. 3 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ........................... 3 Task 6: Numerical Models for Quantification of Hydrate and Free Gas Accumulations....................................................................................................

9

THE PRODUCTION OF GAS HYDRATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee, thank-you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the production and economics of gas hydrate development.

Steven H. Hancock; P. Eng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Methane Hydrates May Exceed the Energy Content of All Other Fossil Fuels Combined; Could Ensure Decades of Affordable Natural Gas and Cut Americas Foreign Oil Dependence

11

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the project reports.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand processes that control production potential of hydrates in marine settings, Mallik was included because of the extensive data collected in a producible hydrate accumulation. To date, such a location had not been studied in the oceanic environment. The project worked closely with ongoing projects (e.g. GOM JIP and offshore India) that are actively investigating potentially economic hydrate accumulations in marine settings. The overall approach was fivefold: (1) collect key data concerning hydrocarbon fluxes which is currently missing at all locations to be included in the study, (2) use this and existing data to build numerical models that can explain gas hydrate variance at all four locations, (3) simulate how natural gas could be produced from each location with different production strategies, (4) collect new sediment property data at these locations that are required for constraining fluxes, production simulations and assessing sediment stability, and (5) develop a method for remotely quantifying heterogeneities in gas hydrate and free gas distributions. While we generally restricted our efforts to the locations where key parameters can be measured or constrained, our ultimate aim was to make our efforts universally applicable to any hydrate accumulation.

George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new Arctic Drilling Platform in search of gas hydrate and free gas accumulations at depths of approximately 1200 to 2500 ft MD. A secondary objective was the gas-charged sands of the uppermost Campanian interval at approximately 3000 ft. Summary results of geophysical analysis of the well are presented in this report.

Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the US have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by maurer Technology, noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R and D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. They plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. They also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. They are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. They hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, the goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the project reports. Documenting the results of this effort are key to extracting lessons learned and maximizing the industry's benefits for future hydrate exploitation. In addition to the Final Report, several companion Topical Reports are being published.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists planning hydrate exploration and development projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this and other project reports. This Topical Report contains details describing logging operations.

Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the project reports. Documenting the results of this effort are key to extracting lessons learned and maximizing the industry's benefits for future hydrate exploitation.

Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models and to research teams for developing future gas-hydrate projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and has been documented by the project team. This Topical Report documents drilling and coring operations and other daily activities.

Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrate; V: Vapor (gas phase); I: Ice; Q 1 : Quadruple pointof the solid phases (hydrate and ice) as tantamount to thealong the 3-phase (aqueous + hydrate + gas, or ice + hydrate

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were generated of these seismic data with cores, logging, and other well data. Unfortunately, the Hot Ice No. 1 well did not encounter hydrates in the reservoir sands, although brine-saturated sands containing minor amounts of methane were encountered within the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). Synthetic seismograms created from well log data were in agreement with reflectivity data measured by the 3D VSP survey. Modeled synthetic seismograms indicated a detectable seismic response would be expected in the presence of hydrate-bearing sands. Such a response was detected in the 3D VSP data at locations up-dip to the west of the Hot Ice No. 1 wellbore. Results of this project suggest that the presence of hydrate-bearing strata may not be related as simply to HSZ thickness as previously thought. Geological complications of reservoir facies distribution within fluvial-deltaic environments will require sophisticated detection technologies to assess the locations of recoverable volumes of methane contained in hydrates. High-resolution surface seismic data and more rigorous well log data analysis offer the best near-term potential. The hydrate resource potential is huge, but better tools are needed to accurately assess their location, distribution and economic recoverability.

Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Quarterly Progress Report Reporting Period: April-June 2007 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Submitted by: Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August, 2007 Office of Fossil Energy Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Quarterly Progress Report Reporting Period: April-June 2007 Prepared by: George Hirasaki Rice University August 2007 CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-06NT42960 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; Fax: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu

25

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas hydrate concentrations previously unseen in shale-gas hydrate, generally found encased in fine-grained muds and shales.

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Descriptions for Energy Department Methane...

28

CFD Modeling of Methane Production from Hydrate-Bearing Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane hydrate is being examined as a next-generation energy resource to replace oil and natural gas. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that methane hydrate may contain more organic carbon the the world's coal, oil, and natural gas combined. To assist in developing this unfamiliar resource, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has undertaken intensive research in understanding the fate of methane hydrate in geological reservoirs. This presentation reports preliminary computational fluid dynamics predictions of methane production from a subsurface reservoir.

Gamwo, I.K.; Myshakin, E.M.; Warzinski, R.P.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of the Messoyakha field demonstrates that gas hydrates are a readily producible source of natural

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012

31

Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Feasibility Production Feasibility Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility The red curves are temperature profiles for various water depths; the blue line shows methane hydrate stability relative to temperature and pressure. The area enclosed by the two curves represents the area of methane hydrate stability. The red curves are temperature profiles for various water depths; the blue line shows methane hydrate stability relative to temperature and pressure. The area enclosed by the two curves represents the area of methane hydrate stability. Methane, the predominant component of natural gas, forms hydrate in the presence of water, low temperatures and high pressures. Alternatively, when the temperature is increased or the pressure decreased so that hydrates are outside their stability field, they dissociate into methane and water.

32

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Dollars awarded will go to research the advance understanding of the nature and occurrence of Deepwater and Arctic gas...

34

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom part of the Ugnu and throughout the West Sak. No hydrate-bearing zones were identified either in recovered core or on well logs. The base of the permafrost was found at about 1260 ft. With the exception of the deepest sands in the West Sak and some anomalous thin, tight zones, all sands recovered (after thawing) are unconsolidated with high porosity and high permeability. At 800 psi, Ugnu sands have an average porosity of 39.3% and geometrical mean permeability of 3.7 Darcys. Average grain density is 2.64 g/cc. West Sak sands have an average porosity of 35.5%, geometrical mean permeability of 0.3 Darcys, and average grain density of 2.70 g/cc. There were several 1-2 ft intervals of carbonate-cemented sandstone recovered from the West Sak. These intervals have porosities of only a few percent and very low permeability. On a well log they appear as resistive with a high sonic velocity. In shallow sections of other wells these usually are the only logs available. Given the presence of gas in Hot Ice No. 1, if only resistivity and sonic logs and a mud log had been available, tight sand zones may have been interpreted as containing hydrates. Although this finding does not imply that all previously mapped hydrate zones are merely tight sands, it does add a note of caution to the practice of interpreting the presence of hydrates from old well information. The methane hydrate stability zone below the Hot Ice No. 1 location includes thick sections of sandstone and conglomerate which would make excellent reservoir rocks for hydrates and below the permafrost zone shallow gas. The Ugnu formation comprises a more sand-rich section than does the West Sak formation, and the Ugnu sands when cleaned and dried are slightly more porous and significantly more permeable than the West Sak.

Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane (more)

Jang, Jaewon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances found in the subsurface. Since gas hydrates are stable at low temperatures and moderate pressures, gas hydrates are found either near the surface in arctic regions or in deep water marine environments where the ambient seafloor temperature is less than 10C. This work addresses the important issue of geomechanical stability in hydrate bearing sediments during different perturbations. I analyzed extensive data collected from the literature on the types of sediments where hydrates have been found during various offshore expeditions. To better understand the hydrate bearing sediments in offshore environments, I divided these data into different sections. The data included water depths, pore water salinity, gas compositions, geothermal gradients, and sedimentary properties such as sediment type, sediment mineralogy, and sediment physical properties. I used the database to determine the types of sediments that should be evaluated in laboratory tests at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The TOUGH+Hydrate reservoir simulator was used to simulate the gas production behavior from hydrate bearing sediments. To address some important gas production issues from gas hydrates, I first simulated the production performance from the Messsoyakha Gas Field in Siberia. The field has been described as a free gas reservoir overlain by a gas hydrate layer and underlain by an aquifer of unknown strength. From a parametric study conducted to delineate important parameters that affect gas production at the Messoyakha, I found effective gas permeability in the hydrate layer, the location of perforations and the gas hydrate saturation to be important parameters for gas production at the Messoyakha. Second, I simulated the gas production using a hydraulic fracture in hydrate bearing sediments. The simulation results showed that the hydraulic fracture gets plugged by the formation of secondary hydrates during gas production. I used the coupled fluid flow and geomechanical model "TOUGH+Hydrate- FLAC3D" to model geomechanical performance during gas production from hydrates in an offshore hydrate deposit. I modeled geomechanical failures associated with gas production using a horizontal well and a vertical well for two different types of sediments, sand and clay. The simulation results showed that the sediment and failures can be a serious issue during the gas production from weaker sediments such as clays.

Grover, Tarun

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program,Of Methane Hydrate Production Methods To Reservoirs WithNumerical Studies of Gas Production From Methane Hydrates,

Moridis, G.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Dollars awarded will go to research the advance understanding of the nature and occurrence of Deepwater and Arctic gas hydrates, and their implications for future resources, geohazards, and the environment Characterizing the Affect of Environmental Change on Gas-Hydrate-Bearing Deposits The University of California at San Diego (San Diego, Calif.) - Researchers at the University of California at San Diego will design, build, and test an electromagnetic (EM) system designed for very shallow water use and will apply the system to determine the extent of offshore permafrost on the U.S. Beaufort inner shelf. Energy Department Investment: $507,000 Duration: 36 months The University of Mississippi (Oxford, Miss.) - Using electronic measurements, the researchers will

39

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies May 2,...

40

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations are Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location is Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Method for production of hydrocarbons from hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering natural gas entrapped in frozen subsurface gas hydrate formations in arctic regions. A hot supersaturated solution of CaCl.sub.2 or CaBr.sub.2, or a mixture thereof, is pumped under pressure down a wellbore and into a subsurface hydrate formation so as to hydrostatically fracture the formation. The CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 solution dissolves the solid hydrates and thereby releases the gas entrapped therein. Additionally, the solution contains a polymeric viscosifier, which operates to maintain in suspension finely divided crystalline CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 that precipitates from the supersaturated solution as it is cooled during injection into the formation.

McGuire, Patrick L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost  

SciTech Connect

The quantity of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations is enormous, leading to significant interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from methane hydrate accumulations in the permafrost by means of depressurization-induced dissociation combined with conventional technologies and horizontal or vertical well configurations. Initial studies on the possibility of natural gas production from permafrost hydrates assumed homogeneity in intrinsic reservoir properties and in the initial condition of the hydrate-bearing layers (either due to the coarseness of the model or due to simplifications in the definition of the system). These results showed great promise for gas recovery from Class 1, 2, and 3 systems in the permafrost. This work examines the consequences of inevitable heterogeneity in intrinsic properties, such as in the porosity of the hydrate-bearing formation, or heterogeneity in the initial state of hydrate saturation. Heterogeneous configurations are generated through multiple methods: (1) through defining heterogeneous layers via existing well-log data, (2) through randomized initialization of reservoir properties and initial conditions, and (3) through the use of geostatistical methods to create heterogeneous fields that extrapolate from the limited data available from cores and well-log data. These extrapolations use available information and established geophysical methods to capture a range of deposit properties and hydrate configurations. The results show that some forms of heterogeneity, such as horizontal stratification, can assist in production of hydrate-derived gas. However, more heterogeneous structures can lead to complex physical behavior within the deposit and near the wellbore that may obstruct the flow of fluids to the well, necessitating revised production strategies. The need for fine discretization is crucial in all cases to capture dynamic behavior during production.

Reagan, M. T.; Kowalsky, M B.; Moridis, G. J.; Silpngarmlert, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61446 61446 GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN OCEANIC SEDIMENTS George J. Moridis Earth Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 E. Dendy Sloan Center for Hydrate Research and Chemical Engineering Department Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 August 2006 This work was partly supported by the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory, under the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Gas Production Potential of Disperse Low-Saturation Hydrate Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and E. Dendy Sloan 2 1 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1166

44

Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with a study directed towards a modeling effort on production related ground movements and subsidence resulting from hydrate dissociation. The goal of this research study was to evaluate whether there could be subsidence related problems that could be an impediment to hydrate production. During the production of gas from a hydrate reservoir, it is expected that porous reservoir matrix becomes more compressible which may cause reservoir compression (compaction) under the influence of overburden weight. The overburden deformations can propagate its influence upwards causing subsidence near the surface where production equipment will be located. In the present study, the reservoir compaction is modeled by using the conventional ``stress equilibrium`` approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ``cavity`` generated by reservoir depletion. The present study is expected to provide a ``lower bound`` solution to the subsidence caused by hydrate reservoir depletion. The reservoir compaction anticipated during hydrate production was modeled by using the finite element method, which is a powerful computer modeling technique. The ground movements at the reservoir roof (i.e. reservoir compression) cause additional stresses and disturbance in the overburden strata. In this study, the reservoir compaction was modeled by using the conventional ``stress equilibrium`` approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ``cavity`` generated by reservoir depletion. The resulting stresses and ground movements were computed by using the finite element method. Based on the parameters used in this investigation, the maximum ground subsidence could vary anywhere from 0.50 to 6.50 inches depending on the overburden depth and the size of the depleted hydrate reservoir.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Kutuk, B.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Geomechanical response of permafrost-associated hydrate deposits to depressurization-induced gas production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shales, depressurization is rapid and effective, leading to fast hydrate dissociation and considerable cooling during the 5 years of production

Rutqvist, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focus of GH exploration and production studies in northernoil and gas exploration and production activities; includingGas hydrate exploration and production activities will be

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page viable gas production. The overall conclusion drawnnot promising targets for gas production. Acknowledgment TheTS. Strategies for gas production from hydrate accumulations

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Natural gas production from hydrate dissociation: An axisymmetric model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an axisymmetric model for natural gas production from the dissociation of methane hydrate in a confined reservoir by a depressurizing well. During the hydrate dissociation, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are analyzed. The system of governing equations is solved by a finite difference scheme. For different well pressures and reservoir temperatures, distributions of temperature and pressure in the reservoir, as well as the natural gas production from the well are evaluated. The numerical results are compared with those obtained by a linearization method. It is shown that the gas production rate is a sensitive function of well pressure. The simulation results are compared with the linearization approach and the shortcomings of the earlier approach are discussed.

Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson Univ., Pottsdam, NY); Ji, Chuang (Clarkson Univ., Pottsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Gas Production from Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Emergent Phenomena -  

SciTech Connect

Even a small fraction of fine particles can have a significant effect on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments and sediment stability. Experiments were conducted to investigate the role of fine particles on gas production using a soil chamber that allows for the application of an effective stress to the sediment. This chamber was instrumented to monitor shear-wave velocity, temperature, pressure, and volume change during CO{sub 2} hydrate formation and gas production. The instrumented chamber was placed inside the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS), which was used to control the fluid pressure and temperature. Experiments were conducted with different sediment types and pressure-temperature histories. Fines migrated within the sediment in the direction of fluid flow. A vuggy structure formed in the sand; these small cavities or vuggs were precursors to the development of gas-driven fractures during depressurization under a constant effective stress boundary condition. We define the critical fines fraction as the clay-to-sand mass ratio when clays fill the pore space in the sand. Fines migration, clogging, vugs, and gas-driven fracture formation developed even when the fines content was significantly lower than the critical fines fraction. These results show the importance of fines in gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments, even when the fines content is relatively low.

Jung, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jang, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Santamarina, Carlos [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

SciTech Connect

The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Gas Price ($/Mscf) for Offshore Gas Hydrate StudyProceedings of the 2010 Offshore Technology Conference, 3-6Proceedings of the 2010 Offshore Technology Conference, 3-6

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hydrology Group - Technologies & Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies & Products Systems & Sensors Water Fluxmeter Software & Models Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS ) FRAMES 1.x ReActive Flow and Transport of Groundwater...

53

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase, and hydrate phase. AHydrate; V: Vapor (gas phase); I: Ice; Q 1 : Quadruple point

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

Technology's Impact on Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) ?? entitled Technologys Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level ? ? the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies ??Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Amann, Rachel; Deweese, Ellis; Shipman, Deborah

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?  

SciTech Connect

Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Thermal Processes Electrolytic Processes Photolytic Processes R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen

58

Ice method for production of hydrogen clathrate hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a method for hydrogen clathrate hydrate synthesis. First, ice and hydrogen gas are supplied to a containment volume at a first temperature and a first pressure. Next, the containment volume is pressurized with hydrogen gas to a second higher pressure, where hydrogen clathrate hydrates are formed in the process.

Lokshin, Konstantin (Santa Fe, NM); Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

59

Technology's Impact on Production  

SciTech Connect

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Gas Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gas Hydrate Production Methods Last Reviewed 09/23/2009 Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gas Hydrate Production Methods Last Reviewed 09/23/2009 DE-FC26-06NT42666 Goal The goal of this project is to compare and contrast, through numerical simulation, conventional and innovative approaches for producing methane from gas hydrate-bearing geologic reservoirs. Numerical simulation is being used to assess the production of natural gas hydrates from geologic deposits using three production technologies: 1) depressurization, 2) direct CO2 exchange, and 3) dissociation-reformation CO2 exchange. Performers Battelle Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, Washington 99352 Background There are relatively few published studies of commercial production methods for gas hydrates, and all of these studies have examined essentially

64

Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

65

Production of hydrocarbons from hydrates. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical and safe method of producing hydrocarbons (or natural gas) from in situ hydrocarbon-containing hydrates is given. Once started, the method will be self-driven and will continue producing hydrocarbons over an extended period of time (i.e., many days).

McGuire, P.L.

1981-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Electrode Technology for Aluminium Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Electrode Technology for Aluminium Production. Sponsorship, The...

67

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Modeling - TOUGH-Fx/HYDRATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate Modeling - TOUGH+/HYDRATE & HydrateResSim Hydrate Modeling - TOUGH+/HYDRATE & HydrateResSim TOUGH+/HYDRATE v1.0 LBNL's new hydrate reservoir simulator (TOUGH+/HYDRATE v1.0) is now publicly available for licensing. TOUGH+/HYDRATE models non-isothermal gas release, phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural CH4-hydrate deposits in the subsurface (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. TOUGH+/HYDRATE v1.0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate formation and dissociation. More information on TOUGH+/Hydrate Also available is HydrateResSim. HydrateResSim (HRS) is a freeware, open-source reservoir simulator code available for use “as-is” from the NETL. HRS’ code was derived from an earlier version of the TOUGH+/Hydrate code.

68

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Gas Hydrate Production and Hazard Avoidance in the Gulf of Mexico Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Gas Hydrate Production and Hazard Avoidance in the Gulf of Mexico DE-FC26-02NT41327 Goal The project goal was to develop new methodologies to characterize the physical properties of methane hydrate and hydrate sediment systems. Performers Westport Technology Center International - Houston, TX University of Houston - Houston, TX Results Project researchers created a pressure cell for measuring acoustic velocity and resistivity on hydrate-sediment cores. They utilized the measurements for input to an existing reservoir model for evaluating possible offshore hydrate accumulations. The organization of an industry-led Advisory Board and the development of a Research Management Plan have been completed. The development of a handbook for transporting, preserving, and storing hydrate core samples brought from the field to the laboratory was completed and distributed for review by industry and researchers.

69

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Modeling - TOUGH-Fx/HYDRATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources...

