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1

Freeport, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freeport, TX) Freeport, TX) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.9541368°, -95.3596617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.9541368,"lon":-95.3596617,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Price) From Nigeria (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Price) From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Price) From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

3

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

4

Algae  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Algae Algae Nature Bulletin No. 556-A March 1, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ALGAE These are the most exciting years that mankind has ever known -- the beginnings of the Space Age. Already, earthlings are making definite plans to visit the moon and Mars and even more distant parts of the universe. Because of the enormous amounts of fuel and equipment necessary for each pound of pay load to escape the earth's gravity and return, the supply of food and oxygen for travelers on these fantastically long journeys must be kept to a minimum. One of the suggested answers is to make use of the microscopic alga, Chlorella, which is found commonly in fresh water. In sunlight, like other green plants, it uses carbon dioxide and plant foods to grow and multiply. In the process it releases pure oxygen which could be used for breathing. Furthermore, a crop of excess Chlorella -- rich in food value -- could be harvested to feed the human passengers. They, in turn, produce the carbon dioxide and waste materials necessary to keep the alga growing. Such a miniature world can be imitated in a sealed glass container of water stocked with a bit of alga and a little aquatic animal life. Set near a window, they often survive for years.

5

Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Freeport pilot-site are ideal for growing blue-green algae, Paul says. During photosynthesis, algae absorb carbon dioxide, producing bio-oils that Algenol will convert into...

6

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas November 15, 2013 - 3:00pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department announced today that it has conditionally authorized Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC (Freeport) to export additional volumes of domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States from the Freeport LNG Terminal in Quintana Island, Texas. Freeport previously received approval to export 1.4 billion cubic feet of natural gas a day (Bcf/d) of LNG from this facility to non-FTA countries on May 17, 2013. The Freeport Expansion

7

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas November 15, 2013 - 3:00pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department announced today that it has conditionally authorized Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC (Freeport) to export additional volumes of domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States from the Freeport LNG Terminal in Quintana Island, Texas. Freeport previously received approval to export 1.4 billion cubic feet of natural gas a day (Bcf/d) of LNG from this

8

Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to United...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United Kingdom (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to United Kingdom (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

9

EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas 87: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas SUMMARY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing an EIS, with DOE as a cooperating agency, to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefaction Project, which would expand an existing LNG import terminal on Quintana Island in Brazoria County, Texas, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export the LNG. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 25, 2012 EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas

10

ORDER NO. 3357: Freeport LNG | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORDER NO. 3357: Freeport LNG ORDER NO. 3357: Freeport LNG ORDER NO. 3357: Freeport LNG ORDER CONDITIONALLY GRANTING LONG-TERM MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE FREEPORT LNG TERMINAL ON QUINTANA ISLAND, TEXAS TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set forth below, DOE/FE has concluded that the opponents of the FLEX Application have not demonstrated that the requested authorization will be inconsistent with the public interest and finds that the exports proposed in this Application are likely to yield net economic benefits to the United States. DOE/FE further finds that FLEX's proposed exports on behalf of other entities should be conditionally authorized at a volumetric rate not to exceed the

11

Freeport, TX Exports to India Liquefied Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports to India Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Exports to India Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct...

12

Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

13

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Yemen (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

from Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,869 3,108...

14

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

From Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,175 3,338 3,262...

15

Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,969 -...

16

Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to Japan...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

17

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to Brazil (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,581 2012 2,601...

18

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to South Korea (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Korea (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to South Korea (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,157...

19

Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

20

Price of Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Freeport, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

570242°, -70.1031057° 570242°, -70.1031057° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8570242,"lon":-70.1031057,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank Florida company looks to put algae in your gas tank January 5, 2010 - 4:02pm Addthis What will the project do? As a result of the stimulus funding, Algenol also has the potential to create hundreds of new jobs. You may never have thought about putting algae in your gas tank, but companies harnessing breakthrough technologies have discovered ways to transform algae into transportation fuels. Now that sounds green. Algenol Biofuels Inc., a Florida-based algae-to-ethanol company, has received a $25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Recovery Act. The grant will aid Algenol in developing a pilot-scale integrated biorefinery in Freeport, Texas, to make ethanol from algae. As a result of the stimulus funding, Algenol also has the potential to

23

Microsoft Word - Algenol_prelim FEA-12-22-10.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALGENOL INTEGRATED BIOREFINERY FOR PRODUCING ETHANOL FROM HYBRID ALGAE Freeport, Texas Fort Myers, Florida Final Environmental Assessment DOEEA-1786 U.S. Department of Energy...

24

Alga Bloom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process unvolved when dealing with the adverse effects that may result from blue-green algae blooms. What are some limitations, costs and factors effecting or related too such...

25

Blue-green algae  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

green algae Name: Renee Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How much oxygen does green-blue algae produce, and how big are they? Replies: Blue-green algae...

26

DOE/EA-1650: Freeport LNG Export Project and BOG/Truck Project Environmental Assessment (May 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Freeport LNG Development, L.P. Freeport LNG Development, L.P. Docket Nos. CP03-75-003, CP03-75-004, CP05-361-001, and CP05-361-002 FREEPORT LNG EXPORT PROJECT and BOG/TRUCK PROJECT Environmental Assessment Cooperating Agency: U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA - 1650 DOE Docket No. FE-08-70-LNG MARCH 2009 FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 OFFICE OF ENERGY PROJECTS In Reply Refer To: OEP/DG2E/Gas 2 Freeport LNG Development, L.P. Docket Nos. CP03-75-003, CP03-75-004 CP05-361-001 and CP05-361-002 §375.308(x) TO THE PARTY ADDRESSED: The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) and the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Fuels, have prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities proposed by

27

Protein from algae  

SciTech Connect

A review considering potential nutrient sources for algal culture, basic requirements for algal production, composition and nutritional value of algae, algae as human food, algal protein for animal feed, and current and future production of microalgae.

Grisanti, N.E.; Oswald, W.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Algae liquefaction / Hope Baloyi.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The liquefaction of algae for the recovery of biooil was studied. Algae oil is a nonedible feedstock and has minimal impact on food security and (more)

Baloyi, Hope

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Biogeography of Marine Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. There are many species that are virtually cosmopolitan (e.g. the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, the red

30

Algae Biodiesel: Commercialization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Inc. PetroAlgae Algae BioFuels Seambiotic Icon Energy LiveFuels Inc Inventure GreenFuel Technologies Biofuels & Technologies OriginOil Kwikpower International Alga Technologies Bio Fuel Systems SQC #12;A Look,Columnist, Biofuels InternationalBiofuels International HQHQ -- Houston, TXHouston, TX #12;BIODIESEL 2020: A GLOBAL

Tullos, Desiree

31

Algae Biofuels Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology More Documents & Publications Details of the FY 2013 Congressional Budget...

32

Algae biofuels in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Texas the energy center of the world is emerging as a pioneer in algae biodiesel research and production. There are a number of (more)

Salpekar, Ashwini

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Algae and Cu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to test algae andor other microorganisms in a pond water mini-environment (a gallon jar that contains pond water and sediment along with various naturally occurring...

34

Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may prove to be a limitation for realizing technologies for very high gradient accelerators. In this article, we present a scheme that uses a hybrid dielectric and iris-loaded...

35

RESISTANCE OF ALGAE TO RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

Data are tabulated on the radiosensitivity of eight algae. The influence of nuclear cytology on radioresistance of some algae is discussed. (C.H.)

Godward, M.B.E.

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Algae Biotecnologia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Algae Biotecnologia Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product Brazil-based 2nd generation ethanol producer. References Algae...

37

Evaluation of Whole and Lipid-Extracted Algae Meals (LEA) in the Diet of Juvenile Red Drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and Digestibility of LEA by Red Drum and Hybrid Striped Bass (Morone chrysops x Morone saxatilis)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As aquaculture continues to expand, protein sources have become more costly and less available. Simultaneously, lipid-extracted algal meals (LEA) (co-products of bio-diesel production) are becoming increasingly available as alternative sources of energy are investigated. By integrating LEA into aquaculture diets, feed prices could be lowered and bio-diesel production would have an additional revenue stream. Three feeding trials each of 7 weeks duration were conducted to evaluate five different algal meals as partial replacements for fishmeal and soy protein concentrate in diets for juvenile red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). Apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) for CP and energy in various LEAs also were determined with red drum and hybrid striped bass (HSB). In the first trial, whole algae meal and LEA derived from Navicula sp. replaced 5 or 10% of the crude protein (CP) in the reference diet. Weight gain, feed efficiency (FE), hepatosomatic index (HSI), as well as protein and energy retention were not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the dietary treatments. Algal inclusion significantly affected the ADCs of the various dietary treatments for dry matter, CP, and energy. The inclusion of ash in the form of diatomaceous earth improved digestibility of protein as well as weight gain, survival and FE. A second feeding trial evaluated LEA derived from Chlorella sp. processed at high temperatures, replacing 5, 10, 20, and 25% of the CP in the reference diet. Weight gain, FE, survival, and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were significantly reduced at substitution levels of 20 and 25%. The third feeding trial evaluated LEA derived from Nanochloropsis salina, replacing 5, 7.5, 10, and 15% of the CP in the reference diet. Weight gain, FE, survival, and PER were significantly affected by some dietary treatments, with the 15% substitution levels causing significant reductions in performance. Intraperitoneal fat ratio and whole-body lipids were significantly lower in the fish fed the 15% substitution diet. Based on the results of these experiments, replacement of up to 10% of CP from fishmeal and soy protein concentrate with LEA was possible without causing substantial reductions in fish performance, and the whole algae product provided a more nutritious product. Red drum and HSB showed similar responses in their ability to digest CP and energy from the various algal products, although ADCs varied greatly among the different products and processing methods.

Patterson, Donovan Aaron

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Algae for Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Algae for Oxygen Algae for Oxygen Name: Pam Burkardt Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I am Pam Burkardt, a seventh grader at Fox Chapel School. I have a question on algae. I read somewhere that someday people might take bath tubs full of algae onto spaceships to provide oxygen for the crew. How much oxygen does algae give off, is this really possible? Replies: I think that most of the oxygen in the atmosphere comes in fact from one-celled plants in the oceans, like algae. They are likely to produce a lot of oxygen per unit weight because they don't have non-photosynthesizing bark, roots, branches, etc., nor (I think) a major dormant period like temperate-zone plants. The cost of space travel at present is dominated by the expense of heaving weight up into Earth orbit (it costs very little extra to send it to the Moon, for example, or Mars). For missions of short duration the weight of the compressed oxygen you need to carry is less than the weight of algae, water and extra plumbing you'd need to carry if you relied on algae to produce your oxygen. The important use of green plants would be in very long duration space flight (years) or permanent inhabitation of worlds like the Moon, where you need an unlimited supply of oxygen. Now if you want to fantasize, Venus' atmosphere is almost all carbon dioxide. Suppose you dropped a whole lot of specially gene-tailored one-celled plants into the atmosphere (not the surface, it's too hot). Why then they might eat up all the carbon dioxide and produce a breathable atmosphere. The "greenhouse effect" would go away, and Venus would become a nice habitable if tropical world only 50 million miles away.

39

Algae Biomass Summit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae Biomass Summit Algae Biomass Summit September 30, 2013 12:00PM EDT to October 3, 2013 12:00PM EDT Algae Biomass Summit...

40

Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

Pienkos, P. T.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Definition: Algae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Algae Algae Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Algae Photosynthetic, plant-like organisms containing chlorophyll. Often fast growing and able to live in freshwater, seawater, or damp oils. May be unicellular and microscopic or very large, as in the giant kelps. Can be used as a source for biofuels, and has been engineered to produce ethanol, oil and even diesel.[1][2][3][4] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms Biofuels, Algae fuel, bioenergy, sustainability References ↑ http://www.nrel.gov/biomass/glossary.html ↑ http://www.soil.ncsu.edu/publications/BMPs/glossary.html ↑ http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/26/business/energy-environment/26algae.html ↑ http://abcnews.go.com/International/algae-solve-worlds-fuel-crisis/story?id=14181088 Retrie

42

Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METABOLISM OF THlOCTlC ACID IN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY ThisMETABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. , C.METABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. C.

Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r - LAWREW RADIATIONAlkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~rtment l~alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a The

Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Commercializing algaechallenges and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The promise of algae provides much motivation for research and investment for the widespread deployment of algae as a feedstock. Commercializing algaechallenges and opportunities Processing Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Inform Magazine Inform

45

Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVSs Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Waste streams for algae cultivation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ALDIGA, short for Algae from Waste for Combined Biodiesel and Biogas Pro-duction, aims to develop a concept for a closed circulation of resources in pro-ducing (more)

Kautto, Antti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae - Energy ...  

Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae ...

48

Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monas reinhardtii (green alga). Planta 214:552561. doi:adaptation in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Eurhydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Common benthic algae and cyanobacteria in southern California tidal wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Janousek Janousek 2011: Algae and cyanobacteria of southernto the Marine Bluegreen Algae. John Wiley and Sons, NewDistribution of bluegreen algae in a Mississippi gulf coast

Janousek, Christopher N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Zeolite?Based Algae Biofilm Rotating Photobioreactor for Algae and Biomass Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Alkaline conditions induced by algae growth in wastewater stabilization ponds create deprotonated ammonium ions that result in ammonia gas (NH3) volatilization. If algae are (more)

Young, Ashton M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Dark algae, life on Mars?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dark algae, life on Mars? Dark algae, life on Mars? Name: Jungle Fever Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I'm probably writing this is vain since my numerous other notes weren't answered, but here goes. Does anyone out there know anything about the dark algae found in Siberia (or Antarctica, I don't remember which) or the primitive microbes found by Chris McKay that were revived by a drop of water? Also, can this concept be applied to the possibility of life on Mars? I'd also appreciate any information on extraterrestrial microorganisms or life forms. Much thanks. Replies: I don't know specifically about the algae that you mention. However, I do know that there are several kinds of algae that go into a sexual reproductive state in response to adverse conditions often including high temperatures or lack of moisture. This sexual phase results in formation of a fertilized zygote which becomes dormant until conditions are optimum for growth. This usually involves water - so a drop of water could initiate growth of the new alga, and it could reproduce asexually quite rapidly, until conditions trigger the sexual phase again. I see no reason why such a growth pattern couldn't apply to life on Mars or anywhere else. There isn't much information, as far as I'm aware, regarding extraterrestrial life. So far, none has been found, but it is likely, statistically, that there is some out there, somewhere. The SETI program (Search for extraterrestrial intelligence), funded in part by the Planetary Society, is trying to find higher forms of life by doing radio searches.

52

Definition: Algae fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fuel fuel Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Algae fuel A specific type of biofuel, made by chemically processing oils from algae.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Algae fuel or Algal biofuel is an alternative to fossil fuel that uses algae as its source of natural deposits. Several companies and government agencies are funding efforts to reduce capital and operating costs and make algae fuel production commercially viable. Harvested algae, like fossil fuel, releases CO2 when burnt but unlike fossil fuel the CO2 is taken out of the atmosphere by the growing of algae and other biofuel sources. The energy crisis and the world food crisis have ignited interest in algaculture (farming algae) for making vegetable oil, biodiesel, bioethanol, biogasoline, biomethanol, biobutanol and other biofuels, using

53

Why Sequence Algae from Acidic Waters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Algae from Acidic Waters? Strains of green algae from isolated acidic waters are being sequenced to understand how they adapt to variable levels of carbon dioxide, as well...

54

Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.  

SciTech Connect

This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Predicting Future Climate Using Algae Sedimentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biologists have shown that algae are the first to be implicated in climate changes and vice versa. The goal of this research effort is to predict the future climate using algae species living in a lake in the past. On performing age depth profile analysis ... Keywords: Marine Organisms, Algae Sedimentation, Climate, Extrapolation, Neural Networks, Regression Analysis, ID3

Jasdeep Natt; Ray Hashemi; Azita Bahrami; Mahmood Bahar; Nicholas Tyler; Jay Hodgson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Are algae really feasible as fuel?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Great effort-and lots of money-is being expended to develop algae as a feedstock for transportation fuel. There doesnt seem to be a clear answer yet, however, as to whether algae will ever be economically viable for this purpose. Are algae really feasib

57

School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels BY: Alessandro Faldi, Ph.D. Section Head is algae- based biofuels, which we believe could be a meaningful part of the energy mix in the future. Algae biofuels have potential to be an economically viable, low-net carbon transportation fuel

Fisher, Frank

58

BioProcess Algae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioProcess Algae BioProcess Algae Jump to: navigation, search Name BioProcess Algae Place Shenandoah, Iowa Sector Biomass Product US-based joint venture created to commercialize advanced photobioreactor technologies for continuous production of algal biomass. References BioProcess Algae[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. BioProcess Algae is a company located in Shenandoah, Iowa . References ↑ "BioProcess Algae" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=BioProcess_Algae&oldid=342867" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

59

Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri One-sentencegenome reveals that this green algas increased organismal16 P. Volvocine algae-specific protein

Prochnik, Simon E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Algae control for hydrogeneration canals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to assess and develop control practices for nuisance algae growth in power canal that delivers water to hydro-generation facilities. This growth results in expenditures related not only to lost generation but also labor and materials costs associated with implementing remediation procedures. On an industry-wide basis these costs associated with nuisance algal growth are estimated to be several million dollars per year.

Grahovac, P.

1997-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Why sequence arctic algae for alternative energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

arctic algae for alternative energy? Five different protists representing different algal classes isolated from the Arctic Ocean are being investigated for adaptation to perennial...

62

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealedc consensus. Harmful Algae 8:313. 2. Sunda WG, Graneli E,of the United States. Harmful Algae 8:3953. 4. Smayda TJ (

Grigoriev, Igor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Field Algae Measurements Using Empirical Correlations at Deer Creek Reservoir.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deer Creek Reservoir in Utah has a history of high algae concentrations. Despite recent nutrient reduction efforts, seasonal algae continue to present problems. Cost effective, (more)

Stephens, Ryan A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

EVALUATION OF ALGAE CONCENTRATION IN MANURE BASED MEDIA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae can be used to treat wastewater and manure while producing a feedstock for renewable energy. Algae require nutrients to achieve their maximum growth and (more)

Pecegueiro do Amaral, Maira Freire

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Evaluation of physicochemical properties of modified algae protein adhesives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae proteins have similar amino acid compositions as conventional plant proteins, and are comparatively richer in the essential amino acids. Algae protein has the potential (more)

Borgen, Kelly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

ALGAE: RADIOACTIVITY UPTAKE AND IRRADIATION EFFECTS. A Literature Search  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-seven references are included on the uptake of radioisotopes by algae and the biological effects of external or internal irradiation of algae. (C.H.)

Smith, L.L.

1961-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation...

68

Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum The Bradbury Science Museum is...

69

Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability  

SciTech Connect

Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

Harvey, R.S.

2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

CYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON DEUTERATED GREEN ALGAE  

SciTech Connect

S>Distinct differences were demonstrated in the morphology and in the amounts and distribution of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates in deuterated green algae as compared to ordinary algae. Cytochemical methods used in the study are described. Possible reasons for the differences found are discussed. (C.H.)

Flaumenhaft, E.; Conrad, S.M.; Katz, J.J.

1960-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

71

CHLOROPLAST PIGMENTS OF DEUTERATED GREEN ALGAE  

SciTech Connect

No new bands were found in chromatograms of chloroplasts from deuterated algae, and none of the usual bands were absent. The infrared spectra of pigments obtained from deuterated algae show essentially all the hydrogen positions occupied by deuterium. The deuterated pigments were determined to be effective in photosynthesis. (C.H.)

Strain, H.H.; Crespi, H.L.; Katz, J.J.

1959-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

72

Hydrogen metabolism of photosynthetic bacteria and algae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The metabolism, metabolic pathways and biochemistry of hydrogen in photosynthetic bacteria and algae are reviewed. Detailed information on the occurrence and measurement of hydrogenase activity is presented. Hydrogen production rates for different species of algae and bacteria are presented. 173 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

Kumazawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae  

SciTech Connect

The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

Ryther, J.H.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Carbon2Algae, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon2Algae, LLC Carbon2Algae, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Solutions4CO2 Name Solutions4CO2 Address 2855 Bloor St W., Suite 616 Place Toronto, ON Zip M8X 3A1 Sector Bioenergy, Biofuels, Biomass, Carbon, Renewable energy, Carbon Capture Product Flue Gas CO2 Capture & mass transfer technology Year founded 2007 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 416-803-9435 Website http://s4co2.com Region Ontario References Solutios4CO2 is an algae-based CO2 solutions companies. Our focus is to Build, Train and Transfer the operation of industrial size algae facilities that will divert large streams of CO2 gas emissions at the stack. Our goal is to be the leading designer of industrial scale high lipid content algae production facilities through the utilization of captured CO2 emissions to produce high quality bio-fuel in all climatic conditions.

75

Flocculation of model algae under shear.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae-to-Fuel Algae-to-Fuel Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel." Shots of vehicles driving on highways. We all need fuel to get around. And as America takes steps to improve our energy security, homegrown fuel sources are more important than ever. Close-up shots of algae, followed by a shots of an algae farm and raceway ponds. The Energy Department is researching one of the fuel sources of the future found here: in algae. Have a look at this algae farm. These large, man-made ponds are called raceways, and they cultivate a new crop of algae every few weeks. Various shots of algae in raceway ponds. Text appears on screen: "Microalgae - Up to 60X Oil of Land-Based Plants."

77

CONCENTRATION OF CESIUM-137 BY ALGAE  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption-absorption of Cs/sup 137/ by algae is of interest because Cs/sup 137/ of the critical fission products in power reactor wastes and atomic weapon fall-out. It is well known that plankton takes up radioactivity in fairly high concentrations. The purpose of this investigation was to study the accumulation of Cs/sup 137/ by fresh water-algae. (A.C.)

Williams, L.G.; Swanson, H.D.

1958-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Synthesis and Metabolism of Carbonyl-C14 Pyruvic and Hydroxypyruvic Acids in Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Cerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.HYDROXYPYRUYIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, * - Andrew A.AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.

Milhaud, Gerhard; Benson, Andrew A.; Calvin, M.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs.

Taylor, W.D.; Giles, K.R.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Algae control problems and practices workshop  

SciTech Connect

Western water resources are continuously facing increased demand from industry and the public. Consequently, many of these resources are required to perform multiple tasks as they cycle through the ecosystem. Many plants and animals depend upon these resources for growth. Algae are one group of plants associated with nutrient and energy cycles in many aquatic ecosystems. Although most freshwater algae are microscopic in size, they are capable of dominating and proliferating to the extent that the value of the water resource for both industrial and domestic needs is compromised. There is a great diversity of aquatic environments and systems in which algae may be found, and there are many varieties of treatment and control techniques available to reduce the impacts of excessive growth. This workshop was organized to exchange information about these control problems and practices.

Pryfogle, P.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, G. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PetroAlgae formerly Dover Glen Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

32901 Product PetroAlgae is a company attempting to utilise natural strains of micro-algae developed by Arizona State University, and bred selectively over many generations, to...

82

Changes related to "BioProcess Algae" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "BioProcess Algae" BioProcess Algae Jump to: navigation, search This is a list of changes made...

83

Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

oils. Under the right conditions, algae can make a lot of oil that can be converted into biofuels. Text appears on screen: "Microalgae - Up to 60X Oil of Land-Based Plants." Algae...

84

Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae  

SciTech Connect

Thioctic acid labeled with sulfur-35 has been prepared and i t s metabolism b y algae has been studied. It i s converted by the algae into a number of forms, all of which upon hydrolysis yield either the disulfide o r i t s sulfoxide. One of these constituted the major portion of the labeled material in the chloroplasts. Aerobic metabolism for some minutes i s required to produce this form. Preliminary studies of the chemical nature of this form suggest i t to be esterified on the carboxyl group with a moiety of very high lipid solubility.

Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

1956-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

CAESIUM-137 LABELLED ALGAE FOR FILTRATION STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

ABS>A method is described whereby the green algae Chlorella and Scenedesmus were cultured in a growth medium containing Cs/sup 137/. These radioactive algae were used as a suspension in water passing through a column of filter sand. The distributions of the algal cells retained in the filter were measured with a scintillation counter mounted externally to the column. Calibrations of the shielded scintillation counter for the amount of activity per algal cell and for the geometry of the filter column are described. (auth)

Ives, K.J.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Branched alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a 750 feet high resolution capillary gas chromatographic column. The mixture was found to be 90% of 1:1 ratio 7-methyl, and 8-methyl-heptadecane, and 10% of 6-methylheptadecane. An optical rotation of +2.5 {+-} 0.5 was obtained on a 5 mg of mixture.

Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

1970-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Algae-to-Fuel Algae-to-Fuel Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel August 13, 2013 - 2:53pm Addthis Learn about algae, a fast-growing, renewable resource that holds great promise to become a reliable, homegrown fuel source to reduce our nation's reliance on foreign oil. Algae are a diverse group of primarily aquatic organisms that are capable of using photosynthesis to generate biomass. This biomass can be used as feedstock for transportation fuels. In the near term, algae may also mitigate the effects of carbon dioxide from sources such as power plants - and in the future, they may be used to capture and reuse fossil-fuel-generated carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. This edition of Energy 101 shares the benefits of an algae-fueled future. For more information on algal biofuels from the Office of Energy Efficiency

88

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Thanks in part to DOE funding and technical support, student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana had the opportunity to participate in an algae biomass research project that could help prepare them for cleantech jobs and pave the way for their Tribe to produce clean, renewable energy. The Cultivation and Characterization of Oil Producing Algae Internship placed students in a laboratory alongside established researchers to study local algae samples and evaluate their possible use in energy applications. The project focused on an integrated coal-to-liquid (ICTL) technology

89

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Thanks in part to DOE funding and technical support, student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana had the opportunity to participate in an algae biomass research project that could help prepare them for cleantech jobs and pave the way for their Tribe to produce clean, renewable energy. The Cultivation and Characterization of Oil Producing Algae Internship placed students in a laboratory alongside established researchers to study local algae samples and evaluate their possible use in energy applications. The project focused on an integrated coal-to-liquid (ICTL) technology

90

The Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Biofuels from Algae Algae Biomass Summit San Francisco, CA November 15, 2007 Philip T. Pienkos, Ph.D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Bioenergy Center NREL/PR-510-42414 The Biodiesel Dilemma Triglycerides (TAGs) from current oilseed crops and waste oils cannot come close to meeting U.S. diesel demand (60+ billion gal/yr) * The entire U.S. soybean crop could provide approximately 2.5 billion gallons per year. * Estimated world-wide production of biodiesel would only yield 13 billion gallons per year. * This much agricultural productivity cannot possibly be diverted from the food supply. * TAGs also represent an attractive feedstock for biopetrochemicals meaning less would be available for transportation fuel. Alternative sources of TAGs are needed!

91

Stable isotopic records of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton ofa lesser extent, endolithic algae within the coral skeleton.Endolithic algae produce distinctive green bands in the

Hartmann, A. C.; Carilli, J. E.; Norris, R. D.; Charles, C. D.; Deheyn, D. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Whole-Cell Sensing for a Harmful Bloom-Forming Microscopic Alga by Measuring Antibody-Antigen Forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fawley, Diversity of coccoid algae in shallow lakes duringof small coccoid green algae from Lake Itasca, Minnesota,BLOOM-FORMING MICROSCOPIC ALGA BY MEASURING ANTIBODY

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Flowing with the Tide:Epiphytic Host-Specificity and Phenotypic Plasticity of the Brown Alga Padina boryana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLASTICITY OF THE BROWN ALGA PADINA BORYANA SIERRA M. FLYNN94720 USA Abstract. Epiphytic algae form complex communitiesmacroalgae hosts. The brown alga Padina boryana acts as a

Flynn, Sierra Michelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101 | Algae-to-Fuel 101 | Algae-to-Fuel Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel September 5, 2012 - 5:11pm Addthis How Energy Department scientists and researchers produce clean, renewable fuel -- from algae. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Where Can I Watch More Energy 101 Videos? For more energy basics, check out our Energy 101 YouTube Playlist. When you think of algae - what immediately comes to mind? Perhaps it's the color green, or maybe an image of a curious-looking underwater species. Whatever your immediate thought, most likely, it is not related to fuel. But that's exactly what Energy Department scientists and researchers are exploring right now - strategies to produce clean, renewable biofuel from algae. In this edition of our Energy 101 video series, we're taking a

95

Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania August 6, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis A $20 million Recovery Act award will help Solazyme take production from tens of thousands of gallons a year of its algae "drop-in" oil to an annual production capacity of over half a million gallons. | Photo courtesy of Solazyme, Inc. | A $20 million Recovery Act award will help Solazyme take production from tens of thousands of gallons a year of its algae "drop-in" oil to an annual production capacity of over half a million gallons. | Photo courtesy of Solazyme, Inc. | Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Some biotech companies use outdoor ponds to make algae-based biofuels, but

96

Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Efficiency of process for producing H.sub.2 by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Efficiency of process for producing H/sub 2/ by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

Greenbaum, E.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

98

How Algae Use a "Sulfate Trap" to Selectively Biomineralize Strontium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed How Algae Use a "Sulfate Trap" to Selectively Biomineralize Strontium OCTOBER 20, 2011 Bookmark...

99

Treatment of Wastewater from Mineral Processing by using Algae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nowadays, the utilisation of algae in industrial processes to produce useful compounds or to treat waste streams is of great interest. Industrial wastewaters such as (more)

Sprock, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Polymer applications for improved biofuel production from algae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biofuel is a renewable and sustainable energy source with near-neutral carbon footprint. Algae are an ideal feedstock for biofuel production because they reproduce quickly and (more)

Jones, Jessica Naomi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Accumulation of uranium at low concentration by the green alga ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

by Scenedesmus obliquus 34 was rapid and energy-independent and the biosorption of. UO2+ ... by the green algaScenedesmus obliquus34 is described here.

102

Development of a novel algae biofilm photobioreactor for biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae are photosynthetic microorganisms that convert carbon dioxide and sunlight into biomass that can be used for biofuel production. Although they are usually cultivated in (more)

Ozkan, Altan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in the same photobioreactor system should be similar at light limited growth conditions based on photon flux. It is how the algae 'allocate' this energy captured that will vary: Data will be presented that shows that Botryococcus invests greater energy in oil production than Chlorella under these growth conditions. In essence, the Chlorella can grow 'fast and lean' or can be slowed to grow 'slow and fat'. The overall energy potential between the Chlorella and Botryococcus, then, becomes much more equivalent on a per-photon basis. This work will indicate an interesting relationship between two very different algae species, in terms of growth rate, lipid content and composition, and energy efficiency of the overall process. The presentation will indicate that in light-limited growth, it cannot be assumed that either rapid growth rate or lipid production rate can be used as stand-alone indicators of which species-lipid relationships will truly be more effective in algae-to-fuels scenarios.

Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Micro-algae come of age as a platform for recombinant protein production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2008), chlorophyta alga Ulva pertusa Table 1 Recentprotein production in algae Expression level achieved010-0326-5 REVIEW Micro-algae come of age as a platform for

Specht, Elizabeth; Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki; Mayfield, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Cross flow filtration for mixed-culture algae harvesting for municipal wastewater lagoons.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The transesterification of lipids extracted from algae makes up the third generation of biodiesel production. The city of Logan, Utah proposes that the algae (more)

Wilson, Misheka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Cross Flow Filtration for Mixed-Culture Algae Harvesting for Municipal Wastewater Lagoons.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The transesterification of lipids extracted from algae makes up the third generation of biodiesel production. The city of Logan, Utah, proposes that the algae (more)

Wilson, Misheka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Frn alger till biodiesel - Den italienska drmmen?; From Algaes to Bio Diesel - The Italian Dream?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This project aims to investigate whether algae can be used for biodiesel production in Italy. Algaes are a good option since they are fast (more)

Andersson, Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Blue-green algae: why they become dominant  

SciTech Connect

The injection of carbon dioxide and the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus to a lake population dominated by blue-green algae results in a rapid shift to dominance by green algae. The basis for the change and its implications are discussed.

Shapiro, J.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Investigation of contamination bearing algae in the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Recent discussions in the group have given rise to the problem of determining whether the beta contamination found in the Columbia River is carried by the algae which are found in the retention basin. The algae accumulate in the basin and apparently remain there longer than the retained water, and thus may be contaminated to a greater extent than the water itself.

Paas, H.J.

1947-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

111

CEC-500-2010-FS-001 Algae OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastructure system. · Enhance the supply and affordability of future transportation fuel choicesCEC-500-2010-FS-001 Algae OMEGA (Offshore Membrane Enclosures For Growing Algae) TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ March 2010

112

Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae  

SciTech Connect

Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae  

SciTech Connect

The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 {mu}g C {center dot} {mu}g chl{sup {minus}1} {center dot} h{sup {minus}1} higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and {sup 14}C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and {sup 14}C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities.

Lizotte, M.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Viable Cyanobacteria and Green Algae from the Permafrost Darkness  

SciTech Connect

This review represents an overview of the existence, distribution and abundance of the photoautotrophic microorganisms in the deep subsurface permafrost of the Northeast Russia and McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The morphology, growth rate, spectral properties, phylogenetic position of the viable permafrost green algae and cyanobacteria have been studied. Viable photoautotrophs were represented by unicellular green algae and filamentous cyanobacteria with low growth rate. Spectral studies of ancient cyanobacteria and green algae did not reveal any significant differences between them and their contemporary relatives. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that permafrost photoautotrophs were closely related to strains and more often to uncultured environmental clones from cold regions.

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hybrid Vehicle Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Links Hybrid Links Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov Web site. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Hybrid Vehicles and Manufacturers Acura ILX Hybrid Audi Q5 Hybrid BMW ActiveHybrid 3 ActiveHybrid 5 ActiveHybrid 7 Buick LaCrosse eAssist* Regal eAssist* Chevrolet Malibu Eco* Impala eAssist* Ford Fusion Hybrid Honda Accord Hybrid Civic Hybrid Honda CR-Z Honda Insight Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Infiniti M Hybrid Q50 Hybrid Q50 S Hybrid QX60 Hybrid Kia Optima Hybrid Lexus CT 200h Lexus ES 300h GS 450h LS 600h L RX 450h Lincoln MKZ Hybrid Mercedes-Benz Mercedes E400 Hybrid Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid Porsche Cayenne S Hybrid Subaru XV Crosstrek Hybrid Toyota Avalon Hybrid

116

EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii 1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc. to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO2 to grow algae for the production of algal oil and subsequent conversion to fuel. The project would generate reliable cost information and test data to access its viability for implementation at a future commercial scale. If approved, DOE would provide approximately 80 percent of the funding for the project. Public Comment Opportunities

117

Algae Based Carbon Capture and Utilization feasibility study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This pre-feasibility study was taken out by the co-operation with Zhejiang University, the CEU lab in Zhejiang University is taking researches of the algae (more)

Sen, Cong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlamydo- monas reinhardtii (green alga). Planta 214:552et al. 2008) of different green microalgal species have beenReduction of CO 2 with H 2 in green plants. Nature 143:204

Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

LIGHT-INDUCED EFFICIENCY AND PIGMENT ALTERATIONS IN RED ALGAE*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low photosynthetic efficiency of chlorophyll in freshly collected red algae, can, in the case of Porphyra perforata, P. nereocystis, and Porpkyridium cruentum, be inercased by growing the algae for 10 days in red or blue light. Exposure to darkness or to green light maintains the algae in their originally low efficiency with respect to chlorophyll, while retaining the high efficiency of phycobilins. Red- or blue-adapted algae are rapidly reversed by exposure to green light, the chlorophyll efficiency dropping to low values again in a few hours. This is assumed to account for the action spectrum of freshly gathered plants. Some pigment changes were observed, but not in the direction of "chromatic adaptation; " and the carotenoid pigments were not activated, even by blue light, but remained as photosynthetically inactive shading filters. The higher red algae (Florideae) did not show activation of chlorophyll by red or blue light. Chlorophyll a of freshly collected marine red algae sensitizes photosynthesis with an efficiency of about 0.04 molecule oxygen liberated per absorbed quantum.

C. S. Yocum; L. R. Blinks

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on ??green fuels? which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI??s have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

122

Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AMONG INVERTEBRATES AND ALGAE OF SOLAR EVAPORATION PONDS INplanktonic invertebrates and algae present along with avianof invertebrates and algae, and avian foraging were examined

Herbst, David B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Freeport, TX LNG Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

124

Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae. The method includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further, specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae. 2 figs.

Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Jarvis, E.E.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae which includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae.

Dunahay, Terri Goodman (2710 Arbor Glen Pl., Boulder, CO 80304); Roessler, Paul G. (15905 Ellsworth Pl., Golden, CO 80401); Jarvis, Eric E. (3720 Smuggler Pl., Boulder, CO 80303)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Influence of algae on photolysis rates of chemicals in water  

SciTech Connect

Sunlight-induced algal transformations of 22 nonionic organic chemicals were studied in order to provide kinetic results and equations concerning the influence of algae on the behavior of pollutants in freshwater environments. Screening studies indicated that green and blue-green algae, at concentrations of 1-10 mg of chlorophyll a/L, accelerate photoreaction of certain polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compounds, and anilines in water. The rate of change in aniline concentration, (P), in the aniline-Chlamydomonas photoreaction can be described by the following expression: rate = A(1 + B/(P))-1. At low substrate concentrations, the reaction rate is first order with respect to both algae and substrate concentration. Methyl parathion and parathion photoreacted 390 times more rapidly when sorbed by algae than in distilled water, and aniline and m-toluidine reacted over 12000 times faster, indicating that light-induced algal transformations of certain pollutants may be significant. Other results indicated that reaction rates are unaffected by heat-killing the algae. 27 references

Zepp, R.G.; Schlotzhauer, P.F.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Algae from the arid southwestern United States: an annotated bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Desert algae are attractive biomass producers for capturing solar energy through photosynthesis of organic matter. They are probably capable of higher yields and efficiencies of light utilization than higher plants, and are already adapted to extremes of sunlight intensity, salinity and temperature such as are found in the desert. This report consists of an annotated bibliography of the literature on algae from the arid southwestern United States. It was prepared in anticipation of efforts to isolate desert algae and study their yields in the laboratory. These steps are necessary prior to setting up outdoor algal culture ponds. Desert areas are attractive for such applications because land, sunlight, and, to some extent, water resources are abundant there. References are sorted by state.

Thomas, W.H.; Gaines, S.R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Holding algae against the light: The overlooked link between photosynthetic performance and algal distribution on coral reefs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High abundances of benthic algae on coral reefs are a potential threat to coral reef health. The organic carbon produced by these algae is consumed (more)

Zande, R.M. van der

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae November 6, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Christy Sterner Algae Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office 1. Where It Grows There are thousands of different kinds of algae that grow in a variety of colors and forms, and can be found everywhere on the planet -- even on snow and ice. When some people think of algae, they picture green film on ponds

132

Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae November 6, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Christy Sterner Algae Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office 1. Where It Grows There are thousands of different kinds of algae that grow in a variety of colors and forms, and can be found everywhere on the planet -- even on snow and ice. When some people think of algae, they picture green film on ponds

133

Mathematical Modelling and Numerical Simulation of Marine Ecosystems With Applications to Ice Algae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sea-ice ecosystem modelling is a novel field of research. In this thesis, the main organism studied is sea-ice algae. A basic introduction to algae and (more)

Wickramage, Shyamila Iroshi Perera

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Pages that link to "BioProcess Algae" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "BioProcess Algae" BioProcess Algae Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page: BioProcess...

135

Solix Biofuels uses a Colorado State lab to test its algae-based formulas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solix Biofuels uses a Colorado State lab to test its algae-based formulas. SAVE THIS | EMAIL. In the classic model, scientists #12;Growing bags produce algae for Solix Biofuels' EECL-based research

Ferrara, Katherine W.

136

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

137

Micro-algae come of age as a platform for recombinant protein production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in therapeutic protein production in algae Expression levelrecombinant protein production Elizabeth Specht Shigekirecombinant protein production in Chlamydomonas, including

Specht, Elizabeth; Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki; Mayfield, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Formation of Radioactive Citrulline During Photosynthetic C14O2-Fixation by Blue-Green Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ClTRULLlNE BY BLUE-GREEN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY This is aC~~O~-FIXATION BLUE-GREEN ALGAE Pekka Linko, 0. Holm-Hansen,C~~O~-FIXATION BLUE-GREEN ALGAE BY Pelcka Linlc~,'~ Holm-

Linko, Pekka; Holm-Hansen, O.; Bassham, J.A.; Calvin, M.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Key Words: Shewanella algae; Fasciitis, Necrotizing; Primary Bacteremia Address for correspondence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shewanella algae infections are rare in humans. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. We report a case of primary S. algae bacteremia occurring after the ingestion of raw seafood in a patient with liver cirrhosis that presented a fulminent course of necrotizing fasciitis.

Primary Shewanella; Bacteremia Mimicking; Vibrio Septicemia; Dae Seong Myung; Young-sun Jung; Seung-ji Kang; Young A Song; Kyung-hwa Park; Sook-in Jung; Soo Hyun Kim; Jong-hee Shin; Sook-in Jung M. D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Biomass from Cyanobacteria:Opportunities for the Proposed Algae Biotechnology and Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State ­ Biofuel feedstock · CO2 addition may: ­ Improve nutrient uptake ­ Accelerate treatment ­ Decrease algae of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work

Tullos, Desiree

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Survey of Hydrogenase Activity in Algae: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capacity for hydrogen gas production was examined in nearly 100 strains of Eukaryotic algae. Each strain was assessed for rate of H2 production in darkness, at compensating light intensity and at saturating Tight intensity. Maximum H2 yield on illumination and sensitivity to molecular oxygen were also measured.

Brand, J. J.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

143

Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology could create an algae biofuels industry that is economically competitive with current fuel prices systems for microalgae capable of producing biofuels. Diesel and jet fuels are critical to our nation more biofuel per acre than any other potential source. Under ideal conditions, microalgae theoretically

Cushing, Jim. M.

144

Hybrid: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

button highlighted Starting Button Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar button highlighted Starting Button Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar OVERVIEW Hybrid-electric vehicles combine the benefits of gasoline engines and electric motors to provide improved fuel economy. The engine provides most of the vehicle's power, and the electric motor provides additional power when needed, such as for accelerating and passing. This allows a smaller, more-efficient engine to be used. The electric power for the motor is generated from regenerative braking and from the gasoline engine, so hybrids don't have to be "plugged in" to an electrical outlet to recharge. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

145

Hybrid: Overview  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

button highlighted Starting Button Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar button highlighted Starting Button Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar OVERVIEW Hybrid-electric vehicles combine the benefits of gasoline engines and electric motors to provide improved fuel economy. The engine provides most of the vehicle's power, and the electric motor provides additional power when needed, such as for accelerating and passing. This allows a smaller, more-efficient engine to be used. The electric power for the motor is generated from regenerative braking and from the gasoline engine, so hybrids don't have to be "plugged in" to an electrical outlet to recharge. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

146

Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics: Implementation, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1704e/i1704e.pdf References: Algae-Based Biofuels [1] Logo: Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Algae-Based Biofuels" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Algae-Based_Biofuels:_Applications_and_Co-Products&oldid=328382" Categories:

147

A new antifouling hybrid CDP formulation with ethyl heptanoate: evaluation of AF performance at Ayajin harbor, east coast of Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antifouling (AF) efficiency of a nontoxic aliphatic ester, ethyl heptanoate was evaluated against spores of a fouling alga Ulva pertusa and a ship fouling diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Based on the nontoxic AF activity exhibited in the laboratory bioassays, ... Keywords: antifouling, ethyl heptanoate, fouling resistance, hybrid controlled depletion paint (CDP), zinc pyrithione

M. Sidharthan; Sang Mok Jung; Haridatta Bhatta Rai; Ji Hyun Lee; Chi Young Lim; Young-Kyu Kang; N. S. Park; H. W. Shin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Application of Hedonic Price Modeling to Estimate the Value of Algae Meal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High productivity rates, usage of nonproductive land, renewability and recovery of waste nutrients and potential for CO2 emission reduction represent some of the advantages that selected algae species might have over competing products. Many research studies have investigated potential usage of algae for different purposes, such as cosmetics or aquaculture; however most of the research studies have focused on the feasibility of algae as a source of second generation biodiesel and feed meal. Because of its high costs of production, using algae only for the purpose of biodiesel production might not be profitable. Thus, for global scale algae commercialization it is important that it be used as a feed meal along with being marketed to the biodiesel industry. One of the major problems faced by economists when attempting to analyze the feasibility of algae is the absence of a market for algae-based fuel and meal. Given that no market exists, prices for algae cannot be observed and realistic investment analysis becomes difficult to perform in this sector. The objective of this study is to estimate a potential price of algae meal using hedonic pricing techniques. For that purpose, twenty two different feed meals commonly having the same usage as Post Extracted Algae Residue (PEAR) are decomposed into their chemical constituents in order to calculate the market value of each characteristic. Calculated prices of these characteristics are then used to estimate the price of algae meal and compare it to different feed meals. Results suggest that algae prices are strictly variable to its chemical components across different algae types. Besides, PEAR represents a sustainable source of financial value and might be considered one of the cornerstones in making algae commercialization a feasible and profitable option.

Gogichaishvili, Ilia

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Uptake and distribution of technetium in several marine algae  

SciTech Connect

The uptake or chemical form of technetium in different marine algae (Acetabularia, Cystoseira, Fucus) has been examined and a simple model to explain the uptake of technetium in the unicellular alga, Acetabularia, has been conceptualized. At low concentrations in the external medium, Acetabularia can rapidly concentrate technetium. Concentration factors in excess of 400 can be attained after a time of about 3 weeks. At higher mass concentrations in the medium, uptake of technetium by Acetabularia becomes saturated resulting in a decreased concentration factor (approximately 10 after 4 weeks). Approximately 69% of the total radioactivity present in /sup 95m/Tc labelled Acetabularia is found in the cell cytosol. In Fucus vesiculosus, labelled with /sup 95m/Tc, a high percentage of technetium is present in soluble ionic forms while approximately 40% is bound, in this brown alga, in proteins and polysaccharides associated with cell walls. In the algal cytosol of Fucus vesiculosus, about 45% of the /sup 95m/Tc appears to be present as anionic TcO/sup -//sub 4/ and the remainder is bound to small molecules. 8 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

Bonotto, S.; Gerber, G.B.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Myttenaere, C.; Van Baelen, J.; Cogneau, M.; van der Ben, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hybrid automobile  

SciTech Connect

The invention discloses a parallel hybrid drive system for self propelled vehicles including a direct current motor-generator having a drive shaft in common with an internal combustion engine leading to a variable speed transmission and a final drive train. The motor-generator has a no-load speed, established by a separate field exciter, below which it drives the shaft as a motor and above which it is driven by the shaft as a generator. Storage batteries are operatively connected to the motor-generator to supply power to it below the no-load speed. The internal combustion engine operates over a small RPM range around its most efficient speed at a power level established by a fixed throttle setting. The transmission is operatively connected to an accelerator and direction selector switch to vary the speed and direction of the vehicle.

Lynch, T.E.; Eastman, D.P.; Price, R.P.

1979-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fish kill mechanisms and toxins exploration for the harmful alga Chattonella marina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???The marine alga Chattonella marina (Raphidophyceae) has long attracted global attention for its association with massive mortality in wild and cultured fish worldwide. Respiratory disorder (more)

Shen, Min ( ??)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hierarchical and size dependent mechanical properties of silica and silicon nanostructures inspired by diatom algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biology implements fundamental principles that allow for attractive mechanical properties, as observed in biomineralized structures. For example, diatom algae contain nanoporous hierarchical silicified shells that provide ...