70

Four Critical Needs to Change the Hydrate Energy Paradigm from Assessment to Production: The 2007 Report to Congress by the U.S. Federal methane Hydrate Advisory Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work summarizes a two-year study by the U.S. Federal Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee recommending the future needs for federally-supported hydrate research. The Report was submitted to the US Congress on August 14, 2007 and includes four recommendations regarding (a) permafrost hydrate production testing, (b) marine hydrate viability assessment (c) climate effect of hydrates, and (d) international cooperation. A secure supply of natural gas is a vital goal of the U.S. national energy policy because natural gas is the cleanest and most widely used of all fossil fuels. The inherent cleanliness of natural gas, with the lowest CO2 emission per unit of heat energy of any fossil fuel, means substituting gas for coal and fuel oil will reduce emissions that can exacerbate the greenhouse effect. Both a fuel and a feedstock, a secure and reasonably priced supply of natural gas is important to industry, electric power generators, large and small commercial enterprises, and homeowners. Because each volume of solid gas hydrate contains as much as 164 standard volumes of methane, hydrates can be viewed as a concentrated form of natural gas equivalent to compressed gas but less concentrated than liquefied natural gas (LNG). Natural hydrate accumulations worldwide are estimated to contain 700,000 TCF of natural gas, of which 200,000 TCF are located within the United States. Compared with the current national annual consumption of 22 TCF, this estimate of in-place gas in enormous. Clearly, if only a fraction of the hydrated methane is recoverable, hydrates could constitute a substantial component of the future energy portfolio of the Nation (Figure 1). However, recovery poses a major technical and commercial challenge. Such numbers have sparked interest in natural gas hydrates as a potential, long-term source of energy, as well as concerns about any potential impact the release of methane from hydrates might have on the environment. Energy-hungry countries such as India and Japan are outspending the United States on hydrate science and engineering R&D by a factor of 10, and may bring this resource to market as much as a decade before the United States.

Mahajan,D.; Sloan, D.; Brewer, P.; Dutta, N.; Johnson, A.; Jones, E.; Juenger, K.; Kastner, M.; Masutani, S.; Swenson, R.; Whelan, J.; Wilson, s.; Woolsey, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Available Technologies: Ligninolytic Enzyme Production  

The estimated production cost of laccase using this technology is about 10-60% of current commercial prices. The efficient bioconversion of plant ...

72

Productive commercialization of university technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Productive commercialization of university technology is a concern for the many stakeholders of the commercialization system. Do more total university research expenditures and more university (more)

Winder, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 07/7/2011 – Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 07/7/2011 Project Objective Observe hydrate formation and dissociation phenomena in various porous media and characterize hydrate-bearing sediments by estimating physical properties (kinetic parameters for hydrate formation and dissociation, thermal conductivity, permeability, relative permeability, and mechanical strength) to enhance fundamental understanding on hydrate formation and accumulation and to support numerical simulations and potential gas hydrate production Project Performers Yongkoo Seol – NETL Office of Research & Development Jeong Choi – Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Jongho Cha-Virginia Polytech Institute Project Location National Energy Technology Laboratory - Morgantown, West Virginia

74

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Contents Producing Hydrogen...1 Hydrogen Production Technologies ...3 Challenges and Research Needs...4 Technology...

75

The Great Gas Hydrate Escape  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Gas Great Gas Hydrate Escape The Great Gas Hydrate Escape Computer simulations revealing how methane and hydrogen pack into gas hydrates could enlighten alternative fuel production and carbon dioxide storage January 25, 2012 | Tags: Carver, Chemistry, Energy Technologies, Hopper, Materials Science PNNL Contact: Mary Beckman , +1 509 375-3688, mary.beckman@pnl.gov NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov The methane trapped in frozen water burns easily, creating ice on fire. For some time, researchers have explored flammable ice for low-carbon or alternative fuel or as a place to store carbon dioxide. Now, a computer analysis of the ice and gas compound, known as a gas hydrate, reveals key details of its structure. The results show that hydrates can hold hydrogen

76

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cumulative mass of produced water M W . Note that pro-Salinity X P of the produced water. Gas production fromThe salinity of the produced water may pose significant

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Model Code Comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study An International Effort to Compare Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulators Code Comparison Logo The National Energy Technology Laboratory...

78

Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model. [Cyclic thermal injection  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Separation and Purification of Methane from coal-Bed Methane via the Hydrate Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separation of methane from coal-bed methane (CBM) via hydrate process using tetrahydrofuran (THF) + sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as additives was investigated in this work. The effect of additives, the concentration of the additives and hydrate memory ... Keywords: CBM, hydrate, separation, THF, SDS

Cai Jing; Chen Zhaoyang; Li Xiaosen; Xu Chungang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessing the Potential of Using Hydrate Technology to Capture, Store and Transport Gas for the Caribbean Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monetizing gas has now become a high priority issue for many countries. Natural gas is a much cleaner fuel than oil and coal especially for electricity generation. Approximately 40 percent of the world's natural gas reserves remain unusable because of lack of economic technology. Gas produced with oil poses a challenge of being transported and is typically flared or re-injected into the reservoir. These are gas transportation issues we now face. Gas hydrate may be a viable means of capturing, storing and transporting stranded and associated gas. For example, stranded gas in Trinidad could be converted to gas hydrates and transported to the islands of the Caribbean. This study will seek to address some of the limitations from previous studies on transporting natural gas as a hydrate while focusing on small scale transportation of natural gas to the Caribbean Islands. This work proposes a workflow for capturing, storing and transporting gas in the hydrate form, particularly for Caribbean situations where there are infrastructural constraints such as lack of pipelines. The study shows the gas hydrate value chain for transportation of 5 MMscf/d of natural gas from Trinidad to Jamaica. The analysis evaluated the water required for hydrate formation, effect of composition on hydrate formation, the energy balance of the process, the time required for formation, transportation and dissociation and preliminary economics. The overall energy requirement of the process which involves heating, cooling and expansion is about 15-20 percent of the energy of the gas transported in hydrate form. The time estimated for the overall process is 2030 hrs. The estimated capital cost to capture and transport 5 MMscf/d from Trinidad to Jamaica is about US$ 30 million. The composition of the gas sample can affect the conditions of formation, heating value and the expansion process. In summary, there is great potential for transporting natural gas by gas hydrate on a small scale based on the proposed hydrate work flow. This study did not prove commerciality at this time, however, some of the limitations require further evaluations and these include detailed modeling of the formation time, dissociation time and heat transfer capabilities.

Rajnauth, Jerome Joel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cement Hydration Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Courtesy of Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, a Windows XP-based version of the hydration program is available. Many thanks to Prof. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 DE-FC26-01NT41331 photo of new Anadarko drilling rig in place at Hot Ice No.1 on Alaska's North Slope Hot Ice No. 1 Drilling Platform courtesy Anadarko Petroleum Corp. Goal The goal of the project was to develop technologies for drilling and recovering hydrates in arctic areas. The specific objectives were to drill, core, and test a well through the hydrate stability zone in northern Alaska Performers Maurer Technology, Inc.* - Project coordination with DOE Anadarko Petroleum Corporation - Overall project management for the design, construction, and operation of the Arctic Drilling Platform and mobile core lab, and field coring operations Noble Engineering and Development* - Real time data collection and

84

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

If you need help finding information on a particular project, please contact the content manager. If you need help finding information on a particular project, please contact the content manager. Search Hydrates Projects Active Projects | Completed Projects Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project. Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FC26-01NT41332 Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization BP Exploration Alaska, Inc. DE-FC26-01NT41330 Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration Chevron Energy Technology Company DE-FE0009897 Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications Georgia Tech Research Corporation DE-FE0009904 Structural and Stratigraphic Controls on Methane Hydrate Occurrence and Distribution: Gulf of Mexico, Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 Oklahoma State University

85

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

goal was to develop new methodologies to characterize the physical properties of methane hydrate and hydrate sediment systems. Performers Westport Technology Center...

86

Production Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Production Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration Production Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Production Technology Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Production Technology Production Technology NNSA continues to assure the safety, security, and reliability of the

87

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate Production Technologies May 17, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A fully instrumented well that will test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits has been safely installed on the North Slope of Alaska. As a result, the "Iġnik Sikumi" (Iñupiaq for "fire in the ice") gas hydrate field trial well will be available for field experiments as early as winter 2011-12. The well, the result of a partnership between ConocoPhillips and the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, will test a technology that involves injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into sandstone

88

Methane Hydrate Field Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Studies Field Studies Methane Hydrate Field Studies Arctic/Alaska North Slope Field Studies Since 2001, DOE has conducted field trials of exploration and production technology in the Alaska North Slope. Although Alaska methane hydrate resources are smaller than marine deposits and currently lack outlets to commercial markets, Alaska provides an excellent laboratory to study E&P technology. The research also has implications for various Alaska resources, including potential gas hydrate resources for local communities, conventional "stranded" gas, as well as Alaska's large unconventional oil resources. The hydrate deposits have been delineated in the process of developing underlying oil fields, and drilling costs are much lower than offshore. DOE-BP Project

89

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP) Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico - Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP) Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico - Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FC26-01NT41330 Goal: The goal of this project is to develop technology and collect data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The intent of the project is to better understand the impact of hydrates on safety and seafloor stability as well as provide data for use by scientists in their study of climate change and assessment of the feasibility of marine hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Photo of the Helix Q4000 The Semi-Submersible Helix Q4000 used on the 21 day JIP Leg II Drilling and Logging Expedition

90

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

91

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

92

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf The Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf was created to provide a repository for information collected from projects funded as part of the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program. As output from the projects is received, it will be reviewed and then placed onto the reference shelf to be available to other methane hydrate researchers. Projects: DOE/NETL Projects : These pages contain detailed information on methane hydrate projects funded through the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Publications: Newsletter | Bibliography | Software | Reports | Program Publications | Photo Gallery Newsletter: Fire in the Ice: A publication highlighting the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program Bibliography: "Project Reports Bibliography"[PDF]: The bibliography lists publications resulting from DOE/NETL-sponsored

93

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost...

94

Available Technologies: Biological Production of Alpha Olefins ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Production of the following from sugar or starch: alpha olefins including 1-hexene, 1-decene, deca-1,5-diene, aromatic ...

95

emerging technologies for metals production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economics of Production of Primary Titanium by Electrolytic Winning [pp. 13-41] ... A Process for Continuous Titanium Production from Titanium Oxide [pp. 79-88

96

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas such as tight gas, shale gas, or coal bed methane gas tolocation. Development of shale oil and gas, tar sands, coalGas hydrates will undoubtedly also be present in shales,

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Feasibility of monitoring gas hydrate production with time-lapse VSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We do not include the ice phase, since ice does not form ingas, liquid, ice or hydrate phases, existing individually orphase theory that considers the existence of two solids (grain and ice

Kowalsky, M.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Available Technologies: Production of Bacterial ...  

IB-2013-014. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Fig. 1: Illustration of a BMC with protein (green and yellow) sequestered within. Biotechnology ; Carbon capture and ...

99

Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate End of Phase 2 Topical Report Reporting Period: June, 2007-June, 2008 Submitted by: Rice...

100

Electrode Technology for Aluminum Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loss in Cathode Life Resulting from the Shutdown and Restart of Potlines at Aluminum Smelters Lower Aluminium Production Cost through Refractory Material...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Technology Innovation in Aluminum Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's U.S. aluminum production includes roughly 5.6 million tonnes of .... to help make the cost of aluminum competitive with steel.12 Aluminum pull tabs were...

102

Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (540 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using impermeable boundaries. The main reason for the reduced productivity is water influx from the surrounding strata; a secondary cause is gas escape into the overburden. The results dictate that in order to reliably estimate production potential, permeability of the surroundings has to be included in a model.

Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Method for the Photocatalytic Conversion of Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Photocatalytic Conversion of Gas Hydrates Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Method for the Photocatalytic Conversion of Gas Hydrates." The...

104

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Numerical Simulation Last Reviewed 3/8/2013 Numerical Simulation Last Reviewed 3/8/2013 Project Goal The goal of NETL's gas hydrate numerical simulation studies is to obtain pertinent, high-quality information on the behavior of gas hydrates in their natural environment under either production (methane gas extraction) or climate change scenarios. This research is closely linked with NETL's experimental and field studies programs to ensure the validity of input datasets and scenarios. Project Performers Brian Anderson, NETL/RUA Fellow (West Virginia University) Hema Siriwardane, NETL/RUA Fellow (West Virginia University) Eugene Myshakin, NETL/URS Project Locations National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA, and Morgantown WV West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Background Field-scale hydrate production tests rely heavily on reservoir-scale

105

Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Hydrogen is an energy carrier, not an energy source-hydrogen stores and delivers energy in a usable form, but it must be produced from hydrogen containing compounds. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as coal (preferentially with carbon sequestration), natural gas, and biomass or using nuclear energy and renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydroelectric power to split water. This great potential for diversity of supply is an important reason why hydrogen is such a promising energy carrier. Hydrogen can be produced at large central plants, semi-centrally, or in small distributed units located at or very near the point of use, such as at refueling stations or stationary power

106

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Hydrate-Bearing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and EngineeringGeological Implications Last Reviewed 6192013 DE-FE0009897 Goal The primary goal of...

107

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is an important energy source that contributes up to 25% of the total US energy reserves (DOE 2011). An increase in natural gas demand spurs further development of unconventional resources, including methane hydrate (Rajnauth 2012). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than 230 gas-hydrate deposits have been discovered globally. Several production technologies have been tested; however, the development of the Messoyakha field in the west Siberian basin is the only successful commercial gas-hydrate field to date. Although the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field was not a certainty, this current study determined the undeniable presence of gas hydrates in the reservoir. This study uses four models of the Messoyakha field structure and reservoir conditions and examines them based on the available geologic and engineering data. CMG STARS and IMEX software packages were used to calculate gas production from a hydrate-bearing formation on a field scale. Results of this analysis confirm the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field and also determine the volume of hydrates in place. The cumulative production from the field on January 1, 2012 is 12.9 x 10^9 m^3, and it was determined in this study that 5.4 x 10^9 m^3 was obtained from hydrates. The important issue of pressure-support mechanisms in developing a gas hydrate reservoir was also addressed in this study. Pressure-support mechanisms were investigated using different evaluation methods such as the use of gas-injection well patterns and gas/water injection using isothermal and non-isothermal simulators. Several aquifer models were examined. Simulation results showed that pressure support due to aquifer activity was not possible. Furthermore, it was shown that the water obtained from hydrates was not produced and remained in the reservoir. Results obtained from the aquifer models were confirmed by the actual water production from the field. It was shown that water from hydrates is a very strong pressure-support mechanism. Water not only remained in the reservoir, but it formed a thick water-saturated layer between the free-gas and gas-hydrate zone. Finally, thermodynamic behavior of gas hydrate decomposition was studied. Possible areas of hydrate preservation were determined. It was shown that the central top portion of the field preserved most of hydrates due to temperature reduction of hydrate decomposition.

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies May 2, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the completion of a successful, unprecedented test of technology in the North Slope of Alaska that was able to safely extract a steady flow of natural gas from methane hydrates - a vast, entirely untapped resource that holds enormous potential for U.S. economic and energy security. Building upon this initial, small-scale test, the Department is launching a new research effort to conduct a long-term production test in the Arctic as well as research to test additional technologies that could be used to locate,

109

HydrateNewsIssue2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the physical response of the gas hydrate to depressurization and thermal production stimulation. Cores are being taken from the well, and scientists hope to retrieve at least...

110

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate R&D Program Newsletter Methane Hydrate R&D Program Newsletter An image of a hydrate burning overlayed with the Newsletter Title: Fire in the Ice The methane hydrate newsletter, Fire in the Ice, is a bi-annual publication highlighting the latest developments in international gas hydrates R&D. Fire in the Ice promotes the exchange of information amoung those involved in gas hydrates research and development, and also recognizes the efforts of a hydrate researcher in each issue. The newsletter now reaches nearly 1300 scientists and other interested individuals in sixteen countries. To subscribe electronically to Fire in the Ice please send an email to karl.lang@contr.netl.doe.gov Please click on the links below to access issues of "Fire in the Ice". More on Methane Hydrates

111

Regional long-term production modeling from a single well test, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the results from the open-hole formation pressure response test in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert well) using Schlumbergers Modular Dynamics Formation Tester (MDT) wireline tool, the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison project performed long-term reservoir simulations on three different model reservoirs. These descriptions were based on 1) the Mount Elbert gas hydrate accumulation as delineated by an extensive history-matching exercise, 2) an estimation of the hydrate accumulation near the Prudhoe Bay L-pad, and 3) a reservoir that would be down-dip of the Prudhoe Bay L-pad and therefore warmer and deeper. All of these simulations were based, in part, on the results of the MDT results from the Mount Elbert Well. The comparison groups consensus value for the initial perme- ability of the hydrate-filled reservoir (k = 0.12 mD) and the permeability model based on the MDT history match were used as the basis for subsequent simulations on the three regional scenarios. The simulation results of the five different simulation codes, CMG STARS, HydrateResSim, MH-21 HYDRES, STOMP-HYD, and TOUGHHYDRATE exhibit good qualitative agreement and the variability of potential methane production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs is illustrated. As expected, the pre- dicted methane production rate increased with increasing in situ reservoir temperature; however, a significant delay in the onset of rapid hydrate dissociation is observed for a cold, homogeneous reservoir and it is found to be repeatable. The inclusion of reservoir heterogeneity in the description of this cold reservoir is shown to eliminate this delayed production. Overall, simulations utilized detailed information collected across the Mount Elbert reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness (37 ft), porosity (35%), hydrate saturation (65%), intrinsic permeability (1000 mD), pore water salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.33.9 ?C). This paper presents the approach and results of extrapolating regional forward production modeling from history-matching efforts on the results from a single well test.

Anderson, Brian; Kurihara, Masanori; White, Mark D.; Moridis, George J.; Wilson, Scott J.; Pooladi-Darvish, Mehran; Gaddipati, Manohar; Masuda, Yoshihiro; Collett, T. S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Narita, Hideo; Rose, Kelly K.; Boswell, Ray

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Photo of hydrogen researcher. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal (with carbon sequestration); nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost reduction. For cost-competitive transportation, a key driver for energy independence, hydrogen must be comparable to conventional fuels and technologies on a per-mile basis in order to succeed in the commercial marketplace. Learn more about DOE's hydrogen cost goal and the analysis used in projecting the future cost of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy supports the research and development of a wide range of technologies to produce hydrogen economically and in environmentally friendly ways.

113

Biodiesel Production Technology: August 2002--January 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* NREL/SR-510-36244 * NREL/SR-510-36244 J. Van Gerpen, B. Shanks, and R. Pruszko Iowa State University D. Clements Renewable Products Development Laboratory G. Knothe USDA/NCAUR Biodiesel Production Technology August 2002-January 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 July 2004 * NREL/SR-510-36244 Biodiesel Production Technology August 2002-January 2004 J. Van Gerpen, B.Shanks, and R. Pruszko Iowa State University D. Clements Renewable Products Development Laboratory G. Knothe USDA/NCAUR NREL Technical Monitor: K. Shaine Tyson

114

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

SciTech Connect

As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Overview of technology options for hydrogen production, its challenges and reserach needs and next steps

116

Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Supply and Emerging Resources Future Supply and Emerging Resources The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program - Graduate Fellowship Program Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship Program Jeffrey James Marlow, a graduate student in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology, was recently selected as the 2012 recipient of the NETL-National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship. Please see page 15 of the March 2013 issue (Vol. 13, Issue 1) of Fire in the Ice for more information on the recipient. The Department of Energy has a long history of building synergistic relationships with research universities. Funding academic research is a "win-win-win" situation. The U.S. government is able to tap into some of the best minds available for solving national energy problems, the universities get the support they need to maintain cutting edge faculty and laboratories, and the students involved are provided with opportunities that help them along their chosen path of study, strengthening the national pool of scientists and engineers. According to Samuel Bodman, speaking about graduate research in methane hydrates, "Students are the foundation of our energy future, bringing new ideas and fresh perspectives to the energy industry. What better way to assure technology innovation than to encourage students working on the development of a resource that has the potential to tip our energy balance toward clean-burning, domestic fuels."