Garca, Andre Phillip

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The ecology of chemical defence in a filamentous marine red alga.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I investigated the ecological functions of halogenated secondary metabolites from the red alga Asparagopsis armata, their localisation in specialised cells and also their cost of (more)

Paul, Nicholas Andrew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Investigation of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic codigestion of algae and sewage sludge for wastewater treatment facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main goals of this research are to investigate the anaerobic digestibility of algae and to investigate the effects of growth media on the growth (more)

Wang, Meng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Biosorption of heavy metal ions to brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental study of the application of brown algae to the aqueous-phase separation of toxic heavy metals was carried out. The biosorption characteristics of cadmium and lead ions were determined with brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida. A metal binding model proposed by the authors was used for the description of metal binding data. The results showed that the biosorption of bivalent metal ions to brown algae was due to bivalent binding to carboxylic groups on alginic acid in brown algae.

Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Hakodate (Japan)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

GROSS BETA RADIOACTIVITY OF THE ALGAE AT ENIWETOK ATOLL, 1954-1956  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to determine the amounts of radioactivity in marine algae, water, and lagoon bottom sand collected at Eniwetok Atoll during the period April 1954 to April 1956. The highest levels of beta radioactivity of algae collected after the detonation of a nuclear device (Nectar) were in algae from those islands closest to the site of detonation and in the downwind path of the fallout. With time after detonation, the decline of radioactivity in the algae at Belle Island was faster than can be accounted for on the basis of physical decay alone. In March 1955, algae and bottom sand collected in the deeper waters (20 to 140 feet) of the lagoon, one half to two miles offshore, contained as much or more radioactivity than samples collected in the shallow water near shore. The radioactive decay rates of algae samples collected from Leroy and Henry Islands were greater than those of algae from other islands, indicating that there was less residual contamination from previous detonations at these two islands. Study of the radioactive decay rates of the algae at Belle Island showed that the radioactivity was decaying at a relatively low rate, which became slower with samples collected late in the survey. These observations indicate that the longer-lived isotopes were being taken up by the algae. (auth)

Palumbo, R.F.

1959-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Optimization of Growth Rate and Lipid Content from Select Algae Strains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Algae are a favorable biofuel source because of the potential high oil content and fast generation of the biomass. However, one challenge of this technology (more)

Csavina, Janae L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Potential for Micro-Algae and other "Micro-Crops" to Produce Sustainable Biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Interest in algae biofuels has increased in recent years due to government funding, industry investment, environmental pressures and renewable fuels policy. Although some analysis has (more)

Assman, Aaron; Southard, Sean; John, Siddharth; Lei, Antony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Experimental Studies of Vertical Mixing in an Open Channel Raceway for Algae Biofuel Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Turbulent mixing plays an important role in the distribution of sunlight, carbon dioxide, and nutrients for algae in the raceway ponds. For large-scale raceway (more)

Voleti, Ram Sudheer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Radiant and thermal energy transport in planktonic and benthic algae systems for sustainable biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biofuel production from microalgal biomass offers a clean and sustainable liquid fuel alternative to fossil fuels. In addition, algae cultivation is advantageous over traditional biofuel (more)

Murphy, Thomas Eugene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: A PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENTH F A PRELIMINARY REPORT IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AKD IN A RECENTrests on the finding that algae have less cellulose and a

Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin, Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between corals and algae on coral reefs: a review of4: 16-24. Wilder, R.M. Algae-Herbivore Interactions on theURCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS

Hoey, Jennifer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dancing Volvox: Hydrodynamic Bound States of Swimming Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spherical alga Volvox swims by means of flagella on thousands of surface somatic cells. This geometry and its large size make it a model organism for studying the fluid dynamics of multicellularity. Remarkably, when two nearby Volvox swim close to a solid surface, they attract one another and can form stable bound states in which they "waltz" or "minuet" around each other. A surface-mediated hydrodynamic attraction combined with lubrication forces between spinning, bottom-heavy Volvox explains the formation, stability and dynamics of the bound states. These phenomena are suggested to underlie observed clustering of Volvox at surfaces.

Knut Drescher; Kyriacos C. Leptos; Idan Tuval; Takuji Ishikawa; Timothy J. Pedley; Raymond E. Goldstein

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Formula Hybrid International Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenge. We are delighted that they are directing their ingenuity and creativity to advancing hybrid with a traditional combustion engine into a hybrid vehicle, overcoming numerous technical challenges along the way of the hybrid gasoline engine, there are more components to a hybrid drivetrain, including the electric motor

Carver, Jeffrey C.

165

Energy from Microbial Fuel Cells Constructed of Algae from Lake Taihu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) generate electricity using bacteria to degrade something and produce current, which have gained much attention. Harmful algae blooms(HABs) in lakes and rivers are on the increase all over the world, which becomes a more and ... Keywords: MFCs, HABs, algae, Lake Taihu

Yang Fei; Qiu Yejing; Wu Wei; Rong Fei; Liu Lin; Wang Keshu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction Processing eChapters Processing 88DDAD55B737C030383E11F3785E5D6C AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction fr

167

Demo: SmartLake: lightweight sensing and optimizing cleanup of algae blooms on Taihu Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Facing the still unclear growth regularity of blooms, we propose rapid lightweight estimating method for the discovery of algae blooms. An application-specific approximate algorithm for timely dispatching salvaging boats is designed to minimize the total ... Keywords: algae blooms sensing, schedule algorithm

Dong Li; Zijiang Wang; Chenda Hou; Le Zhang; Ze Zhao; Li Cui

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

CULTURE OF ALGAE AND OTHER MICRO-ORGANISMS IN DEUTERIUM OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

Three species of green algae were successfully adapted to growth in 99.6% deuterium oxide. Escherichia coli, yeast, and paramecium were also grown in deuterium oxide. Procedures are described. Fully deuterated glucose, chlorophylls, and carotenoids were isolated from the deuterated algae. ( C.H.)

Crespi, H.L.; Archer, S.M.; Katz, J.J.

1959-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

Investigation of Flow Characteristics in an Airlift-Driven Raceway Reactor for Algae Cultivation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the most common choice for outdoor algae cultivation due to their low cost relative to enclosed commercial viability has been restricted mostly to high-value strains such as Spirulina for health food from algae is promising, the high cost of production compared to the relatively low price of fuels

170

Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae  

SciTech Connect

An overview of photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable chemical feed stock and energy carrier is presented. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of photosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance--including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transport and (3) the minimum number of light reactions that are required to split water to elemental hydrogen and oxygen. Each of these research topics is being actively addressed by the photobiological hydrogen research community.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Photosynthetic Hydrogen and Oxygen Production by Green Algae  

SciTech Connect

Photosynthesis research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable fuel and chemical feed stock. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are: (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of hotosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance-including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transpor;t and (3) constructing real-world bioreactors, including the generation of hydrogen and oxygen against workable back pressures of the photoproduced gases.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

1999-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports April 13, 2011 - 6:30pm Addthis Algae samples back at the NREL lab, ready to be analyzed and run through the Fluorescent-Activated Cell Sorter, or FACS, which separates the cells. | Credit: NREL Staff Photographer Dennis Schroeder. Algae samples back at the NREL lab, ready to be analyzed and run through the Fluorescent-Activated Cell Sorter, or FACS, which separates the cells. | Credit: NREL Staff Photographer Dennis Schroeder. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Every day, the United States spends about $1 billion to import foreign oil, money that we could be investing in American energy and the American economy. President Obama recently announced an ambitious but achievable

173

UPTAKE OF RADIOSTRONTIUM BY AN ALGA, AND THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM ION IN THE WATER  

SciTech Connect

The uptake of radiostrontium by the algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum was studied with respect to the effects of Ca/sup 2+/ ions in the water. Equilibrium between the algae and the water (pH 5.8) was found to be reached in ~10 days. The Sr and Ca results for the algae are presented as plots of the logarithm of the concentration factor of Sr or Ca in the algae vs the logarithm of the Ca/sup 2+/ concentration in water ( mu M/g), and the curves are fitted by the equations log CF/sub Sr/ = 2.17 - 1.05 log (Ca/sup 2+/,) and log CF/sub Ca/c 0.935 log STACa/sup 2+/!. The calculated discrimination factor (Sr/Ca) shows that the algae discriminates in favor of Sr at low Ca/sup 2+/ concentrations. (D.L.C.)

Pickering, D.C.; Lucas, J.W.

1962-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

174

Trace metals in fucoid algae and purple sea urchins near a high arctic lead/zinc ore deposit  

SciTech Connect

Trace metal concentrations in fucoid algae and in purple sea urchins from the vicinity of a metal mining district on North Baffin Island were determined. Higher concentrations of iron and zinc were present in algae and urchins collected nearer the mining area than in those collected further away. Concentrations of copper, iron, and zinc in algae increased with tissue age; arsenic and cadmium were lowest in intermediate-age algae tissues. Tissue distributions of iron and zinc in urchins and algae illustrate the food chain relationship between these species. 7 references, 2 tables.

Bohn, A.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

Tran, Hy D. (Albuquerque, NM); Claudet, Andre A. (Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Andrew D. (Waltham, MA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hybrid armature projectile  

SciTech Connect

A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasama blowby.

Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Asay, James R. (Los Lunas, NM); Hall, Clint A. (Albuquerque, NM); Konrad, Carl H. (Albuquerque, NM); Sauve, Gerald L. (Berthoud, CO); Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Susoeff, Allan R. (Pleasanton, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The hydrogen hybrid option  

SciTech Connect

The energy efficiency of various piston engine options for series hybrid automobiles are compared with conventional, battery powered electric, and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell hybrid automobiles. Gasoline, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen are considered for these hybrids. The engine and fuel comparisons are done on a basis of equal vehicle weight, drag, and rolling resistance. The relative emissions of these various fueled vehicle options are also presented. It is concluded that a highly optimized, hydrogen fueled, piston engine, series electric hybrid automobile will have efficiency comparable to a similar fuel cell hybrid automobile and will have fewer total emissions than the battery powered vehicle, even without a catalyst.

Smith, J.R.

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

How Hybrids Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Hybrids Work How Hybrids Work Diagram of full hybrid vehicle components, including (1) an internal combustion engine, (2) an electric motor, (3) a generator, (4) a power split device, and (5) a high-capacity battery. Flash Animation: How Hybrids Work (Requires Flash 6.0 or higher) HTML Version: How Hybrids Work Hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of gasoline engines and electric motors and can be configured to obtain different objectives, such as improved fuel economy, increased power, or additional auxiliary power for electronic devices and power tools. Some of the advanced technologies typically used by hybrids include Regenerative Braking. The electric motor applies resistance to the drivetrain causing the wheels to slow down. In return, the energy from the

179

Statistical analysis of microspectroscopy signals for algae classification and phylogenetic comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed microspectroscopic evaluation of the pigment composition of the photosynthetic compartments of algae belonging to different taxonomic divisions and higher plants. In [11], a supervised Gaussian bands decompositions was performed for the ...

Anna Tonazzini; Primo Coltelli; Paolo Gualtieri

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Chalking up a Marine Blooming Alga: Genome Fills a Gap in the Tree of Life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 12, 2013 June 12, 2013 Chalking up a Marine Blooming Alga: Genome Fills a Gap in the Tree of Life To World War II soldiers, "The White Cliffs of Dover" was a morale-boosting song that lifted spirits in dark times. To geographers, the white cliffs mark the point at which England is closest to continental Europe. To scientists, the white cliffs are towering structures made of the chalky, white shells that envelop the single-celled photosynthetic alga known as Emiliania huxleyi. "Ehux" is a coccolithophore, with an exoskeleton made of calcium carbonate. Even though the process by which the alga's "armor" forms releases carbon dioxide, Ehux can trap as much as 20 percent of organic carbon, derived from CO2, in some marine ecosystems. The white cliffs of Dover are composed of the chalky, white shells that envelop the single-celled photosynthetic alga known as Emiliania huxleyi.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 1, July 1--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in research designed to develop an economically competitive process for producing acetic acid from biomass for the purpose of sparing petroleum for other uses, to evaluate marine algae as a potential source of biomass, and to document the feasibility of running fermentations in fixed packed bed fermenters. It was demonstrated that marine algae can be fermented to acetic acid. Initial rates of up to 168 meq/1 day were observed. These rates are substantially in excess of the 47 meq/1 day used in the economic projections. Also, when using marine algae as a substrate, acid levels were generated equivalent to the highest reported with other substrates. It was also demonstrated that a 4-foot fixed packet bed fermenter may be operated with marine algae as a substrate at 20 percent solids or 200 meq/1.

Sanderson, J.E.; Augenstein, D.C.; Wise, D.L.

1977-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

THE GROWTH OF ALGAE IN D$sub 2$O DEUTERIUM OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

The experiments described indicate that algae grow and divide in a medium containing more than 99% D/sub 2/O. After an inhibition period both Chlorella and Scenedesmus grew and divided, and after growth was established showed only a small percentage of abnormally large cells. The development of improved nutrient media for deuterated organisms is discussed. Deuterated compounds other than sugars were isolated from algae. It may be possible to use deuterated algae as such as a substrate for the growth of organisms that would give high yields of speclfic compounds such as amino acids, mucleic acids, and antibiotics. Simultaneous labeling with C/sup 14/ could also be aecomplished. With the successful culture of algae in deuterated medla the way is open for a considerable variety of experiments involving deuterium and its biological effects. (auth)

Chorney, W.; Scully, N.J.; Crespi, H.L.; Katz, J.J.

1960-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Differential elimination of phenol by diatoms and other unicellular algae from low concentrations  

SciTech Connect

The differential efficiency of unicellular algae in the elimination of phenol from low concentrations was determined. Non-axenic cultures at 20/sup 0/C in liquid phase with light-thermostats were used.

Werner, D.; Pawlitz, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

CARBON DIOXIDE UPTAKE STUDIES IN ALGAE GROWN IN WATER AND DEUTERIUM OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

A procedure is described for studying carbon dioxide uptake in algae using C/sup 14/-labeled sodium bicarbonate as the source of carbon dioxide, Actively dividing, water grown and deuterium oxide adapted, Scenedesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris were employed in the studies. Uptake comparisons were made over pH range 6 to 9 using appropriate buffer systems. Uptake was fairly constant in the range pH 6 to 8 for both the aqueous and deuterated algae. Above pH 8 uptake dropped markedly. In general, the deuterated algae showed between 1O and 30% lower uptake than ordinary algae. Greater chlorophyll content is associated with higher carbon dioxide uptake. (auth)

Blake, M.I.; Kaganove, A.S.; Katz, J.J.

1962-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Program on Technology Innovation: A Case Study of Seambiotic's Research on Utility-Connected Algae Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Seambiotic Ltd.s pilot facility for the cultivation of marine microalgae located at the Israel Electric Corporations (IEC) Rutenberg coal-fired power station, close to the city of Ashkelon, Israel. The algae are cultivated in open ponds using flue gas from the power station, which provides intensive CO2 enrichment for the algae. Significant experience was acquired during the design, construction, and successful operation of the facility, including experimentation with various strain...

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A. [CHUQ, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

www.mdpi.com/journal/marinedrugs Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well

Dovi Kelman; Ellen Kromkowski Posner; Karla J. Mcdermid; Nicole K. Tab; Patrick R. Wright; Anthony D. Wright

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

SciTech Connect

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

189

EVALUATION OF ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF POLYPHENOLIC COMPOUNDS FROM MARINE ALGAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

La formacin de radicales libres mediante procesos naturales conduce a la oxidacin de biomolculas, dando lugar a diversas enfermedades. Los organismos fotosintticos estn expuestos a ambientes muy oxidativos, por lo que poseen un sistema antioxidante muy eficaz. Presentamos en este trabajo un sencillo mtodo para la extraccin y evaluacin de la actividad antioxidante de los polifenoles de algas marinas. La concentracin de polifenoles se determina siguiendo el mtodo de Folin-Ciocalteu, y la medicin de la actividad antioxidante se realiza por el mtodo del DPPH. INTRODUCCIN La excesiva oxidacin de biomolculas da lugar a diversos daos en el organismo (1). As, un exceso de radicales libres se ha relacionado con una mayor incidencia de diversas enfermedades degenerativas (1) como cncer, enfermedades cardiacas, inflamacin, artritis, disfuncin cerebral, aceleracin del envejecimiento (2), etc. El mecanismo por el que los radicales libres producen sus efectos transcurre mediante una reaccin radicalaria, en la que se forman especias reactivas oxigenadas, que son los que producen los efectos nocivos. Este proceso se ve favorecido por la presencia de oxgeno y de luz

Evaluacin De; La Actividad; Antioxidante De; Polifenoles De; Argimiro Rivero Rosales; Juana Rosa; Betancort Rodrguez

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Improved hydrogen photoproduction from photosynthetic bacteria and green algae  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photosynthetic bacteria evolve hydrogen at much higher rates than do other classes of photosynthetic microorganisms. In addition, they tolerate harsh environments, grow rapidly, and utilize both visible and near infrared light in photosynthesis. They do not split water, but this does not necessarily eliminate their potential use in future applied systems. They are easily manipulated genetically, and thus might be modified to metabolize common biomass waste materials in place of expensive defined organic substrates. Furthermore, the potential for increasing hydrogen photoproduction via genetic techniques is promising. Strains that partially degrade cellulose, have high photoproduction rates, or contain very large amounts of the enzymes associated with hydrogen metabolism have been isolated. Green algae also produce hydrogen but are capable of using water as a substrate. For example, C. reinhardi can evolve hydrogen and oxygen at a molar ratio approaching 2:1. Based upon effect of dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (a specific inhibitor of photosystem II, PSII) on hydrogen photoproduction in the wild type strain and upon results obtained with PSII mutants, one can demonstrate that water is the major source of electrons for hydrogen production. The potential efficiency of in vivo coupling between hydrogenase and the photosynthetic electron transport system is high. Up to 76% of the reductants generated by the electron transport system can be channeled directly to the enzyme for in vivo hydrogen production. Rates exceeding 170 ..mu..moles of H/sub 2/ mg Chl/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/ have been observed.

Weaver, P.F.; Lien, S.; Seibert, M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Modeling algae growth in an open-channel raceway.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost-effective implementation of microalgae as a solar-to-chemical energy conversion platform requires extensive system optimization; computer modeling can bring this to bear. This work uses modified versions of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) in conjunction with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers water-quality code (CE-QUAL) to simulate hydrodynamics coupled to growth kinetics of algae (Phaeodactylum tricornutum) in open-channel raceways. The model allows the flexibility to manipulate a host of variables associated with raceway-design, algal-growth, water-quality, hydrodynamic, and atmospheric conditions. The model provides realistic results wherein growth rates follow the diurnal fluctuation of solar irradiation and temperature. The greatest benefit that numerical simulation of the flow system offers is the ability to design the raceway before construction, saving considerable cost and time. Moreover, experiment operators can evaluate the impacts of various changes to system conditions (e.g., depth, temperature, flow speeds) without risking the algal biomass under study.

James, Scott Carlton

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hybrid Cooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water consumption by power plants has become an increasingly contentious siting issue. In nearly all fossil-fired and nuclear plants, water for plant cooling is by far the greatest water requirement. Therefore, the use of water-conserving cooling systems such as dry or hybrid cooling is receiving increasing attention. This technology overview from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provides a brief introduction to hybrid cooling systems. As defined in the report, the term "hybrid cooling" refer...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sonata Hybrid Test cell location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle architecture P2 HEV Vehicle Dynamometer Input...

194

Test des Systmes hybrides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Les systmes hybrides, systmes combinant la fois une dynamique continue et discrte, s'avrent tre un modle mathmatique utile pour diffrents phnomnes physiques, technologiques, biologiques (more)

Nahhal, Tarik

195

New & Upcoming Hybrid Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New & Upcoming Hybrids New & Upcoming Hybrids 2014 Model Year Vehicle EPA MPG Estimates Price (MSRP) Chevrolet Impala eAssist Large Car Chevrolet Impala eAssist Chart: City, 25; Highway, 35; Combined, 29 NA Infiniti Q50 Hybrid Compact Car Infiniti Q50 Hybrid Chart: City, 29; Highway, 36; Combined, 31 $43,950 Infiniti Q50 Hybrid AWD Compact Car Infiniti Q50 Hybrid AWD Chart: City, 28; Highway, 35; Combined, 30 $45,750 Infiniti Q50S Hybrid Compact Car Infiniti Q50S Hybrid Chart: City, 28; Highway, 34; Combined, 30 $46,350 Infiniti Q50S Hybrid AWD Compact Car Infiniti Q50S Hybrid AWD Chart: City, 27; Highway, 31; Combined, 28 $48,150 Infiniti QX60 Hybrid AWD Standard SUV Infiniti QX60 Hybrid AWD Chart: City, 25; Highway, 28; Combined, 26 NA Infiniti QX60 Hybrid FWD

196

Nearshore Dispersal and Reproductive Viability of Intertidal Fucoid Algae : how effective is drift in local to regional dispersal?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ecological importance of drifting will depend on the abundance of drifting algae and whether it is reproductively viable. However, the ability of adult plants (more)

Hawes, Nicola Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biofuel potential, nitrogen utilization, and growth rates of two green algae isolated from a wastewater treatment facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nitrogen removal from wastewater by algae provides the additional benefit of producing lipids for biofuel and biomass for anaerobic digestion. As ammonium is the renewable (more)

Eustance, Everett O'Brien.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Comparative Life Cycle Assessments of Lignocellulosic and Algae Biomass Conversion to Various Energy Products through Different Pathways.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bioenergy has the potential to reduce the world's dependence on fossil fuels, and to decrease the CO2 emissions due to fossil combustion. Lignocellulosic and algae (more)

Pinilla, Maria Juliana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of high fuel economy and low emissions with the power, range, and convenience of conventional diesel and gasoline fueling. HEV technologies also have potential to be combined with alternative fuels and fuel cells to provide additional benefits. Future offerings might also include plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

200

Ingestion, assimilation, survival, and reproduction by Daphnia pulex fed seven species of bluegreen algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daphnia p&x (Crustacea, Cladocera) was fed the blue-green algae (Cyanophyceae) Anacystis nidulans, Synechococcus elongata, S. cedrorum, Merismopedia sp., Anabaena flosaquae, Synechocystis sp., and Gloeocapsa alpicola. The green algae ( Chlorophyceae) Ankistrodesmus falcatus and Chlorella uulgaris were used for comparison. Direct observations were made of D. pulex feeding in depression slides filled with the test food. Food labeled with 14C was usccl to determine ingestion and assimilation. Life tables were constructed for cohorts fed blue-greens, greens, and no food, and survivorship (L), net reproductive rate ( R), median age of death, and intrinsic rate of natural increase ( r) were calculated. In all casts, ingestion, assimilation, survivorship, and reproduction of D. pulex fed bluegreen algae were lower than of those fed green algae, although there were differences among the blue-greens in their efFccts on these parameters. Anacystis nidulans, Merismopedia sp., and Synechocystis sp. showed some toxicity or inhibition towards D. pulex. Although some blue-green algae can be ingested and assimilated by D. pulex, few if any of those tested provide sufficient nutrition to support a population that does not have other food available.

Dean E. Arnold

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

www.mdpi.com/journal/marinedrugs Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with

Edra Jimnez; O Dorta; Cristian Medina; Alberto Ramrez; Ingrid Ramrez; Hugo Pea-corts

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy Basics: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a hybrid electric vehicle. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of high fuel economy and low emissions with the power, range, and convenience of conventional diesel...