118

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

119

Technology Transfer and the Product Development Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is my pleasure this morning to address a topic that is much talked about in passing but rarely examined from a first person point of view. That topic is Technology Transfer. Over the next 30 minutes I'd like to approach Technology Transfer within the context of the Product Development Process looking at it from the perspectives of the federal government researcher and the industry manufacturer/user. Fist let us recognize that we are living in an ''Information Age'', where global economic and military competition is determined as much by technology as it is by natural resource assets. It is estimated that technical/scientific information is presently growing at a rate of l3 percent per year; this is expected to increase to 30 percent per year by the turn of the century. In fact, something like 90 percent of all scientific knowledge has been generated in the last 30 years; this pool will double again in the next 10-15 years (Exhibit 1). Of all the scientists and engineers throughout history, 90% live and work in the present time. Successfully managing this technical information/knowledge--i.e., transforming the results of R&D to practical applications--will be an important measure of national strength. A little over a dozen years ago, the United States with only 5 percent of the world's population was generating approximately 75 percent of the world's technology. The US. share is now 50 percent and may decline to 30 percent by the turn of the century. This decline won't be because of downturn in U.S. technological advances but because the other 95 percent of the world's population will be increasing its contribution. Economic and military strength then, will be determined by how quickly and successfully companies, industries, and nations can apply new technological information to practical applications--i.e., how they manage technology transfer within the context of the product development process. Much discussion and pronouncements are ongoing in public forums today over the apparent decline in global competitiveness of U.S. industry. The question is why does U.S. industry not succeed in the development and marketing of competitive products when they lead in the generation of new technology.

Mock, John E.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate informed decision-making regarding the potential development of gas hydrate resources between the scientific community and other stakeholders/decision makers. The Assessment will provide science-based information on the role of gas hydrates in natural climate change and the carbon cycle, their sensitivity to climate change, and the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of hydrate production. Performers Stiftelsen GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway Funding Institutions United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Statoil Schlumberger United States Department of Energy (USDOE)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shales, silts, and non-commercial sand stringers above the target GH reservoirs. High gas production

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:

123

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Hydrate-Bearing Clayey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-FE0009897 Goal The primary goal of this research effort is to contribute to an in-depth understanding of hydrate bearing, fine-grained sediments with a focus on investigation of their potential for hydrate-based gas production. Performer Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta GA Background Fine-grained sediments host more than 90 percent of global gas hydrate accumulation. Yet hydrate formation in clay-dominated sediments is less understood and characterized than other types of hydrate occurrence. There is an inadequate understanding of hydrate formation mechanisms, segregation structures, hydrate-lense topology, system connectivity, and physical

124

NETL: Methane Hydrates - JIP Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maurer Technology, Inc.,and Anadarko Petroleum Corp. Geologic Characterization of the Eileen and Tarn Gas Hydrate Accumulations on the North Slope of Alaska PDF- 1.12MB Author:...

125

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoirs. J. Canadian Petroleum Technology 44: 39-46.Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology 27 (10). Anderson,Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology 27 (10) Archer, D. ,

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills t

127

Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Roadmap to identify key challenges and priority R&D needs associated with various hydrogen fuel production technologies.

128

Janata biogas technology and fodder production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective bio-gas program leads to efficient use of cow dung for gas recovery and partial supplement to plant nutrient requirements. Bio-gas program leads to improvement in rural living including rural sanitation. The Janata biogas plant designed by the State Planning Institute, Lucknow, based on biogas technology, has proved to be efficient and economical. This book contains the various papers presented at the seminar held to review this technology. The various topics covered are: Status of Biogas Program in India; Role of Extension Agencies in Developing Program of Energy Utilization; Introduction to Drumless Biogas Plant; Principles and Application of Anaerobic Fermentation and Biogas Production, Operational System of Gobar Gas in Rural India; Complete Recycling of Cattle Shed Wastes through Biogas Plant; Chemical Composition of Cattle Excreta and Its Manurial Value; Profitability of Biogas Plant; Biogas Production from Various Organic Wastes; Performance of Janata Biogas Plant and Biogas Utilization in Appliances; Utilization of Solar Energy for Domestic Purposes; and Conservation of Forages. Plant requirements and cost estimates have been given for several units.

Neelakantan, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current conventional oil and gas exploration, is gainingface current oil and gas exploration and productionexploration and production activities will be prone to many of the same potential environmental impacts as conventional oil and gas

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Gas Hydrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gas Hydrate Production Methods Last Reviewed 09232009 DE-FC26-06NT42666 Goal The goal of this project is to compare and contrast, through...

131

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

132

Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: continue both screening and high pressure experiments to determine optimum inhibitors; investigate molecular mechanisms of hydrate formation/inhibition, through microscopic and macroscopic experiments; begin controlled tests on the Exxon pilot plant loop at their Houston facility; and continue to act as a forum for the sharing of field test results. Progress on these objectives are described in this report.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ridge region Ongoing areas of study in the Hydrate Ridge region Map showing where gas hydrates occur off the Cascadia Margin Locations of methane hydrate off the Cascadia Margin...

134

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrates Primer provides background and general information about the history of hydrate R&D, the science of methane hydrates, their occurrences, and R&D related issues. Photo...

135

Novel membrane technology for green ethylene production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethylene is currently produced by pyrolysis of ethane in the presence of steam. This reaction requires substantial energy input, and the equilibrium conversion is thermodynamically limited. The reaction also produces significant amounts of greenhouse gases (CO and CO{sub 2}) because of the direct contact between carbon and steam. Argonne has demonstrated a new way to make ethylene via ethane dehydrogenation using a dense hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to drive the unfavorable equilibrium conversion. Preliminary experiments show that the new approach can produce ethylene yields well above existing pyrolysis technology and also significantly above the thermodynamic equilibrium limit, while completely eliminating the production of greenhouse gases. With Argonne's approach, a disk-type dense ceramic/metal composite (cermet) membrane is used to produce ethylene by dehydrogenation of ethane at 850 C. The gas-transport membrane reactor combines a reversible chemical reaction with selective separation of one product species and leads to increased reactant conversion to the desired product. In an experiment ethane was passed over one side of the HTM membrane and air over the other side. The hydrogen produced by the dehydrogenation of ethane was removed and transported through the HTM to the air side. The air provided the driving force required for the transport of hydrogen through the HTM. The reaction between transported hydrogen and oxygen in air can provide the energy needed for the dehydrogenation reaction. At 850 C and 1-atm pressure, equilibrium conversion of ethane normally limits the ethylene yield to 64%, but Argonne has shown that an ethylene yield of 69% with a selectivity of 88% can be obtained under the same conditions. Coking was not a problem in runs extending over several weeks. Further improved HTM materials will lower the temperature required for high conversion at a reasonable residence time, while the lower temperature will suppress unwanted side reactions and prolong membrane life. With the Argonne approach, oxygen does not contact the ethane/ethylene stream, so oxidation products are not formed. Consequently, higher selectivity to ethylene and fewer by-products can be achieved. Some benefits are: (1) Simplifies overall product purification and processing schemes; (2) Results in greater energy efficiency; (3) Completely eliminates greenhouse gases from the reactor section; and (4) Lowers the cost of the 'back end' purification train, which accounts for about 70% of the capital cost of a conventional ethylene production unit.

Balachandran, U.; Lee, T. H.; Dorris, S. E.; Udovich, C. A.; Scouten, C. G.; Marshall, C. L. (Energy Systems); ( CSE)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Impact of Technological Change and Productivity on the Coal Market  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines the components of past gains in productivity, including regional shifts, the exit of less productive producers, and technological progress Future prospects for continuing productivity gains at sustained, but lower, rates of improvement are discussed.

Information Center

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 / CH4 Exchange Completed Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 / CH4 Exchange Completed DE-NT0006553 Goal The goal of this project is to define, plan, conduct and evaluate the results of a field trial of a methane hydrate production methodology whereby carbon dioxide (CO2) molecules are exchanged in situ for methane (CH4) molecules within a hydrate structure, releasing the methane for production. The objective is to evaluate the viability of this hydrate production technique and to understand the implications of the process at a field scale. image showing Conceptual rendering of proposed CO2 - CH4 exchange methodology for the production of natural gas from hydrates Conceptual rendering of proposed CO2 - CH4 exchange methodology for the

138

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: April 21, 4: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on AddThis.com... Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE

139

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: May 28, 2007 1: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on AddThis.com... Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities

140

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas A&M University - Geochemical & Research Environmental Group(GERG) - Gulf of Mexico Blue Mound w Tube Worms bulk hydrate sample oil slick showing possible hydrate location...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful April 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies. ITM Oxygen will enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, as well as other gasification-based processes. The technology will also enhance the economics of oxy-fired combustion technologies, making it an attractive option for the capture of carbon

142

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

143

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies [Internet]. [cited 2013/10/15]. Available from: http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Petroleum/projects/EP/Explor_Tech/P225.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oil_%26_Natural_Gas_Projects_Exploration_and_Production_Technologies&oldid=688583

144

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 24, 6: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on AddThis.com... Fact #256: February 24, 2003

145

Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To facilitate advances in application of technologies pertaining to gas hydrates, a United States database containing experimentally-derived information about those materials was developed. The Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database (NIST Standard Reference Database {number_sign} 156) was developed by the TRC Group at NIST in Boulder, Colorado paralleling a highly-successful database of thermodynamic properties of molecular pure compounds and their mixtures and in association with an international effort on the part of CODATA to aid in international data sharing. Development and population of this database relied on the development of three components of information-processing infrastructure: (1) guided data capture (GDC) software designed to convert data and metadata into a well-organized, electronic format, (2) a relational data storage facility to accommodate all types of numerical and metadata within the scope of the project, and (3) a gas hydrate markup language (GHML) developed to standardize data communications between 'data producers' and 'data users'. Having developed the appropriate data storage and communication technologies, a web-based interface for both the new Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database, as well as Scientific Results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program was developed and deployed at http://gashydrates.nist.gov.

Micheal Frenkel; Kenneth Kroenlein; V Diky; R.D. Chirico; A. Kazakow; C.D. Muzny; M. Frenkel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and yield insight into the relative merit of various contemplated production and stimulation methods for gas hydrate. Accomplishments Field Testing (Phase 3) Completion of...

147

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the behavior of gas hydrates in their natural environment under either production (methane gas extraction) or climate change scenarios. This research is closely linked with...

148

Gas hydrate reservoir characteristics and economics  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the DOE-funded USGS Gas Hydrate Program is to assess the production characteristics and economic potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. The objectives of this project for FY-1992 will include the following: (1) Utilize industry seismic data to assess the distribution of gas hydrates within the nearshore Alaskan continental shelf between Harrison Bay and Prudhoe Bay; (2) Further characterize and quantify the well-log characteristics of gas hydrates; and (3) Establish gas monitoring stations over the Eileen fault zone in northern Alaska, which will be used to measure gas flux from destabilized hydrates.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Lee, Myung W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Gas hydrate reservoir characteristics and economics  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the DOE-funded USGS Gas Hydrate Program is to assess the production characteristics and economic potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. The objectives of this project for FY-1992 will include the following: (1) Utilize industry seismic data to assess the distribution of gas hydrates within the nearshore Alaskan continental shelf between Harrison Bay and Prudhoe Bay; (2) Further characterize and quantify the well-log characteristics of gas hydrates; and (3) Establish gas monitoring stations over the Eileen fault zone in northern Alaska, which will be used to measure gas flux from destabilized hydrates.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Lee, Myung W.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Managing the integration of technology into the product development pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing the integration of technology is a complex task in any industry, but especially so in the highly competitive automotive industry. Automakers seek to develop plans to integrate technology into their products such ...

Barretto, Eduardo F., 1971-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Available Technologies: Novel Biosynthetic Pathway for Production ...  

See More Biofuels Technologies. Contact Us. Receive Customized Tech Alerts. Tech Transfer Site Map. Last updated: 02/03/2012.

152

Innovative Technologies for Disruptive Products Advanced ...  

Low-cost carbon fiber from renewable sources for vehicle weight reduction Safer, higher power density battery technologies

153

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12002: H2 Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record : 12002 Date: February 22, 2012 Title: H2 Production Status & Threshold Costs Plot 2006-2011 Originator: Eric Miller and Sarah...

154

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the...

155

MBD Driven Digital Product Collaborative Definition Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recording and exchanging the collaborative product definition information is an important aspect of digital product collaborative development process. To resolve the problem of records the product collaborative definition information, promote the implementation ... Keywords: digital product definition, MBD, collaboration, product manufacturing information, integrated model

QiuZhong Zhou; QingChun Fan

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Methane Title: Carbon Dioxide Mixed Hydrates Tae-Hyukof methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposedsequestration of carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) and/or production

Kwon, T.H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on September 24-25, 2013, in Golden, Colorado. The workshop featured 29 participants representing academia, government, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The objective of the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop was to share information and identify issues, barriers, and research and development needs for biological hydrogen production to enable hydrogen production that meets cost goals. Proceedings 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Final Report Presentations Introductory Session Fuel Cell Technologies Office Overview, Sara Dillich, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office

158

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies

159

The Research Path to Determining the Natural Gas Supply Potential of Marine Gas Hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primary goal of the U.S. National Interagency Gas Hydrates R&D program is to determine the natural gas production potential of marine gas hydrates. In pursuing this goal, four primary areas of effort are being conducted in parallel. First, are wide-ranging basic scientific investigations in both the laboratory and in the field designed to advance the understanding of the nature and behavior of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS). This multi-disciplinary work has wide-ranging direct applications to resource recovery, including assisting the development of exploration and production technologies through better rock physics models for GHBS and also in providing key data for numerical simulations of productivity, reservoir geomechanical response, and other phenomena. In addition, fundamental science efforts are essential to developing a fuller understanding of the role gas hydrates play in the natural environment and the potential environmental implications of gas hydrate production, a critical precursor to commercial extraction. A second area of effort is the confirmation of resource presence and viability via a series of multi-well marine drilling expeditions. The collection of data in the field is essential to further clarifying what proportion of the likely immense in-place marine gas hydrate resource exists in accumulations of sufficient quality to represent potential commercial production prospects. A third research focus area is the integration of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical field data into an effective suite of exploration tools that can support the delineation and characterization commercial gas hydrate prospects prior to drilling. The fourth primary research focus is the development and testing of well-based extraction technologies (including drilling, completion, stimulation and production) that can safely deliver commercial gas production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs in a variety of settings. Initial efforts will take advantage of the relatively favorable economics of conducting production tests in Arctic gas-hydrate bearing sandstones with the intent of translating the knowledge gained to later testing in marine sandstone reservoirs. The full and concurrent pusuit of each of these research topics is essential to the determining the future production potential of naturally-occuring gas hydrates.

Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Baker, R.C.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Sestar Technologies, LLC Revolutionar y Solar Energy Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sestar Technologies, LLC Revolutionar y Solar Energy Products Sestar Technologies, LLC (SESTAR) is developing revolutionary solar energy products that will be integral components in the ultimate solution to the world's current and future energy pro- grams. It will lead to paradigm shifts in a number of solar

Choate, Paul M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL: News Release - New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2009 22, 2009 New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful Ceramic Membrane Enables Efficient, Cost-Effective Co-Production of Power and Oxygen Washington, D.C. -The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies. ITM Oxygen will enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, as well as other gasification-based processes. The technology will also enhance the economics of oxy-fired combustion technologies, making it an attractive option for the capture of carbon dioxide from existing coal-fired power plants.

162

Energy Efficient New Metal Production Technology - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011... for Steel Production: Molten Oxide Electrolysis: Antoine Allanore1; Luis ... Intrinsic Hydrogen Reduction Kinetics of Magnetite Concentrate...

163

Available Technologies: Production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5 ...  

The JBEI process results in the conservation of 17% of carbon being converted to terpenoid products. Conserving metabolic materials (carbon) ...

164

Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Full-Scale Production Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Find resources to help you design a production and manufacturing process for a new clean energy technology or product. For full-scale production, other areas to consider include workforce development; R&D funding; and regional, state, and local resources. For more resources, see the Clean Energy Manufacturing Federal Resource Guide. Design Production and Manufacturing Process Advanced Research Projects Agency: Tech-to-Market Resources - general tech-to-market (T2M) resources. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office: Manufacturing Demonstration Facility - a collaborative manufacturing community that works to provide real data to

165

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-FC26-06NT42960 Goal The goal of this project is to improve the understanding of regional and local differences in gas hydrate systems from three perspectives: as an energy resource, as a geohazard, and as a long-term influence on global climate. Performers Rice University, Houston, TX University of Texas, Austin, TX Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Background Heterogeneity in the distribution of gas hydrate accumulations impacts all aspects of research into gas hydrate natural systems. The challenge is to delineate, understand, and appreciate these differences at the regional and local scales, where differences in in situ concentrations are relevant to the importance of gas hydrate as a resource, a geohazard, and a factor in

166

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

167

Available Technologies: Enhancing Fatty Acid Production by ...  

Synthetic biology has opened the door to fatty acid production from simple carbon sources through engineering microbes such as E. coil or yeast.

168

Available Technologies: Biological Production of Cinnamoyl ...  

The JBEI method opens the door for eco-friendly, inexpensive production of a group of chemicals useful in medical therapy and life sciences research.

169

Technology Assessment of Interconnection Products for Distributed Resources: 2001 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim technology assessment for distributed resources (DR), including generation and storage, is intended to assist system engineers in understanding the availability and application of interconnection products. The report provides a frame of reference to assess these products by defining a set of interconnection functions, descriptive elements, and applications and documenting the state of the art of interconnection products.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program August 2010 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary ...............................................................................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Organization of the FCT Program ..................................................................................................................

171

Green Technology Foresight about environmentally friendly products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Environmental governance 9 B. Guiding research and research policy: 11 C. Support for eco-innovation 12 D Foundation 227 6.5.3 EU's Environmental Technologies Action Plan (ETAP) 228 6.6 GUIDING RESEARCH AND RESEARCH- AND NANOTECHNOLOGY 237 6.9.1 Introduction 237 6.9.2 Environmental governance 238 6.9.3 Guiding research and research

Mosegaard, Klaus

172

Application of numerical, experimental and life cycle assessment methods to the investigation of natural gas production from methane hydrate deposits using carbon dioxide clathrate sequestration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas hydrates, commonly called methane (CH4) hydrates, are ice-like materials belonging to the family of clathrates that form at low temperature and high pressure. (more)

Nago, Annick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Technology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways AF&PA estimates that the forest products industry will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions intensity by 12% by 2012 relative to 2000 numbers. One of the main ways AF&PA anticipates that the industry will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions intensity is through implementation of new technologies from research and development programs. AF&PA has been participating in DOE's Industries of the Future program, a collaborative research and development partnership between DOE and the forest products industry. Through this program, AF&PA has participated in the development of a number of technologies aimed at cutting energy use, minimizing environmental impacts, and improving productivity in industry. If fully commercialized, these technologies could make the U.S. forest

174

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Testing of Gas Hydrate/Sediment Samples Mechanical Testing of Gas Hydrate/Sediment Samples DE-AT26-99FT40267 Goal Develop understanding of the mechanical characteristics of hydrate-containing sediments. Background The ACE CRREL has a unique group of experienced personnel that have studied the mechanical characteristics of ice and permafrost that can be applied to the study and characterization of the mechanical properties of gas hydrates. The effort aims to quantify the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and hydrate cemented sediments for use in models of the dynamic behavior of sediments related to drilling and seafloor installations in the Gulf of Mexico. Performers US Army Corp of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) - project management and research products

175

Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A Realistic Technology and Engineering Assessment of Algae Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microalgae biofuel technologies for both oil and biogas production, provides an initial assessment of the US or wastewater treatment, (2) biofuel outputs--either biogas only or biogas plus oil, and (3) farm size

Quinn, Nigel

177

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #194: December 10, 2001 Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: December 10, 2001 Production and ImportsExports for Top 10 Oil-Producing Countries to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 194: December 10, 2001...

178

Essays on information, technology and information worker productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I examine how information technology (IT) skills and use, communication network structures, and the distribution and flow of information in organizations impact individual information worker productivity. The work is divided ...

Aral, Sinan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 11/30/2011 Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 11/30/2011 DE-FC26-06NT42963 Goal The goal of this project is to develop observational and experimental data that can provide a better understanding of the basic mechanisms at work in a methane hydrate reservoir that is under production. To this end, a thorough physical understanding of underlying phenomena associated with methane hydrate production will be acquired through unique, multi-scale experiments and associated analyses. In addition, one or more mathematical models that account for the observed phenomena and provide insights that may help to optimize methane hydrate production methods will be developed. Performers Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

180

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Authors: Mark White and Pete McGrail Venue: The 9th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Technologies will be held November 16-20, 2008 at The Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. The Conference will be organized by MIT in collaboration with the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG), with major sponsorship from the US Department of Energy. http://mit.edu/ghgt9/ . Abstract: Under high pressure and low temperature conditions small nonpolar molecules (typically gases) can combine with water to form crystalline structures known as clathrate hydrates. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) form nearly identical clathrate structures (sI), with the CO2 hydrate being thermodynamically favored. Vast accumulations of methane hydrates have been found in suboceanic deposits and beneath the arctic permafrost. Because of the large volumetric storage densities, clathrate hydrates on the deep ocean floor have been suggested as a sequestration option for CO2. Alternatively, CO2 hydrates can be formed in the geologic settings of naturally occurring accumulations of methane hydrates. Global assessments of natural gas resources have shown that gas hydrate resources exceed those of conventional resources, which is indicative of the potential for clathrate hydrate sequestration of CO2. Recovery of natural gas from hydrate-bearing geologic deposits has the potential for being economically viable, but there remain significant technical challenges in converting these natural accumulations into a useable resource. Currently, conventional methods for producing methane hydrates from geologic settings include depressurization, thermal stimulation, and inhibitor injection. Although CO2 clathrates generally are not naturally as abundant as those of CH4, their occurrence forms the foundation of an unconventional approach for producing natural gas hydrates that involves the exchange of CO2 with CH4 in the hydrate structure. This unconventional concept has several distinct benefits over the conventional methods: 1) the heat of formation of CO2 hydrate is greater than the heat of dissociation of CH4 hydrate, providing a low-grade heat source to support additional methane hydrate dissociation, 2) exchanging CO2 with CH4 will maintain the mechanical stability of the geologic formation, and 3) the process is environmentally friendly, providing a sequestration mechanism for the injected CO2. The exchange production technology would not be feasible without the favorable thermodynamics of CO2 hydrates over CH4 hydrates. This situation yields challenges for the technology to avoid secondary hydrate formation and clogging of the geologic repository. Laboratory-scale experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of producing natural gas and sequestering CO2 using the direct exchange technology in geologic media. These experiments have duplicated numerically using the STOMP-HYD simulator, which solves the nonisothermal multifluid flow and transport equations for mixed hydrate systems in geologic media. This paper describes the design (via numerical simulation) of a pilot-scale demonstration test of the CO2 exchange production and sequestration technology for a geologic setting beneath the arctic permafrost, involving a gas-hydrate interval overlying a free-gas interval (i.e., Class 1 Hydrate Accumulation).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Information Technology Spillover and Productivity: The Role of Information Technology Intensity and Competition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study interindustry information technology (IT) spillover wherein IT investments made by supplier industries increase the productivity of downstream industries. Using data from U.S. manufacturing industries, we find that industries receive significant ... Keywords: Competition, Industry Analysis, Industry Characteristics, It Effects, It Intensity, It Spillover, Productivity, Total Factor Productivity

Kunsoo Han; Young Chang; Jungpil Hahn

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

HydrateNewsIssue2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 T H E N A T I O N A L E N E R G Y T E C H N O L O G Y L A B O R A T O R Y M E T H A N E H Y D R A T E N E W S L E T T E R Announcements ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project Naturally Occurring Gas Hydrate Data Collection Workshop March 14-15, 2002, Adam's Mark Hotel, Houston, Texas The ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP), in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), will be holding a workshop to collect data on naturally occurring hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). All key contributors to the understanding of naturally occurring hydrates are invited to apply to participate in the first of three workshops sponsored by the JIP. The purpose of the workshop is to develop a clear understanding of what

183

Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell T

185

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2011  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell

186

Technology diffusion of energy-related products in residential markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acceptance of energy-related technologies by end residential consumers, manufacturers of energy-related products, and other influential intermediate markets such as builders will influence the potential for market penetration of innovative energy-related technologies developed by the Department of Energy, Office of Building and Community Systems (OBCS). In this report, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the available information on technology adoption, diffusion, and decision-making processes to provide OBCS with a background and understanding of the type of research that has previously been conducted on this topic. Insight was gained as to the potential decision-making criteria and motivating factors that influence the decision-maker(s) selection of new technologies, and some of the barriers to technology adoption faced by potential markets for OBCS technologies.

Davis, L.J.; Bruneau, C.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Properties of Hydrate – Tool Development Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 Thermal Properties of Hydrate – Tool Development Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 Project Goal The goal of this project is increased understanding of gas hydrate thermal properties through measurements on natural hydrate-bearing sediment cores and hydrate-bearing cores formed within laboratory pressure vessels. Project Performers Eilis Rosenbaum, NETL, Office of Research and Development Ronald Lynn, NETL, RDS/Parsons Dr. David Shaw, Geneva College Project Location National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA Background NETL utilizes a modified transient plane source (TPS) shown in Figure 1 using a technique originally developed by Gustafsson [1, 2] in a single-sided configuration (Figure 2). The TPS technique is capable of simultaneously determining both thermal conductivity and thermal

188

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from the ANS drilling and coring operation - February, 2007 DOEJoint Industry Project - Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Cruise Photos from the Gulf of Mexico research cruise -...

189

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of fiber optic temperature and strain sensing technology to gas hydrates Application of fiber optic temperature and strain sensing technology to gas hydrates Authors:...

190

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico - Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Last Reviewed 6142013 DE-FC26-01NT41330 Goal: The goal of...

191

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 CH4 Exchange Last Reviewed 822013 DE-NT0006553 Goal The goal of this project is to define, plan, conduct and evaluate the results of a...

192

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-FC26-06NT42960 Goal The goal of this project is to improve the understanding of regional and local differences in gas...

193

Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities Semi-Annual Report" Report Type: Semi-Annual No:...

194

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Verification Of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will help to determine bottomhole pressure, predict more accurate production rates of methane and water, and facilitate the selection of hydrate reservoirs for economic...

195

2001 TMS Annual Meeting: Exhibitors Product and Technology Mini ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: CASTING & PRIMARY PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY ... dross cooling the inert gas dross coolerand following through to the extraction of aluminium from ... These oils oxydize, polymerise and form vanishs on the mold. .... Dean E. Venturin, Unifrax Corporation USA in association with Rex Roto Corporation USA

196

Review: Sensing technologies for precision specialty crop production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advances in electronic and information technologies, various sensing systems have been developed for specialty crop production around the world. Accurate information concerning the spatial variability within fields is very important for precision ... Keywords: Precision agriculture, Review, Sensing, Specialty crop

W. S. Lee; V. Alchanatis; C. Yang; M. Hirafuji; D. Moshou; C. Li

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at DOEs National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETLs 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve (see Figure 1).

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with emphasis; (6) detailed study of CH4-CO2 exchange as a unique alternative to recover CH4 gas while sequestering CO2; (7) the relevance of fines in otherwise clean sand sediments on gas recovery and related phenomena such as fines migration and clogging, vuggy structure formation, and gas-driven fracture formation during gas production by depressurization.

J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

The specification and estimation of technological change in electricity production  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the rate of technological change in electricity production. The dominant role of fossil fuel-fired electricity production in the industry, coupled with the direct association with the emission of greenhouse gases, makes technology parameters particularly significant for several reasons. First, very long-run simulations of energy-economic paths at a global level require that technical progress occupy a place in the methodology for sound formulations that are vital in global emissions/energy policy analysis. Second, given the outlook for electricity generation being predominately coal-based, especially in developing economies around the world, the specification and measurement of technical change is essential for developing realistic long-run technology forecasts. Finally, industry or sector growth in productivity hinges partly on technical progress, and updated analysis will always be necessary to stay abreast of developments on this front, as well as for economic growth considerations in general. This study is based on empirical economic research on production functions in the electric utility industry. However, it advances a seldom used approach, called the {open_quotes}engineering-production function{close_quotes}, in contrast to the more common neoclassical approach used by economists. Combined with this approach is a major departure from the type of data used to conduct econometric estimations of production parameters. This research draws upon a consistent set of ex ante or {open_quotes}blueprint{close_quotes} data that better reflects planned, technical performance and cost data elements, in contrast to the more customary, expect type of data from actual firm/plant operations. The results from the examination of coal-fired technologies indicate the presence of technical change. Using data for the period from 1979 to 1989, we find technical change to be capital-augmenting at the rate of 1.8 percent per year.

Kavanaugh, D.C.; Ashton, W.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 2: technology characterization and production scenarios  

SciTech Connect

A technology characterization of processes that may be used in the oil shale industry is presented. The six processes investigated are TOSCO II, Paraho Direct, Union B, Superior, Occidental MIS, and Lurgi-Ruhrgas. A scanario of shale oil production to the 300,000 BPD level by 1990 is developed. (ACR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Market enhancement of shale oil: The native products extraction technology  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this work was to assess the feasibility of enhancing shale oil commercialization through SO/NPX technology. Specific objectives were: (1) To determine the properties and characteristics of fractions isolable from shale oil utilizing separation sequences which are based on thermodynamic considerations; (2) To identify product streams of market value for promising technology development; (3)To conduct technology development studies leading to a shale oil extraction and processing sequence which promises economic enhancement of shale oil commercialization; (4) To develop an analytical methodology and model for obtaining engineering design data required for process development; (5) To estimate the economics of SO/NPX including the potential for enhancing the profitability of a commercial-scale shale oil MIS retort.

Bunger, J.W. (Bunger (James W.) and Associates, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); DuBow, J.B. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Wind and hydropower are currently being evaluated in the U.S. and abroad as electricity sources that could enable large volume production of renewable hydrogen for use in transportation and distributed power applications. To further explore this prospect the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, and the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program at the Department of Energy held a workshop to bring together stakeholders from wind, hydropower, and the electrolysis industries on September 9-10, 2003. The main objectives of the workshop were to: 1) discuss with stakeholders their current activities related to hydrogen, 2) explore with industry opportunities for low-cost hydrogen production through integration between wind and hydropower, water electrolysis and the electricity grid, and 3) review and provide feedback on a current Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory analysis efforts to study opportunities for wind electrolysis and other renewable electricity sources.

205

Methane Hydrates: Major Energy Source for the Future or Wishful Thinking?  

SciTech Connect

Methane hydrates are methane bearing, ice-like materials that occur in abundance in permafrost areas such as on the North Slope of Alaska and Canada and as well as in offshore continental margin environments throughout the world including the Gulf of Mexico and the East and West Coasts of the United States. Methane hydrate accumulations in the United States are currently estimated to be about 200,000 Tcf, which is enormous when compared to the conventional recoverable resource estimate of 2300 Tcf. On a worldwide basis, the estimate is 700,000 Tcf or about two times the total carbon in coal, oil and conventional gas in the world. The enormous size of this resource, if producible to any degree, has significant implications for U.S. and worldwide clean energy supplies and global environmental issues. Historically the petroleum industry's interests in methane hydrates have primarily been related to safety issues such as wellbore stability while drilling, seafloor stability, platform subsidence, and pipeline plugging. Many questions remain to be answered to determine if any of this potential energy resource is technically and economically viable to produce. Major technical hurdles include: 1) methods to find, characterize, and evaluate the resource; 2) technology to safely and economically produce natural gas from methane hydrate deposits; and 3) safety and seafloor stability issues related to drilling through gas hydrate accumulations to produce conventional oil and gas. The petroleum engineering profession currently deals with gas hydrates in drilling and production operations and will be key to solving the technical and economic problems that must be overcome for methane hydrates to be part of the future energy mix in the world.

Thomas, Charles Phillip

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Production From Oceanic Class 2 Hydrate Accumulations Gas Production From Oceanic Class 2 Hydrate Accumulations Authors: George J. Moridis, Matt T. Reagan, Lawrence Berkeley...

207

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Production From Class 2 Hydrate Accumulations in the Permafrost Gas Production From Class 2 Hydrate Accumulations in the Permafrost Authors: Moridis, George (speaker) and...

208

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategies for Gas Production From Oceanic Class 3 Hydrate Accumulations Strategies for Gas Production From Oceanic Class 3 Hydrate Accumulations Authors: George J. Moridis, Matt...

209

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Similarity Solution for Gas Production From Dissociating Hydrates in Geologic Media Similarity Solution for Gas Production From Dissociating Hydrates in Geologic Media Authors:...

210

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Use of Horizontal Wells in Gas Production from Hydrate Accumulations The Use of Horizontal Wells in Gas Production from Hydrate Accumulations Authors: George J. Moridis...

211

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Feasibility of Monitoring Gas Hydrate Production with Geophysical Methods Feasibility of Monitoring Gas Hydrate Production with Geophysical Methods Authors: M.B. Kowalsky...

212

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits (OTC 19554)...

213

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Arctic Hydrates (Canadian Test Well and Alaskan "Wells of Opportunity") Characterizing Arctic Hydrates (Canadian Test Well and Alaskan "Wells of Opportunity") photo of drilling rig at Mallik 2L-38 location Rig at Mallik 2L-38 location courtesy Geological Survey of Canada DE-AT26-97FT34342 Goal The purpose of this project is to assess the recoverability and potential production characteristics of the onshore natural gas hydrate and associated free-gas accumulations in the Arctic of North America Performer United States Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 80225 - partner in GSC-managed consortium and provide expertise in data gathering and analysis Background The U.S. Geological Survey has been participating in natural gas hydrate reservoir research with DOE NETL through an interagency agreement which began in the early 1980’s. The work has been an ongoing effort as part of

214

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OFFICE OFFICE Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office September 2013 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Notice This report is being disseminated by the Department of Energy. As such, this document was prepared in compliance with Section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001(Public Law 106-554) and information quality guidelines issued by the Department of Energy. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness

215

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.

Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.

Weakley, Steven A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Data from Alaska Test Could Help Advance Methane Hydrate R&D | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from Alaska Test Could Help Advance Methane Hydrate R&D from Alaska Test Could Help Advance Methane Hydrate R&D Data from Alaska Test Could Help Advance Methane Hydrate R&D March 25, 2013 - 1:27pm Addthis Image of how methane hydrates can form in arctic and marine environments. | Illustration by the Energy Department. Image of how methane hydrates can form in arctic and marine environments. | Illustration by the Energy Department. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy DOE & Methane Hydrates The Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 established DOE as the lead U.S. agency for methane hydrate R&D. Innovative technology is being developed to inject CO2 into methane hydrate deposits to both release the fuel and permanently store carbon dioxide. DOE's R&D program is focused on developing the tools and

218

Engineering analysis of biomass gasifier product gas cleaning technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For biomass gasification to make a significant contribution to the energy picture in the next decade, emphasis must be placed on the generation of clean, pollutant-free gas products. This reports attempts to quantify levels of particulated, tars, oils, and various other pollutants generated by biomass gasifiers of all types. End uses for biomass gases and appropriate gas cleaning technologies are examined. Complete systems analysis is used to predit the performance of various gasifier/gas cleanup/end use combinations. Further research needs are identified. 128 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs.

Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Moore, R.H.; Mudge, L.K.; Elliott, D.C.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter...

220

E ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ciates to yield natural gas and water. Such hydrate technology has two important characteristics: AmbientE ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates Odd I. Levik(1) , Jean for storage and transport of natural gas. Storage of natural gas in the form of hydrate at elevated pressure

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Aspects of the Kalina technology applied to geothermal power production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of studies conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) concerning the applicability of the Kalina technology to geothermal (hydrothermal) power production. This report represents a correction and addition to that report. The Heat Cycle Research Program (HCRP) has as its primary goal the cost-effective production of electric power from moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. Recent work has included the study of supercritical cycles with counterflow condensation which utilize mixtures as working fluids. These advanced concepts are projected to give a 20 to 30% improvement in power produced per unit geofluid flow rate (geofluid effectiveness, w hr/lb). The original Kalina cycle is a system which is similar to the cycles being studied in the Heat Cycle Research program and it was felt that this new cycle should be studied in the geothermal context. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.

1989-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Barrow Gas Fields - North Slope Borough, Alaska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this project is to evaluate, design, drill, log, core and production test methane hydrate resources in the Barrow Gas Fields near Barrow, Alaska to determine its impact on future free gas production and its viability as an energy source. Photo of Barrow welcome sign Performers North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska 99723 Petrotechnical Resources Alaska (PRA), Fairbanks, AK 99775 University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 Background Phase 1 of the Barrow Gas Fields Hydrate Study provided very strong evidence for the existence of hydrates updip of the East Barrow and Walakpa Gas Fields. Full-field history matched reservoir modeling supported the

223

Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member and/or six member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone.

Sloan, Jr., Earle D. (Golden, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-AI26-06NT42878 Goal The goal of the Interagency Agreement between the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Naval Research Laboratory is to conduct research to enhance understanding of the extent and dynamics of gas hydrate deposits and their relation to areas of focused fluid flux at and beneath the seafloor. Performer Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Background Methane is a potent greenhouse gas necessitating a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling its contribution to the atmospheric carbon cycle. Active methane fluxes (from deep sediment hydrates and seeps) contribute to shallow sediment biogeochemical carbon cycles, which in turn

226

Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

BC Technologies

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

Methane Hydrate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Methane Hydrate Methane Hydrate Types of Methane Hydrate Deposits Types of Methane Hydrate Deposits Methane hydrate is a cage-like lattice of ice inside of which are trapped molecules of methane, the chief constituent of natural gas. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will revert back to water and natural gas. When brought to the earth's surface, one cubic meter of gas hydrate releases 164 cubic meters of natural gas. Hydrate deposits may be several hundred meters thick and generally occur in two types of settings: under Arctic permafrost, and beneath the ocean floor. Methane that forms hydrate can be both biogenic, created by biological activity in sediments, and thermogenic, created by geological processes deeper within the earth.