203

THE RADIOACTIVITY OF A NUMBER OF THE HIGHER ALGAE IN THE REGION OF THEODOSIA  

SciTech Connect

Samples of algae were ashed, and the radioactivity in the ash was determined by counting on a MST-17 end-window counter. A potassium standard was used to convert relative activities to absolute values. The potassium in the ash was determined quantitatively by the cobalt-nitrite method. It was found that the radioactivity in Cystoseira barbata significantly exceeded the natural activity due to potassium. Aluminum absorption studies on the ash of this algae indicated the existence of Sr/sup 90/-Y/sup 90/ in the ash. A sample of Cystoseira barbata gathered in 1953 was secured from a local museum and analyzed. It showed only the presence of K/sup 40/. Other samples of Cystoseira barbata from the Sevastopol Biological Station which were gathered in 1939 and 1949 indicated the absence of fission products in the ash. The radioactivity in the ash of the other algae present was due to the presence of K/sup 40/. (TTT)

Mironov, O.G.

1961-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Microsoft Word - PhycalAlgaePilotProject_NEPAFinalEA_October2011.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phycal Algae Pilot Project DOE/EA-1829 Phycal Algae Pilot Project DOE/EA-1829 Phycal, Inc. November 2011 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc. (Phycal), to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO 2 to grow algae for the production of algal oil and subsequent conversion to fuel. The project would generate reliable cost information and test data to assess its viability for future implementation at commercial scale. If approved, DOE would provide approximately 80 percent of the funding for the project.

205

Hybrid Vehicle Technology - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Batteries * Batteries * Modeling * Testing Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Hybrid Vehicle Technology revolutionize transportation Argonne's Research Argonne researchers are developing and testing various hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and their components to identify the technologies, configurations, and engine control strategies that provide the best combination of high fuel economy and low emissions. Vehicle Validation Argonne also serves as the lead laboratory for hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) and technology validation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). HIL is a

206

Hybrid electric vehicles TOPTEC  

SciTech Connect

This one-day TOPTEC session began with an overview of hybrid electric vehicle technology. Updates were given on alternative types of energy storage, APU control for low emissions, simulation programs, and industry and government activities. The keynote speech was about battery technology, a key element to the success of hybrids. The TOPEC concluded with a panel discussion on the mission of hybrid electric vehicles, with a perspective from industry and government experts from United States and Canada on their view of the role of this technology.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

Artificial mismatch hybridization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

Guo, Zhen (Madison, WI); Smith, Lloyd M. (Madison, WI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Freeport, TX LNG Imports (Price) from Yemen (Dollars per Thousand...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 10.30...

209

Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Price) From Peru (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's 7.44 7.38...

210

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 6,463 9,775...

211

Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

212

Village of Freeport, New York (Utility Company) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial Commercial Residential Non Heating Residential Residential Space Heating Residential Residential Space and Water...

213

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price to Brazil (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 12.74 11.19...

214

Freeport, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to South Korea (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- 6.30 2010's 8.09 10.89...

215

An Investigation into Delta Wing Vortex Generators as a Means of Increasing Algae Biofuel Raceway Vertical Mixing Including an Analysis of the Resulting Turbulence Characteristics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Algae-derived biodiesel is currently under investigation as a suitable alternative to traditional fossil-fuels. Though it possesses many favorable characteristics, algae remains prohibitively expensive to (more)

Godfrey, Aaron H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Predicting of Reservoir Algae Viscosity Based on Independent Component Analysis and Back Propagation Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rapid development of industry and agriculture, an increasing of nitrogen phosphorus and other nutrient emission has accelerated the eutrophication process and stimulated the abnormal reproduction of algae. Frequent outbreaks of algal bloom in ... Keywords: algal bloom, algae concentration prediction, independent component analysis, BP neural network, Songshan Lake reservoir

Chang Xu; Hongliang Zhou; Hongjian Zhang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Life Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins, Dr. Alissa Kendall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

displacement. The cost of wastewater treatment using the ATS was estimated to be $1.23 per m3 wastewater Wastewater Processing Algae Processing Biogas Processing Equipment and Material Data Sources Fixed filmLife Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins

California at Davis, University of

218

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburg, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

Program on Technology Innovation: Utility-Connected Algae Systems--Analysis and Decision Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility power plants have supplies of CO2, impaired water, and low-grade heat that are useful inputs for growth of microalgae (algae), which itself can be biomass feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. Because modern algae cultivation requires a source of CO2, growing algal biomass is thus a potential scenario for lowering net power plant CO2 emissions. At present, microalgal growth is still an unproven technology on a large scale for any purpose other than creating specialty neutr...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Dual-Mode Hybrid/Two-Mode Hybrid Accomplishment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dual-Mode Hybrid/Two-Mode Hybrid Accomplishment Dual-Mode Hybrid/Two-Mode Hybrid Accomplishment DOE-funded research, in collaboration with Allison Buses and General Motors Corporation has led to the commercialization of a dramatically different hybrid transmission system for heavy-duty and light-duty applications. The Dual-Mode or Two-Mode hybrid system is an infinitely variable speed hybrid transmission that works with the engine and battery system and automatically chooses to operate in a parallel or series hybrid path to maximize efficiency and minimize emissions, fuel consumption and noise. Parallel and Series hybrid configurations are found on most hybrid vehicles today, both with their own pluses and minuses. The Dual- Mode/Two-Mode systems uses the positive characteristics from both systems to maximize fuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hybrid matrix geometric algebra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structures of matrix algebra and geometric algebra are completely compatible and in many ways complimentary, each having their own advantages and disadvantages. We present a detailed study of the hybrid 2 2 matrix geometric algebra M(2,IG) ...

Garret Sobczyk; Gordon Erlebacher

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hybrid Systems Diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an on-going project to investigate techniques to diagnose complex dynamical systems that are modeled as hybrid systems. In particular, we examine continuous systems with embedded supervisory controllers that experience abrupt, partial ...

Sheila A. McIlraith; Gautam Biswas; Dan Clancy; Vineet Gupta

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Diesel hybridization and emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

Assimilating hybridized architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis searches for means of operation to deal with hybridized architecture. As a conceptual framework, sociology theory appears to be an insightful precedent, for it analyzes and classifies how multiple constituents ...

Wu, Jane C., 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATICHYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT: APRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The theory that algal oozes could give rise to oil shales is not a recent one. Evidence for this theory rests on the finding that algae have less cellulose and a correspondingly greater proportion of lipids than most plant material. In addition, the contemporary alga Botyrococcus is present in microscopic remains in some organic oozes. Since the algal ooze precursor theory rests primarily on geological and paleobotanical evidence, they have sought to complement this evidence by making a study of the constitutents of various genera of algae at the molecular level and comparing them with the organic constituents isolated and identified in the algal ooze from a Florida lake. They have analyzed the hydrocarbon constituents of four species of algae: the blue-greens, Nostoc and Anacystis, the green algae, Spirogyra and Chlorella.

Han, Jerry; McCarthy, E.D.; Van Hoeven Jr., William; Calvin,Melvin; Bradley, W. H.

1967-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Research on Algae Removal by Electro-flotation/Photo-catalytic Oxidization Combined Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lake-type raw water was treated in Photo-catalytic Oxidization reactor. Under the condition of the inflow discharge control in 15L/h, the padding packing compares 2/5, UV lamp 30W, added no chemicals, pH 7.35, use the electro-flotation to treat it ... Keywords: algae, Electro-flotation, photo-catalytic oxidization

Wang Liping; Jiang Weijuan; Gao Naiyun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 2, September 30--December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results on the production of acetic acid from marine algae by anaerobic fermentation indicate that the rate is quite fast. First order rate constants of 0.77 day/sup -1/ were observed. This rate constant gives a half-life of less than one day. In other words, with a properly designed product removal system a five day retention time would yield 98% of theoretical conversion. Determination of the theoretical conversion of marine algae to acetic acid is the subject of much experimentation. The production of one acetic acid molecule (or equivalent in higher organic acids) for each three carbon atoms in the substrate has been achieved; but it is possible that with a mixed culture more than one acetic acid molecule may be produced for each three carbons in the substrate. Work is continuing to improve the yield of acetic acid from marine algae. Marine algae have been found to be rather low in carbon, but the carbon appears to be readily available for fermentation. It, therefore, lends itself to the production of higher value chemicals in relatively expensive equipment, where the rapid conversion rate is particularly cost effective. Fixed packed bed fermenters appear to be desirable for the production of liquid products which are inhibitory to the fermentation from coarse substrates. The inhibitory products may be removed from the fermentation by extraction during recirculation. This technique lends itself to either conventional processing or low capital processing of substrates which require long retention times.

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Final technical report [Molecular genetic analysis of biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project was to identify genes necessary for biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae, using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an experimental organism. The main strategy was to isolate mutants that are selectively deficient in hydrogen production and to genetically map, physically isolate, and ultimately sequence the affected genes.

Mets, Laurens

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Algae Biofuels Collaborative Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-371  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to advance biofuels research on algal feedstocks and NREL's role in the project is to explore novel liquid extraction methods, gasification and pyrolysis as means to produce fuels from algae. To that end several different extraction methods were evaluated and numerous gasification and pyrolysis conditions were explored. It was found that mild hydrothermal treatment is a promising means to improve the extraction and conversion of lipids from algae over those produced by standard extraction methods. The algae were essentially found to gasify completely at a fairly low temperature of 750 degrees C in the presence of oxygen. Pyrolysis from 300-550 degrees C showed sequential release of phytene hydrocarbons, glycerides, and aromatics as temperature was increased. It appears that this has potential to release the glycerides from the non-fatty acid groups present in the polar lipids to produce a cleaner lipid. Further research is needed to quantify the pyrolysis and gasification yields, analyze the liquids produced and to test strategies for removing organic-nitrogen byproducts produced because of the high protein content of the feed. Possible strategies include use of high-lipid/low-protein algae or the use of catalytic pyrolysis.

French, R. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Expulsion of Symbiotic Algae during Feeding by the Green Hydra a Mechanism for Regulating Symbiont Density?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Algal-cnidarian symbiosis is one of the main factors contributing to the success of cnidarians, and is crucial for the maintenance of coral reefs. While loss of the symbionts (such as in coral bleaching) may cause the death of the cnidarian host, over-proliferation of the algae may also harm the host. Thus, there is a need for the host to regulate the population density of its symbionts. In the green hydra, Chlorohydra viridissima, the density of symbiotic algae may be controlled through host modulation of the algal cell cycle. Alternatively, Chlorohydra may actively expel their endosymbionts, although this phenomenon has only been observed under experimentally contrived stress conditions. Principal Findings: We show, using light and electron microscopy, that Chlorohydra actively expel endosymbiotic algal cells during predatory feeding on Artemia. This expulsion occurs as part of the apocrine mode of secretion from the endodermal digestive cells, but may also occur via an independent exocytotic mechanism. Significance: Our results demonstrate, for the first time, active expulsion of endosymbiotic algae from cnidarians under natural conditions. We suggest this phenomenon may represent a mechanism whereby cnidarians can expel excess symbiotic algae when an alternative form of nutrition is available in the form of prey.

Yelena Fishman; Eliahu Zlotkin; Daniel Sher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

EFFECTS OF RADIUM ON STREAM ALGAE AND FISH BLOOD . Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

BS>Experiments are being carried out to determine uptake rates and concentration factors of soluble radium by filamentous algae. The effects of radium on the cells and proteins of fish blood were determined. Results are presented in tabular form. (M.C.G.)

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Effect of light intensity variations on the rate of photosynthesis of algae: A dynamical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In biology, it is common practice to describe the photosynthetic activity of algae (P) with respect to light (I) by means of static models in the form of single-valued functions P = f(I). This implies that the photosynthetic response to any light variation ...

A. Cloot

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Effects of p-Cresol on photosynthetic and respiration rates of a filamentous green alga (spirogyra)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of spilled phenols and cresols from coal gasification plants on the green alga SPIROYRA was investigated in experimental streams built by the US EPA near Monticello, Minnesota. P-Cresol at low concentrations inhibited photosynthesis and increased algal respiration rates. (JMT)

Stout, J. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing); Kilham, S.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great Lakes. The PC1 site score was significantly related to both periphyton and phytoplankton biomass, respectively accounted for 18% of the variation in epiphyton biomass. Periphytic and epiphytic biomass were negatively

McMaster University

235

Toxicity of shale oil to freshwater algae: comparisons with petroleum and coal-derived oils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The toxicities of various water-soluble fractions of Paraho/SOHIO shale oils and coal liquefaction products to the algae Selenastrum capricornutum and Microcystis aeruginosa are investigated. Photosynthetic inhibition is the criterion of toxicity. A secondary objective of the algal bioassay is determination of the range of toxic concentrations. (ACR)

Giddings, J.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as grass, wood chips, corn stalks and algae. New methods of making biofuel are also available that use Argonne, LLC. Did you know... Biofuels can be made from a wide variety of biological feedstocks. OPPORTUNITY Argonne biofuels researchers have teamed up with the lab's mechanical engineers as part

Walter, M.Todd

237

Artificial Life Simulation of Living Alga Cells and Its Sorption Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Resistance mechanisms of organisms against toxic metals are based on a few different mechanisms provided by algae cells. These mechanisms can be localized on the cell wall, on the cell wall and cytoplasm membrane, and intracellular localized mechanisms. ... Keywords: Chlorella kessleri, Swarm, arsenic, artificial life, heavy metal, sorption

Julius Csonto; Jana Kadukova; Marek Polak

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Plug-in Hybrid Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Hybrid Links Plug-in Hybrid Links Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov Web site. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles and Manufacturers Chevrolet Volt Official site for the Chevrolet Volt Cadillac ELR Official site for the Cadillac ELR (arriving early 2014) Ford C-MAX Energi Plug-in Hybrid Official site for the C-MAX Energi Plug-in Hybrid Ford Fusion Energi Plug-in Hybrid Official site for the Fusion Energi Plug-in Hybrid Honda Accord Plug-in Official site for the Honda Accord Plug-in Hybrid Toyota Prius Plug-in Official site for the Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid Plug-in-Related Information and Tools

239

Hybrid Systems Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ion suppression of lower-level information not relevant for the current task Encapsulation (information hiding) implementation details are hidden, only interface information is visible F. Kurfe Hybrid System Architectures ASHS '96 37 Inheritance common characteristics are derived from ancestors Polymorphism appropriate instances of classes and operators can be selected at runtime Advantages ffl very flexible ffl suitable for large systems ffl support reuse Problems ffl handling of new and atypical situations ffl quite complex ffl formal verification F. Kurfe Hybrid System Architectures ASHS '96 38 Expert System What is an Expert System? Basic concepts ffl designer / user supplies facts and information ffl user asks queries and receives expert advice ffl limited to a problem domain (knowledge domain) Components ffl user interface ffl knowledge base ffl inference mechanism Synonyms: knowledge-based system, knowledge-based expert system F. Kurfe Hybrid System Archi...

Franz J. Kurfe

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Association Conference Transportation Association Conference Vancouver, Canada December 2005 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Jim Francfort U.S. Department of Energy - FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity INL/CON-05-00964 Presentation Outline * Background & goals * Testing partners * Hybrid electric vehicle testing - Baseline performance testing (new HEV models) - 1.5 million miles of HEV fleet testing (160k miles per vehicle in 36 months) - End-of-life HEV testing (rerun fuel economy & conduct battery testing @ 160k miles per vehicle) - Benchmark data: vehicle & battery performance, fuel economy, maintenance & repairs, & life-cycle costs * WWW information location Background * Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - part of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Diagnostics for hybrid reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

Orsitto, Francesco Paolo [ENEA Unita' Tecnica Fusione , Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla Fusione C R Frascati v E Fermi 45 00044 Frascati (Italy)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid...

243

Issue 5: High Interest in Hybrid Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Associates. (2002). Hybrid Vehicle Consumer Acceptancedefinitely consider a hybrid vehicle, and any of these werepercent or more for a hybrid vehicle. O THER V ARIATIONS IN

Ong, Paul M.; Haselhoff, Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the last century. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) reduceon their design, hybrid electric vehicles employ electricof this paper, hybrid electric vehicles are a broad set of

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Efficient simulation of hybrid systems: A hybrid bond graph approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and efficient simulations facilitate cost-effective design and analysis of large, complex, embedded systems, whose behaviors are typically hybrid, i.e. continuous behaviors interspersed with discrete mode changes. In this paper we present an ... Keywords: component-oriented modeling, dynamic causal assignment, hybrid bond graphs, modeling and simulation environments, simulation of hybrid systems

Indranil Roychoudhury; Matthew J Daigle; Gautam Biswas; Xenofon Koutsoukos

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Standards Development as Hybridization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While users in the rest of the World have been offered 3G mobile phones based on either the CDMA2000 or W-CDMA standards, users in China have the additional option of using phones based on the TD-SCDMA standard. As a technology largely developed by Chinese ... Keywords: Global, Hybridization, Indigenous, Innovation, Mobile Phones, National, Technology

Xiaobai Shen, Ian Graham, James Stewart, Robin Williams

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Federal Tax Credits for Hybrids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrids Hybrids Hybrid Vehicle Photo Federal tax credit up to $3,400! Hybrids purchased or placed into service after December 31, 2005 may be eligible for a federal income tax credit of up to $3,400. Credit amounts begin to phase out for a given manufacturer once it has sold over 60,000 eligible vehicles. Vehicles purchased after December 31, 2010 are not eligible for this credit. The information below is provided for those filing amended tax returns for previous years. BMW Chrysler/Dodge Ford Brands GM Brands Honda Mazda Mercedes Nissan Porsche Toyota/Lexus 2011 Vehicle Make & Model Full Credit Phase Out No Credit 50% 25% BMW Jan. 1, 2006 TBD TBD Jan. 1, 2011 BMW ActiveHybrid 750i 2011 BMW ActiveHybrid 750i $900 -- -- $0 BMW ActiveHybrid 750Li 2011 BMW ActiveHybrid 750Li $900 -- -- $0

248

New Plug-in Hybrids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cars 2014 Midsize Cars Fuel Economy Specs 2013 Chevrolet Volt 2012 Fisker Karma Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle 2012 Chevy Volt Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle 2012 Karma Fisker Configuration...

249

Mirror fusion--fission hybrids  

SciTech Connect

The fusion-fission concept and the mirror fusion-fission hybrid program are outlined. Magnetic mirror fusion drivers and blankets for hybrid reactors are discussed. Results of system analyses are presented and a reference design is described.

Lee, J.D.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hybrid and Hierarchical Composite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chang Soo Kim, University of Wisconsin -Milwaukee. Scope, Hybrid and hierarchical composite materials have several advantageous characteristics that ...

251

SolarHybrid AG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarHybrid AG Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarHybrid AG Place Germany Sector Solar Product Germany-based solar thermal hybrid product manufacturer References SolarHybrid...

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Batteries Deployment Maintenance & Safety Laws & Incentives Hybrids Plug-In Hybrids All-Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles

253

Look back at the U. S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae Close-Out Report NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program-Biodiesel from Algae July 1998 By John Sheehan Terri Dunahay John Benemann Paul Roessler Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development

254

Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program was a relatively small research effort intended to look at the use of aquatic plants as sources of energy. Its history dates back to 1978, but much of the research from 1978 to 1982 focused on using algae to produce hydrogen. The program switched emphasis to other transportation fuels, particularly biodiesel, beginning in the early 1980's. This report summarizes the research activities carried out from 1980 to 1996, with an emphasis on algae for biodiesel production.

Sheehan, J.; Dunahay, T.; Benemann, J.; Roessler, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hybrids for Photovoltaics - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Organic: Inorganic Materials for Alternative Energy: Hybrids for Photovoltaics Program Organizers: Andrei Jitianu, Lehman College, City University of...

256

Hybrids for Batteries and Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Organic: Inorganic Materials for Alternative Energy: Hybrids for Batteries and Fuel Cells Program Organizers: Andrei Jitianu, Lehman College, City...

257

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Genes from Tiny Algae Shed Light on Big Role  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 9, 2009 April 9, 2009 Genes from Tiny Algae Shed Light on Big Role Managing Carbon in World's Oceans & Coping with Environmental Change WALNUT CREEK, CA-Scientists from two-dozen research organizations led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have decoded genomes of two algal strains, highlighting the genes enabling them to capture carbon and maintain its delicate balance in the oceans. These findings, from a team led by Alexandra Z. Worden of MBARI and published in the April 10 edition of the journal Science, will illuminate cellular processes related to algae-derived biofuels being pursued by DOE scientists. The study sampled two geographically diverse isolates of the photosynthetic

258

PYOMELANIN IS PRODUCED BY SHEWANELLA ALGAE BRY AND EFFECTED BY EXOGENOUS IRON  

SciTech Connect

Melanin production by S. algae BrY occurred during late/post-exponential growth in lactate-basal-salts liquid medium supplemented with tyrosine or phenylalanine. The antioxidant ascorbate inhibited melanin production, but not production of the melanin precursor, homogentisic acid. In the absence of ascorbate, melanin production was inhibited by the 4-hydroxyplenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor, sulcotrione and Fe(II) (>0.2mM). These data support the hypothesis that pigment production by S. algae BrY was a result the conversion of tyrosine or phenylalanine to homogentisic acid which was excreted, auto-oxidized and self-polymerized to form pyomelanin. The inverse relationship between Fe(II) concentration and pyomelanin production has implications that pyomelanin may play a role in iron assimilation under Fe(II) limiting conditions.

Turick, C; Frank Caccavo, F; Jr., J; Louis S. Tisa, L

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effect of light intensity on photosynthesis by thermal algae adapted to natural and reduced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal algae in alkaline hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) grow as compact mats in which self-shading is extensive, as shown by measurement by autoradiog-raphy of photosynthetic activity of cells at different levels in the mat. The effect of light intensity on photosynthesis of the algal mats was studied using neutral density filters during incubation with lCO Despite the intense sunlight at the altitude of Yellowstone, light inhibition by full sur$ght was observed only occasionally; the rate of photosynthesis fell progressively with decreasing light, although the most efficient use was at 7-14s of full sunlight. Later, the light intensity over portions of the algal mats was reduced to 18 % of full sunlight by installing neutral density glass plates, and changes of chlorophyll content, cell number, and response of photosynthesis to light intensity were determined over the next year. Although the chlorophyll content of the algae at the surface of the mat rose quickly, the chlorophyll content of the mat as a whole rose slowly or not at all; the photosynthetic response of the algal mats to full and reduced sunlight also changed slowly or not at all. Although individual algal cells can adapt rapidly to changes in light, the entire population, because of its existence in compact mats, adapts slowly. At the latitude of Yellowstone there is sufficient light throughout the year to enable algal growth to occur even at temperatures near the upper limit at which blue-green algae can grow; in Iceland, hot spring algae cannot grow during several winter months. Natural ultraviolet radiation neither inhibited nor stimulated photosynthesis.