228

GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically and thermally; (7) Design, construction, and successful deployment of an in situ pore-water sampling device; (8) Improvements to the original Raman spectrometer (methane sensor); (9) Laboratory demonstration of the impact of bacterially-produced surfactants' rates of hydrate formation; (10) Construction and sea floor emplacement and testing--with both watergun and ship noise sources--of the prototypal vertical line array (VLA); (11) Initiation of studies of spatial controls on hydrates; (12) Compilation and analyses of seismic data, including mapping of surface anomalies; (13) Additional field verification (bottom samples recovered), in support of the site selection effort; (14) Collection and preliminary analyses of gas hydrates from new sites that exhibit variant structures; (15) Initial shear wave tests carried out in shallow water; (16) Isolation of microbes for potential medicinal products development; (17) Preliminary modeling of occurrences of gas hydrates.

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

230

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, July 2006 (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil and gas reservoirs, or even to the large (and rapidly increasing) data-base of information on unconventional

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of U.S. Oil and Gas Resources (on CD-ROM) (Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields, Structuraland logging conventional oil and gas wells. The ability to

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Additionally, data from a waterflood and the correspondingbearing location during a waterflood (higher densities are

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen production technologies  

SciTech Connect

The future vision for hydrogen is that it will be cost-effectively produced from renewable energy sources and made available for widespread use as an energy carrier and a fuel. Hydrogen can be produced from water and when burned as a fuel, or converted to electricity, joins with oxygen to again form water. It is a clean, sustainable resource with many potential applications, including generating electricity, heating homes and offices, and fueling surface and air transportation. To achieve this vision, researchers must develop advanced technologies to produce hydrogen at costs competitive with fossil fuels, using sustainable sources. Hydrogen is now produced primarily by steam reforming of natural gas. For applications requiring extremely pure hydrogen, production is done by electrolysis. This is a relatively expensive process that uses electric current to dissociate, or split, water into its hydrogen and oxygen components. Technologies with the best potential for producing hydrogen to meet future demand fall into three general process categories: photobiological, photoelectrochemical, and thermochemical. Photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes generally use sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Thermochemical processes, including gasification and pyrolysis systems, use heat to produce hydrogen from sources such as biomass and solid waste.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Methane Hydrate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2011 FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress July 2012 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | July 2012 FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report entitled U.S. Department of Energy FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area of research. Pursuant to statutory requirements, this report is being provided to the following

236

Methane Hydrate Annual Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of Methane Hydrate research. Listed are the Annual Reports per...

237

Methane Hydrate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fiscal Year 2012 Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress August 2013 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | August 2013 Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the actions taken to carry out methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report, entitled U.S. Department of Energy Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area

238

Service and Product Provider Success Story - Emerging Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in partnership with Emerging Technologies Associates, Inc., achieves a 9% reduction in energy use intensity. Project Scope Emerging Technologies Associates, Inc. (ETA) worked...

239

Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology without additional DOE resources. This technology may be applicable to LNG with minimal additional development. Barriers discussed herein remain for industry to...

240

Driving force and composition for multicomponent gas hydrate nucleation from supersaturated aqueous solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driving force and composition for multicomponent gas hydrate nucleation from supersaturated aqueous.1063/1.1817999 I. INTRODUCTION Gas hydrate crystallization from mixtures of natural gases and water is of interest for both the prevention of hy- drate formation in natural gas production and for promotion of hydration

Firoozabadi, Abbas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of gas hydrates. The effort aims to quantify the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and hydrate cemented sediments for use in models of the dynamic behavior of...

242

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes June 6th - 7th, 2013...

243

MethaneHydrateRD_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

gas is an important energy gas is an important energy resource for the United States, providing nearly one-quarter of total energy use. The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has played a major role in developing technologies to help tap new, unconventional sources of natural gas. FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH BENEFITS Methane Hydrate R&D "The (DOE) Program has supported and managed a high-quality research portf olio that has enabled signifi cant progress toward the (DOE) Program's long-term goals." The Nati onal Academies 2010 One of these is methane hydrate - molecules of natural gas trapped in ice crystals. Containing vast amounts of natural gas, methane hydrate occurs in a variety of forms in sediments within and below thick permafrost in Arctic regions, and in the

244

Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We then used TOUGH + Hydrate to simulate the observed gas production and reservoir pressure field data at Messoyakha. We simulated various scenarios that help to explain the field behavior. We have evaluated the effect of reservoir parameters on gas recovery from hydrates. Our work should be beneficial to others who are investigating how to produce gas from a hydrate capped gas reservoir. The results also can be used to better evaluate the process of producing gas from offshore hydrates. The Schlumberger PETREL model is used in industry to the description of geologic horizons and the special distribution of properties. An interface between FLAC3D and Petrel was built by Schlumberger to allow for efficient data entry into TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D.

Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities. Volume 5. Gas hydrates in the Russian literature. [271 references  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is Volume V of a series of reports entitled ''Geological Evolution and Analysis of Confirmed or Suspected Gas Hydrate Localities.'' Volume V is an analysis of ''Gas Hydrates in the Russian Literature.'' This report presents an assessment of gas hydrate research as documented in Russian literature. It presents material that includes regional and local settings, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides some necessary regional and geological background of major hydrate occurrences in Russia. This report provides a better understanding of the gas hydrate phenomena in Russia and gives a detailed account of gas production history from a gas hydrate field in Siberia. It provides an important assessment of the understanding of gas hydrate deposition and production. 271 refs., 51 figs., 19 tabs.

Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The IT productivity paradox revisited: technological determinism masked by management method?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The productivity paradox in information technology is that investment in IT does not seem to be reflected in increased productivity. There is a host of possible explanations, but little consensus on which are responsible, or even on whether the paradox ... Keywords: information technology, management method, productivity paradox

Stuart Macdonald

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Organizing for Product Development Across Technological Environments: Performance Trade-offs and Priorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines how designing for product development influences project performance in distinct technological environments. Drawing on a series of computational experiments and paired-case comparisons of six product development projects, we specifically ... Keywords: innovation, new product development, organizational design, qualitative research, research triangulation, simulation, technological environments

Laura B. Cardinal; Scott F. Turner; Michael J. Fern; Richard M. Burton

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas the Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas The Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas (OTC 19435) Authors: George J. Moridis (speaker), Matthew T. Reagan, and Keni Zhang Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: Recent numerical studies have provided strong indications that it is possible to produce large volumes of gas from natural hydrate deposits at high rates (in excess of 10 MMSCFD) for long times by depressurization-induced dissociation of hydrates. Of the various factors that can adversely affect the production potential of hydrates, low temperatures have one of the strongest negative impacts. These can be caused by low initial temperatures, increasing stability of the hydrate (as defined by the deviation between the temperature of the deposit and the equilibrium temperature at the reservoir pressure), and by an advanced stage of dissociation (a strongly endothermic reaction) when substantial amounts of hydrates remain. The reasons for the production decline include a reduction in the rate of the hydrate dissociation at lower temperatures and the evolution of flow restrictions in the vicinity of the well caused by the formation of hydrate and/or ice in the vicinity of the wellbore. The latter is caused by continuous cooling, and is the reason why large amounts of gas that may have been released in the reservoir in the course of earlier dissociation cannot be easily recovered.

249

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Ce

250

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

before the installation of facilities for hydrate deposits can proceed, and if gas production from hydrate deposits is to become reality. HBS are often unconsolidated, and are...

251

Available Technologies - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Analysis of: geothermal reservoirs; nuclear waste storage sites; gas hydrate-bearing formations; geologic carbon sequestration ...

252

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 6142013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate...

253

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Barrow Gas Fields - North Slope Borough...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04062010 DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this...

254

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 9 Semi-Boiled Soap Production Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 9 Semi-Boiled Soap Production Systems Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 9 Semi-Boiled Soap Production Systems fr

255

Long Tails vs. Superstars: The Effect of Information Technology on Product Variety and Sales Concentration Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Internet and related information technologies are transforming the distribution of product sales across products, and these effects are likely to grow in coming years. Both the Long Tail and the Superstar effect are ...

Brynjolfsson, Erik

256

Environmental benefits of advanced oil and gas exploration and production technology  

SciTech Connect

THROUGHOUT THE OIL AND GAS LIFE CYCLE, THE INDUSTRY HAS APPLIED AN ARRAY OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE. THIS REPORT FOCUSES SPECIFICALLY ON ADVANCES IN EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION (E&P) OPERATIONS.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Natural gas hydrates on the North Slope of Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, mainly methane, in which a solid-water lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure, or clathrate. These substances often have been regarded as a potential (unconventional) source of natural gas. Significant quantities of naturally occurring gas hydrates have been detected in many regions of the Arctic including Siberia, the Mackenzie River Delta, and the North Slope of Alaska. On the North Slope, the methane-hydrate stability zone is areally extensive beneath most of the coastal plain province and has thicknesses as great as 1000 meters in the Prudhoe Bay area. Gas hydrates have been identified in 50 exploratory and production wells using well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were recovered in a core by ARCO Alaska and EXXON. Most of these gas hydrates occur in six laterally continuous Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sandstone and conglomerate units; all these gas hydrates are geographically restricted to the area overlying the eastern part of the Kuparuk River Oil Field and the western part of the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field. The volume of gas within these gas hydrates is estimated to be about 1.0 {times} 10{sup 12} to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 12} cubic meters (37 to 44 trillion cubic feet), or about twice the volume of conventional gas in the Prudhoe Bay Field. Geochemical analyses of well samples suggest that the identified hydrates probably contain a mixture of deep-source thermogenic gas and shallow microbial gas that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. The thermogenic gas probably migrated from deeper reservoirs along the same faults thought to be migration pathways for the large volumes of shallow, heavy oil that occur in this area. 51 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hydration of Gases to Reduce Major Greenhouse Gases Emission into the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology on replacement methane (CH4) from natural gas hydrate (NGH) with carbon dioxide (CO2) is described. And the technology is demonstrated in theoretics and experiment, respectively. Moreover, combined with the main emission channel of CH4 in ... Keywords: greenhouse effect, hydrate, CO2, CH4

Feng Xu; Lihua Zhu; Qiang Wu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Development of Technology for the Production of HIC Resistant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Technology of Shot Blasting and Pickling in S31803 Duplex Stainless Steel Plate and GR2 Titanium Plate Analysis of Scale Deformation and Fracture in...

260

Hydrogen Technology Analysis: H2A Production Model Update (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Todd Ramsden at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's hydrogen technology analysis activities.

Ramsden, T.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressurized Coring Equipment Pressurized Coring Equipment Pressure Core Equipment used by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program Pressure Core Equipment - Photo Gallery One of the key objectives of the ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico hydrates Joint Industry Project is the collection and analyses of deepwater sediment samples. Because these samples may contain hydrate which is only stable at specific temperature and pressure conditions it is necessary to use specialized sampling equipment. Otherwise, the combination of reduced pressure and increased temperatures as the sample is retrieved through 4,000 feet of gulf seawater will fully dissociate the hydrate, leaving only gas and water. Although techniques exist to infer hydrates presence from distinctive geochemical markers, we have lost the ability to image the nature of hydrate distribution, or to conduct measurements of the various physical and chemical properties of hydrates in the host sediments.

262

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Verification Of Capillary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification Of Capillary Pressure Functions And Relative Permeability Equations For Modeling Gas Production From Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/12/2013 Verification Of Capillary Pressure Functions And Relative Permeability Equations For Modeling Gas Production From Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/12/2013 DE-FE0009927 Goal The goal of this project is to verify and validate the capillary pressure functions and relative permeability equations that are frequently used in hydrate numerical simulators. In order to achieve this goal, numerical simulation using a network model will be used to suggest fitting parameters, modify existing equations or, if necessary, develop new equations for better simulation results. Performers Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202-3622 Background Numerical simulation is used to estimate and predict long-term behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments during gas production [Kurihara et al., 2008;

263

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

GIS-technologies for integrated assessment of the productive mining areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the bases of a new application of GIS-technologies for integrated assessment and comparison of the productive mining areas, involving a wide range of mining and technological factors, considering mineral properties, mineral occurrence conditions and geographical advantages of a mineral deposit location. The model capabilities are exemplified by a comparison of technological characteristics of coals, transportation and power supply infrastructure of the productive mining areas at the Kuznetsk Coal Basin.

Zamaraev, R.Y.; Oparin, V.N.; Popov, S.E.; Potapov, V.P.; Pyastunovich,O.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New Zealand Task Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New Zealand Task DE-AI26-06NT42878 Goal The objective of this research is to determine the extent and dynamics of gas hydrate deposits and their relation to areas of focused fluid flux at and beneath the seafloor. Specific objectives include: a). Refine geophysical, geochemical and microbiological technologies for prospecting hydrate distribution and content; b). Contribute to establishing high-priority geographical regions of prospective interest, in terms of methane volume estimates; c). Prediction of environmental effects and geologic risks at the continental margin associated to the natural resource occurrence and resource exploitation; and d). Expand understanding of the biogeochemical parameters and associated microbial community diversity in shallow sediments that influence the porewater sulfate gradient observed through anaerobic oxidation of methane. To accomplish these objectives, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) collaborated with New Zealand’s Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (GNS) in a research cruise off the coast of New Zealand. NRL has conducted similar research cruises off the west coast and east coast of the United States, in the Gulf of Mexico and off the coast of Chile.

267

Grain & Wood Based Technologies for Production of Ethanol  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Outline Sources of Ethanol Grain Based Dry Mill Process Cellulosic Based Processes Costs Conclusions The Production of Ethanol Bioethanol ...

268

Technology drives natural gas production growth from shale ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... Rapid increases in natural gas production from shale gas formations resulted from widespread application ...

269

Buildings R&D Breakthroughs: Technologies and Products Supported by the Building Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings R&D Breakthroughs: Technologies and Products Supported by the Building Technologies Program April 2012 Table of Contents Executive Summary ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� v 1.0 Introduction���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 1-1

270

Smelting Technology and Final Product Quality of Steel Rails Used ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baotou Steel (Group) Corp. is one of the important production bases for steel rails in China. In order to meet the development of railway transportation, steel rails...

271

Forest products industry of the future: Building a sustainable technology advantage for America`s forest products industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US forest, wood, and paper industry ranks as one of the most competitive forest products industries in the world. With annual shipments valued at nearly $267 billion, it employs over 1.3 million people and is currently among the top 10 manufacturing employers in 46 out of 50 states. Retaining this leadership position will depend largely on the industry`s success in developing and using advanced technologies. These technologies will enable manufacturing plants and forestry enterprises to maximize energy and materials efficiency and reduce waste and emissions, while producing high-quality, competitively priced wood and paper products. In a unique partnership, leaders in the forest products industry have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to encourage cooperative research efforts that will help position the US forest products industry for continuing prosperity while advancing national energy efficiency and environmental goals.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Compatibility of Admix and Synthetic Liner Materials With Clean Coal Technology By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When designing effective liner systems for clean coal technology by-products, utilities need information on the liner materials most suitable for each type of waste by-product. This study has developed data on twenty admix and synthetic liner types for seven different by-product combinations.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Hydrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is to develop analytical techniques capable of quantitatively evaluating the nature of methane hydrate reservoir systems through modeling of their acoustic response using...

274

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Properties of Hydrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is to measure physical, chemical, mechanical, and hydrologic property changes in methane hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to injection of carbon dioxide and nitrogen....

275

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis - Fugro Operations and Geotechnical Investigations PDF-7.13MB National Methane Hydrate R&D Program website. Photos: Photo Gallery - miscellaneous - Photos from...

276

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The DOEJIP Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Cruise Status Reports During this expedition we will maintain an intermittent log of information relayed from the chief scientist on the...

277

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressurized Coring Equipment Pressure Core Equipment used by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program Pressure Core Equipment - Photo Gallery One of the key objectives...

278

Biofuels Fuels Technology Pathway Options for Advanced Drop-in Biofuels Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced drop-in hydrocarbon biofuels require biofuel alternatives for refinery products other than gasoline. Candidate biofuels must have performance characteristics equivalent to conventional petroleum-based fuels. The technology pathways for biofuel alternatives also must be plausible, sustainable (e.g., positive energy balance, environmentally benign, etc.), and demonstrate a reasonable pathway to economic viability and end-user affordability. Viable biofuels technology pathways must address feedstock production and environmental issues through to the fuel or chemical end products. Potential end products include compatible replacement fuel products (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and JP8 and JP5 jet fuel) and other petroleum products or chemicals typically produced from a barrel of crude. Considering the complexity and technology diversity of a complete biofuels supply chain, no single entity or technology provider is capable of addressing in depth all aspects of any given pathway; however, all the necessary expert entities exist. As such, we propose the assembly of a team capable of conducting an in-depth technology pathway options analysis (including sustainability indicators and complete LCA) to identify and define the domestic biofuel pathways for a Green Fleet. This team is not only capable of conducting in-depth analyses on technology pathways, but collectively they are able to trouble shoot and/or engineer solutions that would give industrial technology providers the highest potential for success. Such a team would provide the greatest possible down-side protection for high-risk advanced drop-in biofuels procurement(s).

Kevin L Kenney

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the shale boundaries k B on gas production (Q R and Q P )during the production period. The shale interlayer betweenbounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production

Moridis, G.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Technoeconomic Evaluation of Large-Scale Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale production of electrolytic hydrogen and oxygen could increase use of baseload and off-peak surplus power. To be competitive, however, water electrolysis will require low-cost electricity.

1985-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Transitioning technology from R&D to production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporate research and development (R&D) drives progress in the high-tech industries. Companies that advance the state-of-the-art in product performance enjoy significant advantages over the competition. However, although ...

Pulitzer, Seward Webb, 1974-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Authors: George J. Moridis, Jonny Rutqvist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Venue: 2007 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 30–May 1, 2007 (http://www.otcnet.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The thermal and mechanical loading of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) can result in hydrate dissociation and a significant pressure increase, with potentially adverse consequences on the integrity and stability of the wellbore assembly, the HBS, and the bounding formations. The perception of HBS instability, coupled with insufficient knowledge of their geomechanical behavior and the absence of predictive capabilities, has resulted in a strategy of avoidance of HBS when locating offshore production platforms. These factors can also impede the development of hydrate deposits as gas resources. For the analysis of the geomechanical stability of HBS, project researchers developed and used a numerical model that integrates a commercial geomechanical code into a simulator describing the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transport, and thermodynamic behavior in geologic media. The geomechanical code includes elastoplastic models for quasi-static yield and failure analysis and viscoplastic models for time-dependent (creep) analysis. The hydrate simulator can model the non-isothermal hydration reactions (equilibrium or kinetic), phase behavior, and flow of fluids and heat in HBS, and can handle any combination of hydrate dissociation mechanisms. The simulations can account for the interdependence of changes in the hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical properties of the HBS, in addition to swelling/shrinkage, displacement (subsidence), and possible geomechanical failure. Researchers investigated in three cases the coupled hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS systems. The first involves hydrate heating as warm fluids from deeper, conventional reservoirs ascend to the ocean floor through uninsulated pipes intersecting the HBS. The second case involves mechanical loading caused by the weight of structures placed on HBS at the ocean floor, and the third describes system response during gas production from a hydrate deposit. The results indicate that the stability of HBS in the vicinity of warm pipes may be significantly affected, especially near the ocean floor where the sediments are unconsolidated and more compressible. Conversely, the increased pressure caused by the weight of structures on the ocean floor increases the stability of hydrates, while gas production from oceanic deposits minimally affects the geomechanical stability of HBS under the conditions that are deemed desirable for production.

284

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Interagency Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links to interagency pdf. The multi-faceted issues associated with naturally occurring methane hydrates demand a coordinated approach to studying (1) the potential of this resource...

285

EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic 9: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99

286

Promise or Threat? : The Co-production of Technology and Politics in Uranium Enrichment in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis point of departure is to recapture the co-production idiom within the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) when analyzing Irans nuclear energy (more)

Moezzi, Maryam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Technology strategy of competing with industrial design in markets of high-tech consumer products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the role of industrial design in the formulation of technology strategy for certain firms that compete in markets of high-tech consumer products. The initial intuition is that the role of industrial ...

Mak, Arthur T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Modelling and Experimental Study of Methane Catalytic Cracking as a Hydrogen Production Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production of hydrogen is primarily achieved via catalytic steam reforming, partial oxidation,and auto-thermal reforming of natural gas. Although these processes are mature technologies, they are (more)

Amin, Ashraf Mukhtar Lotfi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic 29: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99

291

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - On-Site Production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Site Production of Mercury Sorbent with Low Concrete Impact On-Site Production of Mercury Sorbent with Low Concrete Impact The detrimental health effects of mercury are well documented. Furthermore, it has been reported that U.S. coal-fired plants emit approximately 48 tons of mercury a year. To remedy this, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) on March 15, 2005. A promising method to achieve the mandated mercury reductions is activated carbon injection (ACI). While promising, the current cost of ACI for mercury capture is expensive, and ACI adversely impacts the use of the by-product fly-ash for concrete. Published prices for activated carbon are generally 0.5-1 $/lb and capital costs estimates are 2-55 $/KW. Because of the high costs of ACI, Praxair started feasibility studies on an alternative process to reduce the cost of mercury capture. The proposed process is composed of three steps. First, a hot oxidant mixture is created by using a proprietary Praxair burner. Next, the hot oxidant is allowed to react with pulverized coal and additives. The resulting sorbent product is separated from the resulting syngas. In a commercial installation, the resulting sorbent product would be injected between the air-preheater and the particulate control device.

292

Marine Electromagnetic Methods for Gas Hydrate Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , 2003: Natural Gas Hydrates: Background and History ofIn Natural Gas Hydrate: Back- ground and History ofNatural Gas Hydrate: Occurrence, Distribution and Detection, chapter History

Weitemeyer, Karen A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Marine electromagnetic methods for gas hydrate characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , 2003: Natural Gas Hydrates: Background and History ofIn Natural Gas Hydrate: Back- ground and History ofNatural Gas Hydrate: Occurrence, Distribution and Detection, chapter History

Weitemeyer, Karen Andrea

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solder technology in the manufacturing of electronic products  

SciTech Connect

The electronics industry has relied heavily upon the use of soldering for both package construction and circuit assembly. The solder attachment of devices onto printed circuit boards and ceramic microcircuits has supported the high volume manufacturing processes responsible for low cost, high quality consumer products and military hardware. Defects incurred during the manufacturing process are minimized by the proper selection of solder alloys, substrate materials and process parameters. Prototyping efforts are then used to evaluate the manufacturability of the chosen material systems. Once manufacturing feasibility has been established, service reliability of the final product is evaluated through accelerated testing procedures.

Vianco, P.T.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Field Work Proposal.: ESD12-011 2012 Annual Research Progress Report (April - December 2012) Numerical Studies for the Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Project Period (April 2012 - March 2013) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory George Moridis (Principal Investigator) GJMoridis@lbl.gov Tel: (510) 486-4746 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Submission date: 2/4/2013 Office of Fossil Energy ii 2012Annual Progress Report Numerical Studies for the Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits WORK PERFORMED UNDER ESD12-010 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory George Moridis (Principal Investigator)

296

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cruise Cruise Special Report - Bottom-Simulating Reflections(BSR). Seismic lines from deep continental shelves all around the world contain anomalous reflections known as bottom-simulating reflections(BSR). The reflections mimic the sea-floor topography at a near constant depth below the surface, and commonly cut across geological layers. The nature of the reflection indicates a horizon across which seismic velocity dramatically decreases. At one time, scientists thought the reflection must be due to some mineralogical alteration in the sediment due to heat and pressure. Once the existence of natural methane hydrate was established, BSRs were thought to record the decrease in velocity when passing from hydrate-bearing sediments to those containing only water. Therefore, BSRs were thought to be a direct indicator of hydrate: no BSR meant no hydrate. However, the velocity contrast between hydrate and no-hydrate was determined to be insufficient to cause BSRs. Today, scientists have established that BSRs are an indication of concentrations of free methane gas that is blocked from further upward migration by the presence of methane hydrate in the overlying layers. Consequently, the distribution of BSRs may mark only a subset of the areas containing hydrate.

297

Visions on Energy Production Technologies for Finland up to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1% 14% 16% 28% 1.2-1.5 CHP products District heat Back pressure turbine Combined cycle plants Micro-plants (microturbine, fuel cell,..) Heat storage Cold storage Hydrogen storage Clean water District cooling Hydrogen The share of district heating CHP electricity in Finland The share of total CHP electricity in Finland

298

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development Biofuel production technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of different biofuels can be produced, including Fisher-Tropsch liquids (FTL), dimethyl ether (DME that would be used for biofuel production. These fuels include Fischer-Tropsch liquids (FTL), methanol such as dimethyl ether (DME) or Fischer-Tropsch liquids (FTL) made from lignocellulosic biomass. A relatively

299

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments (OTC 19672) Authors: Jonny Rutqvist (speaker), George J. Moridis, and Tarun Grover Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: This study investigated coupled multiphase flow, themal, thermodynamic and geomechanical behavior of oceanic Hydrate Bearing Sediments (HBS), during depressurization-induced gas production in general, and potential wellbore in-stability and casing deformation in particular. The project investigated the geomechanical changes and wellbore stability for two alternative cases of production using a horizontal well in a Class 3 deposit and a vertical well in a Class 2 deposit. The research compared the geomechanical responses and the potential adverse geomechanical effects for the two different cases. Analysis shows that geomechanical responses during depressurization-induced gas production from oceanic hydrate deposits is driven by the reservoir-wide pressure decline (Delta P), which in turn is controlled by the induced pressure decline near the wellbore. Because any change quickly propagates within the entire reservoir, the reservoir wide geomechanical response can occur within a few days of production induced pressure decline.

300

Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. November 20, 2013 - 12:08pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced nearly $5 million in funding across seven research projects nationwide designed to increase our understanding of methane hydrates - a large, completely untapped natural gas resource-and what it could mean for the environment, as well as American economic competiveness and energy security. "The recent boom in natural gas production - in part due to long-term Energy Department investments beginning in the 70's and 80's - has had

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone. Additives can also contain multiple cyclic chemical groupings having different size rings. One such additive is sold under the name Gaffix VC-713.

Sloan, E.D. Jr.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

302

Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone. Additives can also contain multiple cyclic chemical groupings having different size rings. One such additive is sold under the name Gaffix VC-713.

Sloan, Jr., Earle D. (Golden, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL ORD Methane Hydrate Research - Thermal Properties of Hydrate Tool Development Last Reviewed 3182013 Project Goal The goal of this project is increased understanding of...

304

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Projects If you need help finding information on a particular project, please contact the content manager. Search Hydrates Projects Active Projects | Completed...

305

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with sampling and observation from the surface ship. Activities included collection of methane hydrate, sediment, water, and other materials from methane hydrate and seep sites...

306

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3182013 Project Goals The primary goals of the DOENETL Natural Gas Hydrate Field Studies...

307

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

natural and simulated sediment samples, and to use these sediments as hosts to form methane hydrate and to investigate the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation...

308

MethaneHydrateRD_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Academies 2010 One of these is methane hydrate - molecules of natural gas trapped in ice crystals. Containing vast amounts of natural gas, methane hydrate occurs in a variety...

309

Low-Cost NIALMS Technology: Market Issues & Product Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-Intrusive Appliance Load Monitoring System (NIALMS) provides the ability to submeter residential loads from the meter, without intruding into the home. It utilizes a meter recorder installed between the meter socket and a meter, eliminating the need for additional sensors and dataloggers. NIALMS is now a commercially available product, used primarily for load research by utilities. The issues surrounding the proliferation of NIALMS in the meter industry have always involved cost and functionality. Bu...

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Technology assessment of laser-fusion power production  

SciTech Connect

The inherent features of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described. Technology developments for ultimate commercial application are outlined.

Booth, L.A.; Frank, T.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fractionation of reformate: A new variant of gasoline production technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Novo-Ufa Petroleum Refinery is the largest domestic producer of the unique high-octane unleaded automotive gasolines AI-93 and AI-95 and the aviation gasolines B-91/115 and B-92. The base component for these gasolines is obtained by catalytic reforming of wide-cut naphtha; this basic component is usually blended with certain other components that are expensive and in short supply: toluene, xylenes, and alkylate. For example, the unleaded gasoline AI-93 has been prepared by blending reformate, alkylate, and toluene in a 65:20:15 weight ratio; AI-95 gasoline by blending alkylate and xylenes in an 80:20 weight ratio; and B-91/115 gasoline by compounding a reformate obtained with light straight-run feed, plus alkylate and toluene, in a 55:35:10 weight ratio. Toluene and xylenes have been obtained by process schemes that include the following consecutive processes: redistillation of straight-run naphtha cuts to segregate the required narrow fraction; catalytic reforming (Platforming) of the narrow toluene-xylene straight-run fraction; azeotropic distillation of the reformate to recover toluene and xylenes. A new technology based on the use of reformate fractions is proposed.

Karakuts, V.N.; Tanatarov, M.A.; Telyashev, G.G. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. Read Dr. Boswell's testimony Dr. Ray Boswell, Senior Management and Technology Advisor at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, testified before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources that the R&D program in gas hydrates is working to integrate and leverage

314

Status of DOE Research Efforts in Gas Hydrates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status of DOE Research Efforts in Gas Hydrates Status of DOE Research Efforts in Gas Hydrates Status of DOE Research Efforts in Gas Hydrates July 30, 2009 - 1:38pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Ray Boswell, National Energy Technology Laboratory before the Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the status of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) research efforts in naturally-occurring gas hydrates. INTRODUCTION Since 2000, DOE, through the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has led the national research program in gas hydrates. The program is conducted through partnerships with private

315

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seam Well Completion Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas September 2003 DOE/NETL-2003/1193 Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) (Strategic Center for Natural Gas) DOE/NETL-2003/1193 September 2003 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

317

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Hydrate Reservoir  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques Last Reviewed 11/29/2013 Advanced Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques Last Reviewed 11/29/2013 DE-FE0010160 Goal The primary goal of this research is to develop analytical techniques capable of quantitatively evaluating the nature of methane hydrate reservoir systems through modeling of their acoustic response using techniques that integrate rock physics theory, amplitude analysis, and spectral decomposition. Performers Fugro GeoConsulting, Inc., Houston TX Background Past efforts under the DOE-supported Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry project included the selection of well locations utilizing prospectivity analysis based primarily on a petroleum systems approach for gas hydrate using 3-D exploration seismic data and derivative analyses that produced predicted

318

NETL: Methane Hydrates - The National R&D Program - Hydrates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 (Enrolled Bill) H.R.1753 One Hundred Sixth Congress of the United States of America AT THE...

319

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

While Drilling Operations The downhole logging while drilling (LWD) operations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program (GOM-JIP) was designed in part to obtain...

320

DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Technologies for the Co-Production Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks August 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The total value of the projects is approximately $8.2 million, with $6.4 million of DOE funding and $1.8 million of non-Federal cost sharing. Syngas is a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen which can subsequently be converted either to power, fuels, or chemicals. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over several years, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

322

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cumulative mass of produced water (M W ). Production Using aw and cumulative mass of produced water M w associated withcumulative mass of produced water M w in Figure 16 increase

Moridis, G.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fire in the Ice, August 2010 Methane Hydrate Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1: Simulation results of coupled thermo-dynamic and geomechanical changes around a hot Figure 1: Simulation results of coupled thermo-dynamic and geomechanical changes around a hot production well intersecting an HBS near a sloping seafloor after 30 years of production and heating (Rutqvist and Moridis, 2010). CONTENTS Geohazards of In Situ Gas Hydrates ...........................................1 Behavior of Methane Released in the Deep Ocean.....5 Core-Scale Heterogeneity ............6 Gas Volume Ratios ........................9 The Role of Methane Hydrates in the Earth System ....................12 Announcements .......................15 * Inter-Laboratory Comparison Project * Mississippi Canyon 118 * Research Fellowship * Call for Papers * Call for Abstracts * Upcoming Meetings Spotlight on Research .......... 20 Graham Westbrook CONTACT

324

Sample Contract Language for Information Technology Using Energy-Efficient Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- EFFICIENT PRODUCTS Section C - Performance Work Statement/Descriptions, Specifications The Contractor shall comply with Sections 524 and Sections 525 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007; Section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; Executive Order 13514, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance," dated October 5, 2009; Executive Order 13423, "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," dated

325

Sample Contract Language for Information Technology Using Energy-Efficient Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- EFFICIENT PRODUCTS Section C - Performance Work Statement/Descriptions, Specifications The Contractor shall comply with Sections 524 and Sections 525 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007; Section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; Executive Order 13514, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance," dated October 5, 2009; Executive Order 13423, "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," dated

326

Influence of Fly Ash and Fluorgypsum on Hydration Heat and Mortar ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results show that: the heat of hydration of cement hydration heat is lower than ... Analysis of Carbon Fiber Recovered from Optimized Processes of Commercial Scale Recycling Facilities Clayey Ceramic Incorporated with Powder from the Sintering Plant of a ... Production of Rock Wool from Ornamental Rock Wastes.

327

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585. GC-62@hq.doe.gov ATTN: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS. Response to Request for Information - Federal Register "The Costs and Benefits of Dealing with Federal Laboratories" This "white paper" is intended to deal constructively with issues relating to technology transfer and interaction of small businesses with federal laboratories, and should be considered a response to #6 (other). As a small businessman and entrepreneur engaged in the

328

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585. GC-62@hq.doe.gov ATTN: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS. Response to Request for Information - Federal Register "The Costs and Benefits of Dealing with Federal Laboratories" This "white paper" is intended to deal constructively with issues relating to technology transfer and interaction of small businesses with federal laboratories, and should be considered a response to #6 (other). As a small businessman and entrepreneur engaged in the

329

Methane Hydrates R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrates R&D Program Methane Hydrates R&D Program Gas hydrates are a naturally-occurring combination of methane gas and water that form under specific conditions of low temperature and high pressure. Once thought to be rare in nature, gas hydrates are now known to occur in great abundance in association with arctic permafrost and in the shallow sediments of the deep-water continental shelves. The most recent estimates of gas hydrate abundance suggest that they contain

330

New techniques and products solve industry problems. [New technology available for the natural gas pipeline industry  

SciTech Connect

Recently introduced technology advances in data handling, manipulation and delivery; new gas and storage marketing products; a nonintrusive pipe-crack arrester; and responsive pipe-coating mill construction show promise for cutting industry costs by increasing efficiency in pipe line construction, repair, rehabilitation, and operations. The products, services and methods described in this new technology survey include: a PC-compatible dataserver that requires no user programming; flexible, responsive gas transportation scheme; evaluation of possible further uses on brittle transmission lines for fiberglass-reinforced resin composite; new multilayer epoxy PE coating mill in Corinth, Greece, near areas where large pipe line construction and rehabilitation projects are contemplated.

Bullion, L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas The Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with...

332

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

333

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural...

334

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas...

335

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in the Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Submitted by: Baylor University One Bear Place, Box 97354 Waco, TX 76798 Principal Author: John A. Dunbar Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 15, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Pr oject Quar ter 17 Repor t Report Type: Quarterly Starting October 1, 2010 Ending December 31, 2010 Author: John A. Dunbar Baylor University Department of Geology January 15, 2011 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-06NT142959

336

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health

337

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Calculation of gas hydrate dissociation with finite-element model  

SciTech Connect

In situ gas hydrates have been found abundantly in the Arctic regions of the US, Canada, and Russia. Gas recovery from such a hydrate reservoir under permafrost conditions is described in the present paper. The technique is based upon a finite-element transient heat-conduction model that includes the ability to handle phase change. That model is applied to field data available from the North Slope of Alaska for predicting natural-gas production. Parametric studies have also been conducted to explore the effects of hydrate zone thickness, wellbore temperature, wellbore radius, porosity, etc., on the gas production rate. Comparisons of temperature distributions throughout the medium, and the propagation of the moving dissociation front with respect to time predicted by the present scheme and a finite-difference scheme, show good agreement. The data generated in the present study may be useful in deciding on the most optimal technique for gas recovery from hydrates. Additionally, it may provide drilling engineers with valuable information to establish guidelines for safe drilling in the presence of hydrates.

Das, D.K.; Srivastava, V. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Numerical Modeling of Gas Recovery from Methane Hydrate Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACTClass 1 hydrate deposits are characterized by a hydrate bearing layer underlain by a two phase, free-gas and water, zone. A Class 1 hydrate reservoir (more)

Silpngarmlert, Suntichai

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th-7th, 2013 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th-7th, 2013 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee...

343

Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and...

344

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, January 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, January 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes January, 2010 Atlanta, GA Methane Hydrate Advisory...

345

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, March 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, March 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes March 2010 Washington, DC Methane Hydrate Advisory...

346

High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy TechnologySummary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� v 1.0 Introduction ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

348

2011 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� v 1.0 Introduction ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

349

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead previously by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC). The project is now under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP) after it acquired GEC and the E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology from Global Energy in July 2003. The Phase I of this project was supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while the Phase II is supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research, Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The two project phases planned for execution include: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at Global Energy's existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The WREL facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and now COP and the industrial partners are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Thomas Lynch

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of Fusion Energy Options for Commercial Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion energy options were reviewed to assess technical readiness levels for commercial electricity production for the power industry. Magnetic and inertial confinement systems, in addition to nontraditional fusion concepts, were reviewed by a technical panel of experts, based on workshop presentations by the proponents of each technology. The results are summarized in this ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production: Commercial Facilities · Applicant's Legal Name: Yokayo Biofuels, Inc. · Name of project: A Catalyst for Success · Project Description: Yokayo Biofuels, an industry veteran with over 10 years experience

352

Reciprocating Engines for Stationary Power Generation: Technology, Products, Players, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reciprocating engines (REs) have long played an important role in the distributed resources market and should, in the future, continue to provide end-use customers and energy companies benefits in both onsite and grid-connected power generation service. This report presents a comprehensive worldwide overview of RE technology and the business climate for these products.