Thomas D. Brock; M. Louise Brock

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Can a Hybrid Save Me Money?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Can a Hybrid Save Me Money? Can a Hybrid Save Me Money? Step 1: Show me a hybrid. I want to compare... 2013 Acura ILX Hybrid 2013 Acura ILX Hybrid Tech Pkg 2014 Buick LaCrosse eAssist 2013 Cadillac Escalade Hybrid 2WD 2013 Cadillac Escalade Hybrid 4WD 2013 Chevrolet Malibu Eco 2SA 2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid 2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid Titanium 2013 GMC Yukon Denali Hybrid 2WD 2013 GMC Yukon Denali Hybrid 4WD 2013 Honda Insight 2013 Honda Civic Hybrid 2013 Honda Civic Hybrid w/ Nav 2013 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid 2013 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Limited 2013 Infiniti M35h 2014 Infiniti Q50 Hybrid Premium 2014 Infiniti Q50 Hybrid Premium AWD 2013 Kia Optima Hybrid 2013 Lexus ES 300h 2013 Lexus GS 450h 2013 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid 2013 Toyota Avalon Hybrid XLE Touring 2013 Toyota Avalon Hybrid Limited 2014 Toyota Camry Hybrid LE 2014 Toyota Camry Hybrid XLE 2013 Toyota Highlander Hybrid 4WD 2013 Toyota Prius c One 2013 Toyota Prius Two

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

(Carbon and hydrogen metabolism of green algae in light and dark)  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this project was the elucidation of anaerobic metabolism in ecuaryotic green algae, chlamydomonas reinhardii. Chlamydomonas is a versatile organism that can grow under disparate conditions such as fresh water lakes and sewage ponds. The cell an photoassimilate CO{sub 2} aerobically and anaerobically, the latter after adaptation'' to a hydrogen metabolism. It can recall the knallgas or oxyhydrogen reaction and utilize hydrogen the simplest of all reducing agents for the dark assimilation of CO{sub 2} by the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle. The dark reduction with hydrogen lies on the border line between autotrophic and heterotrophic carbon assimilation. Both autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are known in which molecular hydrogen can replace either inorganic or organic hydrogen donors. Here the dark reduction of CO{sub 2} acquires a particular importance since it occurs in the same cell that carries on photoreduction and photosynthesis. We will demonstrate here that the alga chloroplast possesses a respiratory capacity. It seems likely that Chlamydomonas may have retained the chloroplastic respiratory pathway because of the selective advantage provided to the algae under a wide range of environmental conditions that the cells experience in nature. The ability to cycle electrons and poise the reduction level of the photosynthetic apparatus under aerobic and microaerobic conditions could allow more efficient CO{sub 2} fixation and enhanced growth under unfavorable conditions or survival under more severe conditions.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the Volvox carteri genome reveals that this green alga's increased organismal complexity and multicellularity are associated with modifications in protein families shared with its unicellular ancestor, and not with large-scale innovations in protein coding capacity. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and its morphologically diverse close relatives (the volvocine algae) are uniquely suited for investigating the evolution of multicellularity and development. We sequenced the 138 Mb genome of V. carteri and compared its {approx}14,500 predicted proteins to those of its unicellular relative, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Despite fundamental differences in organismal complexity and life history, the two species have similar protein-coding potentials, and few species-specific protein-coding gene predictions. Interestingly, volvocine algal-specific proteins are enriched in Volvox, including those associated with an expanded and highly compartmentalized extracellular matrix. Our analysis shows that increases in organismal complexity can be associated with modifications of lineage-specific proteins rather than large-scale invention of protein-coding capacity.

Prochnik, Simon E.; Umen, James; Nedelcu, Aurora; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M.; Nishii, Ichiro; Ferris, Patrick; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Hellsten, Uffe; Chapman, Jarrod; Simakov, Oleg; Rensing, Stefan A.; Terry, Astrid; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Jurka, Jerzy; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Schmitt, Rudiger; Kirk, David; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Full Hybrid: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlighted Stop/Start button banner graphic: blue bar highlighted Stop/Start button banner graphic: blue bar subbanner graphic: gray bar Overview Button highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button OVERVIEW Full hybrids use a gasoline engine as the primary source of power, and an electric motor provides additional power when needed. In addition, full hybrids can use the electric motor as the sole source of propulsion for low-speed, low-acceleration driving, such as in stop-and-go traffic or for backing up. This electric-only driving mode can further increase fuel efficiency under some driving conditions. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

264

Pulsed hybrid field emitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

Sampayan, S.E.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pulsed hybrid field emitter  

SciTech Connect

A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Full Hybrid: Overview  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button OVERVIEW Full hybrids use a gasoline engine as the primary source of power, and an electric motor provides additional power when needed. In addition, full hybrids can use the electric motor as the sole source of propulsion for low-speed, low-acceleration driving, such as in stop-and-go traffic or for backing up. This electric-only driving mode can further increase fuel efficiency under some driving conditions. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

267

Hybrid electroluminescent devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid electroluminescent (EL) device comprises at least one inorganic diode element and at least one organic EL element that are electrically connected in series. The absolute value of the breakdown voltage of the inorganic diode element is greater than the absolute value of the maximum reverse bias voltage across the series. The inorganic diode element can be a power diode, a Schottky barrier diode, or a light-emitting diode.

Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Michael, Joseph Darryl (Schenectady, NY)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

268

Mirror hybrid reactors  

SciTech Connect

The fusion-fission hybrid is a combination of the fusion and fission processes, having features which are complementary. Fission energy is running out of readily available fuel, and fusion has extra neutrons which can be used to breed that fission fuel. Fusion would have to take on an extra burden of radioactivity, but this early application would give fusion, which does not work well enough now to make power, practical experience which may accelerate development of pure fusion.

Moir, R.W.

1978-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

Developing New Alternative Energy in Virginia: Bio-Diesel from Algae  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this study was to select chemical processing equipment, install and operate that equipment to directly convert algae to biodiesel via a reaction patented by Old Dominion University (Pat. No. US 8,080,679B2). This reaction is a high temperature (250- 330{degrees}C) methylation reaction utilizing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to produce biodiesel. As originally envisioned, algal biomass could be treated with TMAH in methanol without the need to separately extract triacylglycerides (TAG). The reactor temperature allows volatilization and condensation of the methyl esters whereas the spent algae solids can be utilized as a high-value fertilizer because they are minimally charred. During the course of this work and immediately prior to commencing, we discovered that glycerol, a major by-product of the conventional transesterification reaction for biofuels, is not formed but rather three methoxylated glycerol derivatives are produced. These derivatives are high-value specialty green chemicals that strongly upgrade the economics of the process, rendering this approach as one that now values the biofuel only as a by-product, the main value products being the methoxylated glycerols. A horizontal agitated thin-film evaporator (one square foot heat transfer area) proved effective as the primary reactor facilitating the reaction and vaporization of the products, and subsequent discharge of the spent algae solids that are suitable for supplementing petrochemicalbased fertilizers for agriculture. Because of the size chosen for the reactor, we encountered problems with delivery of the algal feed to the reaction zone, but envision that this problem could easily disappear upon scale-up or can be replaced economically by incorporating an extraction process. The objective for production of biodiesel from algae in quantities that could be tested could not be met, but we implemented use of soybean oil as a surrogate TAG feed to overcome this limitation. The positive economics of this process are influenced by the following: 1. the weight percent of dry algae in suspension that can be fed into the evaporator, 2. the alga species ability to produce a higher yield of biodiesel, 3. the isolation of valuable methoxylated by-products, 4. recycling and regeneration of methanol and TMAH, and 5. the market value of biodiesel, commercial agricultural fertilizer, and the three methoxylated by-products. The negative economics of the process are the following: 1. the cost of producing dried, ground algae, 2. the capital cost of the equipment required for feedstock mixing, reaction, separation and recovery of products, and reactant recycling, and 3. the electrical cost and other utilities. In this report, the economic factors and results are assembled to predict the commercialization cost and its viability. This direct conversion process and equipment discussed herein can be adapted for various feedstocks including: other algal species, vegetable oil, jatropha oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, and other TAG containing raw materials as a renewable energy resource.

Hatcher, Patrick [Old Dominion University

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hybrid2: The hybrid power system simulation model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a large-scale need and desire for energy in remote communities, especially in the developing world; however the lack of a user friendly, flexible performance prediction model for hybrid power systems incorporating renewables hindered the analysis of hybrids (including wind turbines, PV, diesel generators, AC/DC energy storage) as options to conventional solutions. A user friendly model was needed with the versatility to simulate the many system locations, widely varying hardware configurations, and differing control options for potential hybrid power systems. To meet these ends, NREL and U. Mass. researchers developed the Hybrid2 software. This paper provides an overview of the capabilities, features, and functionality of the Hybrid2 code, discusses its validation and future plans. Model availability and technical support provided to Hybrid2 users are also discussed.

Baring-Gould, E I; Green, H J; van Dijk, V A.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Manwell, J F [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States). Renewable Energy Research Lab.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Solar thermal electric hybridization issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal electric systems have an advantage over many other renewable energy technologies because the former use heat as an intermediate energy carrier. This is an advantage as it allows for a relatively simple method of hybridization by using heat from fossil-fuel. Hybridization of solar thermal electric systems is a topic that has recently generated significant interest and controversy and has led to many diverse opinions. This paper discusses many of the issues associated with hybridization of solar thermal electric systems such as what role hybridization should play; how it should be implemented; what are the efficiency, environmental, and cost implications; what solar fraction is appropriate; how hybrid systems compete with solar-only systems; and how hybridization can impact commercialization efforts for solar thermal electric systems.

Williams, T A; Bohn, M S; Price, H W

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid geothermal heat pump systems offer many of the benefits of full geothermal systems but at lower installed costs. A hybrid geothermal system combines elements of a conventional water loop heat pump system in order to reduce the geothermal loop heat exchanger costs, which are probably the largest cost element of a geothermal system. These hybrid systems have been used successfully where sufficient ground space to install large heat exchangers for full geothermal options was unavailable, or where the...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

Energy Basics: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

274

Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid and Vehicle Hybrid and Vehicle Systems to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Modeling & Simulation Integration & Validation Benchmarking Parasitic Loss Reduction Propulsion Systems Advanced Vehicle Evaluations Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

275

Review and evaluation of immobilized algae systems for the production of fuels from microalgae. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the use of immobilized algae systems. It was the finding that commercial immobilized algae systems are not in operation at this time but, with research, could certainly become so. The use of immobilized algae will depend on, as in all commercial systems, the economic value of the product. This paper reviews the technical feasibility of immobilization as it applies to algae. Finally, the economics of possible immobilized algal systems that would produce liquid fuels were investigated. It was calculated that an immobilized system would have 8.5 times the capital costs of a conventional microalgae culture system. Operational costs would be about equal, although there would be substantial savings of water with the immobilized system. A major problem with immobilizing algae is the fact that sunlight drives the system. At present, an immobilized algal system to mass produce lipids for use as a liquid fuel does not appear to be economically feasible. The major drawback is developing a low-cost system that obtains the same amount of solar energy as provided to a shallow 3 square mile pond while increasing the culture density by an order of magnitude. R and D to increase light availability and to develop low cost transparent tanks could increase the competitiveness of immobilized algal systems. 44 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evolution of Plant-Like Crystalline Storage Polysaccharide in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii Argues for a Red Alga Ancestry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Single-celled apicomplexan parasites are known to cause major diseases in humans and animals including malaria, toxoplasmosis, and coccidiosis. The presence of apicoplasts with the remnant of a plastid-like DNA argues that these parasites evolved from photosynthetic ancestors possibly related to the dinoflagellates. Toxoplasma gondii displays amylopectin-like polymers within the cytoplasm of the dormant brain cysts. Here we report a detailed structural and comparative analysis of the Toxoplasma gondii, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii storage polysaccharides. We show Toxoplasma gondii amylopectin to be similar to the semicrystalline floridean starch accumulated by red algae. Unlike green plants or algae, the nuclear DNA sequences as well as biochemical and phylogenetic analysis argue that the Toxoplasma gondii amylopectin pathway has evolved from a totally different UDP-glucose-based metabolism similar to that of the floridean starch accumulating red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae and, to a lesser extent, to those of glycogen storing animals or fungi. In both red algae and apicomplexan parasites, isoamylase and glucanwater dikinase sequences are proposed to explain the appearance of semicrystalline Correspondence to: Stanislas Tomavo;

Jean-stphane Varr; Luc Lienard; David Dauville E; Yann Gue Rardel; Marie-odile Soyer-gobillard; Alain Bule On; Steven Ball; Stanislas Tomavo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 9. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Algae Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet algae slurries can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In a pressurized-water environment (20 MPa), near-total conversion of the organic structure of the algae to gases has been achieved in the presence of a supported ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming, as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. As opposed to earlier work, biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties in the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. As a result, the algae feedstocks, even those with high ash contents, were much more reliably processed. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations. Consistent catalyst operation in these short-term tests suggested good stability and minimal poisoning effects. High methane content in the product gas was noted with significant carbon dioxide captured in the aqueous byproduct in combination with alkali constituents and the ammonia byproduct derived from proteins in the algae. High conversion of algae to gas products was found with low levels of byproduct water contamination and low to moderate loss of carbon in the mineral separation step.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hybrid vehicle potential assessment. Volume 7. Hybrid vehicle review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Review of hybrid vehicles (HVs) built during the past ten years or planned to be built in the near future is presented. An attempt is made to classify and analyze these vehicles to get an overall picture of their key characteristics. The review includes on-road hybrid passenger cars, trucks, vans, and buses.

Leschly, K.O.

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hybrid solar lighting systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Images of Hybrid Vehicles Each of the householdsbetween hybrid and non-hybrid vehicles was observed in smallowned Honda Civic Hybrids, vehicles that are virtually

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Ken; Turrentine, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

EA-1786: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1786: Final Environmental Assessment Algenol Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae, Freeport, Texas, Fort Myers, Florida The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of up to $18 million in cost-shared federal funding to support the final design, construction, and start-up of a pilot-scale Direct to Ethanol® integrated biorefinery (hereafter referred to as biorefinery or proposed project). DOE has authorized Algenol Biofuels, Inc. (Algenol) to use a percentage of its federal funding for pilot-scale activities ($7 million), which include: research and development related to organism development, developing the flexible film photobioreactor, preliminary process engineering, construction planning, regulatory submissions and

283

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 6940 of 26,764 results. 31 - 6940 of 26,764 results. Download EA-1786: Final Environmental Assessment Algenol Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae, Freeport, Texas, Fort Myers, Florida http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1786-final-environmental-assessment Download CX-004660: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Whey Permeate to Ethanol Process CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 12/09/2010 Location(s): Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004660-categorical-exclusion-determination Rebate Natural Gas Utility Conservation Programs (Maine) This Chapter describes how natural gas utilities serving more than 5,000 residential customers must implement natural gas energy conservation programs. The regulations describe

284

Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are also included in this study. Based on this analysis, the estimated future selling price of hydrogen produced from algae ranges $0.57/kg to $13.53/kg.

Amos, W. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Conceptual innovations in hybrid reactors  

SciTech Connect

A number of innovations in the conception of fusion-fission hybrid reactors, including the blanket, the fusion driver, the coupling of the fusion and the fission components as well as the application of hybrid reactors are described, and their feasibility assessed.

Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Look back at the U. S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae Close-Out Report NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program-Biodiesel from Algae July 1998 By John Sheehan Terri Dunahay John Benemann Paul Roessler Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development Prepared by: the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Operated by Midwest Research Institute Under Contract No. DE-AC36-83CH10093 Executive Summary From 1978 to 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development funded a program to develop renewable transportation fuels from algae. The main focus of the program, know as the Aquatic

287

Hybrids Plus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hybrids Plus Hybrids Plus Jump to: navigation, search Name Hybrids Plus Address 3245 Prarie Ave Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80301 Sector Vehicles Product Plug in Electric Hybrid Vehicle conversions, chargers, battery systems Website http://www.eetrex.com/ Coordinates 40.022143°, -105.250981° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.022143,"lon":-105.250981,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

288

Issue 5: High Interest in Hybrid Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005). High Interest in Hybrid Cars. SCS Fact Sheet, Vol.May 2005 High Interest in Hybrid Cars I NTRODUCTION PublicThe unique features of a hybrid car mean that it is more

Ong, Paul M.; Haselhoff, Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secrets, but the price of hybrid cars and trucks are betweenCosts of hybrid vehicles Depending on whether a car companydiesel-hybrid prototypes that attained 70 MPG (Green Car

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emergence of Hybrid Vehicles: Ending oils strangleholdthe benefits of hybrid vehicles Dr. Thomas Turrentine Dr.the benefits of hybrid vehicles Report prepared for CSAA Dr.

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hybrid powertrain controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid powertrain for a vehicle comprising a diesel engine and an electric motor in a parallel arrangement with a multiple ratio transmission located on the torque output side of the diesel engine, final drive gearing connecting drivably the output shaft of transmission to traction wheels of the vehicle, and an electric motor drivably coupled to the final drive gearing. A powertrain controller schedules fuel delivered to the diesel engine and effects a split of the total power available, a portion of the power being delivered by the diesel and the balance of the power being delivered by the motor. A shifting schedule for the multiple ratio transmission makes it possible for establishing a proportional relationship between accelerator pedal movement and torque desired at the wheels. The control strategy for the powertrain maintains drivability of the vehicle that resembles drivability of a conventional spark ignition vehicle engine powertrain while achieving improved fuel efficiency and low exhaust gas emissions.

Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI); Powell, Barry Kay (Belleville, MI)

2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Test cell location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle architecture P2 HEV Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document date 8/7/2013 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3750 26.8 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.15 0.0145 Revision number 3 Notes: Test Fuel Information Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE Gasoline Fuel density [g/ml] Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 0.742 18202 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S o l a r L a m p s [ W / m 2 ] V e i c l e C l i m a t e C o n t r o l s e t t i n g s H o o d P o s i t i o n [ U p ] o r [ C l o s e d ] W i n d o w P o s i t i o n [ C l o s e d ] o r [ D o w n ] C y c l e D i s t a n c e [ m i ] C

293

Toxicity of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/: selective inhibition of blue-green algae by bisulfite and nitrite  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms were exposed to bisulfite at concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mM and nitrite of a concentration of 1.0 mM. Results show that the photosynthetic activity of the blue-green algae studied was almost totally inhibited by 0.1 mM bisulfite. By contrast, the other algae generally showed little or no inhibition by 0.1 mM bisulfite; this group of resistant species included 14 green algae, 2 yellow algae, a red algae, and EUGLENA GRACILIS. Similarly, the 8 genera of blue-green algae were consistently sensitive to 1 mM nitrite. On the other hand, not one of the 10 green and yellow algal genera tested was appreciably inhibited by nitrite at this concentration. The potential sensitivity of blue-green algae to atmospheric sulfur dioxide is particularly interesting because the blue-green algae are the dominant nitrogen-fixing organisms in some ecosystems.

Wodzinski, R.S.; Labeda, D.P.; Alexander, M.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Lvy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer's flow field. We show that the experimentally observed non-Gaussian tails are generic and arise due to a combination of truncated L\\'evy statistics for the velocity field and algebraically decaying time correlations in the fluid. Our analytical considerations are illustrated through extensive simulations, implemented on graphics processing units to achieve the large sample sizes required for analyzing the tails of the tracer distributions.

Irwin M. Zaid; Jrn Dunkel; Julia M. Yeomans

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic29 Figure 9. Sensitivity to Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic21 Figure 6. Comparison of ACWH and CCGT-Wind

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

century. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) reduce emissionsas plug-in HEVs and full electric vehicles to market. In theon their design, hybrid electric vehicles employ electric

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Chevrolet Silverado Hybrid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevrolet Silverado Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Reliability Testing - April 2009 to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Chevrolet Silverado Hybrid...

299

Calibration of Hygrometers with the Hybrid Humidity ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hybrid Humidity Generator ... The HHG combines the two-pressure and divided-flow humidity generation techniques (hence the name hybrid). ...

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

Hybrid Car Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hybrid Car Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hybrid Car Calculator AgencyCompany Organization: New American Dream Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-1248E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

302

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Phadke, Amol, Charles A....

303

Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid and Vehicle Systems Hybrid and vehicle systems research provides an overarching vehicle systems perspective to the technology research and development (R&D) activities of...

304

Just the Basics - Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) offer reduced pollution and improved fuel economy. That's why the government and auto- makers are anxious to introduce a...

305

2010 Hyundai LPI Hybrid Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyundai LPI Hybrid Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Alternative Fuel Hybrid...

306

Development of a Novel Air Hybrid Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An air hybrid vehicle is an alternative to the electric hybrid vehicle that stores the kinetic energy of the vehicle during braking in the form (more)

Fazeli, Amir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hybrid lighting: Illuminating our future  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid lighting is a combination of natural and artificial illumination to be used indoors for all lighting needs. Ideally, hybrid lighting is effectively indistinguishable from standard artificial lighting except in quality and cost, where it will likely be an improvement. Hybrid lighting systems are produced by a combination of four technologies: collecting natural light, generating artificial light, transporting and distributing light to where it is needed, and controlling the amounts of both natural and artificial light continuously during usage. Lighting demands a large fraction of our energy needs. If we can control or decrease this demand, we are able to accommodate societal growth without energy demand growth.

Cates, M.R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hybrid Vehicle Program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities on the Hybrid Vehicle Program. The program objectives and the vehicle specifications are reviewed. The Hybrid Vehicle has been designed so that maximum use can be made of existing production components with a minimum compromise to program goals. The program status as of the February 9-10 Hardware Test Review is presented, and discussions of the vehicle subsystem, the hybrid propulsion subsystem, the battery subsystem, and the test mule programs are included. Other program aspects included are quality assurance and support equipment. 16 references, 132 figures, 47 tables.

None

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hybrid Fiber Optics  

SciTech Connect

Instruments and devices based on optical fiber were originally simple and passive. That has changed. A variety of devices uses optical fiber for sensing, communications and various optoelectronic functions. This paper discusses the creation of a hybrid optical fiber that incorporates not just the light transmission function but other types of materials and new multiple fiber arrangements. Recent experiences with a fiber draw tower reveal new possibilities for achieving multifunctional devices able to perform diverse instrumentation sensing applications. This is achievable even with feature sizes, when desired, on the nanoscale. For instance, fiber comprised of one or more light guides and one or more electrically conducting wires is feasible. This combination of optical fiber and metal wire may be termed a wiber . The wiber could determine temperature and proximity to surfaces, detect radio-frequency radiation, and provide electrical power. At the same time, a wiber would have the capability to simultaneously transmit light where the light is utilized to sense temperature and proximity and give illumination. There are many possible uses--depending on design and configuration--cutting across many technologies and programs.

Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Simpson, John T [ORNL; Gillies, George [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Full Hybrid: Starting  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

highlighted Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button highlighted Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button STARTING When a full hybrid vehicle is initially started, the battery typically powers all accessories. The gasoline engine only starts if the battery needs to be charged or the accessories require more power than available from the battery. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Battery (highlighted): The battery stores energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the electric motor. Since the battery powers the vehicle at low speeds, it is larger and holds much more energy than batteries used to start conventional vehicles. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection.

311

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and recollection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hour parametric tests and 100-hour proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency.

Stanley J. Miller; Grant L. Schelkoph; Grant E. Dunham

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Study on the Law of the Phosphorus Forms Transformation in the Sediment of Excess Alga Period Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the experiment of the phosphorus forms and the effect factors of phosphorus release from sediment in the urban shallow lake (taking Lake Xuanwu as a example)?the results showed that when the water body had higher pH value during the excess ... Keywords: phosphorus forms, phosphorus release from sediment, excess alga period, eutrophication, alkaline phosphate

Cao Shiwei; Chen Wei; Yang Min

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Low energy method of manufacturing high-grade protein using blue-green algae of the genus Spirulina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algae are well suited to replace many conventional sources of protein because of their efficient use of energy, land, and raw materials. The most promising genus, Spirulina, is compared with conventional protein sources on the bases of energy efficiency, land usage, and production costs.

Leesley, M.E.; Newsom, T.M.; Burleson, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Algae Biofuels and Future Engineers Kimberley Ogden is UAs principal investigator on a $44million DOE biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algae Biofuels and Future Engineers Kimberley Ogden is UAs principal investigator on a $44million DOE biofuels project and an NSF-funded STEM educator. The National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels totaling more than $44 million for algal Biofuels And bio products research and development. Kim Ogden

Wong, Pak Kin

315

NREL: Learning - Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Photo of the front and part of the side of a bus parked at the curb of a city street with tall buildings in the background. This diesel hybrid electric bus operated by the Metropolitan Transit Authority, New York City Transit, was part of a test study that recently investigated the fuel efficiency and reliability of these buses. Credit: Leslie Eudy Today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) range from small passenger cars to sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and large trucks. Though they often look just like conventional vehicles, HEVs usually include an electric motor as well as a small internal combustion engine (ICE). This combination provides greater fuel economy and fewer emissions than most conventional ICE vehicles do. HEVs are powered by two energy sources: an energy conversion unit, such as

316

Physics Out Loud - Hybrid Meson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hadron Previous Video (Hadron) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Laser) Laser Hybrid Meson We're well on our way in exploring how the strong force glues the nucleus together....

317

Global optimization of hybrid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems that exhibit both discrete state and continuous state dynamics are called hybrid systems. In most nontrivial cases, these two aspects of system behavior interact to such a significant extent that they cannot be ...

Lee, Cha Kun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect

For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

None available

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

NIST 'Hybrid Metrology' Method Could Improve Computer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST 'Hybrid Metrology' Method Could Improve Computer Chips. From NIST Tech Beat: September 5, 2012. ...

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

320

Cell body rocking is a dominant mechanism for flagellar synchronization in a swimming algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas swims with two flagella, which can synchronize their beat. Synchronized beating is required to swim both fast and straight. A long-standing hypothesis proposes that synchronization of flagella results from hydrodynamic coupling, but the details are not understood. Here, we present realistic hydrodynamic computations and high-speed tracking experiments of swimming cells that show how a perturbation from the synchronized state causes rotational motion of the cell body. This rotation feeds back on the flagellar dynamics via hydrodynamic friction forces and rapidly restores the synchronized state in our theory. We calculate that this `cell body rocking' provides the dominant contribution to synchronization in swimming cells, whereas direct hydrodynamic interactions between the flagella contribute negligibly. We experimentally confirmed the coupling between flagellar beating and cell body rocking predicted by our theory. We propose that the interplay of flagellar beating and hydrodynamic forces governs swimming and synchronization in Chlamydomonas.

Veikko Geyer; Frank Jlicher; Jonathon Howard; Benjamin M Friedrich

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Neutron diagnostics for mirror hybrids  

SciTech Connect

Fusion-fission (FuFi) hybrids will need instrumentation to diagnose the deuteriumtritium plasma, whose 14-MeV neutron emission is the driver of the sub-critical fission core. While the fission neutron yield rate (Y{sub fi} and hence power P{sub fi}) can be monitored with standard instrumentation, fusion plasmas in hybrids require special diagnostics where the determination of Y{sub th} ({proportional_to}P{sub fu}) is a challenge. Information on Y{sub fu} is essential for assessing the fusion plasma performance which together with Y{sub fi} allows for the validation of the neutron multiplication factor (k) of the subcritical fission core. Diagnostics for hybrid plasmas are heuristically discussed with special reference to straight field line mirror (SFLM). Relevant DT plasma experience from JET and plans for ITER in the main line of fusion research were used as input. It is shown that essential SFLM plasma information can potentially be obtained with proposed instrumentation, but the state of the hybrid plasma must be predictably robust as derived from fully diagnosed dedicated experiments without interface restrictions of the hybrid application.

Kaellne, Jan; Noack, Klaus; Agren, Olov; Gorini, Giuseppe; Tardocchi, Marco; Grosso, Giovanni [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 256, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Universita degli Studi di Milano - Bicocca, Dip. di Fisica 'G. Occhialini', Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126, Milan (Italy)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print The inherently high surface area of bimetallic nanoparticles makes them especially attractive materials for heterogeneous catalysis. The ability to selectively grow these and other types of nanoparticles on a desired surface is ideal for the fabrication of higher-order nanoscale architectures. However, the growth mechanism for bimetallic nanoparticles on a surface is expected to be quite different than that for free particles in solution. The altered growth process can lead to modulations in stoichiometry, elemental homogeneity, and surface structure, all of which can profoundly affect the catalytic or magnetic properties of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Now, researchers have experimentally observed these subtle structural differences through x-ray absorption spectroscopic studies at ALS Beamline 10.3.2. The results illustrate how directed nanoparticle growth on specific surfaces can lead to hybrid nanomaterials with a structurally different bimetallic component than its unhybridized counterpart.

323

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print The inherently high surface area of bimetallic nanoparticles makes them especially attractive materials for heterogeneous catalysis. The ability to selectively grow these and other types of nanoparticles on a desired surface is ideal for the fabrication of higher-order nanoscale architectures. However, the growth mechanism for bimetallic nanoparticles on a surface is expected to be quite different than that for free particles in solution. The altered growth process can lead to modulations in stoichiometry, elemental homogeneity, and surface structure, all of which can profoundly affect the catalytic or magnetic properties of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Now, researchers have experimentally observed these subtle structural differences through x-ray absorption spectroscopic studies at ALS Beamline 10.3.2. The results illustrate how directed nanoparticle growth on specific surfaces can lead to hybrid nanomaterials with a structurally different bimetallic component than its unhybridized counterpart.

324

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print The inherently high surface area of bimetallic nanoparticles makes them especially attractive materials for heterogeneous catalysis. The ability to selectively grow these and other types of nanoparticles on a desired surface is ideal for the fabrication of higher-order nanoscale architectures. However, the growth mechanism for bimetallic nanoparticles on a surface is expected to be quite different than that for free particles in solution. The altered growth process can lead to modulations in stoichiometry, elemental homogeneity, and surface structure, all of which can profoundly affect the catalytic or magnetic properties of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Now, researchers have experimentally observed these subtle structural differences through x-ray absorption spectroscopic studies at ALS Beamline 10.3.2. The results illustrate how directed nanoparticle growth on specific surfaces can lead to hybrid nanomaterials with a structurally different bimetallic component than its unhybridized counterpart.

325

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print The inherently high surface area of bimetallic nanoparticles makes them especially attractive materials for heterogeneous catalysis. The ability to selectively grow these and other types of nanoparticles on a desired surface is ideal for the fabrication of higher-order nanoscale architectures. However, the growth mechanism for bimetallic nanoparticles on a surface is expected to be quite different than that for free particles in solution. The altered growth process can lead to modulations in stoichiometry, elemental homogeneity, and surface structure, all of which can profoundly affect the catalytic or magnetic properties of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Now, researchers have experimentally observed these subtle structural differences through x-ray absorption spectroscopic studies at ALS Beamline 10.3.2. The results illustrate how directed nanoparticle growth on specific surfaces can lead to hybrid nanomaterials with a structurally different bimetallic component than its unhybridized counterpart.

326

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print The inherently high surface area of bimetallic nanoparticles makes them especially attractive materials for heterogeneous catalysis. The ability to selectively grow these and other types of nanoparticles on a desired surface is ideal for the fabrication of higher-order nanoscale architectures. However, the growth mechanism for bimetallic nanoparticles on a surface is expected to be quite different than that for free particles in solution. The altered growth process can lead to modulations in stoichiometry, elemental homogeneity, and surface structure, all of which can profoundly affect the catalytic or magnetic properties of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Now, researchers have experimentally observed these subtle structural differences through x-ray absorption spectroscopic studies at ALS Beamline 10.3.2. The results illustrate how directed nanoparticle growth on specific surfaces can lead to hybrid nanomaterials with a structurally different bimetallic component than its unhybridized counterpart.

327

Requirements Specifications For Hybrid Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to present a formal framework for representing and reasoning about the requirements of hybrid systems. As background, the paper briefly reviews an abstract model for specifying system and software requirements, called the Four Variable Model [12], and a related requirements method, called SCR (Software Cost Reduction) [10, 1]. The paper then introduces a special discrete version of the Four Variable Model, the SCR requirements model [8] and proposes an extension of the SCR model for specifying and reasoning about hybrid systems. 2 Background

Constance Heitmeyer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd EditionChapter 7 Alternative Carbon Sources for Heterotrophic Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid by the Marine Alga Crypthecodinium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd Edition Chapter 7 Alternative Carbon Sources for Heterotrophic Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid by the Marine Alga Crypthecodinium Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproduc

329

Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parallel hybrid passenger car (VW Golf) combined an EDLCpassenger cars using the ultracapacitors in micro-hybrid,passenger car using both carbon/carbon and hybrid carbon

Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options for Compactof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: Nationwideand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options, EPRI, Palo

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options for Compactof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: Nationwideand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options, EPRI, Palo

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S.; Burke, Andrew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and impacts of hybrid electric vehicle options for compactof plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, vol. 1: nationwideimpacts of hybrid electric vehicle options. Report #1000349,

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. , 2006. Plug-in hybrid vehicle analysis. Milestonegas emissions from plug-in hybrid vehicles: implications forPresentation at SAE 2008 Hybrid Vehicle Technologies

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ultracapacitors, fuel cells and hybrid vehicle design. Dr.on electric and hybrid vehicle technology and applicationsand performance. Hybrid vehicles utilizing a load leveling

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Medium and Heavy Duty Hybrid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an electric vehicle. Medium and heavy duty HEV testing results to date are posted below. Vehicle Testing Reports INL Hybrid Shuttle Busses INL Hybrid Shuttle Busses INL Hybrid...

336

Evaluation Of Potential Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications: Vol I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle Symposium, "The Hybrid Vehicle Revisited", OctoberBus Hv REFERENCES Hybrid Vehicle Assessment, Phase I,Laboratory, March 1984 Hybrid Vehicle Engineering Task

Gris, Arturo E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including the Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Act of 1976. Suchand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options for Compactof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: Nationwide

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation Of Potential Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications: Vol I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Potential Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications Volume IOF POTENTIAL HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE APPLICATIONS VOLUME IVIII International Electric Vehicle Symposium, "The Hybrid

Gris, Arturo E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including the Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Act of 1976. Suchand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options for Compactof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: Nationwide

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S.; Burke, Andrew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacitors fuel-cell hybrid electric vehicle optimizationsize for fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle-Part I, Journalbeen developed for hybrid electric vehicles with an internal

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of hybrid and electric vehicles Simulation ofand Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles Andrew Burkemarketing of hybrid and electric vehicles of various types

Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in batteries, ultracapacitors, fuel cells and hybrid vehicleBattery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle SymposiumBattery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

SciTech Connect

The Aquatic Species Program was a relatively small research effort intended to look at the use of aquatic plants as sources of energy. Its history dates back to 1978, but much of the research from 1978 to 1982 focused on using algae to produce hydrogen. The program switched emphasis to other transportation fuels, particularly biodiesel, beginning in the early 1980's. This report summarizes the research activities carried out from 1980 to 1996, with an emphasis on algae for biodiesel production.

Sheehan, J.; Dunahay, T.; Benemann, J.; Roessler, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NETL: News Release - Cal State to Explore Use of Marine Algae To "Soak Up"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 11, 2000 December 11, 2000 Cal State to Explore Use of Marine Algae To "Soak Up" Carbon Dioxide DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program Continues to Grow SAN MARCOS, CA - One possibility for reducing the buildup of gases in the atmosphere that can cause global warming may be to create algae ponds that can soak up the carbon dioxide released from power plants. MORE INFO DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program To explore this concept, the Department of Energy will add a project proposed by California State University, San Marcos, CA, to its carbon sequestration research program. The department will provide slightly more than $200,000 for the 1-year exploratory effort, while the university will contribute nearly $100,000. Cal State researchers will investigate the use of coccolithophorids -

345

Investigating Sources of Toxicity in Stormwater: Algae Mortality in Runoff Upstream of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A source evaluation case study is presented for observations of algae toxicity in an intermittent stream passing through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory near Livermore, California. A five-step procedure is discussed to determine the cause of water toxicity problems and to determine appropriate environmental management practices. Using this approach, an upstream electrical transfer station was identified as the probable source of herbicides causing the toxicity. In addition, an analytical solution for solute transport in overland flow was used to estimate the application level of 40 Kg/ha. Finally, this source investigation demonstrates that pesticides can impact stream water quality regardless of application within levels suggested on manufacturer labels. Environmental managers need to ensure that pesticides that could harm aquatic organisms (including algae) not be used within close proximity to streams or storm drainages and that application timing should be considered for environmental protection.

Campbell, C G; Folks, K; Mathews, S; Martinelli, R

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

346

1997 hybrid electric vehicle specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US DOE sponsors Advanced Vehicle Technology competitions to help educate the public and advance new vehicle technologies. For several years, DOE has provided financial and technical support for the American Tour de Sol. This event showcases electric and hybrid electric vehicles in a road rally across portions of the northeastern United States. The specifications contained in this technical memorandum apply to vehicles that will be entered in the 1997 American Tour de Sol. However, the specifications were prepared to be general enough for use by other teams and individuals interested in developing hybrid electric vehicles. The purpose of the specifications is to ensure that the vehicles developed do not present a safety hazard to the teams that build and drive them or to the judges, sponsors, or public who attend the competitions. The specifications are by no means the definitive sources of information on constructing hybrid electric vehicles - as electric and hybrid vehicles technologies advance, so will the standards and practices for their construction. In some cases, the new standards and practices will make portions of these specifications obsolete.

Sluder, S.; Larsen, R.; Duoba, M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hybrid free electron laser devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider hybrid free electron laser devices consisting of Cerenkov and undulator sections. We will show that they can in principle be used as segmented devices and also show the possibility of exploiting Cerenkov devices for the generation of nonlinear harmonic coherent power. We discuss both oscillator and amplifier schemes.

Asgekar, Vivek; Dattoli, G. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); ENEA, Unita Tecnico Scientifica Technologie Fisiche, Avanzate, Centro Ricerche Frascati, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Are hybrid cars too quiet?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase in availability of alternative fuel vehicles has elicited concerns for pedestrians who might not hear the approach of these quieter cars. Three experiments tested the relative audibility of hybrid vehicles (in their electric mode) and internal combustion engine (ICE) cars. Binaural recordings were made of the cars approaching from either the right or left

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is a high quality form of energy that can be easily converted to other forms of energy with high efficiency and, even more importantly, it can be used to control lower grades of energy quality with ease. However, building a cost-effective ... Keywords: charge, electrical storage, energy, energy storage, hybrid storage, management

Massoud Pedram; Naehyuck Chang; Younghyun Kim; Yanzhi Wang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

How Plug-in Hybrids Save Money  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Plug-in Hybrids Save Money How Plug-in Hybrids Save Money Plug-in hybrid recharging Plug-in hybrids reduce fuel costs by Using high-capacity batteries that allow them to operate on electricity from the outlet for significant distances-electricity typically costs less than half as much as gasoline Using a larger electric motor that typically allows the vehicle to use electricity at higher speeds than regular hybrids Using regenerative braking to recover energy typically wasted when you apply the brakes Plug-in hybrid designs differ, and your driving habits, especially the distance you drive between re-charging, can have a big effect on your fuel bill. My Plug-in Hybrid Calculator estimates gasoline and electricity costs for any available plug-in hybrid using your driving habits and fuel costs.

351

Dynamic programming for hybrid pneumatic vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pneumatic hybridization of internal combustion engines may prove to be a viable and cost-efficient alternative to electric hybridization. This paper investigates the fuel consumption reduction that is possible with this rather new concept in combination ...

Christian Dnitz; Iulian Vasile; Christopher Onder; Lino Guzzella

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Issue 5: High Interest in Hybrid Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Oregon Hybrid Gas-Electric Car Owners. July. U.S.of a qualifying gas-electric car, but because this is aor leasing a hybrid car (gas-electric) (Baldassare, 2004).

Ong, Paul M.; Haselhoff, Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hybrid vehicle-centric route guidance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes a hybrid route guidance system in which predictive guidance is generated in a centralized layer and revised in a reactive, decentralized layer that resides on-board the vehicle. This hybrid approach ...

Farver, Jennifer M. (Jennifer Margaret), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a literature review of hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation is first given with an emphasis on system integration and evaluation. Hybrid systems are defined as those which use solar energy and fuel ...

Sheu, Elysia J. (Elysia Ja-Zeng)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The process is based on Fischer- Tropsch technology in which the shale gas is reformed with steam, while and industry; e.g. ExxonMobil announced a $600 million program [10-12]. However, the use of Fischer-Tropsch the gap between current fuels and biofuels by using Fischer-Tropsch (FT) technology with a hybrid source

Edwards, Paul N.

356

Whole-cell sensing for a harmful bloom-forming microscopic alga by measuring antibody--antigen forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractAureococcus anophagefferens, a harmful bloomforming alga responsible for brown tides in estuaries of the Middle Atlantic U.S., has been investigated by atomic force microscopy for the first time, using probes functionalized with a monoclonal antibody specific for the alga. The rupture force between a single monoclonal antibody and the surface of A. anophagefferens was experimentally found to be 246 6 11 pN at the load rate of 12 nN/s. Force histograms for A. anophagefferens and other similarly-sized algae are presented and analyzed. The results illustrate the effects of load rates, and demonstrate that force-distance measurements can be used to build biosensors with high signal-to-noise ratios for A. anophagefferens. The methods described in this paper can be used, in principle, to construct sensors with single-cell resolution for arbitrary cells for which monoclonal antibodies are available. Index TermsAtomic force microscopy, Aureococcus anophagefferens, biosensors, force-distance measurements, single-cell identification.

Er S. Lee; Mrinal Mahapatro; David A. Caron; Aristides A. G. Requicha; Life Fellow; Beth A. Stauffer; Mark E. Thompson; Chongwu Zhou

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

R. W. Moir; N. N. Martovetsky; A. W. Molvik; D. D. Ryutov; T. C. Simonen

358

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A HYBRID BIO ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and characterization of A Hybrid bio/synthetic biomimetic aggrecan Macromolecule for the treatment of Low Back Pain. ...

359

Development of Hybrid Supercapacitors for Portable Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examples of integrated devices built using Battelle's hybrid supercapacitor materials are presented and work ... Energy Storage for Advanced Electric Vehicles.

360

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid combined cycle power plant natural gas combined cyclePower Plants study, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Hybrid Automobile and the Atkinson Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hybrid automobile is a strikingly new automobile technology with a number of new technological features that dramatically improve energy efficiency. This paper will briefly describe how hybrid automobiles work; what are these new technological features; why the Toyota Prius hybrid internal combustion engine operates on the Atkinson cycle instead of the Otto cycle; and what are the advantages and disadvantages of the hybrid automobile. This is a follow-up to my two previous papers on the physics of automobile engines.1

Bernard J. Feldman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Hybrid Controller for Multiple Energy Storage Devices ...  

Summary. A new hybrid energy storage controller developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is designed for a centralized ...

363

Hybrid Organic: Inorganic Materials for Alternative Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Hybrid Organic: Inorganic Materials for Alternative Energy. Sponsorship.

364

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-1248E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Principal Authors Amol Phadke1 , Charles;Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis ii LBNL-1248E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;#12;Advanced Coal

365

Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

Unkefer, Pat J. (Los Alamos, NM); Knight, Thomas J. (Portland, ME); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM)

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Increasing the concentration of prolines such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that overexpress glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramnate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

Unkefer, Pat J. (Los Alamos, NM); Knight, Thomas J. (Portland, ME); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

Evaluation of Marine Brown Algae and Sponges from Brazil as Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The ischemic disorders, in which platelet aggregation and blood coagulation are involved, represent a major cause of disability and death worldwide. The antithrombotic therapy has unsatisfactory performance and may produce side effects. So, there is a need to seek molecules with antithrombotic properties. Marine organisms produce substances with different well defined ecological functions. Moreover, some of these molecules also exhibit pharmacological properties such as antiviral, anticancer, antiophidic and anticoagulant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through in vitro tests, the effect of two extracts of brown algae and ten marine sponges from Brazil on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation. Our results revealed that most of the extracts were capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation and clotting measured by plasma recalcification tests, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogenolytic activity. On the other hand, five of ten species of sponges induced platelet aggregation. Thus, the marine organisms studied here may have molecules with antithrombotic properties, presenting biotechnological potential to antithrombotic therapy. Further chemical investigation shouldMar. Drugs 2011, 9 1347

Laura De Andrade Moura; Fredy Ortiz-ramirez; Diana Negrao Cavalcanti; Suzi Meneses Ribeiro; Guilherme Muricy; Valeria Laneuville Teixeira; Andre Lopes Fuly

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Pilot Scale Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-389  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This collaboration between Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will provide valuable information regarding Direct to Ethanol technology. Specifically, the cooperative R&D will analyze the use of flue gas from industrial sources in the Direct to Ethanol process, which may demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously producing a valuable product, i.e., ethanol. Additionally, Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will develop both a techno-economic model with full material and energy balances and an updated life-cycle analysis to identify greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline, each of which will provide a better understanding of the Direct to Ethanol process and further demonstrate that it is a breakthrough technology with varied and significant benefits.

Pienkos, P. T.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:13am Addthis Photo of hands holding a battery pack (grey rectangular box) for a hybrid electric vehicle. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of high fuel economy and low emissions with the power, range, and convenience of conventional diesel and gasoline fueling. HEV technologies also have potential to be combined with alternative fuels and fuel cells to provide additional benefits. Future offerings might also include plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Hybrid electric vehicles typically combine the internal combustion engine of a conventional vehicle with the battery and electric motor of an electric vehicle. The combination offers low emissions and convenience-HEVs never need to be plugged in.

370

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:13am Addthis Photo of hands holding a battery pack (grey rectangular box) for a hybrid electric vehicle. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of high fuel economy and low emissions with the power, range, and convenience of conventional diesel and gasoline fueling. HEV technologies also have potential to be combined with alternative fuels and fuel cells to provide additional benefits. Future offerings might also include plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Hybrid electric vehicles typically combine the internal combustion engine of a conventional vehicle with the battery and electric motor of an electric vehicle. The combination offers low emissions and convenience-HEVs never need to be plugged in.

371

Planar slot coupled microwave hybrid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A symmetrical 180.degree. microwave hybrid is constructed by opening a slot line in a ground plane below a conducting strip disposed on a dielectric substrate, creating a slot coupled conductor. Difference signals propagating on the slot coupled conductor are isolated on the slot line leaving sum signals to propagate on the microstrip. The difference signal is coupled from the slot line onto a second microstrip line for transmission to a desired location. The microstrip branches in a symmetrical fashion to provide the input/output ports of the 180.degree. hybrid. The symmetry of the device provides for balance and isolation between sum and difference signals, and provides an advantageous balance between the power handling capabilities and the bandwidth of the device.

Petter, Jeffrey K. (Williston, VT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compositional Variation Within Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures Print Wednesday, 29 September 2010 00:00 The inherently high surface area of bimetallic nanoparticles makes them especially attractive materials for heterogeneous catalysis. The ability to selectively grow these and other types of nanoparticles on a desired surface is ideal for the fabrication of higher-order nanoscale architectures. However, the growth mechanism for bimetallic nanoparticles on a surface is expected to be quite different than that for free particles in solution. The altered growth process can lead to modulations in stoichiometry, elemental homogeneity, and surface structure, all of which can profoundly affect the catalytic or magnetic properties of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Now, researchers have experimentally observed these subtle structural differences through x-ray absorption spectroscopic studies at ALS Beamline 10.3.2. The results illustrate how directed nanoparticle growth on specific surfaces can lead to hybrid nanomaterials with a structurally different bimetallic component than its unhybridized counterpart.

373

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHAPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J.Fabry

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids ? single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate ? to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

385

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

Algae as a Feedstock for Biofuels: An Assessment of the State of Technology and Opportunities. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pursuit of a stable, economically-sound, and environmentally-friendly source of transportation fuel has led to extensive research and development (R&D) efforts focused on the conversion of various feedstocks into biofuels. Some feedstocks, such as sugar cane, corn and woody biomass, are targeted because their structures can be broken down into sugars and fermented into alcohols. Other feedstocks, such as vegetable oils, are appealing because they contain considerable amounts of lipids, which can be extracted and converted into biodiesel or other fuels. While significant R&D and commercial strides have been made with each of these feedstocks, technical and market barriers (e.g., cost, scalability, infrastructure requirements, and 'food vs. fuel' debates) currently limit the penetration of the resultant biofuels into the mainstream. Because of algae's ability to potentially address several of these barriers, its use as a feedstock for biofuels has led to much excitement and initiative within the energy industry. Algae are highly diverse, singleor multi-cellular organisms comprised of mostly lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, which may be used to produce a wide variety of biofuels. Algae offer many competitive advantages over other feedstocks, including: 1) Higher potential lipid content than terrestrial plants, sometimes exceeding 50% of the cell's dry biomass (U.S. DOE, May '10; Tornabene et al., 1983) 2) Rapid growth rates that are 20-30 times higher than terrestrial crops (McDill, 2009) and, in some cases, capable of doubling in size with 10 hours 3) Diverse number of species that can collectively thrive in a wide range of environments throughout the world, presenting an overall high overall tolerance for climate, sunlight, nutrient levels, etc. 4) Daily harvesting potential instead of seasonal harvest periods associated with terrestrial crops 5) Potential to redirect CO2 from industry operations to algal cultivation facilities to be used in an algal biofuel cycle before it is released into the atmosphere 6) Ability to be cultivated on land that that is unsuitable for agriculture, so it does not directly compete with farmland Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rates, maximum oil yields of 20,000--115,000 L/ha/yr (2,140-13,360 gal/ac/yr) have been estimated. xiv 7) Ability to thrive in seawater, wastewater, or other non-potable sources, so it does not directly compete with fresh water resources. In fact, wastewater can provide algae with some essential nutrients, such as nitrogen, so algae may contribute to cleaning up wastewater streams. 8) Non-toxic and biodegradable 9) Co-products that may present high value in other markets, including nutriceuticals and cosmetics Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rate, maximum oil yields of 20,000 -- 115,000 liters per hectare per year (L/ha/yr) (2,140 -- 13,360 gallons per acre per year) (Baldos, 2009; Wijffels, 2008) have been estimated, which is considerably higher than any other competing feedstock. Although algae species collectively present many strong advantages (although one specific species is unlikely to possess all of the advantages listed), a sustainable algal biofuel industry is at least one or two decades away from maturity, and no commercial scale operations currently exist. Several barriers must first be overcome before algal biofuels can compete with traditional petroleum-based fuels. Production chains with net energy output need to be identified, and continued R&D is needed to reduce the cost in all segments of the production spectrum (e.g., harvesting, dewatering, extracting of oil). Further research to identify strains with high production rates and/or oil yields may also improve competitiveness within the market. Initiatives to seamlessly integrate algal biofuels into the existing transportation infrastructure may increase their convenience level.

Sikes, K.; McGill, R. [Sentech, Inc. (United States); Van Walwijk, M. [Independent Consultant (France)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Algae as a Feedstock for Biofuels: An Assessment of the State of Technology and Opportunities. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The pursuit of a stable, economically-sound, and environmentally-friendly source of transportation fuel has led to extensive research and development (R&D) efforts focused on the conversion of various feedstocks into biofuels. Some feedstocks, such as sugar cane, corn and woody biomass, are targeted because their structures can be broken down into sugars and fermented into alcohols. Other feedstocks, such as vegetable oils, are appealing because they contain considerable amounts of lipids, which can be extracted and converted into biodiesel or other fuels. While significant R&D and commercial strides have been made with each of these feedstocks, technical and market barriers (e.g., cost, scalability, infrastructure requirements, and 'food vs. fuel' debates) currently limit the penetration of the resultant biofuels into the mainstream. Because of algae's ability to potentially address several of these barriers, its use as a feedstock for biofuels has led to much excitement and initiative within the energy industry. Algae are highly diverse, singleor multi-cellular organisms comprised of mostly lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, which may be used to produce a wide variety of biofuels. Algae offer many competitive advantages over other feedstocks, including: 1) Higher potential lipid content than terrestrial plants, sometimes exceeding 50% of the cell's dry biomass (U.S. DOE, May '10; Tornabene et al., 1983) 2) Rapid growth rates that are 20-30 times higher than terrestrial crops (McDill, 2009) and, in some cases, capable of doubling in size with 10 hours 3) Diverse number of species that can collectively thrive in a wide range of environments throughout the world, presenting an overall high overall tolerance for climate, sunlight, nutrient levels, etc. 4) Daily harvesting potential instead of seasonal harvest periods associated with terrestrial crops 5) Potential to redirect CO2 from industry operations to algal cultivation facilities to be used in an algal biofuel cycle before it is released into the atmosphere 6) Ability to be cultivated on land that that is unsuitable for agriculture, so it does not directly compete with farmland Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rates, maximum oil yields of 20,000--115,000 L/ha/yr (2,140-13,360 gal/ac/yr) have been estimated. xiv 7) Ability to thrive in seawater, wastewater, or other non-potable sources, so it does not directly compete with fresh water resources. In fact, wastewater can provide algae with some essential nutrients, such as nitrogen, so algae may contribute to cleaning up wastewater streams. 8) Non-toxic and biodegradable 9) Co-products that may present high value in other markets, including nutriceuticals and cosmetics Given microalgae's high lipid content and rapid growth rate, maximum oil yields of 20,000 -- 115,000 liters per hectare per year (L/ha/yr) (2,140 -- 13,360 gallons per acre per year) (Baldos, 2009; Wijffels, 2008) have been estimated, which is considerably higher than any other competing feedstock. Although algae species collectively present many strong advantages (although one specific species is unlikely to possess all of the advantages listed), a sustainable algal biofuel industry is at least one or two decades away from maturity, and no commercial scale operations currently exist. Several barriers must first be overcome before algal biofuels can compete with traditional petroleum-based fuels. Production chains with net energy output need to be identified, and continued R&D is needed to reduce the cost in all segments of the production spectrum (e.g., harvesting, dewatering, extracting of oil). Further research to identify strains with high production rates and/or oil yields may also improve competitiveness within the market. Initiatives to seamlessly integrate algal biofuels into the existing transportation infrastructure may increase their convenience level.

Sikes, K.; McGill, R. [Sentech, Inc. (United States); Van Walwijk, M. [Independent Consultant (France)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Surface Complexation of Neptunium(V) onto Whole Cells and Cell Components of Shewanella alga: Modeling and Experimental Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We systematically quantified surface complexation of Np(V) onto whole cells, cell wall, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of Shewanella alga strain BrY. We first performed acid and base titrations and used the mathematical model FITEQL to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of specific surface functional groups. Deprotonation constants most likely corresponded to a carboxyl group not associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 5), a phosphoryl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 7.2), and an amine site (pK{sub a} > 10). We then carried out batch sorption experiments with Np(V) and each of the S. alga components as a function of pH. Since significant Np(V) sorption was observed on S. alga whole cells and its components in the pH range 2-5, we assumed the existence of a fourth site: a low-pK{sub a} carboxyl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 2.4) that is associated with amino acids. We used the SPECIATE submodel of the biogeochemical model CCBATCH to compute the stability constants for Np(V) complexation to each surface functional group. The stability constants were similar for each functional group on S. alga bacterial whole cells, cell walls, and EPS, and they explain the complicated sorption patterns when they are combined with the aqueous-phase speciation of Np(V). For pH XNH{sub 3}{sup +}, which complexed with NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-}. The log K for NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-} complexed onto the amine groups was 3.1-3.9. All of the log K values are similar to those of Np(V) complexes with aqueous carboxyl and N-containing carboxyl ligands. These results help quantify the role of surface complexation in defining actinide-microbiological interactions in the subsurface.

Deo, Randhir P.; Songkasiri, Warinthorn; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Reed, Donald T. (King Mongkut); (AZU); (LANL)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Interactions of carbon and nitrogen metabolism with changing light intensity in natural populations and cultures of planktonic blue-green algae  

SciTech Connect

This study dealt with the factors contributing to the occurrence of blue-green algae in the plankton of lakes. Blue-green algal populations were examined in two different aquatic systems, moderately productive Lawrence Lake and hypereutrophic Wintergreen Lake, with regard to inorganic nitrogen source, light intensity and regime, and species of blue-green algae present. In order to understand the relationship between light and nitrogen source better among natural populations, representative species of blue-green algae, including isolates of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Anabaena flos-aquae, were grown in laboratory cultures under continuously high, variable, and continuously low light at intensities similar to those in the lakes.

Ward, A.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NREL: Learning - Fuel Cell, Hybrid Electric, and Plug-In Hybrid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell, Hybrid Electric, and Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles Photo of a small blue subcompact vehicle in a roadway with other vehicles and foothills in the background. Experimental fuel...

392

Hybrid powertrain controller - Energy Innovation Portal  

A hybrid powertrain for a vehicle comprising a diesel engine and an electric motor in a parallel arrangement with a multiple ratio transmission located on the torque ...

393

Ultracapacitors and Batteries in Hybrid Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using an ultracapacitor in conjunction with a battery in a hybrid vehicle combines the power performance of the former with the greater energy storage capability of the latter.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Zolot, M.; Sprik, S.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

How Plug-in Hybrids Save Money  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of gasoline's widespread availability and quick refueling. Plug-in hybrids also save energy through regenerative braking, which recovers much of the energy typically lost when...

395

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Provides an overview on the current status, long-term prospects, and key challenges in the development of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology.

Markel, T.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hybrid Anode for Semiconductor Radiation Detectors - Energy ...  

The present invention relates to a novel hybrid anode configuration for a radiation detector that effectively reduces the edge effect of surface defects on the ...

397

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyundai Sonata (4932) Battery Report 2010 Ultra-Battery Honda Civic Battery Report Some hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine a conventional internal combustion engine (using...

398

Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric vehicle testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric Vehicle Testing (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Jim Francfort Discovery Center of Idaho - September 2005 INLCON-05-00693 HEV & EV Testing...

399

A verification framework for hybrid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining; discrete state transitions with differential equations, Hybrid system models provide an expressive formalism for describing software systems that interact with a physical environment. Automatically checking ...

Mitra, Sayan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC PC advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plantnatural gas combined cycle gas turbine power plant carboncrude gasification combined cycle power plant with carbon

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

motor of an electric vehicle. Other hybrids combine a fuel cell with batteries to power electric propulsion motors. Fuel Cell Concept: Fuel passes through an anode, electrolyte,...

402

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles - Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPRI and Argonne Assess Commercial Viability of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argonne National Laboratory are engaged in a...

403

Hybrid Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key feature of the Pierre Auger Observatory is its hybrid design, in which ultra high energy cosmic rays are detected simultaneously by fluorescence telescopes and a ground array. The two techniques see air showers in complementary ways, providing important cross-checks and measurement redundancy. Much of the hybrid capability stems from the accurate geometrical reconstruction it achieves, with accuracy better than either the ground array detectors or a single telescope could achieve independently. We have studied the geometrical and longitudinal profile reconstructions of hybrid events. We present the results for the hybrid performance of the Observatory, including trigger efficiency, energy and angular resolution, and the efficiency of the event selection.

B. R. Dawson; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Rotaxanes are mechanically interlocked molecular architectures consisting of a dumbbell-shaped molecule, the...

405

Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific productivities of selected algal strains will eventually be incorporated into this model.

Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake (SmartWhale Consulting, Dartmouth, NS, CA); Pienkos, Philip P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); O'Leary, Stephen J. (National Research Council Canada, Institute for Marine Biosciences, Halifax, NS, CA); Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cooling Evolution of Hybrid Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cooling of compact isolated objects for different values of the gravitational mass has been simulated for two alternative assumptions. One is that the interior of the star is purely hadronic and second that the star can have a rather large quark core. It has been shown that within a nonlocal chiral quark model the critical density for a phase transition to color superconducting quark matter under neutron star conditions can be low enough for these phases to occur in compact star configurations with masses below 1.3 M_sun. For a realistic choice of parameters the equation of state (EoS) allows for 2SC quark matter with a large quark gap ~ 100 MeV for u and d quarks of two colors that coexists with normal quark matter within a mixed phase in the hybrid star interior. We argue that, if in the hadronic phase the neutron pairing gap in 3P_2 channel is larger than few keV and the phases with unpaired quarks are allowed, the corresponding hybrid stars would cool too fast. Even in the case of the essentially supp...

Grigorian, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hybrid regional air pollution models  

SciTech Connect

This discussion deals with a family of air quality models for predicting and analyzing the fine particulate loading in the atmosphere, for assessing the extent and degree of visibility impairment, and for determining the potential of pollutants for increasing the acidity of soils and water. The major horizontal scales of interest are from 400km to 2000km; and the time scales may vary from several hours, to days, weeks, and a few months or years, depending on the EPA regulations being addressed. First the role air quality models play in the general family of atmospheric simulation models is described. Then, the characteristics of a well-designed, comprehensive air quality model are discussed. Following this, the specific objectives of this workshop are outlined, and their modeling implications are summarized. There are significant modeling differences produced by the choice of the coordinate system, whether it be the fixed Eulerian system, the moving Lagrangian system, or some hybrid of the two. These three systems are briefly discussed, and a list of hybrid models that are currently in use are given. Finally, the PNL regional transport model is outlined and a number of research needs are listed.

Drake, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Drive cycle analysis of the performance of hybrid electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a drive cycle analysis of hybrid electric vehicle power train configurations. Based on fuel economy and emissions factors, a tradeoff between conventional, series hybrid, parallel hybrid, and a parallel-series hybrid is drawn. The ... Keywords: emissions, fuel consumption, hybrid electric vehicles, modeling and simulation

Behnam Ganji; Abbas Z. Kouzani; H. M. Trinh

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Electrochemical Capacitors as Energy Storage in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles: Present Status and Future Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Storage in Hybrid- Electric Vehicles: Present Statusmarketing of hybrid-electric vehicles of various types arefor various types of hybrid-electric vehicles Type of hybrid

Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermal Modeling of Hybrid Storage Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a lack of thermal models for storage clusters; most existing thermal models do not take into account the utilization of hard drives (HDDs) and solid state disks (SSDs). To address this problem, we build a thermal model for hybrid storage clusters ... Keywords: Cluster, Hybrid, Model, Storage, Thermal

Xunfei Jiang; Maen M. Al Assaf; Ji Zhang; Mohammed I. Alghamdi; Xiaojun Ruan; Tausif Muzaffar; Xiao Qin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A universal planning system for hybrid domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many real world problems involve hybrid systems, subject to (continuous) physical effects and controlled by (discrete) digital equipments. Indeed, many efforts are being made to extend the current planning systems and modelling languages to support such ... Keywords: Hybrid systems, PDDL+, Universal planning

Giuseppe Della Penna; Daniele Magazzeni; Fabio Mercorio

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Presented by Adaptive Hybrid Mesh Refinement for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

meters. · Orography plays an important role in determining the strength and location of the atmospheric on orographic field data Hybrid adapted geodesic mesh based on orographic field data Structured adapted spherical mesh based on orographic field data #12;7 Khamayseh_ITAPS_SC07 h-Adaptive hybrid mesh generation

413

Solving Fuzzy Linear Regression with Hybrid Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy linear regression is an important tool to find the linear inexact relationship between uncertain data. We then propose a hybrid optimization method based on tabu search and harmony search as a potential way of solving fuzzy linear regression. The ... Keywords: Fuzzy linear regression, Harmony search, Hybrid optimization, Tabu search

M. H. Mashinchi; M. A. Orgun; M. Mashinchi

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A hybrid face recognition approach using GPUMLib  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a hybrid face recognition approach which relies on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Machine Learning (ML) Library (GPUMLib). The library includes a high-performance implementation of the Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) and the Multiple ... Keywords: GPU computing, face recognition, hybrid systems, multiple back-propagation, non-negative matrix factorization

Noel Lopes; Bernardete Ribeiro

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Brief Equivalence of hybrid dynamical models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper establishes equivalences among five classes of hybrid systems: mixed logical dynamical (MLD) systems, linear complementarity (LC) systems, extended linear complementarity (ELC) systems, piecewise affine (PWA) systems, and max-min-plus-scaling ... Keywords: Equivalent models, Hybrid systems, Piecewise affine systems

W. P. M. H. Heemels; B. De Schutter; A. Bemporad

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Poulsen Hybrid, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poulsen Hybrid, LLC Poulsen Hybrid, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Poulsen Hybrid, LLC Address 6 Waterview Drive Place Shelton, Connecticut Zip 06615 Sector Vehicles Product Poulsen Hybrid Year founded 2007 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 203-954-0050 Website http://www.poulsenhybrid.com Coordinates 41.2940567°, -73.0830626° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2940567,"lon":-73.0830626,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

417

Hybrid Multicore Consortium Tackles Programming Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Multicore Hybrid Multicore Consortium Tackles Programming Challenges Hybrid Multicore Consortium Tackles Programming Challenges Oak Ridge, Lawrence Berkeley and Los Alamos national laboratories to pool high-end computing expertise with Georgia Tech, Swiss University November 18, 2009 HMC PORTLAND, Oregon-While hybrid multicore technologies will be a critical component in future high-end computing systems, most of today's scientific applications will require a significant re-engineering effort to take advantage of the resources provided by these systems. To address this challenge, three U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories, including the Berkeley Lab, and two leading universities have formed the Hybrid Multicore Consortium, or HMC, and held their first meeting at SC09.

418

Ultra-thin microporous/hybrid materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultra-thin hybrid and/or microporous materials and methods for their fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, the exemplary hybrid membranes can be formed including successive surface activation and reaction steps on a porous support that is patterned or non-patterned. The surface activation can be performed using remote plasma exposure to locally activate the exterior surfaces of porous support. Organic/inorganic hybrid precursors such as organometallic silane precursors can be condensed on the locally activated exterior surfaces, whereby ALD reactions can then take place between the condensed hybrid precursors and a reactant. Various embodiments can also include an intermittent replacement of ALD precursors during the membrane formation so as to enhance the hybrid molecular network of the membranes.

Jiang, Ying-Bing (Albuquerque, NM); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Oregon Hybrid Gas-Electric Car Owners. Julysimilar disdain for non-hybrid compact cars. During her HEVefficient, non-hybrid compact or midsized car during their

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Ken; Turrentine, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

similar disdain for non-hybrid compact cars. During her HEVSurvey of Oregon Hybrid Gas-Electric Car Owners. Julyefficient, non-hybrid compact or midsized car during their

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. (2006) Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle Analysis, Milestone Report,gas emissions from plug-in hybrid vehicles: Implications forPresentation at SAE 2008 Hybrid Vehicle Technologies

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S.; Burke, Andrew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. (2006) Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle Analysis, Milestone Report,gas emissions from plug-in hybrid vehicles: Implications forPresentation at SAE 2008 Hybrid Vehicle Technologies

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Battery for Hybrid Vehicle Applications. ProceedingsAF. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Design and Performance.A, Thornton M. Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Analysis. NREL/MP-540-

Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Charge It: The Promise of Plug-in Electric Hybrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy andthe plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, a variant of theknown self-charging hybrid electric vehicle, is fast gaining

Recker, W.W.; Kang, J.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Charge It: The Promise of Plug-in Electric Hybrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy andthe plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, a variant of theknown self-charging hybrid electric vehicle, is fast gaining

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including the Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Act of 1976. Suchfor plug- in hybrid electric vehicles: analysis and2007. Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan: Working

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles Reid R. HeffnerImage in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles Reid R. Heffner,6, 2005 Abstract Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) have image,

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Ken; Turrentine, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6, 2005 Abstract Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) have image,Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles Reid R. HeffnerImage in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles Reid R. Heffner,

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hybrid2: The hybrid system simulation model, Version 1.0, user manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In light of the large scale desire for energy in remote communities, especially in the developing world, the need for a detailed long term performance prediction model for hybrid power systems was seen. To meet these ends, engineers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Massachusetts (UMass) have spent the last three years developing the Hybrid2 software. The Hybrid2 code provides a means to conduct long term, detailed simulations of the performance of a large array of hybrid power systems. This work acts as an introduction and users manual to the Hybrid2 software. The manual describes the Hybrid2 code, what is included with the software and instructs the user on the structure of the code. The manual also describes some of the major features of the Hybrid2 code as well as how to create projects and run hybrid system simulations. The Hybrid2 code test program is also discussed. Although every attempt has been made to make the Hybrid2 code easy to understand and use, this manual will allow many organizations to consider the long term advantages of using hybrid power systems instead of conventional petroleum based systems for remote power generation.

Baring-Gould, E.I.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hybrid Microwave Cavity Heat Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose and analyze the use of hybrid microwave cavities as quantum heat engines. A possible realization consists of two macroscopically separated quantum dot conductors coupled capacitively to the fundamental mode of a microwave cavity. We demonstrate that an electrical current can be induced in one conductor through cavity-mediated processes by heating up the other conductor. The heat engine can reach Carnot efficiency with optimal conversion of heat to work. When the system delivers the maximum power, the efficiency can be a large fraction of the Carnot efficiency. The heat engine functions even with moderate electronic relaxation and dephasing in the quantum dots. We provide detailed estimates for the electrical current and output power using realistic parameters.

Christian Bergenfeldt; Peter Samuelsson; Bjrn Sothmann; Christian Flindt; Markus Bttiker

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cooling Evolution of Hybrid Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cooling of compact isolated objects for different values of the gravitational mass has been simulated for two alternative assumptions. One is that the interior of the star is purely hadronic and second that the star can have a rather large quark core. It has been shown that within a nonlocal chiral quark model the critical density for a phase transition to color superconducting quark matter under neutron star conditions can be low enough for these phases to occur in compact star configurations with masses below 1.3 M_sun. For a realistic choice of parameters the equation of state (EoS) allows for 2SC quark matter with a large quark gap ~ 100 MeV for u and d quarks of two colors that coexists with normal quark matter within a mixed phase in the hybrid star interior. We argue that, if in the hadronic phase the neutron pairing gap in 3P_2 channel is larger than few keV and the phases with unpaired quarks are allowed, the corresponding hybrid stars would cool too fast. Even in the case of the essentially suppressed 3P_2 neutron gap if free quarks occur for M cooling data existing by today. It is suggested to discuss a "2SC+X" phase, as a possibility to have all quarks paired in two-flavor quark matter under neutron star constraints, where the X-gap is of the order of 10 keV - 1 MeV. Density independent gaps do not allow to fit the cooling data. Only the presence of an X-gap that decreases with increase of the density could allow to appropriately fit the data in a similar compact star mass interval to that following from a purely hadronic model.

H. Grigorian

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays  

SciTech Connect

DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to single spots to release hybridized DNA. This work leverages LLNL expertise in optics, microfluids, and bioinformatics.

Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

433

Algae Tile Data: 2004-2007, BPA-51; Preliminary Report, October 28, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multiple files containing 2004 through 2007 Tile Chlorophyll data for the Kootenai River sites designated as: KR1, KR2, KR3, KR4 (Downriver) and KR6, KR7, KR9, KR9.1, KR10, KR11, KR12, KR13, KR14 (Upriver) were received by SCS. For a complete description of the sites covered, please refer to http://ktoi.scsnetw.com. To maintain consistency with the previous SCS algae reports, all analyses were carried out separately for the Upriver and Downriver categories, as defined in the aforementioned paragraph. The Upriver designation, however, now includes three additional sites, KR11, KR12, and the nutrient addition site, KR9.1. Summary statistics and information on the four responses, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a Accrual Rate, Total Chlorophyll, and Total Chlorophyll Accrual Rate are presented in Print Out 2. Computations were carried out separately for each river position (Upriver and Downriver) and year. For example, the Downriver position in 2004 showed an average Chlorophyll a level of 25.5 mg with a standard deviation of 21.4 and minimum and maximum values of 3.1 and 196 mg, respectively. The Upriver data in 2004 showed a lower overall average chlorophyll a level at 2.23 mg with a lower standard deviation (3.6) and minimum and maximum values of (0.13 and 28.7, respectively). A more comprehensive summary of each variable and position is given in Print Out 3. This lists the information above as well as other summary information such as the variance, standard error, various percentiles and extreme values. Using the 2004 Downriver Chlorophyll a as an example again, the variance of this data was 459.3 and the standard error of the mean was 1.55. The median value or 50th percentile was 21.3, meaning 50% of the data fell above and below this value. It should be noted that this value is somewhat different than the mean of 25.5. This is an indication that the frequency distribution of the data is not symmetrical (skewed). The skewness statistic, listed as part of the first section of each analysis, quantifies this. In a symmetric distribution, such as a Normal distribution, the skewness value would be 0. The tile chlorophyll data, however, shows larger values. Chlorophyll a, in the 2004 Downriver example, has a skewness statistic of 3.54, which is quite high. In the last section of the summary analysis, the stem and leaf plot graphically demonstrates the asymmetry, showing most of the data centered around 25 with a large value at 196. The final plot is referred to as a normal probability plot and graphically compares the data to a theoretical normal distribution. For chlorophyll a, the data (asterisks) deviate substantially from the theoretical normal distribution (diagonal reference line of pluses), indicating that the data is non-normal. Other response variables in both the Downriver and Upriver categories also indicated skewed distributions. Because the sample size and mean comparison procedures below require symmetrical, normally distributed data, each response in the data set was logarithmically transformed. The logarithmic transformation, in this case, can help mitigate skewness problems. The summary statistics for the four transformed responses (log-ChlorA, log-TotChlor, and log-accrual ) are given in Print Out 4. For the 2004 Downriver Chlorophyll a data, the logarithmic transformation reduced the skewness value to -0.36 and produced a more bell-shaped symmetric frequency distribution. Similar improvements are shown for the remaining variables and river categories. Hence, all subsequent analyses given below are based on logarithmic transformations of the original responses.

Holderman, Charles

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Taxicab  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Taxicab Restriction Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Taxicab Restriction Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Taxicab Restriction Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Taxicab Restriction Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Taxicab Restriction Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Taxicab Restriction Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Taxicab Restriction Exemption on AddThis.com...

435

Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes the basics of electric-drive vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, and the various charging options.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes the basics of electric-drive vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, and the various charging options.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY HYBRID POWER GENERATION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The proposed hybrid system is based on planar SOFC and...

438

Performance analysis of hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the coefficient of performance (COP) of a hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system. This hybrid cooling system includes three sections: 1) conventional (more)

Zhou, Zhipeng (Joe Zoe)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Reliability Testing - October 2007 to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid...

440

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Honda Accord Hybrid Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accord Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Reliability Testing - April 2008 to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Honda Accord Hybrid Electric Vehicle...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mechanical and Regenerative Braking Integration for a Hybrid Electric Vehicle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hybrid electric vehicle technology has become a preferred method for the automotive industry to reduce environmental impact and fuel consumption of their vehicles. Hybrid electric (more)

DeMers, Steven Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Synthesis and properties of chitosan-silica hybrid aerogels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthesis and properties of chitosan-silica hybrid aerogels Title Synthesis and properties of chitosan-silica hybrid aerogels Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication...

443

Ultracapacitor Technologies and Application in Hybrid and Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moderate Hybrid-electric Vehicles. ESScap06, Switzerland,GH. SIMPLEV: A Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation Program-Ultracapacitors in Hybrid- electric Vehicle Applications.

Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

batteries and ultracapacitors for electric vehicles. EVS24Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposiumpublications on electric and hybrid vehicle technology and

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Materials for Motors of Hybrid Automobiles - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To realize the sustainable mobility society, Hybrid vehicle could be one of the good candidates as eco-friendly car. In this speech, the benefit of Hybrid vehicle ...

446

King County Metro Transit: Allison Hybrid Electric Transit Bus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

advanced hybrid electric drivetrain. Both vehicles also incorporated an oxidizing diesel particulate filter. The fuel economy and emissions benefits of the hybrid vehicle were...

447

Platform Engineering Applied to Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This paper quantifies the relative impacts of each platform engineering step on conventional, hybrid, and plug-in hybrid vehicle architectures.

Markel, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1:...

449

HYSPEC: the Hybrid Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Spectrometer at SNS Hybrid Spectrometer Schematic of the HYSPEC instrument Developed by a team from leading U.S. universities and national laboratories and an international...

450

Design and Development of Hybrid Nanoparticles for Energy and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRESENTATION PRESENTATION " " Design and Development of Design and Development of Hybrid Hybrid Nanoparticles Nanoparticles for for Energy and Biomedical Energy and Biomedical...

451

Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with Hybrid Insulation Approach Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation Approach, Wyandotte, Michigan (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study:...

452

The relation of chlorophyll-a concentration with the reflectance peak near 700 nm in algae-dominated waters and sensitivity of fluorescence algorithms for detecting algal bloom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the relation of chlorophyll-a concentration with the reflectance peak near 700 nm, reflectance spectra of harmful algal bloom (HAB) species and non-HAB algae were obtained based on in situ measurements in the oceans and cultural ...

Dongzhi Zhao; Xiaogang Xing; Yuguang Liu; Jianhong Yang; Lin Wang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd EditionChapter 13 Algae Oils for Biofuels: Chemistry, Physiology, and Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd Edition Chapter 13 Algae Oils for Biofuels: Chemistry, Physiology, and Production Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters 42F0779FEFD534382396369A34D3B1B8

454

Price of Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- 4.24 2010's --...

455

Price of Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 13.83 4.77 2010's -- 10.60...

456

Hybrid options for light-duty vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) offer great promise in improving fuel economy. In this paper, we analyze why, how, and by how much vehicle hybridization can reduce energy consumption and improve fuel economy. Our analysis focuses on efficiency gains associated solely with vehicle hybridization. We do not consider such other measures as vehicle weight reduction or air- and tire-resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. The analysis starts with understanding the energy inefficiencies of light-duty vehicles associated with different operation modes in US and Japanese urban and highway driving cycles, with the corresponding energy-saving potentials. The potential for fuel economy gains due to vehicle hybridization can be estimated almost exclusively on the basis of three elements: the reducibility of engine idling operation, the recoverability of braking energy losses, and the capability of improving engine load profiles to gain efficiency associated with specific HEV configurations and control strategies. Specifically, we evaluate the energy efficiencies and fuel economies of a baseline MY97 Corolla-like conventional vehicle (CV), a hypothetical Corolla-based minimal hybrid vehicle (MHV), and a MY98 Prius-like full hybrid vehicle (FHV). We then estimate energy benefits of both MHVs and FHVs over CVs on a performance-equivalent basis. We conclude that the energy benefits of hybridization vary not only with test cycles, but also with performance requirements. The hybrid benefits are greater for ''Corolla (high) performance-equivalent'' vehicles than for ''Prius (low) performance-equivalent'' vehicles. An increasing acceleration requirement would result in larger fuel economy benefits from vehicle hybridization.

An, F., Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Powertrain system for a hybrid electric vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including an electric motor/generator drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of a transmission. The electric is utilized for synchronizing the rotation of the drive shaft with the driven shaft during gear shift operations. In addition, a mild hybrid concept is provided which utilizes a smaller electric motor than typical hybrid powertrain systems. Because the electric motor is drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of the transmission, the electric motor/generator is driven at high speed even when the vehicle speed is low so that the electric motor/generator provides more efficient regeneration. 34 figs.

Reed, R.G. Jr.; Boberg, E.S.; Lawrie, R.E.; Castaing, F.J.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Powertrain system for a hybrid electric vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including an electric motor/generator drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of a transmission. The electric is utilized for synchronizing the rotation of the drive shaft with the driven shaft during gear shift operations. In addition, a mild hybrid concept is provided which utilizes a smaller electric motor than typical hybrid powertrain systems. Because the electric motor is drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of the transmission, the electric motor/generator is driven at high speed even when the vehicle speed is low so that the electric motor/generator provides more efficient regeneration.

Reed, Jr., Richard G. (Royal Oak, MI); Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI); Lawrie, Robert E. (Whitmore Lake, MI); Castaing, Francois J. (Bloomfield Township, MI)

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Chloroplast Gene Order and the Divergence of Plants and Algae, from the Normalized Number of Induced Breakpoints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction. The origin and diversification of plants and algae, and their relationships with other chloroplast-containing organisms, are some of the fundamental problems of evolutionary theory. The widely accepted endosymbiotic origin of the chloroplast and its consequent evolution, in key respects independent of the evolution of the nuclear genome, make it a natural focus of phylogenetic studies, though in a narrower range than the almost-ubiquitous eukaryote mitochondrion. Thus phylogenies based on the amino acid sequences of a number of proteins coded by organellar genes give a clearer understanding of the evolution of classes of green plants than was possible based on morphological classifications alone or on ribosomal RNA surveys [17, 16, 7]. In this note, we propose to study another type of chloroplast genome data, namely gene order, to see what this can contribute to the sequence-level analyses. The key methodology used here is that of the normalized number of induced breakp

David Sankoff; Melanie Deneault; David Bryant; Claude Lemieux; Monique Turmel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases by algae. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to determine the feasibility of the alga Botryococcus braunii as a biocatalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of flue gas CO{sub 2} to hydrocarbons. The research program involves the determination of the biocatalytic characteristics of free and immobilized cultures of Botryococcus braunii in bench-scale studies, and the feasibility study and economic analysis of the Botryococcus braunii culture systems for the conversion of flue gas CO{sub 2} to hydrocarbons. The objective of the third quarter of this research program was to determine the growth and hydrogen formation characteristics of free and immobilized cells of Botryococcus braunii in bench-scale photobioreactors. Raceway and inclined surface type bioreactors were used for free cell and immobilized cell studies respectively. The free cell studies with air and CO{sub 2} enriched air [10% (v/v) CO{sub 2} in air] in media with and without NaHCO{sub 3} were conducted.

Akin, C.; Pradhan, S. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases by algae. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program is to determine the feasibility of the alga Botryococcus braunii as a biocatalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of flue gas CO{sub 2} to hydrocarbons. Free and immobilized cells of Botryococcus braunii were grown in aqueous medium supplemented with nitrogen, phosphorus and mineral nutrients. Air and CO{sub 2} enriched air [10% to 15% (V/V) CO{sub 2}] in the gas phase and 0.2% to 2% NaHCO{sub 3} in the liquid medium served as the carbon source. Growth and hydrocarbon formation characteristics of free and immobilized cultures of Botryococcus braunii were determined in bench-scale photobioreactors. Technical and economic feasibility of the conversion of flue gas CO{sub 2} to hydrocarbons by Botryococcus braunii culture systems was evaluated. In free cell systems, the hexane extractable oil productivity was about 15 to 37 grams of oil per 100 grams of cell dry weight. In immobilized cell systems, the oil production ranged between 5% and 47% at different immobilization systems and immobilized surface locations, with an average of 19% of cell biomass dry weight. The feasibility and economic evaluation estimated the cost of oil produced from flue gas CO{sub 2} by algae to range between $45 and $75 per barrel assuming that a hydrocarbon yield of about 50% of the biomass weight is achievable and a credit of $60 per ton of carbon removed is available. A future research program leading to development of a multistage process, consisting of closed systems for heavy inoculum buildup followed by lower cost open systems for oil production is recommended.

Akin, C.; Maka, A.; Patel, S.; Conrad, J. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Benemann, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hybrid Electric Vehicles - HEV Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Modeling Background Because of time and cost constraints, designers cannot build and test each of the many possible powertrain configurations for advanced vehicles. Thus, developing fuel cells and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) requires accurate, flexible simulation tools. Argonne undertook a collaborative effort to further develop Autonomie in collaboration with General Motors. Autonomie is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program. Autonomie is a Plug-and-Play Powertrain and Vehicle Model Architecture and Development Environment to support the rapid evaluation of new powertrain/propulsion technologies for improving fuel economy through virtual design and analysis in a math-based simulation environment. Autonomie is an open architecture to support the rapid integration and analysis of powertrain/propulsion systems and technologies for rapid technology sorting and evaluation of fuel economy improvement under dynamic/transient testing conditions. The capability to sort technologies rapidly in a virtual design environment results in faster improvements in real-world fuel consumption by reducing the time necessary to develop and bring new technologies onto our roads.

463

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Rotaxanes are mechanically interlocked molecular architectures consisting of a dumbbell-shaped molecule, the "axle," that threads through a ring called a macrocycle. Because the rings can spin around and slide along the axle, rotaxanes are promising components of molecular machines. While most rotaxanes have been entirely organic, the physical properties desirable in molecular machines are mostly found in inorganic compounds. Working together, two British groups at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Manchester have bridged this gap with hybrid rotaxanes, in which inorganic rings encircle the organic axles. The hybrid architecture greatly increases their range of useful physical properties, such as the magnetism based on molecular magnets that may make them suitable as qubits for quantum computers.

464

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Rotaxanes are mechanically interlocked molecular architectures consisting of a dumbbell-shaped molecule, the "axle," that threads through a ring called a macrocycle. Because the rings can spin around and slide along the axle, rotaxanes are promising components of molecular machines. While most rotaxanes have been entirely organic, the physical properties desirable in molecular machines are mostly found in inorganic compounds. Working together, two British groups at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Manchester have bridged this gap with hybrid rotaxanes, in which inorganic rings encircle the organic axles. The hybrid architecture greatly increases their range of useful physical properties, such as the magnetism based on molecular magnets that may make them suitable as qubits for quantum computers.

465

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Rotaxanes are mechanically interlocked molecular architectures consisting of a dumbbell-shaped molecule, the "axle," that threads through a ring called a macrocycle. Because the rings can spin around and slide along the axle, rotaxanes are promising components of molecular machines. While most rotaxanes have been entirely organic, the physical properties desirable in molecular machines are mostly found in inorganic compounds. Working together, two British groups at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Manchester have bridged this gap with hybrid rotaxanes, in which inorganic rings encircle the organic axles. The hybrid architecture greatly increases their range of useful physical properties, such as the magnetism based on molecular magnets that may make them suitable as qubits for quantum computers.

466

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Rotaxanes are mechanically interlocked molecular architectures consisting of a dumbbell-shaped molecule, the "axle," that threads through a ring called a macrocycle. Because the rings can spin around and slide along the axle, rotaxanes are promising components of molecular machines. While most rotaxanes have been entirely organic, the physical properties desirable in molecular machines are mostly found in inorganic compounds. Working together, two British groups at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Manchester have bridged this gap with hybrid rotaxanes, in which inorganic rings encircle the organic axles. The hybrid architecture greatly increases their range of useful physical properties, such as the magnetism based on molecular magnets that may make them suitable as qubits for quantum computers.

467

Highline Hydrogen Hybrids | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Hybrids Hydrogen Hybrids Jump to: navigation, search Name Highline Hydrogen Hybrids Place farmington, Arkansas Zip 72730-1500 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Vehicles Product US-based manufacturer of hydrogen conversion systems for gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles. Coordinates 43.533982°, -88.093717° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.533982,"lon":-88.093717,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

468

Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials E. Munch, 1 M. E.guide the synthesis of bio-inspired ceramic-based compositesLike many hard mineralized bio-composites, the ice-templated

Munch, Etienne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Argonne CNM Highlight: Improved Hybrid Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Hybrid Solar Cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells inorganic-organic hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells imade of highly ordered titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube arrays filled with solid organic hole conductors such as conjugated polymers One approach for making inexpensive inorganic-organic hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells is to fill highly ordered titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube arrays with solid organic hole conductors such as conjugated polymers. Center for Nanoscale Materials researchers and collaborative users from the University of Chicago present a new in situ ultraviolet (UV) polymerization method for growing polythiophene inside TiO2 nanotubes and compare this method to the conventional approach of infiltrating nanotubes with presynthesized polymer. A nanotubular TiO2 substrate is immersed in a 2,5-diiodothiophene (DIT)

470

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing? Print Rotaxanes are mechanically interlocked molecular architectures consisting of a dumbbell-shaped molecule, the "axle," that threads through a ring called a macrocycle. Because the rings can spin around and slide along the axle, rotaxanes are promising components of molecular machines. While most rotaxanes have been entirely organic, the physical properties desirable in molecular machines are mostly found in inorganic compounds. Working together, two British groups at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Manchester have bridged this gap with hybrid rotaxanes, in which inorganic rings encircle the organic axles. The hybrid architecture greatly increases their range of useful physical properties, such as the magnetism based on molecular magnets that may make them suitable as qubits for quantum computers.

471

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles What's New 2012 Hyundai Sonata (4932) Battery Report (PDF 574KB) 2010 Ultra-Battery Honda Civic Battery Report (PDF 614KB) 2013 Chevrolet Malibu Baseline...

472

Hybrid Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modulators for sili- con photonics, in Proc. IEEE Photon.J.E. Bowers, Hybrid silicon photonics for optical Intercon-The evolution of silicon photonics as an enabling technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Coal-Wind Non-Hybrid SNG IGCC+CCS PC CCGT Windor a synthetic natural gas (SNG) production facility) and anwithout Fuel With with SNG Production or Syncrude Production

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Travelling waves in hybrid chemotaxis models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid models of chemotaxis combine agent-based models of cells with partial differential equation models of extracellular chemical signals. In this paper, travelling wave properties of hybrid models of bacterial chemotaxis are investigated. Bacteria are modelled using an agent-based (individual-based) approach with internal dynamics describing signal transduction. In addition to the chemotactic behaviour of the bacteria, the individual-based model also includes cell proliferation and death. Cells consume the extracellular nutrient field (chemoattractant) which is modelled using a partial differential equation. Mesoscopic and macroscopic equations representing the behaviour of the hybrid model are derived and the existence of travelling wave solutions for these models is established. It is shown that cell proliferation is necessary for the existence of non-transient (stationary) travelling waves in hybrid models. Additionally, a numerical comparison between the wave speeds of the continuum models and the hybr...

Franz, Benjamin; Painter, Kevin J; Erban, Radek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Hybrid electric vehicles take to the streets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors describe how, equipped with a gasoline engine and an electric motor, hybrid electric vehicles can now bridge the gap between vehicle range and environmental concerns

D. Hermance; S. Sasaki

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Issue 5: High Interest in Hybrid Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reports. (2005). Which Cars Would People Get Again? Con-Motor Trend Announces 2004 Car of the Year. Motor Trend,Oregon Hybrid Gas-Electric Car Owners. July. U.S. Internal

Ong, Paul M.; Haselhoff, Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Hybrid hierarchical learning from dynamic scenes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work proposes a hierarchical architecture for learning from dynamic scenes at various levels of knowledge abstraction. The raw visual information is processed at different stages to generate hybrid symbolic/sub-symbolic descriptions of the scene, ...

Prithwijit Guha; Pradeep Vaghela; Pabitra Mitra; K. S. Venkatesh; Amitabha Mukerjee

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Fuel Savings from Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's study shows that hybrid electric vehicles can significantly reduce oil imports for use in light-duty vehicles, particularly if drivers switch to smaller, more fuel-efficient vehicles overall.

Bennion, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

HEV Fleet Testing - 2001 Honda Insight Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Honda Insight Hybrid VIN JHMZE14781T002163 Date Mileage Description Cost 2202002 7,595 Changed oil, rotated tires 27.00 592002 15,119 15K service 160.21 6142002 19,290...

480

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal prices have been far less volatile than natural gas prices.Coal Prices Figure 9 is similar to Figure 8 except the natural gas pricesCoal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis interested in natural gas prices

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hybrid algae freeport" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per month; one model, the Toyota Prius has reached salesand their halo effect on Toyota and Honda have spurred abattery. Blending power Toyotas Hybrid Synergy Drive uses

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Experimental Study of Hybrid Cooled Heat Exchanger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A test system for a hybrid cooled heat exchanger was designed, and the test facility was constructed based on ASHRAE Standard 41.2-1987. A conventional air-cooled (more)

Tsao, Han-Chuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Hybrid staging of geothermal energy conversion process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the demonstration of the feasibility of hybrid staging in geothermal energy conversion is described, particularly processes involving the Lysholm engine. The performance limitations of the Lysholm engine were studied. (MHR)

Steidel, R.F. Jr.

1984-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

484

Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid Electric Trolleys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the evaluation done by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity on the Knoxville Area Transit's use of propane hybrid electric trolleys.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Study of Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump systems often combine a traditional geothermal system with either a cooling tower or fluid cooler for heat rejection and a boiler or solar heat collector for heat addition to the loop. These systems offer the same energy efficiency benefits as full geothermal systems to utilities and their customers but at a potentially lower first cost. Many hybrid systems have materialized to resolve heat buildup in full geothermal system loops where loop temperatures continue to rise as ...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

486

Analysis of Hybrid Hydrogen Systems: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on biomass pathways for hydrogen production and how they can be hybridized to support renewable electricity generation. Two hybrid systems were studied in detail for process feasibility and economic performance. The best-performing system was estimated to produce hydrogen at costs ($1.67/kg) within Department of Energy targets ($2.10/kg) for central biomass-derived hydrogen production while also providing value-added energy services to the electric grid.

Dean, J.; Braun, R.; Munoz, D.; Penev, M.; Kinchin, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Use of Hybrid Rendering Styles for Presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents hybrid rendering that combines the use of photorealistic and non-photorealistic rendering styles in the same image. This allows to extend the set of expression dimensions available in a visualization environment. To provide general applicability, this use of hybrid rendering styles is controlled by an XML-based scene description. We discuss the according schema definition and present an architecture for implementing the presented methods as well as two exemplary applications.

Roland Jesse; Tobias Isenberg

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mixed-hybrid discretization methods for the P1 equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider mixed-hybrid discretization methods for the linear Boltzmann transport equation which is extensively used in computational neutron transport. Mixed-hybrid methods combine attractive features of both mixed and hybrid methods, namely the simultaneous ... Keywords: 02.60.Cb, 02.70.Dh, 65N12, 65N30, Linear Boltzmann transport equation, Mixed-hybrid discretization methods, P1 approximation

S. Van Criekingen; R. Beauwens

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Super Energy Saver Heat Pump with Dynamic Hybrid Phase Change ...  

Super Energy Saver Heat Pump with Dynamic Hybrid Phase Change Material United States Patent Application

490

Modeling and Simulation of Hybrid Electric Yuliang Leon Zhou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Simulation of Hybrid Electric Vehicles By Yuliang Leon Zhou B. Eng., University and Simulation of Hybrid Electric Vehicles By Yuliang Leon Zhou B.Eng., University of Science and Technology and analysis of next generation hybrid electric vehicles, exploring the potentials of new hybrid powertrain

Victoria, University of

491

Predictive energy management for hybrid electric vehicles -Prediction horizon and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictive energy management for hybrid electric vehicles - Prediction horizon and battery capacity of a combined hybrid electric vehicle. Keywords: Hybrid vehicles, Energy Management, Predictive control, Optimal on a sliding window in order to minimize the hybrid vehicle fuel consumption. For real time implementation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

492

Perspective on the fusion-fission hybrid reactor  

SciTech Connect

The hybrid reactor's role as a source of fuel for fission converter reactors is investigated. The role of the hybrid reactor in the energy economy, the interface between the hybrid reactor and the present fusion program, implications of the Carter Energy Plan, and the rationale for further hybrid reactor studies are discussed.

Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Moir, R.W.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Adaptive hybrid impedance control of robot manipulators: a comparative study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: direct adaptive control, hybrid impedance control, passivity-based adaptive control, robotics

Lus F. Baptista; Jos M. G. S da Costa

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Hydraulic Hybrid Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Hybrid Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Hydraulic Hybrid Systems Name Hydraulic Hybrid Systems Address 320 N. Railroad Ave Place Loveland, Colorado Zip 80537 Sector Vehicles Product hydraulic hybrid system for light-duty vehicles Year founded 2008 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 303-519-4144 Website http://www.hydraulichybridsyst Coordinates 40.394833°, -105.0758931° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.394833,"lon":-105.0758931,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

495

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Hybrid Electric State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg

496

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements to Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg

497

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV)

498

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements to and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg

499

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Taxis Go Hybrid  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Texas Taxis Go Hybrid Texas Taxis Go Hybrid to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Taxis Go Hybrid on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Taxis Go Hybrid on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Taxis Go Hybrid on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Taxis Go Hybrid on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Taxis Go Hybrid on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Taxis Go Hybrid on AddThis.com... May 6, 2010 Texas Taxis Go Hybrid L earn how San Antonio is replacing traditional cabs with gasoline-electric hybrids. For information about this project, contact Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio). Download QuickTime Video QuickTime (.mov) Download Windows Media Video Windows Media (.wmv)

500

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on AddThis.com... April 7, 2011 Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools " The hybrid school bus project not only serves as a means to improve