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Anaerobic digesters · Electrogenesis ­ Generation of electricity ­ Exoelectrogens ­ Microbial fuel cells1 Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies Bruce E. Logan · US electricity generation: 13 quad ·Electricity needed for H2 transportation: · Via water

Lee, Dongwon

354

Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now Available on NETL Website Data from Innovative Methane Hydrate Test on Alaska's North Slope Now Available on NETL Website March 11, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis DOE participated in gas hydrate field production trials in early 2012 in partnership with ConocoPhillips and the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp at the IÄ¡nik Sikumi (Inupiat for “Fire in the Ice”) test well, shown here, on the north slope of Alaska. Datasets from that field trial are now available to the public. DOE participated in gas hydrate field production trials in early 2012 in partnership with ConocoPhillips and the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp at the Iġnik Sikumi (Inupiat for "Fire in the Ice") test well,

355

Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Long-term commercialization approach with first products first Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Washington, DC Glenn Rambach August 11, 2011 Potential market area for fuel cells (or other power plants). Defined by peak power vs. cost per unit power capacity (W vs. $/kW) for typical applications currently satisfied by legacy technologies. Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable Educational device Retail A Less difficult Less difficult (smaller units) (cost tolerant market) Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable Educational device Retail A Range of application size and specific cost that all can be commercially satisfied

356

Approaches for identifying consumer preferences for the design of technology products : a case study of residential solar panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates ways to obtain consumer preferences for technology products to help designers identify the key attributes that contribute to a product's market success. A case study of residential solar PV panels ...

Chen, Heidi Qianyi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle, May 2008.

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. During the reporting period, various methods to remove low-level contaminants for the synthesis gas were reviewed. In addition, there was a transition of the project personnel for GEC which has slowed the production of the outstanding project reports.

Gary Harmond; Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Large-scale production, harvest and logistics of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) - current technology and envisioning a mature technology  

SciTech Connect

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a promising cellulosic biomass feedstock for biorefineries and biofuel production. This paper reviews current and future potential technologies for production, harvest, storage, and transportation of switchgrass. Our analysis indicates that for a yield of 10 Mg ha 1, the current cost of producing switchgrass (after establishment) is about $41.50 Mg 1. The costs may be reduced to about half this if the yield is increased to 30 Mg ha 1 through genetic improvement, intensive crop management, and/or optimized inputs. At a yield of 10 Mg ha 1, we estimate that harvesting costs range from $23.72 Mg 1 for current baling technology to less than $16 Mg 1 when using a loafing collection system. At yields of 20 and 30 Mg ha 1 with an improved loafing system, harvesting costs are even lower at $12.75 Mg 1 and $9.59 Mg 1, respectively. Transport costs vary depending upon yield and fraction of land under switchgrass, bulk density of biomass, and total annual demand of a biorefinery. For a 2000 Mg d 1 plant and an annual yield of 10 Mg ha 1, the transport cost is an estimated $15.42 Mg 1, assuming 25% of the land is under switchgrass production. Total delivered cost of switchgrass using current baling technology is $80.64 Mg 1, requiring an energy input of 8.5% of the feedstock higher heating value (HHV). With mature technology, for example, a large, loaf collection system, the total delivered cost is reduced to about $71.16 Mg 1 with 7.8% of the feedstock HHV required as input. Further cost reduction can be achieved by combining mature technology with increased crop productivity. Delivered cost and energy input do not vary significantly as biorefinery capacity increases from 2000 Mg d 1 to 5000 Mg d 1 because the cost of increased distance to access a larger volume feedstock offsets the gains in increased biorefinery capacity. This paper outlines possible scenarios for the expansion of switchgrass handling to 30 Tg (million Mg) in 2015 and 100 Tg in 2030 based on predicted growth of the biorefinery industry in the USA. The value of switchgrass collection operations is estimated at more than $0.6 billion in 2015 and more than $2.1 billion in 2030. The estimated value of post harvest operations is $0.6 $2.0 billion in 2015, and $2.0 $6.5 billion in 2030, depending on the degree of preprocessing. The need for power equipment (tractors) will increase from 100 MW in 2015 to 666 MW in 2030, with corresponding annual values of $150 and $520 million, respectively. 2009 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Turhollow, Jr., Anthony [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kumar, Amit [University of Alberta; Bransby, David [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College; Laser, Mark [Dartmouth College

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates  

SciTech Connect

Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and/or production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates. We prepared CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO{sub 2} than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO{sub 2} in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO{sub 2}. The dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH{sub 4} hydrate and CO{sub 2} hydrate, increasing with the CO{sub 2} fraction in the hydrate phase.

Kwon, T.H.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2013 0, 2013 Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S. WASHINGTON - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced nearly $5 million in funding across seven research projects nationwide designed to increase our understanding of methane hydrates - a large, completely untapped natural gas resource-and what it could mean for the environment, as well as American economic competiveness and energy security. "The recent boom in natural gas production - in part due to long-term Energy Department investments beginning in the 70's and 80's - has had a transformative impact on our energy landscape, helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and support thousands of American jobs," said Secretary Moniz. "While our research into methane hydrates is still in its early stages, these investments will increase our understanding of this domestic resource and the potential to safely and sustainably unlock the natural gas held within."

362

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products  

SciTech Connect

This eleventh quarterly report describes work done during the eleventh three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini; Wiles Elder

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Assessing the Thermodynamic Feasibility of the Conversion of Methane Hydrate into Carbon Dioxide Hydrate in Porous Media  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing the Thermodynamic Feasibility of the Conversion of Methane Assessing the Thermodynamic Feasibility of the Conversion of Methane Hydrate into Carbon Dioxide Hydrate in Porous Media Duane H. Smith (dsmith@netl.doe.gov; 304-285-4069), U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Kal Seshadri (kal.seshadri@netl.doe.gov; 304-285-4680), Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, Morgantown, WV 26505 Joseph W. Wilder (wilder@math.wvu.edu; 304-293-2011), U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 (Permanent Address: Dept of Mathematics, P. O. Box 6310, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506-6310) Abstract Concerns about the potential effects of rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have stimulated interest in a number of carbon dioxide sequestration studies. One

366

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS Oxygen PrOductiOn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen PrOductiOn B-500 Oxygen PrOductiOn u.S. dePartment Of energy advanced carbOn diOxide caPture r&d PrOgram: technOlOgy uPdate, may 2013 itm Oxygen technOlOgy fOr integratiOn...

367

Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data  

SciTech Connect

The numerical simulator TOUGH+HYDRATE (T+H) was used to predict the transient pure methane hydrate (no sediment) dissociation data. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to visualize the methane hydrate formation and dissociation processes. A methane hydrate sample was formed from granular ice in a cylindrical vessel, and slow depressurization combined with thermal stimulation was applied to dissociate the hydrate sample. CT images showed that the water produced from the hydrate dissociation accumulated at the bottom of the vessel and increased the hydrate dissociation rate there. CT images were obtained during hydrate dissociation to confirm the radial dissociation of the hydrate sample. This radial dissociation process has implications for dissociation of hydrates in pipelines, suggesting lower dissociation times than for longitudinal dissociation. These observations were also confirmed by the numerical simulator predictions, which were in good agreement with the measured thermal data during hydrate dissociation. System pressure and sample temperature measured at the sample center followed the CH{sub 4} hydrate L{sub w}+H+V equilibrium line during hydrate dissociation. The predicted cumulative methane gas production was within 5% of the measured data. Thus, this study validated our simulation approach and assumptions, which include stationary pure methane hydrate-skeleton, equilibrium hydrate-dissociation and heat- and mass-transfer in predicting hydrate dissociation in the absence of sediments. It should be noted that the application of T+H for the pure methane hydrate system (no sediment) is outside the general applicability limits of T+H.

Gupta, A.; Moridis, G.J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Sloan, Jr., E.D.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Formation of Hydrates from Single-Phase Aqueous Solutions and Implications for Oceanic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation of Hydrates from Single-Phase Aqueous Solutions Formation of Hydrates from Single-Phase Aqueous Solutions and Implications for Oceanic Sequestration of CO 2 . G. Holder (holder@engrng.pitt.edu) 412-624-9809 L. Mokka (lakshmi.mokka@netl.doe.gov) 412-386-6019 Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15261 R. Warzinski* (robert.warzinski@netl.doe.gov) 412-386-5863 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 Introduction a Gas hydrates are crystalline solids formed from mixtures of water and low molecular weight compounds, referred to as hydrate formers, that typically are gases at ambient conditions (1). Generally, hydrates are formed in the laboratory from two-phase systems by contacting a hydrate former or formers in the gas or liquid phase with liquid water and increasing the pressure until

369

Research Note---Does Technological Progress Alter the Nature of Information Technology as a Production Input? New Evidence and New Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior research at the firm level finds information technology (IT) to be a net substitute for both labor and non-IT capital inputs. However, it is unclear whether these results hold, given recent IT innovations and continued price declines. In this study ... Keywords: IT business value, capital services, complement, hedonic, organizational decentralization, price index, productivity, rental price, substitute, technological change

Paul Chwelos; Ronald Ramirez; Kenneth L. Kraemer; Nigel P. Melville

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 In Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 DE-FC26-01NT41329 photo of a man showing the pressure core sampler on the deck of JOIDES Resolution Pressure core sampler on deck courtesy Texas A&M University Goal The goal of the project was to characterize hydrate accumulation at Hydrate Ridge (offshore Oregon) and improve the ability to use geophysical and subsurface logging to identify hydrates. A follow-on goal was to characterize hydrate accumulation at offshore Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. Background This project focused on physically verifying the existence of hydrates at Hydrate Ridge through the collection of pressurized and non-pressurized core samples and logging data. This study developed and tested tools to

371

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrates Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel Last Reviewed 1202010 DE-AI26-06NT42938 Goal The goal of this project is to facilitate advances in hydrate applications...

372

Natural Gas Hydrates Update 1998-2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Significant events have transpired on the natural gas hydrate research and development front since "Future Supply Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates" appeared in Natural Gas 1998 Issues and Trends and in the Potential Gas Committee's 1998 biennial report.

David F. Morehouse

2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area, known as Mississippi Canyon lease block 118, is well-known for the occurrence of methane hydrate and is the location of the University of Mississippis gas hydrate...

374

Methane Hydrates - Mt. Elbert Well Log Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more. Project background information - Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization - DE-FC26-01NT41332 More information on the National Methane Hydrates R&D Program...

375

NETL: Methane Hydrates - ANS Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo of hydrate saturated, fine grained sand core from the Mt. Elbert 1 well Hydrate saturated, fine grained sand core from the Mt. Elbert 1 well .- click on image to enlarge...

376

Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project was established to evaluate integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project was under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy Inc. in July 2003. The project has completed both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of development. The two project phases include the following: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at SG Solutions LLC (SGS), previously the Wabash River Energy Limited, Gasification Facility located in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plant (CEP) operated at the Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations. (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. Phase 1 of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase 2 was supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The SGS integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other carbonaceous fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas (syngas) is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-Gas technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and later COP and the industrial partners investigated the use of syngas produced by the E-Gas technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort were to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from syngas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The intended result of the project was to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that would be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The EECP study conducted in Phase 1 of the IMPPCCT Project confirmed that the concept for the integration of gasification-based (E-Gas) electricity generation from coal and/or petroleum coke and methanol production (Liquid Phase Methanol or LPMEOH{trademark}) processes was feasible for the coproduction of power and chemicals. The results indicated that while there were minimal integration issues that impact the deployment of an IMPPCCT CEP, the major concern was the removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, which are known methanol catalyst poisons, from the syngas. However, economic concerns in the domestic methanol market which is driven by periodic low natural gas prices and cheap offshore supplies limit the commercial viability of this more capital intensive concept. The objective of Phase 2 was to conduct RD&T as outlined in the Phase 1 RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. Studies were designed to address the technical concerns that would mak

Conocophillips

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Natural Gas Hydrates Update 2000-2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Natural gas hydrates research and development (R&D) activity expanded significantly during the 2000-2002.

David F. Morehouse

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Dehydration of plutonium trichloride hydrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Estimating Hydrogen Production Potential in Biorefineries Using Microbial Electrolysis Cell Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are devices that use a hybrid biocatalysis-electrolysis process for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Future biofuel and bioproducts industries are expected to generate significant volumes of waste streams containing easily degradable organic matter. The emerging MEC technology has potential to derive added- value from these waste streams via production of hydrogen. Biorefinery process streams, particularly the stillage or distillation bottoms contain underutilized sugars as well as fermentation and pretreatment byproducts. In a lignocellulosic biorefinery designed for producing 70 million gallons of ethanol per year, up to 7200 m3/hr of hydrogen can be generated. The hydrogen can either be used as an energy source or a chemical reagent for upgrading and other reactions. The energy content of the hydrogen generated is sufficient to meet 57% of the distillation energy needs. We also report on the potential for hydrogen production in existing corn mills and sugar-based biorefineries. Removal of the organics from stillage has potential to facilitate water recycle. Pretreatment and fermentation byproducts generated in lignocellulosic biorefinery processes can accumulate to highly inhibitory levels in the process streams, if water is recycled. The byproducts of concern including sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furans and phenolics can also be converted to hydrogen in MECs. We evaluate hydrogen production from various inhibitory byproducts generated during pretreatment of various types of biomass. Finally, the research needs for development of the MEC technology and aspects particularly relevant to the biorefineries are discussed.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Kinetic Parameters for the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetic Parameters for the Exchange of Hydrate Formers Last Reviewed 12/16/2013 Kinetic Parameters for the Exchange of Hydrate Formers Last Reviewed 12/16/2013 FWP 65213 Goal The overarching goal of this project is to gain an improved understanding of the dynamic processes of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media by combining laboratory studies, numerical simulation, and analysis of shipboard infrared imaging of hydrate core samples. This project comprises four principal components: (1) fundamental laboratory investigations, (2) numerical simulator development and verification, (3) hydrate core characterization and analysis, and (4) applied laboratory and numerical investigations. Performer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington Background Numerical Simulation A new simulator in the STOMP simulator series for the production of natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The effect of gyrolite additive on the hydration properties of Portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The influence of gyrolite additive on the hydration properties of ordinary Portland cement was examined. It was found that the additive of synthetic gyrolite accelerates the early stage of hydration of OPC. This compound binds alkaline ions and serves as a nucleation site for the formation of hydration products (stage I). Later on, the crystal lattice of gyrolite becomes unstable and turns into C-S-H, with higher basicity (C/S {approx} 0.8). This recrystallization process is associated with the consumption of energy (the heat of reaction) and with a decrease in the rate of heat evolution of the second exothermic reaction (stage II). The experimental data and theoretical hypothesis were also confirmed by thermodynamic and the apparent kinetic parameters of the reaction rate of C{sub 3}S hydration calculations. The changes occur in the early stage of hydration of OPC samples and do not have a significant effect on the properties of cement stone.

Eisinas, A., E-mail: anatolijus.eisinas@ktu.lt; Baltakys, K.; Siauciunas, R.

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating gas hydrate behavior in porous media  

SciTech Connect

In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. The use of the equilibriumreaction model often appears to be justified and preferred for simulatingthe behavior of gas hydrates, given that the computational demands forthe kinetic reaction model far exceed those for the equilibrium reactionmodel.

Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

383

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Drilling through gas hydrates formations: possible problems and suggested solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate research in the last two decades has taken various directions ranging from ways to understand the safe and economical production of this enormous resource to drilling problems. as more rigs and production platforms move into deeper waters to its environmental impact on global warming and cooling. Gas hydrates are ice-like structures of a water lattice with cavities, which contain guest gases. Gas hydrates are stable at low temperatures and high pressures. The amount of energy trapped in gas hydrates all over the world is about twice the amount found in all recoverable fossil fuels today. This research identifies the problems facing the oil and gas industry as it drills in deeper waters where gas hydrates are present and suggests solutions to some of the problems. The problems considered in this research have been approached from a drilling point of view. Hence, the parameters investigated and discussed are drilling controlled parameters. They include rate of penetration, circulation rate and drilling fluid density. The rate of penetration in offshore wells contributes largely to the final cost of the drilling process. These 3 parameters have been linked in the course of this research in order to suggest an optimum rate of penetration. The results show the rate of penetration is directly proportional to the amount of gas released when drilling through gas hydrate. As the volume of gas released increases, the problems facing the drilling rigs, drilling crew and environment is seen to increase. The results also show the extent of risk to be expected while drilling through gas hydrate formations. A chart relating the rate of penetration, circulation rate and effective mud weight was used to select the optimum drilling rate within the drilling safety window. Finally, future considerations and recommendations in order to improve the analyses presented in this work are presented. Other drilling parameters proposed for future analysis include drill bit analysis with respect to heat transfer and the impact of dissociation of gas hydrate around the wellbore and seafloor stability.

Amodu, Afolabi Ayoola

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

NETL: Hydrogen and Clean Fuels - Central Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics Geological & Env. Systems Materials Science Contacts TECHNOLOGIES Oil & Natural Gas Supply Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources...

386

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

388

GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP BLOCKS 13 AND 14, ATWATER VALLEY AREA BLOCK 151, KEATHLEY CANYON AREA GULF OF MEXICO RESULTS OF CORE SAMPLE ANALYSIS, STANDARD AND ADVANCED LABORATORY TESTING Report No. 0201-5081 CHEVRON TEXACO ENERGY TECHNOLOGY COMPANY Houston, Texas FUGRO-McCLELLAND MARINE GEOSCIENCES, INC. P. O. Box 740010, Houston, Texas 77274, Phone: 713-369-5600, Fax: 713-369-5570 GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION CHEVRON GULF OF MEXICO GAS HYDRATES JIP BLOCKS 13 AND 14, ATWATER VALLEY AREA BLOCK 151, KEATHLEY CANYON AREA GULF OF MEXICO RESULTS OF CORE SAMPLE ANALYSIS, STANDARD AND ADVANCED LABORATORY TESTING REPORT NO. 0201-5081 Client: ChevronTexaco Energy Technology Company 1500 Louisiana St. Houston, Tx 77002

389

NETL: Methane Hydrates Interagency R&D Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrates Interagency R&D Conference Methane Hydrates Interagency R&D Conference March 20-22, 2002 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations The Curiosity of Hydrates Methane Hydrates Issues Arctic Region Projects West Coast Projects East Coast Projects Gulf of Mexico Projects Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

390

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

391

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

392

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

393

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

394

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

395

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 - December 2010 0 - December 2010 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 31, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion............................................................................3 Conclusion.................................................................................................... 5 Cost Status......................................................................................................7

396

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - September 2011 1 - September 2011 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 23, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion............................................................................3 Conclusion..................................................................................................... 4 Cost Status......................................................................................................5

397

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - June 2012 2 - June 2012 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 31, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion............................................................................3 Conclusion..................................................................................................... 4 Cost Status......................................................................................................5

398

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Quarterly Progress Report (April - June 2009) ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFILTER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 17, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion........................................................................... 3 Conclusion..................................................................................................... 5 Cost Status..................................................................................................... 6

399

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 - December 2009 09 - December 2009 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 16, 2010 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion........................................................................... 3 Conclusion..................................................................................................... 6 Cost Status..................................................................................................... 7

400

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - March 2012 2 - March 2012 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 26, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion............................................................................3 Conclusion..................................................................................................... 4 Cost Status......................................................................................................5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 - March 2010 0 - March 2010 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 15, 2010 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion........................................................................... 3 Conclusion..................................................................................................... 6 Cost Status..................................................................................................... 7

402

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 - September 2010 0 - September 2010 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 30, 2010 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary....................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion........................................................................ 3 Conclusion....................................................................................................5 Cost Status...................................................................................................6

403

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 - September 2009 09 - September 2009 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 31, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion........................................................................... 3 Conclusion..................................................................................................... 6 Cost Status..................................................................................................... 7

404

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 - June 2010 0 - June 2010 ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF THE AEROBIC METHANOTROPHIC BIOFIL- TER IN METHANE HYDRATE ENVIRONMENTS Submitted by: University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106 Principal Investigator: David L. Valentine Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 17, 2010 Office of Fossil Energy 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.......................................................................................... 2 Progress, Results and Discussion........................................................................... 3 Conclusion..................................................................................................... 6 Cost Status..................................................................................................... 7

405

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Last Reviewed 8/21/2013 Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Last Reviewed 8/21/2013 Field Work Proposals: ESD07-014 (LBNL) and 08FE-003 (LANL) Project Goal The primary objectives of this project are to: 1) investigate the effect of rising water temperatures on the stability of oceanic hydrate accumulations, 2) estimate the global quantity of hydrate-originating carbon that could reach the upper atmosphere as CH4 or CO2 thus affecting global climate, 3) quantify the interrelationship between global climate and the amount of hydrate-derived carbon reaching the upper atmosphere focusing on the potential link between hydrate dissociation and cascading global warming and 4) test the discharge phase of the Clathrate Gun Hypothesis which stipulates large-scale hydrate dissociation and gas

406

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 - Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 Project Goals The primary goals of the DOE/NETL Natural Gas Hydrate Field Studies (NGHFS) project are: Conduct field-based studies that advance the ability to predict, detect, characterize, and understand distribution of and controls on natural gas hydrate occurrences. Analyze geologic, geochemical, and microbiologic data for indications of past and current changes to the stability of natural gas hydrate in marine settings. Develop links between the U.S. Gas Hydrate Program and international R&D efforts through direct participation in international field programs and workshops. Evaluate the potential role natural gas hydrates may play in the global carbon cycle through analysis of modern and paleo-natural gas

407

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization and Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02/17/2010 Characterization and Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02/17/2010 EST-380-NEDA Goal The purpose of this study is to establish sediment lithology and quantification of methane in hydrates hosted in fine-grained sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), a marine site of methane hydrate occurrence. The results will help establish a correlation between laboratory data and hydrate accumulation field data on dispersed hydrates in the natural environment. Performer Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York 11973 Background Gas hydrates are located in permafrost and marine environments and show potential as a vast methane source worldwide. However, methane is about 17 times more potent a greenhouse gas than CO2 and the inherent instability of

408

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Natural Hydrate Bearing Sediments and Hydrate Dissociation Kinetics Last Reviewed 12/6/2013 Characterization of Natural Hydrate Bearing Sediments and Hydrate Dissociation Kinetics Last Reviewed 12/6/2013 FWP-45133 Work conducted under this field work proposal (FWP) includes two distinct phases. Ongoing Phase 2 work is discussed directly below. Click here to review the completed, Phase 1 work, associated with this FWP. Phase 2 Project Information Characterization of Natural Hydrate Bearing Core Samples Goal The overarching goal of this project is to gain an improved understanding of the dynamic processes of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media by combining laboratory studies, numerical simulation, and analysis of shipboard infrared imaging of hydrate core samples. This project comprises four principal components: (1) fundamental laboratory investigations, (2)

409

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee The Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee was created in response to provisions of the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 and reauthorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The Committee is to advise the Secretary of Energy on potential applications of methane hydrate; assist in developing recommendations and priorities for the methane hydrate research and development program; and submit to Congress one or more reports on an assessment of the research program and an assessment of the DOE 5-year research plan. The Committee's charter stipulates that up to 15 members can be appointed by the Secretary of Energy, representing institutions of higher education, industrial enterprises and oceanographic institutions and state agencies.

410

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Two project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, DOE approved the RD&T Plan submitted in the previous quarter. The RD&T Plan forms the basis for the Continuation Application to initiate the transition of the project from Phase I to Phase II. Potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis will be tested in slipstream units at the WREL facility during Phase II. A supplemental information package consisting of a revised Work Breakdown Structure and Budget Plan for Phase II and other necessary forms was also submitted. Agreement is being reached with DOE's patent attorney on the scope of the limited rights data to be provided under the Cooperative Agreement. Preparation of a comprehensive Final Report for Phase I of the project, which will consolidate the remaining deliverables including the Initial Feasibility Report, Concept Report, Site Analysis Report, Economic Analysis, and Preliminary Project Financing Plan, continued during the reporting period. Significant progress was made in the Subsystem Design Specification section of the report.

Albert Tsang

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Authors: J. Phirani. & K. K. Mohanty Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, July 6-10, 2008. http://www.ichg.org/showcontent.aspx?MenuID=287 [external site]. Abstract: Large quantities of natural gas hydrate are present in marine sediments. This research is aimed at assessing production of natural gas from these deposits. We had developed a multiphase, multicomponent, thermal, 3D simulator in the past, which can simulate production of hydrates both in equilibrium and kinetic modes. Four components (hydrate, methane, water and salt) and five phases (hydrate, gas, aqueous-phase, ice and salt precipitate) are considered in the simulator. The intrinsic kinetics of hydrate formation or dissociation is considered using the Kim–Bishnoi model. Water freezing and ice melting are tracked with primary variable switch method (PVSM) by assuming equilibrium phase transition. In this work, we simulate depressurization and warm water flooding for hydrate production in a hydrate reservoir underlain by a water layer. Water flooding has been studied as a function of well spacing, well orientation, and injection temperature. Results show that depressurization is limited by the supply of heat of hydrate formation. Warm water flooding can supply this heat of formation. Gas production rate is higher for the water flooding than depressurization. Optimum configuration for wells and water temperature are identified.

412

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial plants operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations; (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues; and (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. This report describes management planning, work breakdown structure development, and feasibility study activities by the IMPPCCT consortium in support of the first project phase. Project planning activities have been completed, and a project timeline and task list has been generated. Requirements for an economic model to evaluate the West Terre Haute implementation and for other commercial implementations are being defined. Specifications for methanol product and availability of local feedstocks for potential commercial embodiment plant sites have been defined. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the fifth phase solicitation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the GEC and an Industrial Consortia are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Doug Strickland; Albert Tsang

2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: A Technology of Low Coal Rate and High Productivity of RHF Ironmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An economical and environment-friendly ironmaking process based on heating the chemiexecy self-sufficient green balls of iron ore and coal in a hearth furnace is being developed with financial support from AISI members and DOE. DRI, which is hot (1400 C), dense (3.2 g/cm) and of high degree of metallization (95%), has been produced in laboratory and in a pilot plant in Genoa, Italy. Products of such quality have been made from American and Brazilian ores, BOF sludge, EAF dust/BOF sludge mixtures and millscale. The removal of zinc and lead from green balls by this process is essentially complete. In comparison with typical blast furnace operation, the new technology with a melter would have a lower total coal rate by 200kg.THM. The elimination of cokemaking and high temperature agglomeration steps, and a simpler gas handling system would lead to lower capital and operating costs. In comparison with commercial RHF practice it is different in atmosphere (fully oxidized at 1600 to 1650 C), in bed height (120 mm instead of 20-25 mm) and in pellet composition (much less coal but of higher VM). The combined effect leads to three times higher furnace productivity, lower coal consumption and superior DRI quality. The risk of re-oxidation (slag formation) and dusty operation are practiexecy eliminated. The process is stable, tolerant and independent of the size, shape and movement of the hearth. However, materials handling (e.g., discharge of hot DRI) and the exact energy savings have to be established in a larger furnace, straight or rotary, and in a continuous mode of operation.

Wei-Kao Lu

2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

NETL: Methane Hydrates - 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial Photo of the Ignik Drilling Pad Download 2011/2012 Field Test Data Ignik Sikumi #1 "Fire in the Ice" Video Project Background Participants Ignik Sikumi Well Review CO2-Ch4 Exchange Overview August 2, 2013 - Project operations are complete. Read the Final Project Technical Report [PDF-44.1MB] February 19, 2013 - Data from the 2011/2012 field test is now available! Click here to access data. Status Report - May 7, 2012 Final abandonment of Ignik Sikumi #1 wellsite has been completed. Tubing, casing-tubing annulus, and flatpack were filled with cement per the abandonment procedure approved by the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. To minimize effects on the landscape and leave as little trace of the operations as possible, a small area around the wellhead was

415

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireline Logging Wireline Logging From: Timothy Collett, USGS Conventional Wireline Logging Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program Conventional wireline (CWL) logging operations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program (GOM-JIP) was scheduled to include the deployment of a signal logging string (Figure 1) and a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) tool (Figure 2) in several of the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon drill sites. The only wireline logging tool scheduled to be deployed was the FMS-sonic tool string, which consisted of the Formation MicroScanner (FMS), a general purpose inclinometer tool (GPIT), and scintillation gamma ray tool (SGT), and the dipole shear sonic imager tool (DSI). The vertical seismic imager tool (VSI) will also be deployed during the GOM-JIP drilling program. The wireline logging tools were provided by Schlumberger wireline services.

416

Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect

An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Enhanced product realization techniques using as-built and model reconstruction technologies  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Center for Advanced Engineering Technology has developed a product realization process designed to enhance the complexity and comprehensiveness of the information fed back to the designer after the analytical and manufacturing operations have been completed. This process uses principles of As-Built Engineering and Model Reconstruction in a Models Based Engineering environment, allowing optimization in the manufacturing and assembly operations and providing information as to the As-Built configuration to engineering and physics designers for evaluation. As-Built Engineers is a product realization methodology founded on the notion that life-cycle engineering should be based on what is actually produced and not on what is nominally designed. It enables customization in mass production environments and questions nominal based methods of engineering. Model Reconstruction provides the capability of subjecting a design to adverse conditions within the computer aided environment and building a stereolithography model and simulated radiograph from the analytical finite element information of the simulated damaged part. Models Based Engineering is an information management tool and a key driver toward the development of adaptive product realization infrastructures. It encompasses the breadth of engineering information, from concept through design to product application.

Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.; Tsai, C.S.; Maes, G.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand-prone sedimentary section that rises stratigraphically across the base of the gas hydrate stability zone and that has seismic indicators of gas hydrate. Copyright 2008, Offshore Technology Conference

Jones, E. (Chevron); Latham, T. (Chevron); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Hunt, J. (Minerals Management Service); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger); Boswell, R.M. (NETL); Rose, K.K. (NETL); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Hutchinson, D. (USGS); Collett, T. (USGS); Dugan, B. (Rice University); Wood, W. (Naval Research Laboratory)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

Yusibani, Elin [Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage, AIST (Japan); Department of Physics, Universitas Syiah Kuala (Indonesia); Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydrate production technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Proceedings of the Guld of Mexico Hydrates R&D Planning Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf of Mexico Hydrates R&D Planning Workshop Gulf of Mexico Hydrates R&D Planning Workshop Contents Disclaimer Participant Letter Executive Summary Papers and Presentations Welcome DOE National Hydrates Program Overview Industry Perspectives Panel Session Project Reviews Panel Session Appendices A - Breakout Session Products B - Participants List C - Poster Session Participants Proceedings of the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates R&D Planning Workshop Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

422

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council on Energy and Environment, for Mexico, the NationalMexico, Brazil, and Indonesia), examining long-run trends in productivity, technological change, energy andenergy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico,

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

425

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

DOE/Fossil Energy`s drilling, completion, and stimulation RD&D: A technologies/products overview  

SciTech Connect

An overview of natural gas drilling, completion, and stimulation RD&D sponsored by the US Department of Energy is reported in this paper. Development of high rate-of-penetration drilling systems and underbalanced drilling technologies are detailed among other RD&D activities. The overview serves as a technology transfer medium and is intended to accelerate the deployment of the products and technologies described.

Duda, J.R.; Yost, A.B. II

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FutureGen FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production Office of Fossil Energy U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC June 2, 2003 Lowell Miller, Director, Office of Coal & Power Systems 24-Jun-03 Slide 2 Office of Fossil Energy Presentation Agenda * FE Hydrogen Program * FutureGen * Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) 24-Jun-03 Slide 3 Office of Fossil Energy Key Drivers * Decreasing domestic supply will lead to increased imports from less stable regions * Conventional petroleum is finite; production will peak and irreversibly decline due to continually increasing demand * Improving environmental quality - Meeting air emission regulations - Greenhouse gas emissions 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

429

Effective Transfer of Waste Heat Recovery Technology: A Case Study of GTE Products Corporation's Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GTE Products Corporation recently completed a cost sharing technology acceleration program with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs (Contract No. DE-FC01-80CS40330). The cost shared program called for the installation of 175 ceramic recuperators on 38 different furnace that operate with clean exhaust between 1600 F and 2500 F. The engineering team approach utilized by GTE for the system design, installation, and start-up-shakedown support is considered the major reason for the reported success of the GTE program. Savings attributable to recuperation averaged 38% based on energy audits by Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Battelle was contracted to monitor the furnaces before and after the retrofit by the D.O.E. and condense report and compare the data in terms of specific energy consumption vs. product throughout. Economic analysis shows that payback periods generally range from 1 - 2.5 years.

Gonzalez, J. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Free energy of ionic hydration  

SciTech Connect

The hydration free energies of ions exhibit an approximately quadratic dependence on the ionic charge, as predicted by the Born model. We analyze this behavior using second-order perturbation theory. The average and the fluctuation of the electrostatic potential at charge sites appear as the first coefficients in a Taylor expansion of the free energy of charging. Combining the data from different charge states (e.g., charged and uncharged) allows calculation of free-energy profiles as a function of the ionic charge. The first two Taylor coefficients of the free-energy profiles can be computed accurately from equilibrium simulations, but they are affected by a strong system-size dependence. We apply corrections for these finite-size effects by using Ewald lattice summation and adding the self-interactions consistently. An analogous procedure is used for the reaction-field electrostatics. Results are presented for a model ion with methane-like Lennard-Jones parameters in simple point charge water. We find two very closely quadratic regimes with different parameters for positive and negative ions. We also studied the hydration free energy of potassium, calcium, fluoride, chloride, and bromide ions. We find negative ions to be solvated more strongly (as measured by hydration free energies) compared to positive ions of equal size, in agreement with experimental data. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Hummer, G.; Pratt, L.R.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

431

CONTENTS BOEM Releases Assessment of In-Place Gas Hydrate Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BOEM Releases Assessment of BOEM Releases Assessment of In-Place Gas Hydrate Resources of the Lower 48 United States Outer Continental Shelf ..............1 Re-examination of Seep Activity at the Blake Ridge Diapir ............6 Field Data from 2011/2012 ConocoPhillips-JOGMEC-DOE Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial Now Available .......................9 Announcements .......................11 * Norwegian Center of Excellence to Receive Ten Years of Arctic Research Funding * Release of Mallik 2007-2008 Results * Goldschmidt Conference * 2012 Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship Awarded to Jeffrey James Marlow Spotlight on Research........... 16 Bjørn Kvamme CONTACT Ray Boswell Technology Manager-Methane Hydrates, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 304-285-4541 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov

432

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program 2009 Gulf of Mexico JIP - Leg II DOE-Sponsored Expedition Confirms Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico Leg II Initial Scientific Reports Now Available Photo of semi-submersible Helix Project Background Participants Pre-Drilling Expedition Overview Drilling/Logging Sites The LWD Program Site Summaries Walker Ridge-Block 313 Green Canyon-Block 955 Alaminos Canyon block 21 and East Breaks block 992 JIP Website [external site] FITI article - Summer 2009 Leg II Initial Scientific Reports On May 6, 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Minerals Management Service, an industry research consortium led by Chevron, and others completed a landmark gas hydrate

433

Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

Freeway, Katy (PB-KBB Inc.) [PB-KBB Inc.; Rogers, R.E. (Mississippi State University) [Mississippi State University; DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D. (RESPEC) [RESPEC

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

2.0 Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate) Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate) 2.1 Problem Description One half of a 20-m, one-dimensional horizontal domain, discretized using uniformly spaced 1-m grid cells (optionally 0.1-m grid cells) is initialized with aqueous-hydrate conditions; whereas, the other half of the domain is initialized with gas-aqueous conditions. As with the Base Case problem, a closed horizontal domain is used to eliminate gravitational body forces and boundary condition effects. The initial conditions are specified to yield complete dissociation of the hydrate, via the thermal capacitance of the domain-half initialized with gas-aqueous conditions. To initialize the aqueous-hydrate half of the domain, temperature, pressure, and hydrate saturation are

436

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Enhanced Oil Recovery Gas Hydrates Natural Gas Resources Contacts Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification...

437

WABASH RIVER IMPPCCT, INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the Gasification Engineering Corporation and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, financial, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility Study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility and for fence-line commercial plants operated at The Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations (i.e. the Commercial Embodiment Plant or CEP) (2) Research, development, and testing to address any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Ltd., plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. During the reporting period work was furthered to support the development of capital and operating cost estimates associated with the installation of liquid or gas phase methanol synthesis technology in a Commercial Embodiment Plant (CEP) utilizing the six cases previously defined. In addition, continued development of the plant economic model was accomplished by providing combined cycle performance data. Performance and emission estimates for gas turbine combined cycles was based on revised methanol purge gas information. The economic model was used to evaluate project returns with various market conditions and plant configurations and was refined to correct earlier flaws. Updated power price projections were obtained and incorporated in the model. Sensitivity studies show that break-even methanol prices which provide a 12% return are 47-54 cents/gallon for plant scenarios using $1.25/MM Btu coal, and about 40 cents/gallon for most of the scenarios with $0.50/MM Btu petroleum coke as the fuel source. One exception is a high power price and production case which could be economically attractive at 30 cents/gallon methanol. This case was explored in more detail, but includes power costs predicated on natural gas prices at the 95th percentile of expected price distributions. In this case, the breakeven methanol price is highly sensitive to the required project return rate, payback period, and plant on-line time. These sensitivities result mainly from the high capital investment required for the CEP facility ({approx}$500MM for a single train IGCC-methanol synthesis plant). Finally, during the reporting period the Defense Contractor Audit Agency successfully executed an accounting audit of Global Energy Inc. for data accumulated over the first year of the IMPPCCT project under the Cooperative Agreement.

Doug Strickland

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

Why alite stops hydrating below 80% relative humidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been observed that the hydration of cement paste stops when the relative humidity drops below about 80%. A thermodynamic analysis shows that the capillary pressure exerted at that RH shifts the solubility of tricalcium silicate, so that it is in equilibrium with water. This is a reflection of the chemical shrinkage in this system: according to Le Chatelier's principle, since the volume of the products is less than that of the reactants, a negative (capillary) pressure opposes the reaction.

Flatt, Robert J. [Sika Technology AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Scherer, George W., E-mail: scherer@princeton.edu [Princeton University, Eng. Quad. E-319, Princeton NJ 08544 (United States); Bullard, Jeffrey W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg MD (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundari