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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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1

Gi Hwang  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weber. "Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells." Electrochimica Acta 95 (2013): 29-37. Hwang, Gi Suk, Dilworth Y. Parkinson,...

2

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Harold Hwang Wins Top...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to give commemorative lectures at major universities, academies and high schools across Korea. Hwang is an expert in creating complex oxide materials with extraordinary electronic...

3

John Kerr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Zhu, Xiaobing, John B. Kerr, Qinggang He, Gi Suk Hwang, Zulima Martin, Kyle Clark, Adam Z. Weber, and Nana Zhao. "Bridge to Fuel Cell Molecular Catalysis: 3D...

4

Kyle Clark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

He, Gi Suk Hwang, Zulima Martin, Kyle Clark, Adam Z. Weber, and Nana Zhao. "Bridge to Fuel Cell Molecular Catalysis: 3D Non-Platinum Group Metal Catalyst in MEAs." ECS...

5

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weber. "Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells." Electrochimica Acta 95 (2013): 29-37. 2011 Hwang, Gi Suk, Massoud Kaviany,...

6

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weber. "Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells." Electrochimica Acta 95 (2013): 29-37. Hwang, Gi Suk, Dilworth Y. Parkinson,...

7

Hwang-050312 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hwang-050312 Hwang-050312 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Prof. Harold Y. Hwang Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory TITLE: "Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces" DATE: Thursday, May 3, 2012 TIME: 11:00 a.m. PLACE: Building 212 / A-157 HOST: TBA Refreshments will be served at 10:45 a.m. ABSTRACT: Complex oxides are fascinating systems which host a vast array of unique phenomena, such as high temperature (and unconventional) superconductivity, 'colossal' magnetoresistance, all forms of magnetism and ferroelectricity, as well as (quantum) phase transitions and couplings between these states. In recent years, there has been a mini-revolution in the ability to grow thin film heterostructures of these materials with atomic precision. With this level of control, the electrostatic boundary

8

"Cherty" stringers in the Barnett Shale are agglutinated foraminifera Kitty Milliken a,, Suk-Joo Choh b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Cherty" stringers in the Barnett Shale are agglutinated foraminifera Kitty Milliken a,, Suk within several lithologies in the Barnett Shale (lower Mississippian) of central Texas. A typical quartz-rich masses in the Barnett Shale are interpreted as agglutinated foraminifera that have been dramatically

Schieber, Juergen

9

NIST Jeeseong Hwang  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... serving on a steering committee of the IEEE-Nanotechnology Conference in 2010, a program committee of the annual SPIE BiOS convention since ...

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Jun Suk Rho  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 3D indefinite cavities at nanoscale with anomalous scaling law", Nature Photonics 6, 450-454, 2012 (Featured in LBL news, IEEE spectrum, Photonics Spectra, Korea...

11

Heavy Metals Behavior of Municiple Solid Waste Incineration ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Heavy Metals Behavior of Municiple Solid Waste Incineration Bottom Ash with Magnetic Separation by Gi-Chun Han, Nam-Il Um, Kwang-Suk...

12

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 results: 3 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Rodney L. Borup [Clear All Filters] 2013 Hwang, Gi Suk, Hyoungchul Kim, Roger Lujan, Rangachary Mukundan, Dusan Spernjak, Rodney L. Borup, Massoud Kaviany, Moo Hwan Kim, and Adam Z. Weber. "Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells." Electrochimica Acta 95 (2013): 29-37. 2012 Hussey, Daniel S., Dusan Spernjak, Adam Z. Weber, Rangachary Mukundan, Joseph Fairweather, Eric L. Brosha, John Davey, Jacob S. Spendelow, David L. Jacobson, and Rodney L. Borup. "Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography." Journal of Applied Physics 112, no. 10 (2012): 104906.

13

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 results: 3 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Rangachary Mukundan [Clear All Filters] 2013 Hwang, Gi Suk, Hyoungchul Kim, Roger Lujan, Rangachary Mukundan, Dusan Spernjak, Rodney L. Borup, Massoud Kaviany, Moo Hwan Kim, and Adam Z. Weber. "Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells." Electrochimica Acta 95 (2013): 29-37. 2012 Hussey, Daniel S., Dusan Spernjak, Adam Z. Weber, Rangachary Mukundan, Joseph Fairweather, Eric L. Brosha, John Davey, Jacob S. Spendelow, David L. Jacobson, and Rodney L. Borup. "Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography." Journal of Applied Physics 112, no. 10 (2012): 104906.

14

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

degradation [Clear All Filters] degradation [Clear All Filters] 2013 Hwang, Gi Suk, Hyoungchul Kim, Roger Lujan, Rangachary Mukundan, Dusan Spernjak, Rodney L. Borup, Massoud Kaviany, Moo Hwan Kim, and Adam Z. Weber. "Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells." Electrochimica Acta 95 (2013): 29-37. 2007 Kerlau, Marie, Marek Marcinek, Venkat Srinivasan, and Robert Kostecki. "Reprint of "Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries"." Electrochimica Acta 53 (2007): 1385-1392. Kerlau, Marie, Marek Marcinek, Venkat Srinivasan, and Robert Kostecki. "Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries." Electrochimica Acta 52 (2007): 5422-5429

15

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 results: 2 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Dusan Spernjak [Clear All Filters] 2013 Hwang, Gi Suk, Hyoungchul Kim, Roger Lujan, Rangachary Mukundan, Dusan Spernjak, Rodney L. Borup, Massoud Kaviany, Moo Hwan Kim, and Adam Z. Weber. "Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells." Electrochimica Acta 95 (2013): 29-37. 2012 Hussey, Daniel S., Dusan Spernjak, Adam Z. Weber, Rangachary Mukundan, Joseph Fairweather, Eric L. Brosha, John Davey, Jacob S. Spendelow, David L. Jacobson, and Rodney L. Borup. "Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography." Journal of Applied Physics 112, no. 10 (2012): 104906

16

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 results: 19 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is John B. Kerr [Clear All Filters] 2012 Zhu, Xiaobing, John B. Kerr, Qinggang He, Gi Suk Hwang, Zulima Martin, Kyle Clark, Adam Z. Weber, and Nana Zhao. "Bridge to Fuel Cell Molecular Catalysis: 3D Non-Platinum Group Metal Catalyst in MEAs." ECS Transactions 45, no. 2 (2012): 143-152. 2008 Shin, Joon Ho, Pratyay Basak, John B. Kerr, and Elton J. Cairns. "Rechargeable Li/LiFePO4 Cells Using N-Methyl-N-butyl pyrrolidinium Bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide-LiTFSI Electrolyte Incorporating Polymer Additives." Electrochimica Acta 54, no. 2 (2008): 410-414. Hardwick, Laurence J., Marek Marcinek, Leanne Beer, John B. Kerr, and Robert Kostecki. "An Investigation of the effect of graphite degradation on

17

TO: FILE GiR FROM: SUBJECT: I OWNER(S) Past: Current:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 749 3 749 '*,. .,;L ----.-. _ 5' . iMEMORANDUM TO: FILE GiR FROM: , SUBJECT: I OWNER(S) ------__ Past: ------------------_----~ Current: Owner contacted q yes qnnc; ~~-~~~---------~~--_______ if yes, date contacted 1 ! I TYPE OF OPERATION --~_--___~---_--_ $ Research b Development a Facility Type 1 I 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale Bench Scale Process Theoretical 'Studies 0 Sample & Analysis G Production E Disposal/Storage 0 Research 0 Uther --------------T------ I T'/PE OF CONTRACT -----------_____ 0 Prime I2 C! Subcontractor Other information (i.e.:, cost q Purchase Order + fixed fee, unit Arice, time 84 material, etr) i ------- 'I ----------------------i__--_ Contract/Purchase Qrdei. W -----------I--k---j----- ~PJKJbL-I @J OWNERSHIP:

18

The $G/GI/N$ queue in the Halfin--Whitt regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the $G/\\mathit{GI}/N$ queue in the Halfin--Whitt regime. Our first result is to obtain a deterministic fluid limit for the properly centered and scaled number of customers in the system which may be used to provide a first-order approximation to the queue length process. Our second result is to obtain a second-order stochastic approximation to the number of customers in the system in the Halfin--Whitt regime. This is accomplished by first centering the queue length process by its deterministic fluid limit and then normalizing by an appropriate factor. We then proceed to obtain an alternative but equivalent characterization of our limiting approximation which involves the renewal function associated with the service time distribution. This alternative characterization reduces to the diffusion process obtained by Halfin and Whitt [Oper. Res. 29 (1981) 567--588] in the case of exponentially distributed service times.

Reed, Josh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

U.S. DEPARTlVIENT OF ENERGY p.GI.G!) EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

p.GI.G!) EERE PROJECT MAN AG p.GI.G!) EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Palm Beach County STATE: FL PROJECT TITLE: EECBG Activity 1: Digester Biogas Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EE00013 DE-EE0000793 GFO-0000793-001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45 1.1A), 1 have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 65.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical assistance to individuals (such as builders, owners, consultants, designers), organizations (such as utilities), and state

20

Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network Title Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL5396E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hwang, Gi Suk, Massoud Kaviany, Jeffrey T. Gostick, Brian L. Kienitz, Adam Z. Weber, and Moo Hwan Kim Journal Polymer Volume 52 Start Page 2584 Issue 12 Pagination 2584-2593 Date Published 05/2011 Keywords Proton conductivity, Water diffusivity, Water uptake Abstract Using molecular simulations and a bimodal-domain network, the role of water state on Nafion water uptake and water and proton transport is investigated. Although the smaller domains provide moderate transport pathways, their effectiveness remains low due to strong, resistive water molecules/domain surface interactions. The water occupancy of the larger domains yields bulk-like water, and causes the observed transition in the water uptake and significant increases in transport properties.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bridge to Fuel Cell Molecular Catalysis: 3D Non-Platinum Group Metal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bridge to Fuel Cell Molecular Catalysis: 3D Non-Platinum Group Metal Bridge to Fuel Cell Molecular Catalysis: 3D Non-Platinum Group Metal Catalyst in MEAs Title Bridge to Fuel Cell Molecular Catalysis: 3D Non-Platinum Group Metal Catalyst in MEAs Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Zhu, Xiaobing, John B. Kerr, Qinggang He, Gi Suk Hwang, Zulima Martin, Kyle Clark, Adam Z. Weber, and Nana Zhao Journal ECS Transactions Volume 45 Issue 2 Pagination 143 - 152 Date Published 04/2012 ISSN 1938-6737 Abstract Transition metal porphyrin complexes have been mounted in a three dimensional homogenous distribution inside the ionomer of catalyst layers in MEAs to achieve competitive fuel cell catalysis activity. The effect of electrode components including ionomer, carbon, catalyst, and mediator, and ionomer film thickness, is investigated in fuel cell molecular catalysis system. Membrane electrode assembly (MEA) durability testing has been conducted. SEM and TEM techniques are employed to investigate molecular catalysis electrode micro- and nano- structure and morphology. To date, surprisingly, the best fuel cell performance, i.e. 1280 mA/cm2 of maximum/short-circuit current density is achieved, approaching that of Pt-based electrode, indicating higher turnover frequencies than Pt although with poorer voltages.

22

Floodplain delineation with heC-RaS and GiS September 6-8, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floodplain delineation with heC-RaS and GiS September 6-8, 2011 texaS a&m UniverSity College Station, texaS texaS Water reSoUrCeS inStitUte Continuing Education Courses http, September 8, 5 p.m. at the Centeq Building on the Texas A&M University Campus. Please note that all

23

NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts · West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts · eNerGy · Healt;#12;Copyright ©2012 by WVU Research Corporation Unless otherwise noted, data used for this forecast is from IHS Population 2 GlOBAl OUTlOOk 3 Current Trends 3 Forecast 6 UNITED STATES OUTlOOk 9 Global and United States

Mohaghegh, Shahab

24

The homeownership gap : how the post-world War II GI bill shaped modern day homeownership patterns for black and white Americans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, commonly known as the GI Bill, was a transformative piece of legislation signed by President Roosevelt intended to help WWII Veterans transition successfully from soldier to citizen. ...

McKenna, Cyd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Ho-Ling Hwang - Research Staff - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support Systems Motor Fuel Consumption Models National Intermodal Bottlenecks Evaluation Tool (IBET) Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity Study (TLC) Estimating International...

26

Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells Title Phase-change-related degradation of catalyst layers in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hwang, Gi Suk, Hyoungchul Kim, Roger Lujan, Rangachary Mukundan, Dusan Spernjak, Rodney L. Borup, Massoud Kaviany, Moo Hwan Kim, and Adam Z. Weber Journal Electrochimica Acta Volume 95 Pagination 29 - 37 Date Published 4/2013 ISSN 00134686 Keywords degradation, Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), Freeze/thaw cycle, Membrane electrode assembly (MEA), Nanostructured thin film (NSTF), Pt/C dispersion Abstract Understanding and optimizing water and thermal management in the catalyst layer of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells is crucial for performance and durability improvements. This is especially the case at low temperatures, where liquid water and even ice may exist. In this article, the durability of a traditional Pt/C dispersed and a nanostructure thin film (NSTF) membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) are examined under wet/dry and freeze/thaw cycles using both in situ and ex situ experiments. Multiple isothermal cold starts result in a performance degradation for the dispersed MEA, while no such a degradation is found in the NSTF. The results are consistent with stand-alone MEA tests, wherein the dispersed catalyst layer results in an exponential increase in the number and size of cracks until it delaminates from the membrane due to the impact of the freeze/thaw process within the catalyst-layer pores. The NSTF catalyst layer shows minimal crack generation without delamination since the ice forms on top of the layer. The results are useful for understanding degradation due to phase-change containing cycles.

27

Research paper Changes in hydraulic geometry of the Hwang River below the Hapcheon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

94 to 85 cm/km from 1983 to 2003. The analysis of aerial photographs and field surveys shows Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. Email: Pierre@engr.colostate.edu (Author series of aerial photographs taken in 1982, 1993 and 2004 showed that the non-vegetated active channel

Julien, Pierre Y.

28

Scientific ermeneutics and Fiction_____ a study of Hwang-Hai and his science fiction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??After developing for a century, science fictions and movies are becoming huge culture enterprises in Europe and America. But in Taiwan, the audiences and readers (more)

Huang, Jui-tien

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

d'ordre : 424 GI prsente par  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and are assessed an additional $50 late fee. For more information on paying fees, see "Billing." Mandatory Medical as a voluntary option on the BAR statement and is in addition to the amount due each term. To request MIP, academic or enrollment verification (official, each copy) 5.00 Transcripts -- additional services/fees Same

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Transport in chemically doped graphene in the presence of adsorbed molecules E. H. Hwang, S. Adam, and S. Das Sarma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

could be extremely high even at room temperature. The increase in graphene carrier mobility induced impurities.18 At high densities i.e., high gate voltages , one expects9 the competing effects of short Shown solid lines are the calculated graphene conductivity for both doped and undoped cases for ni =1

Adam, Shaffique

31

Multi-Channel Transfer Function with Dimensionality Han Suk Kima, c, Jurgen P. Schulzeb, Angela C. Conec,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compromising visualization accuracy. In this publication we report on the impact of the dimensionality, Transfer Function, Multi-Channel Volume, Light Microscopy Imaging, Dimen- sionality Reduction 1 ABSTRACT The design of transfer functions for volume rendering is a difficult task. This is particularly

Schulze, Jürgen P.

32

The Dynamics of Employees' Identities in the Organization: Evidence from a Korean Company by Eun-Suk Lee.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is about identity and identification in organizations. I analyze the dynamic processes by which individual employees' identities are constructed in a large global Korean company (K-Co) that actively pursues ...

Lee, Eun-Suk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

bis(2-pyridylmethylene)propane-1,3diamine]manganese(II) (1/2/1) In-Chul Hwang a and Kwang Ha b *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R factor = 0.045; wR factor = 0.116; data-to-parameter ratio = 16.6. There are three different Mn II complexes in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Mn(C15H16N4)(H2O)2]Br2-2{[MnBr(C15H16N4)(H2O)]Br} [MnBr2(C15H16N4)]. In the neutral complex, the Mn 2+ ion is six-coordinated in a distorted octahedral environment by four N atoms of the tetradentate ligand N,N0-bis(2-pyridylmethylene)propane-1,3-diamine (bppd) and two bromide ligands. In the two cationic complexes, the Mn 2+ ions are also six-coordinated in similar environments, but one Mn ion is coordinated by four N atoms of bppd, one Br atom and one O atom of a coordinating water molecule, whereas the other Mn ion is coordinated by four N atoms of bppd and two O atoms of water ligands. The complexes with two coordinated Br atoms or two H2O ligands are disposed about a twofold axis through Mn and C atoms with the special positions ( 1 1 2, y, 0) and (0, y,

Monoclinic C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Soft x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy study of superoxide KO2 J.-S. Kang,* D. H. Kim, and J. H. Hwang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy study of superoxide KO2 J.-S. Kang,* D. H. Kim of superoxide KO2 was investigated by employing soft x-ray absorption spectros- copy XAS and core cooling, O2 - molecular bond axes seem to tilt to have a lower crystal monoclinic symme- try. By lowering

Min, Byung Il

35

GI12-Paper - DR in AS Markets 20121115 Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8E 8E Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A Comparison of Opportunities and Challenges in the US Wholesale Markets Jason MacDonald Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Peter Cappers Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Duncan Callaway University of California, Berkeley Sila Kiliccote Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory November 2012 Presented at Grid-Interop 2012, Irving, TX, December 3-6, 2012, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

36

Reduction of Utility Usage in a Glyphosate Intermediate (GI) Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1991, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) introduced Eco- Efficiency as a management strategy to link financial and environmental performance to create more value with less ecological impact. Based on this strategy, CETAC-WEST (Canadian Environmental Technology Advancement Corporation - West), in mid-2000, introduced a practical approach to eco-efficiency to Western Canada's upstream oil and gas sector. The CETAC-WEST Eco-Efficiency Program, focused primarily on sour gas processing facilities, has developed methods and programs to identify opportunities for energy conservation and GHG reductions. The program outlined in this paper consists of four interrelated phases that are used to identify and track efficiency opportunities as well as promote the use of energy efficient methodologies and technologies. If, as program results suggest, 15% to 20% of the gas that is now consumed at by plant operations can be saved through efficiencies, it would save $500 to $700 million worth of gas for sale on the market. Although this small Pilot Program in the gas processing sector has surfaced major opportunities, there are significantly greater opportunities in other sectors with high GHG emissions intensity, such as sweet gas processing, conventional oil, heavy oil and oil sands. Capturing these opportunities will require a carefully considered strategy. This strategy should include, in addition to commitments for expanding the scope of the current Program, sustained leadership by industry champions and by governments - all aimed at changing the operating mode and improving the culture in the oil and gas industry.

Sander, M. L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

"$#&%(' )10 3 25 47698#A@CBED%C FH GI#&% ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... integrate and dump filter has a rectangular impulse response with a length of T ... packet inter- arrival times for the WLAN, with an offered load of 50%. ...

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

38

GI-2012-Interop-CC_Ghatikar-Koch-Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6E Deploying Systems Interoperability and Customer Choice within Smart Grid Girish Ghatikar Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Ed Koch AkuacomHoneywell November 2012 Presented...

39

Analysis of an open non-Markovian GI -- (GI| ?)K queueing network with high-rate renewal arrival process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze an open non-Markovian queueing network with high-rate renewal arrival process, Markovian routing, arbitrary service policy, and unlimited number of servers at nodes. We obtain mean values for the number of busy servers at nodes of the queueing ...

A. A. Nazarov; A. N. Moiseev

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A note on comparing response times in the M/GI/1/FB and M/GI/1/PS queues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-digit subtracters are denoted SDS1 through SDS4. One multiplication cycle consists of a sequence of four radix-4 number in SD format to be used as input to SDS1. Part of the primary rank of the double rank register to SDS1. Secondary rank for the US register. Secondary rank for the UM register. The primary rank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) Mechanism of Structural Component Materials in Pressurized Water Reactors : Young Suk...

42

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image 300 DPI Image . Title: Nanotechnology; Biotechnology/Health; Nanocrystals; Hwang. ...

43

"GiGa": the Billion Galaxy HI Survey -- Tracing Galaxy Assembly from Reionization to the Present  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we review the Billion Galaxy Survey that will be carried out at radio--optical wavelengths to micro--nanoJansky levels with the telescopes of the next decades. These are the Low-Frequency Array, the Square Kilometer Array and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope as survey telescopes, and the Thirty Meter class Telescopes for high spectral resolution+AO, and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for high spatial resolution near--mid IR follow-up. With these facilities, we will be addressing fundamental questions like how galaxies assemble with super-massive black-holes inside from the epoch of First Light until the present, how these objects started and finished the reionization of the universe, and how the processes of star-formation, stellar evolution, and metal enrichment of the IGM proceeded over cosmic time. We also summarize the high-resolution science that has been done thus far on high redshift galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Faint galaxies have steadily decreasing sizes at fainter fluxes and higher redshifts, reflecting the hierarchical formation of galaxies over cosmic time. HST has imaged this process in great structural detail to zsub-clumps. Finally, we summarize how the 6.5 meter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will measure first light, reionization, and galaxy assembly in the near--mid-IR.

R. A. Windhorst; S. H. Cohen; N. P. Hathi; R. A. Jansen; R. E. Ryan Jr

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Neural Network Based Approaches, Solving Haplotype Reconstruction in MEC and MEC/GI Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) are different variant positions (1% of DNA sequence) of human genomes which their mutation is associated with complex genetic diseases. As a consequence, obtaining all SNPs from human populations is one of the primary ... Keywords: Bioinformatics, biology and genomics, haplotype reconstruction, SNP fragments, clustering, genotype information, haplotype, reconstruction rate, unsupervised neural network

M-Hossein Moeinzadeh; Ehsan Asgarian; Sara Sharifian-R; Amir Najafi-Ardabili; Javad Mohammadzadeh

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash by Carbonation Reaction with Diffeent Water Content by Nam-Il Um, Kwang-Suk...

46

Recycling Symposium Advance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Lee, Rare Metals Research Group, Kigam, Korea; Kyung-Hee Ju, Jae-Koo Yoom, ... Kang, Young-Suk Kim, Hun-Joon Sogn, Seoul National University, Korea.

47

Small Nanoparticles Bring Big Improvement to Medical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dynamic cellular processes.. * H. Kang, F. Tokumasu, M. Clarke, Z. Zhou, J. Tang, T. Nguyen and J. Hwang. Probing dynamic ...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Metrology of fluorescent nanocrystals for the standards in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Quantitative Molecular Sensors and Imaging Techniques for Diagnostic Detection of Infectious Diseases Jeeseong Hwang jch@nist.gov ...

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

49

NIST Image Gallery: Browse: Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2007. Thumbnail, Nanotechnology; Biotechnology/Health; Nanocrystals; Hwang, created 6/21/2004, entered 11/5/2004. ...

50

MaSST 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... How does the nondeterminism of scheduling ... memory use, parallelism, virtual machines, and cloud ... Jeehyun Hwang, North Carolina State University. ...

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Secret color images sharing schemes based on XOR operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s paper presents two new constructi ons for the secret colori mages shari ng schemes .Onei s a (n, n) th eshold scheme, whi ch can be const ucted based on XOR ope ati on. The othe i s a (2, n) th eshold scheme, whi ch can be const ucted by usi ng AND and XOR ope ati ons. The two schemes have no pi xel expansi on, and the ti me complexi ty fo const ucti ng sha ed i mages i s O(k 1 n), excludi ng the ti me needed fo gene ati ng n di sti nct andom mati ces (he e k si ze of the sharedi mage). The reconstructed i mages can be obtai nedi n the two schemes by usi ng the XOR operati on alone. The relati vedi fferences of the two schemes are 1 and 1/2, respecti vely. The ti me complexi ty of the recoveredi magesi s O(k 1 n) and O(2k 1 ), especti vely. The two schemes also povi de pe fect sec ecy. Keywo ds: Sec et shai ng scheme; Vi sual c yptog aphy; Vi sual sec et shai ng scheme; XOR ope ati on; Pe fect sec ecy 1. Int oduction Afte Blakely and Shami i ndependently p oposed the (k, n) th eshold scheme [1-2], hund eds of pape s we e publi shed epo ti ng esea ch about thi s topi c. Howeve , these schemes a e only sui table fo di gi tal data such as text fi les, passwo ds, and enc ypti on / Correspondi ng author. Tel.: +86-10-62782930 E-mai l address: daoshun@mai l.tsi nghua.edu.cn decrypti on keys [3]. Compared wi thdi gi tal data such as passwords and text fi les,di gi tal i mages have a large amount of datum, and the di fference between two nei ghbori ng datum i s very small. Because of the features ofdi gi tali mages,i ti si mpracti cal to apply the tradi ti onal threshold scheme to share a secretdi gi tali magedi rectly, soi ti s veryi mportant and necessary toi nvesti gate (k, n) th eshold schemes of di gi tal i mages. In [3], the Chang and Hwang p ...

Wang Dao-Shun; Zhang Lei; Ma Ning; Huang Lian-Sheng; Bei Ji

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Joint Symposium of ICA Working Group on CEWaCM and JBGIS Gi4DM Cartography and Geoinformatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be available to support disaster response. It is widely seen as a successful example of international challenges due to increasing disaster response needs and recovery costs. The development of Disaster Response mapping can strengthen analytical capabilities and decision making for disaster response. The development

Köbben, Barend

53

SMar khams 'bom rnam snang ngam/ lha 'dus rnam snang gi skor la cung zad gleng ba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

^-d]-dl^en-nz#-V-wr-[*c-e[]- [}rn-]n-V-wr-[*-N(c-R#-[qc-ye-t#e-zdC#-X^c-xr-xr-N^v-h$v-xr-en$rn- z[^e ![*-*n-w(r-e#n-p(e-fc-z[#-Vz#-[qc-ye-ef-e]n-x#e-t#e-zdC#-dc-f- ]^n-[e(rn-Wr-! fh]-fz-#-vf-[^-N^-d]-[*-[e-]#-f-ac-Nr-fj[-[r- [*z#-N^-zw(c! [*-fn-dl*rn-fw]-]#-dg]-a(-nC... (-x#]-h$v-#n-an-[*-dl#]-[qc-ye-dfn-ac-Nn! X^-fh]-[*-[e- vn-d([-W#-x$v-eC-^we-[r-[^n-fhfn-f#-z[}-dz#-]r-[^-X-d;z-q(r-uz-b^en- X*]-[*-u#-Vz#-X-y*-eo#r-;d-x([-f*[-(en-p$d-]zr-! x$v-zd(-l*n-az#-w$v-[^- f-ac-Nr-fj[-W#-N^-d]-dl*rn-x...

Tsering, Tashi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

U.S. DEPARTlVIENT OF ENERGY p.GI.G!) EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas flare . The microturbine wi" generate mechanical energy which will be converted to electricity for 100% on-site use. The proposed biogas microturbine project would complete...

55

Light Source Notes | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Linear Lattice of the APS Storage Ring Vadim Sajaev,Louis Emery LS-292 Direct-Drive and Eddy-Current Septum Magnets Suk Hong Kim LS-291 Calculation of Pulsed Kicker...

56

Copper Electrorefining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... Program Organizers: Shijie Wang, Rio Tinto Kennecott Utah Copper; J. E. Dutrizac, CANMET; Michael Free, University of Utah; J. Y. Hwang,...

57

Filter-Analyzer Neutron Spectrometer (FANS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... J. Hwang, "Probing the Unusual Proton and Anion Mobility of LiBH ... Analysis of the Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectra of Electron Donor-Acceptor ...

58

Structures and Mechanical Properties IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013... Francois Payen1; Nayomi Plaza1; Jinwoo Hwang1; Eren Kalay2; Matt Kramer2 ; 1University of Wisconsin, Madison; 2Ames Laboratory

59

GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities during the reoxidation of a bioreduced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), protocatechuate (R. sphaeroides, gi 22975204), vanillin (Corynebacterium efficiens, gi 25027190), catechol

60

Engelska publikationer Bartish G.I., Jeppsson N., Bartish I.V. and Nybom H. 2001. Assessment of genetic diversity using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Scand., Sect. B Soil Plant Sci. 56: 70­80 Nybom H., Esselink G.D., Werlemark G., Leus L. and Vosman B (4): 9­13 Tahir I.I. 2003. Tio bra sorter för industrin. Frukt & bär 45 (1): 28 Tahir I.I. 2003, Nya lovande skorvresistenta sorter, Smaktester, Skördetidpunkt och lagring, ?pplets innehåll, För

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Passive Film Formed on Alloy 600 as a Steam Generator Tubing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... A Passive Film Formed on Alloy 600 as a Steam Generator Tubing Material by Dong-Jin Kim, Hyuk Chul Kwon, Seong Sik Hwang and Hong...

62

TRUCK ROLL STABILITY DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 TRUCK ROLL STABILITY DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS S. S. Stevens, Principal Investigator S. M. Chin K. A. Hake H. L. Hwang J. P. Rollow L. F. Truett July 2001 Prepared for the...

63

THE POLYTECHNIC REPORTER The Voice of the Student Body of Polytechnic Institute of NYU Thursday, April 15, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SHIH-YING HWANG Pietro PM Iannetta Kamal M Ibrahim Roberto Iglesias-Prieto Sonja Ihle Pelle K Mike Westerman Rob J Whelan Michael G Whitlock Richard Whittington Jeanette Whitton Chris Wilcock Jerry

Gupta, Nikhil

64

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - American Physical Society...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

said. But Friend also characterizes him as "a wonderful colleague." Recalling a recent power outage, she said Hwang stepped right in: "He did a great job. He's willing to help...

65

at-meeting technical program as a .pdf file  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 15, 1998 ... GROWTH: NONG M. HWANG1; Sung B. Lee1; Chan H. Han1; Duk Y. Yoon1 ..... triple junctions, known as the Herring Relations or Young's Equation. .... SHOWS AN f -1 DEPENDENCE: MARK ANDREW MIODOWNIK1;.

66

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richard E. Brown, James W. Hanford, Alan H . Sanstad, andFrancis X . , James W. Hanford, Richard E. Brown, Alan H.place for these end-uses (Hanford et al. 1994, Hwang et al.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Solar Blind Micropulse Raman Lidar for Boundary Layer Water Vapor Measurements Whiteman, D.N., Mathur, S., Nam, M., Hwang, I.H., and Prasad, C.R., National...

68

Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of Denaturation Temperature Gradient Polymerase Chain Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ji Youn Lee, Hee-Woong Lim , Suk-In Yoo , Byoung-Tak Zhang and Tai Hyun Park School of Chemical amplification of nucleic acids, which is applicable to versatile biochemical applications. PCR plays is formulated with kinetic constants of hybridization reactions while the extension step is formulated

Yoo, SukIn

69

2298 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 13, NO. 2, JUNE 2003 Cryogenic Cooling Temperature of HTS Transformers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, thermal optimization, transformer. I. INTRODUCTION MAIN advantages of HTS power transformers are the small Temperature of HTS Transformers for Compactness and Efficiency Ho-Myung Chang, Yeon Suk Choi, Steven W. Van- genic cooling temperature of HTS transformer is presented, aiming simultaneously at compactness

Chang, Ho-Myung

70

-Oak Ridge National l. oy [EFECT%W flHSUia-9PI gi)N~PCOEjJIR!.,o tS N9IN FN_RWiD)LCTH pgR^ s -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOT Engineering Technology Division IWO-PHASE, TWO-COMPONENT STIRLING ENGINE WITH CONTROLLED EVAPORATION C. D angular frequency of operation #12;TWO-PHASE, TWO-COMPONENT STIRLING ENGINE WITH CONTROLLED EVAPORATION C. D. West ABSTRACT In a Stirling-like engine, the specific power can be greatly increased by the use

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

71

Michael Cheung, MD Clopidogrel with or without Omeprazle in Coronary Artery Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with stent placement. Primary GI endpoint was first occurrence of upper GI bleeding, occult GI bleed, hgb and occult) was statistically reduced with ompprazole compared to placebo. Cardiovascular endpoints

72

Content-Based Video Copy Detection: PRISMA at TRECVID ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ?(Gi,Gj) = w1 ?1(Gi,Gj) + w2 ?2(Gi,Gj) We defined ? as L1 (Manhattan) distance for EHD, GH and CH vectors: L1(x, y) = d ? i=0 |xi ? yi| ...

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Small Business Conference Small Businesses Don't Want to Miss |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Small Business Conference Small Businesses Don't Want to Miss The Small Business Conference Small Businesses Don't Want to Miss The Small Business Conference Small Businesses Don't Want to Miss December 14, 2010 - 3:53pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director Alice Hwang has a lot on her plate. As the CEO and CFO of Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. (ATL), a 150 employee technical and management consulting firm located in Germantown, Maryland, Ms. Hwang oversees her company's budget, manages projects and technical activities, and directs the financial, accounting, human resources, and IT infrastructure needed to keep the company running and growing. As a small business owner, Ms. Hwang is accustomed to finding creative solutions to address multiple challenges. The small businesses and the

74

ENDOSCOPY SUITE DIRECT ENDOSCOPY REQUEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ who _______ negative colonoscopy 1st degree relative ______ Occult GI bleeding with ______ Abnormal, x-ray or CT ______ Occult GI bleeding (attach report) ______ Hematochezia ______ Nausea and

Viola, Ronald

75

Calnuc plays a role in dynamic distribution of G alpha i but not G beta subunits and modulates ACTH secretion in AtT-20 neuroendocrine secretory cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PM B C G?i1/2 (NT) G?i1/2 (CNG) % of Total Protein (pooled)NT Cells G?i3 (NT) G?i3 (CNG)CNG Cells G? (NT) G? (CNG) Top Pooled Bottom Figure 9

Lin, Ping; Fischer, Thierry; Lavoie, Christine; Huang, Haining; Farquhar, Marilyn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Wind Sea and Swell Separation of 1D Wave Spectrum by a Spectrum Integration Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an earlier paper by Wang and Hwang, a wave steepness method was introduced to separate the wind sea and swell of the 1D wave spectrum without relying on external information, such as the wind speed. Later, the method was found to produce the ...

Paul A. Hwang; Francisco J. Ocampo-Torres; Hctor Garca-Nava

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Annual Report Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in uncovering the unique electronic properties of graphene, which is a remarkable new material consisting. "Flexible Electronics, NanoCenter Industrial Workshop (Samsung)," August, 2007. "Graphene is all surface Function, Screening, and Plasmons in Two-Dimensional Graphene, E.H. Hwang and S. Das Sarma, Phys. Rev. B 75

Lathrop, Daniel P.

78

Threat Modeling: Herdict: A distributed model for threats online  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It can be difficult for users to know what effect a piece of software is to have on their computers. Herdict, a nascent project in distributed software, will use end users' computers to gain an understanding of how software affects them. Tim Hwang, a ...

Tim Hwang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

1:30PM, EE1+ Interface Roughness Broadening of Intersubband ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth of InGaAsP on InP DFB Laser Gratings by Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy: W.-Y. HWANG, J.N. Baillargeon, A.Y. Cho, S.N.G. Chu, P.F. Jr. Sciortino

80

Aerogel waveplates Pradeep Bhupathi,1,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerogel waveplates Pradeep Bhupathi,1,* Jungseek Hwang,2, Rodica M. Martin,1 Jackson Blankstein,3% porosity silica aerogel samples under various degrees of uniaxial strain. Uniaxially compressed aerogels demonstrates that uniaxially strained high porosity aerogels can be used as tunable waveplates in a broad

Tanner, David B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Chemical and Biological studies of Nakiterpiosin and Nakiterpiosinone Shuanhu Gao, Qiaoling Wang, Lily Jun-Shen Huang, Lawrence Lum and Chuo Chen*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Clark, R. Stein, L. Dick, D. Hwang, A. L. Goldberg, Cell 1994, 78, 761 ± 771. [2] A. Craiu, M. Gaczynska. A. Cruickshank, L. R. Dick, L. Grenier, J. M. Klunder, Y.-T. Ma, L. Plamondon, R. L. Stein, BioorgCormack, W. Baumeister, L. Grenier, C. Moomaw, L. Plamondon, B. Pramanik, C. Slaughter, F. Soucy, R. Stein, F

Chen, Chuo

82

Efficient Inverse Modeling of Barotropic Ocean Tides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally efficient relocatable system for generalized inverse (GI) modeling of barotropic ocean tides is described. The GI penalty functional is minimized using a representer method, which requires repeated solution of the forward and ...

Gary D. Egbert; Svetlana Y. Erofeeva

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Gina Valds. Comiendo lumbre. Colorado Springs, Colorado: Maize Press, 1986. 62 pages.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Los Angeles GiNA Valds. Comiendo lumbre. ColoradoSprings, Colorado: Maize Press, 1986. 62 pages. The Gina

Sherno, Sylvia R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

[Cover page, Margins: Left 1 in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

32 32 Supply Chain-Based Solution to Prevent Fuel Tax Evasion: Proof of Concept Final Report November 2011 Prepared by Gary Capps Mary Beth Lascurain Oscar Franzese Duncan Earl David West Timothy McIntyre Shih-Miao Chin Ho-Ling Hwang Raynella Connatser Samuel Lewis ORNL/TM-2011/132 Energy and Transportation Science Division SUPPLY CHAIN-BASED SOLUTION TO PREVENT FUEL TAX EVASION: PROOF OF CONCEPT FINAL REPORT Gary Capps Mary Beth Lascurain Oscar Franzese Duncan Earl David West Timothy McIntyre Shih-Miao Chin Ho-Ling Hwang Raynella Connatser Samuel Lewis Date Published: November 2011 Prepared by OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6283 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

87

Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition August 23, 2012 - 2:44pm Addthis The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of University of Maryland students -- designed and built a prototype for a wall unit air conditioner that showed more than 30 percent energy savings when tested in a lab. | Photo courtesy of Yunho Hwang, University of Maryland. The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of University of Maryland students -- designed and built a prototype for a wall unit air conditioner that showed more than 30 percent energy savings when tested in a lab. | Photo courtesy of Yunho Hwang, University of Maryland. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

88

Parallel evolution of conserved non-coding elements that target a common set of developmental regulatory genes from worms to humans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHA- 4. Dev Biol 2004, 266(2):388-398. 4. Wenick AS, Hobert O: Genomic cis-regulatory architecture and trans-acting regulators of a single interneuron-specific gene battery in C. elegans. Dev Cell 2004, 6(6):757-770. 5. Hwang SB, Lee J: Neuron cell... Genefinder coding_exon * Genefinder exon * history CDS history coding_exon * history exon * history Transcript history Pseudogene Pseudogene exon * Pseudogene Pseudogene inverted inverted_repeat RepeatMasker repeat...

Vavouri, Tanya; Walter, Klaudia; Gilks, Walter R; Lehner, Ben; Elgar, Greg

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

JGI - The GEBA Pilot Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEBA Sequencing Plans GEBA Sequencing Plans For status information, see the Genome Projects section, or go to Microbial Genomics to find the latest releases. Organism Domain Phylum Status IMG-ER NCBI PID Culture ID GOLD ID Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans DSM 10331 Bacteria Actinobacteria draft DSM 10331 Gi02326 Actinosynnema mirum 101, DSM 43827 Bacteria Actinobacteria draft 2500395345 19705 DSM 43827 Gi02064 Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius acidocaldarius 104-IA, DSM 446 Bacteria Firmicutes draft 29405 DSM 446 Gi02324 Anaerococcus prevotii PC 1, DSM 20548 Bacteria Firmicutes draft DSM 20548 Gi02318 Atopobium parvulum IPP 1246, DSM 20469 Bacteria Actinobacteria draft 29401 DSM 20469 Gi02317 Beutenbergia cavernosa HKI 0122, DSM 12333 Bacteria Actinobacteria draft 2500395322 20827 DSM 12333 Gi02225

90

Why Sequence Five Verrucomicrobia?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

host environment and GI tract microbiota, through comparative and functional genomics. CSP project participants: Hauke Smidt and Willem M. de Vos (proposers, Wageningen Univ.)...

91

USEPA: OSWER: Risk Assessment: Guidance for Superfund Volume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the specified body part GI Gastrointestinal GSD Geometric standard deviation HHEM Human Health Evaluation Manual IR Ingestion rate (for water, litersday) K ew Equilibrium...

92

Pages that link to "New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dharamshala Hydro Power Ltd ( links) Gehra Hydro Power Ltd ( links) General Electric in India GE ( links) GI Power Corporation Limited GIPCL ( links)...

93

A comparison of the glycemic index of sorghum and other commonly consumed grains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Little in vivo research on glycemic index (GI) values or the digestive impact of sorghum based food products currently exists. Because sorghum is a gluten-free (more)

Pruett, Ashley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations September 29, 2003 1 Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Nicholas S. Sereno, Suk H. Kim 1.0 Abstract Time-varying magnetic fields of magnets in booster accelerators induce substantial eddy currents in the vacuum chambers. The eddy currents in turn act to produce various multi- pole fields that act on the beam. These fields must be taken into account when doing a lat- tice design. In the APS booster, the relatively long dipole magnets (3 meters) are linearly ramped to accelerate the injected 325 MeV beam to 7 GeV. Substantial dipole and sextu- pole fields are generated in the elliptical vacuum chamber from the induced eddy currents. In this note, formulas for the induced dipole and sextupole fields are derived for elliptical and rectangular vacuum chambers for a time-varying dipole field. A discussion is given

95

Elucidation of Hydrogen Interaction Mechanisms with Metal-Doped Carbon Nanostructures - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Ragaiy Zidan (Primary Contact), Joseph A.Teprovich Jr., Douglas A Knight, Robert Lascola, Lucile C. Teague Savannah River National Laboratory Building 999-2W, Aiken, SC 29808 Phone: (803) 646-8876 Email: ragaiy.zidan@srnl.doe.gov Collaborators: * Prof. Puru Jena - Department of Physics - Virginia Commonwealth University * Prof. Mark Conradi - Department of Physics - Washington University of St. Louis * Prof. Sonjong Hwang - Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division - California Institute of Technology

96

OFF-HIGHWAY GASOLINE CONSUMPTION ESTIMATION MODELS USED IN THE FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION ATTRIBUTION AND PROCESS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

222 222 Center for Transportation Analysis Energy and Transportation Science Division OFF-HIGHWAY GASOLINE CONSUMPTION ESTIMATION MODELS USED IN THE FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION ATTRIBUTION AND PROCESS 2008 Updates Ho-Ling Hwang, Ph.D. Stacy Davis Date Published: December 2009 Prepared by OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6283 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES....................................................................................v LIST OF ACRONYMS .................................................................................................... vii ABSTRACT ....................................................................................................................... ix

97

Which nets are being used: factors associated with mosquito net use in Amhara, Oromia and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples' Regions of Ethiopia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-17]. The knowledge of even how to hang a net cor- rectly, or the materials needed to do so, may be lacking [18]. Factors that have been associated with net use include age, educational level attained, wealth, urban/ rural location, seasonality and weather[19... randomized controlled trial in western Kenya. Am J Trop Med Hyg 2003, 68:137-141. 25. Hwang J, Graves PM, Jima D, Reithinger R, Kachur SP: Knowledge of malaria and its association with malaria-related behaviorsresults from the Malaria Indicator Survey...

Ngondi, Jeremiah; Graves, Patricia M; Gebre, Teshome; Mosher, Aryc W; Shargie, Estifanos B; Emerson, Paul M; Richards, Frank O Jr; Ethiopia Malaria Indicator Survey Working Group

2011-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Opportunities for US-China Joint Initiative Roland J. Hwang Transportation Program Director Natural Resources Defense Council US-China Electric Vehicles Forum Beijing, China September 30, 2009 rhwang@nrdc.org, 415-875-6100 2 Slide The Natural Resources Defense Council * National Environmental Non Governmental Organization (NGO) founded in 1970 * 350 Lawyers, Scientists and other professionals * 1.2 million members and activists * 6 offices: New York, D.C., San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and Beijing * Beijing Office founded in 1996 and focuses on energy (including

99

SSRL HEADLINES - December 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 - December 2011 6 - December 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director - Outreach and Support Efforts Science Highlight - Manganese-II Oxidation: A Biotic and Abiotic Process Science Highlight - Characterization of Iron Diazene Complexes in Two Oxidation States Biological SAXS Symposium - A Tribute to Dr. Hiro Tsuruta Awards - Prof. Harold Hwang Named American Physical Society Fellow Announcements - Shipping, Lightsources.org Survey, SSRL at the Exploratorium, NUFO Profile - Postdoc Eric Verploegen Energized by Experiences, Mentoring In the News - Metallurgy, Earth's Core, Nitrogenase __________________________________________________________________________ 1. From the Director: Outreach and Support Efforts

100

Online Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online Resources Online Resources       General Information Discovering New Physics - Fermilab: where physicists unravel the mysteries of the universe Electromagnetic Simulation: Charged Particle Motion in E/M Field (by Fu-Kwun Hwang, National Taiwan Normal University) Fermilabyrinth - Online versions of exhibits at the Lederman Science Center Fermilab Virtual Tour - Photos of accelerators and detectors with figure captions International Particle Physics Outreach Group (from CERN) Fermilab Homepage - Links to general information, experiments and projects (Fermilab at Work), particle physics (inquiring minds), resources for students (education) and more High-Energy Physics Acronyms - (from Fermilab) Particle Physics - a list of links from the American Physical Society)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

1.0 EDC Problem Formulation Each plant i has a cost-rate curve that gives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the total generation equals the total demand PD plus the total losses PL. LD m i Gi PPP 1 (4a) The demand PD are independent variables. Given demand and losses, one of the generation values is determined once the other m-1. The generators cannot exceed their maximum capabilities, represented by max GiP . And clearly, they cannot

McCalley, James D.

102

A Core Equilibrium Convergence in a Public Goods Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is called the equal treatment core and is denoted by Cr. Finally, an allocation ((xi, gi), i ? N) is an Edgeworth allocation if for each positive integer r, ((xi, gi), i ? N) is in the equal treatment core of the rth replica economy Er, that is, ((xi, gi), i... ? N) ? ?? r=1 Cr. 3.1 Nonemptiness of the set of Edgeworth allocations Andreoni (2006) and Bernheim and Rangel (2007) argue that asymptotically consumers charitable giving is due more to the act of giving itself than to concerns about the aggregate...

Allouch, N

103

An Analysis of a Phase FieMModel of a Free Boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Diy q Gi ci, d~ f(u, ~) r,o ~· X" A d(e, Q) v(t, x) IIvl(om n~(')(v) [Ivll(f) C/+~(A) L(A)(v) aij, bi

?aginalp, Gunduz

104

New technologies for optical coherence microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the American Cancer Society, gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are among the most common forms of malignancies suffered today, affecting -200,000 people and causing -80,000 deaths in the United States every year. ...

Huang, Shu-Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evolution and Functions of Oleosins and Oleosin-Coated Oil Bodies in Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ofOleosinsandOleosin?CoatedOilBodiesinPlants AGI,MundyJ,TzenJT(2001)Oilbodiesandtheirassociatedlocalizationandsynthesisofanoil?bodymembrane protein

Huang, Chien-Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

UTCA Project 99244 December 30, 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................................................... 11 Chemical Dispersion Modeling. Industry and commerce use GI in many ways. Utility companies (power, gas, water, and telephone) are major considers appropriate Chemical Dispersion Modeling Dispersion modeling is one of the tools that can be used

Pitt, Robert E.

107

Screening-Engineered Field-E?ect Solar Cells  

sustained internally by electrical activity of the cell itself, eliminating the need for an external gate power source and thus ... power consumption (P g = V gI g

108

Evaluation and Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Gastroenterological Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008;23: 4. Rockey DC. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding.Summary and Conclusions Occult GI bleeding remains the mostVL. Hemoccult detection of fecal occult blood quantitated by

Zhu, Amy; Kaneshiro, Marc; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nanomaterials for Energy Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Catalytic Properties of AgCu Bimetallic Nanoparticles for PEMFC Cathode: ... Mansoo Choi2; Won Gi Kim2; Yang-Kook Sun2; Wonbong Choi1;...

110

The role of DNA sequence during helicase loading at S. cerevisiae origins of replication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication is a tightly regulated process that initiates at multiple origins of replication throughout the genome. As cells enter the GI phase of the cell cycle, the Mcm2-7 replicative helicase ...

Lam, Wendy M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E8. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i...

112

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Development of Tight Sand Gas Deposits G.I.the Development of Tight Sand Gas Deposits G.I. Barenblattintense exploitation of tight sand gas deposits will be

Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

MICROSTRUCTURE ON A BLACK CHROME SOLAR SELECTIVE ABSORBER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meeting of International Solar Energy Society, AmericanPhoto-Thermal Conversion of Solar Energy," NSF'/RANN/SE/GI-a Solar Selective Coating," Solar Energy, VoL 17, p.ll9. 2.

Lampert, Carl M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

? ??? ? ??? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?? ? !"$#%"'& - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

()&10"3254. 6. 798$8A@ BD C$CFE$E$E GI HQPRHTS GV UXW`Y GV HQa9Cc bd@$egf`hiEpPrqts u vxwxy ? ?$?A?p?...

115

Building Bridges Throughout Your Career  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room E1200 Strand Chairs: Bob Erck, Angel Yanguas-Gi, Alfredo Bobadilla 10:30 AM IN SITU PHOTOLUMINESCENCE STUDY OF EUROPIUM SURFACE-DOPED TITANIUM-DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLES....

116

The sGang steng-b rNying ma'i rGyud manuscript from Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first folios, itsimply gives the volume identification and pagination in gold ink. 6 Volumes Ka, Pa, Ra, Ha to Ki, Gi, Ci, Chi, Nyi, Thi, Ni, Pi, Bi, and Mi 7 This is unlike the Rig 'dzin edition, where...

Cathy Cantwell; Mayer, Rob

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Khar: The Oral Tradition of Game of Riddles in Tshanglakha Speaking Community of Eastern Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nyen ngag gi tenchey chenpo melong la jhug pey shaed jar danyidhiye gong jan zhe jawa zhug so (1999) by Mepham Geyleg Namgyal. 60 Khar: The Oral Tradition of Game of Riddles There is a second very strong argument with regard to independent origin... Nyen ngag gi tenchey chenpo melong la jhug pey shaed jar danyidhiye gong jan zhe jawa zhug so. Delhi: Tibetan Cultural & Religious Publication Centre. 76 Khar: The Oral Tradition of Game of Riddles Pelden, Setshang Lobzang (2004). Tshangsey...

Dorji, Tshering

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Research Staff - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff CTA Staff David E. Smith Center Director [CV/Bio] Alphabetic List Debbie Bain P.T. Jones [CV/Bio] Ingrid Busch [CV/Bio] Keith Kahl [CV/Bio] Gary Capps [CV/Bio] Tim LaClair [CV/Bio] Shih-Miao Chin [CV/Bio] Brandon Langley [CV/Bio] Sujit Das [CV/Bio] Jan Mou Li [CV/Bio] Diane Davidson [CV/Bio] Zhenhong Lin [CV/Bio] Stacy Davis [CV/Bio] Changzheng Liu [CV/Bio] Dean Deter [CV/Bio] Andreas Malikopoulos [CV/Bio] Susan Diegel [CV/Bio] Sheila Moore Oscar Franzese [CV/Bio] Bruce Peterson [CV/Bio] Rick Goeltz [CV/Bio] Simon Rose [CV/Bio] Steve Gordon [CV/Bio] Bo Saulsbury [CV/Bio] Mike Hilliard [CV/Bio] Mike Schultze [CV/Bio] Ho-Ling Hwang [CV/Bio] Adam Siekmann [CV/Bio]

119

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 15520 of 26,764 results. 11 - 15520 of 26,764 results. Article World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave A California company will harness the Mojave Desert sunshine to create the world's largest solar energy system by the end of 2013. http://energy.gov/articles/world-s-largest-solar-energy-project-heads-mojave Article Industry Leaders Saving Energy Companies such as AT&T, 3M, Intel, PepsiCo and Whirlpool are participating in the Energy Department's Save Energy Now LEADER initiative, committing to reducing their energy use by 25 percent or more in 10 years. http://energy.gov/articles/industry-leaders-saving-energy Article The Small Business Conference Small Businesses Don't Want to Miss Small business owner Alice Hwang explains the benefits of the Department's Annual Small Business Conference & Expo.

120

Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Spatial and Temporal Surface Spectral Reflectivity Over the ARM SGP CART Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Spatial and Temporal Surface Spectral Reflectivity Over the ARM SGP CART Area A. P. Trishchenko, Y. Luo, R. Latifovic, W. Park, J. Cihlar, and B. Hwang Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Z. Li and M. C. Cribb University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland Introduction Surface albedo is a key variable determining the disposition of solar radiation between the surface and the atmosphere. Reliable mapping of surface albedo and improved understanding of radiation interactions at the surface are required for advancing weather forecasting and climate studies. The ground-based observations are limited to a handful of locations sparsely distributed in the South Great Plains (SGP). Frequently, they represent only small-scale features of surface reflective properties and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance: Phase 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance: Phase 2 November 2004 Prepared by S. M. Chin O. Franzese D. L. Greene H. L. Hwang Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee R. C. Gibson The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov

122

Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Domain: Impact of Improved Molecular Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Domain: Impact of Improved Molecular Spectroscopy A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada B. Hwang Intermap Technologies Corp. Calgary, Canada Z. Li University of Maryland and The Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center College Park, Maryland Introduction Atmospheric correction of satellite measurements is a major step in the retrieval of surface reflective properties. It involves removing the effect of gaseous absorption as well as correcting for the effect of an atmospheric molecular and particulate scattering. In the past few years, there has been significant advancement in our knowledge of the absorbing properties of various atmospheric radiatively active

123

Photon Science : SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Science Photon Science Directorate | Science Highlights | Publications | SLAC Faculty Affairs | Org Chart Photon Science Faculty Arthur I. Bienenstock * Britt Hedman Anders Nilsson Gordon E. Brown, Jr. Keith O. Hodgson Jens Nørskov Axel T. Brunger Norbert Holtkamp R. Paul Phizackerley * Herman Winick * Philip Bucksbaum Zhirong Huang Piero A. Pianetta Bob Byer Harold Y. Hwang Srinivas Raghu Bruce Clemens Kent Irwin David A. Reis Yi Cui Chi-Chang Kao Zhi-Xun Shen Thomas Devereaux Ingolf Lindau * Edward I. Solomon Sebastian Doniach Aaron Lindenberg Joachim Stöhr Kelly Gaffney Wendy Mao Soichi Wakatsuki John Galayda Todd J. Martinez William Weis (Chair) Jerry Hastings Nicholas Melosh Helmut Wiedemann * *Emeritus Visiting/Consulting Faculty Faculty Affairs Office Particle Physics and Astrophysics Faculty

124

Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance May 2002 Prepared by S. M. Chin O. Franzese D. L. Greene H. L. Hwang Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee R. C. Gibson The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov

125

A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TM TM -2003/171 A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption July 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the followi ng source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

126

THE FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION GASOHOL CONSUMPTION ESTIMATION MODEL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 THE FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION GASOHOL CONSUMPTION ESTIMATION MODEL August 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

127

UNIRIB Publications: 2007 Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Bibliography 7 Bibliography These citations provide bibliographical information about articles published by University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium staff in 2007. Articles in Scientific Journals Alpha Decay of ¹⁰⁹I and Its Implications for the Proton Decay of ¹⁰⁵Sb and the Astrophysical Rapid Proton-Capture Process, C. Mazzocchi, R.K. Grzywacz, S.N. Liddick, K.P. Rykaczewski, H. Schatz, J.C. Batchelder, C.R. Bingham, C.J. Gross, J.H. Hamilton, J.K. Hwang, S. Ilyushkin, A. Korgul, W. Krolas, K. Li, R.D. Page, D. Simpson and J.A. Winger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 212501 (2007) Conferences/Meetings Development of a High Resolution Isobar Separator for Study of Exotic Decays, A. Piechaczek, V. Shchepunov , H.K. Carter, J.C. Batchelder, E.F. Zganjar, S.N. Liddick, H. Wollnik, Y. Hu, B.O. Griffith, Proceedings from

128

Microsoft Word - 34164475-file00.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Running Head Running Head Cell Wall Architecture in Zinnia elegans Tracheary Elements Corresponding Author Michael P. Thelen Physical and Life Sciences Directorate Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-452 PO Box 808 Livermore, CA 94550 Office: (925) 422-6547 Fax: (925) 422-2282 Email: mthelen@llnl.gov Journal Research Area Cell Biology Plant Physiology Preview. Published on July 6, 2010, as DOI:10.1104/pp.110.155242 Copyright 2010 by the American Society of Plant Biologists 2 Imaging Cell Wall Architecture in Single Zinnia elegans Tracheary Elements* Catherine I. Lacayo 1 , Alexander J. Malkin 1 , Hoi-Ying N. Holman 2 , Liang Chen 2 , Shi-You Ding 3, 4 , Mona S. Hwang 1 , and Michael P. Thelen 1, 5, § 1 Physical & Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA;

129

Colloquium 2010 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Materials Science 2010 Colloquium Archive 21-January-2010 Prof. Cheol Seong Hwang, Seol National University Identification and formation mechanism of conducting nano-filaments in TiO2 resistive switching thin film 28-January-2010 Dr. Haifeng Ding, Nanjing University 11-February-2010 Dr. John Schlueter, Materials Science Division Molecular Architectures for Control of Electron Spin and Its Transport, 16-April-2010 Prof. Albrecht Jander, Oregon State University Nanostructured Magentic Materails for Inductors 29-April-2010 Prof. Aldo Romero, CINVESTAV-Unidad Queretaro, Mexico 06-May-2010 Dr. Alex Zayak, UC Berkeley/Molecular Foundry, LBNL 20-May-2010 Dr. Matthew J. Highland, Materials Science Division 27-May-2010 Dr. Mark Stiles, National Institute of Standards and Technology

130

Microsoft Word - 2012 Abstract Book FINAL.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cover images courtesy of: Hussein Aluie, T-5 Steven Anton, INST-OFF and AET-1 Anirban Chaudhuri, MPA-11 Jonathan Engle, C-IIAC Edward Holby, MST-6 and MPA-11 Yoontae Hwang and Jennie Schei, MPA-CINT and P-21 Binh-Minh Nguyen, MPA-CINT Katherine Lovejoy, MPA-MC Sarah Sewell, B-8 Blake Sturtevant, MPA-11 Xiaodong Wen, T-1 John Yeager, WX-9 i LANL Postdoc Research Day Table of Contents Page ACCELERATOR OPERATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION AOT---ABS Accelerator a nd B eam S cience Kolski, Jeffrey "Diagnostic" Pulse for Single---Particle---Like Beam Position Measurements 1 during Accumulation/Production Mode in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring Pang, Xiaoying High Performance Beam Dynamics Simulator for the LANSCE Linear 2 Accelerator BIOSCIENCE DIVISION B---7 Biosecurity

131

Open Source Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Source Physics (Brown, 2012; Christian, 2010; Esquembre, 2012; Hwang, 2010) empowers teachers and students to create and use these free tools with the associated intellectual property rights given to customise (Wee & Mak, 2009) the computer models/tools to suit their teaching and learning needs. Open Source Physics (OSP) focuses on design of computer models, such as Easy Java Simulations (EJS) and the use of video modeling and analysis (Tracker). They allow students to investigate, explore and analyse data which is either real or simulated. The OSP approach helps users overcome barriers in creating, using and scaling up meaningful ICT use in education. In Singapore, teachers and students have created or customised existing computer models to design and re-purpose EJS models to suit their context and learning needs. Tracker tools allow students to analyse different aspects of a physics phenomena to deepen their understanding of abstract physics concepts. Using Tracker, students record the motion of ob...

Wee, Loo Kang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

ESH100.1.EP.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Procedure Title Complete an Environmental Life-cycle Management Evaluation Procedure Manager HWANG, HUE-SU A. Status Active Subject Matter Expert Michael D. Nagy-Subject Matter Expert Stephanie A. Salinas-Subject Matter Expert CA, Robert C. Holland-Subject Matter Expert Applicability, Exceptions, and Consequences This corporate procedure applies to all Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) organizations, all management elements, all SNL sites, and all Members of the Workforce. The procedure applies to any member of the workforce who use or handle materials, which may potentially impact the environment, have a high-disposal cost, or are difficult to dispose of upon completion of the project (i.e., creation of SNL/NM legacy waste). Potential project activities may include, but are not limited to, destructive testing,

133

CONCERNING THE DUAL GROUP OF A DENSE SUBGROUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Throughout this Abstract, G is a topological Abelian group and ?G is the space of continuous homomorphisms from G into T in the compact-open topology. A dense subgroup D of G determines G if the (necessarily continuous) surjective isomorphism ?G ? ?D given by h ? ? h|D is a homeomorphism, and G is determined if each dense subgroup of G determines G. The principal result in this area, obtained independently by L. Auenhofer and M. J. Chasco, is the following: Every metrizable group is determined. The authors offer several related results, including these. (1) There are (many) nonmetrizable, noncompact, determined groups. (2) If the dense subgroup Di determines Gi with Gi compact, then ?i Di determines ?i Gi. In particular, if each Gi is compact then ?i Gi determines ?i Gi. (3) Let G be a locally bounded group and let G + denote G with its Bohr topology. Then G is determined if and only if G + is determined. (4) Let non(N) be the least cardinal ? such that some X ? T of cardinality ? has positive outer measure. No compact G with w(G) ? non(N) is determined; thus if non(N) = ?1 (in particular if CH holds), an infinite compact group G is determined if and only if w(G) = ?. Question. Is there in ZFC a cardinal ? such that a compact group G is determined if and only if w(G) < ?? Is ? = non(N)? ? = ?1?

W. W. Comfort; S. U. Raczkowski; F. Javier Trigos-arrieta

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

WAIVERS BY PETITIONER Waivers By Petitioner Petitioner  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WAIVERS WAIVERS BY PETITIONER Waivers By Petitioner Petitioner 3M COMPANY 3M INNOVATIVE PROPE A. B. CHANCE COMPAN ABB AIR PREHEATER, I ABB COMBUSTION ENG ABB POWER GENERATI ABB POWER T&D COMP ABB-CE COMPANY ABENGOA BIOENERGY ACCELERATED DEPLO ACUREX CORP. Waiver Number W (A) 1975-001 W (A) 1975-001 W (C) 1999-008 W (C) 2001-001 W (C) 2002-002 W (A) 2000-012 W (A) 2004-038 W (A) 2003-002 W (1) 1978-029 W (A) 1993-024 W (A) 1995-045 W (A) 1995-035 W (A) 1998-016 W (A) 1991-024 W (A) 2005-003 W (C) 1998-003 W (A) 1980-114 W (A) 1980-115 Contact Numumber DE-SC02-99CH 10989 DE-AC05-00OR22725 DE-AC05-960R22464 DE-FC36-01AL67621 DE-FC02-02CH 11111 C-170 DE-FC36-95G01006 DE-AC04-76DP00789 DE-FC36-03GO13142 DE-FC02-80CS30264 DE-FC02-80CS30265 Waiver Status G G Gi G1 GI GI Gl GI WD G1 CL GI G1 GI P Gl G G Wednesday, February 02, 2005

135

Genomic acquisition of a capsular polysaccharide virulence cluster by non-pathogenic Burkholderia isolates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#7;PBSX family phage portal protein, DEAD/DEAH box helicase, XRE family transcriptional regulator, protein kinase domain-containing protein, gp31, gp30#7;#7;#7;nGi-02#7;559124#7;559510#7;387#7;59.9#7;#7;#7;#7;#7; #7; #7;#7;#7;nGi-03#7;560626#7;562894#7... ;62.6#7;1#7;#7;6#7;4#7;BTH_I0913-BTH_I0928#7;phage related protein, ISBma1, gp11, gp12, lysozyme#7;#7;#7;GI-03 1625457- 1652568#7;1627883#7;1653194#7;25312#7;57.7#7;#7;#7;5#7;2#7;BTH_I1442-BTH_I1456#7;superfamily I DNA/RNA helicase, HAD superfamily...

Sim, Bernice Meng Qi; Chantratita, Narisara; Ooi, Wen Fong; Nandi, Tannistha; Tewhey, Ryan; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Tumapa, Sarinna; Ariyaratne, Pramila; Sung, Wing-Kin; Sem, Xiao Hui; Chua, Hui Hoon; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Lin, Chi Ho; Liu, Yichun; Feil, Edward J; Glass, Mindy B; Tan, Gladys; Peacock, Sharon J; Tan, Patrick

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

136

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach M. G. Ierapetritou and C. A. Floudas®elopment plan with well locations, gi®en a reser®oir property map and a set of infrastructure constraints, represents a ®ery challenging prob- lem. The problem of selecting the optimal ®ertical well locations

137

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and marine fish in the Aleutian Islands in the first half of 2000s Gi Hoon Hong a , Mark Baskaran b Alaska Fish Aleutian Islands Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides A number of caribou and muskoxen samples from the western Alaskan Arctic and fish samples from the Aleutian Islands were collected between

Peterson, Blake R.

138

A watershed-scale design optimization model for stormwater best management practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency developed a decision-support system, System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis Integration (SUSTAIN), to evaluate alternative plans for stormwater quality management and flow abatement techniques in urban ... Keywords: BMP modeling, Best management practices (BMPs), Cost-effectiveness, Decision-support system, Design optimization model, Green infrastructure (GI), Low impact development (LID), Stormwater management

Joong Gwang Lee; Ariamalar Selvakumar; Khalid Alvi; John Riverson; Jenny X. Zhen; Leslie Shoemaker; Fu-Hsiung Lai

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

www.fas.umontreal.ca PROGRAMMES DE 1ER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matériel pédagogique. > Observatoire linguistique Sens-Texte, regroupant trois disciplines langa- gières: la linguistique, la termino- logie et la didactique. Modélisation formelle des phénomènes lexicaux et de la traduction, de la terminologie et de l'interprétation. Le Département de linguistique et de

Parrott, Lael

140

C:\\Forms\\HQ F 1410.4.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

( O P T I O N A L F O L D ) ( O P T I O N A L F O L D ) 3 . DAT E 6 . DAT E ORI GI NAT I NG OF F I CE USE 8 . DAT E DI SPAT CHED FOR RETURN 4 . T I ME 7 . T I ME T I ME RETURNED -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An integrative approach for genomic island prediction in Prokaryotic genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A genomic island (GI) is a segment of genomic sequence that is horizontally transferred from other genomes. The detection of genomic islands is extremely important to the medical research. Most of current computational approaches that use sequence composition ... Keywords: gene information, genomic islands, intergenic distance, sequence composition

Han Wang; John Fazekas; Matthew Booth; Qi Liu; Dongsheng Che

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

THE MULTIFUNCTIONAL GUT OF FISH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulation), but a poor candidate for gas absorption (Crawford 1974). However, the esophagus of Dallia of Defense 118 v #12;4. Natural Gut Microbes and their Role in Immunity 125 5. Conclusion 125 4. The Role. Implications of GI Function for Gas Exchange, Acid­Base Balance and Nitrogen Metabolism J.R. Taylor, C

Nelson, Jay A.

143

Khesbn No. 38-39, September 1964 - Entire Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ST>O g TX srwn p^n T X ix vx anp C? 8i3 "lis) girg^-g^giD-^ng ptta :lgaya tona 8 n p u r n anp agn n px BT$tooa*p ayaypx pynx yana-a^gn nnx p x a anp tix ny^ya^aantp lytyn n y

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

(karafrac.mws) Code for drawing the Karatsuba fractal. - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BfDF.Fagu7$$\\"++c'Gp#F.Fagu7$$\\"++? vbFF.F\\\\guFdbwF4F8-F$6%7'Fhdw7$ FidwF\\\\iu7$$\\"++)[gi#F.Faiu7$F\\\\ewF\\\\iu F[ewF4F8-F$6%7'F[ew7$$\\"++wx5GF.

145

! "# $ %& ' ( $ ! ( )' 0 12 "  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... " ! # $$ 001 23 4( 5687 99@ AC BBD E0F3 4( 56 7 99@ AC BBD GI H PQ RS TU VWH PUX YRXR` aH PR b` RRc a de fgh i pHS qTr ...

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

XIN CAO LOI, A HET CHO AU XE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... i ROBERT J. FLORES Ch? Th??ng Nghi?p LUCILLE KRING ... ngn kho?n ? trong ti nguyn c?a ti?u ... 66-Cc Gi?i H?n V? Lu?t "Ba L?n Ph?m ...

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Noncollective Communicator Creation in MPI James Dinan,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) IBM Blue Gene/P system "Intrepid" indicates that the typical system project. This simulator models the storage system hardware and software protocols used by the ALCF ALCF computing environment. Next, we configured each I/O node to use a 4 GiB burst buffer

148

Pipelined Regeneration with Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description of the Domain Apprentice Tasks Capabi Ii ties of the Demonstration System D i a log Speci fic as an expert consul- tant to a human apprentice. Together, the system and the apprentice will be engaged system will gi ve the human apprentice advice about how to diagnose equipment faults , how to repair them

Li, Baochun

149

dI UNIVERSITY OF NEV\\DA SYSTEM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

concentration at equilibrium 137gs 661.6 0.2 PgA gain calibration - rmply r.'orldwide fallout* 221pg 911.1 0.6 rnpry 23216 concentration* 214gi 1120.4 j.4 Imply 226Ra ad 23BU...

150

Structural characteristics of genomic islands associated with GMP synthases as integration hotspot among sequenced microbial genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

tRNA, tmRNA and some small RNA genes are recognized as general integration hotspots of genomic islands (GIs). The GMP synthase gene (guaA) has been firstly identified as one insertion hotspot of foreign DNA fragments. Thirty four islands integrated into ... Keywords: AlpA, GMP synthase gene (guaA), Genomic island (GI), Integration hotspot, P4 integrase

Lei Song; Yuting Pan; Sihong Chen; Xuehong Zhang

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Molecular Thermodynamics of Asphaltene Precipitation in Reservoir Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Thermodynamics of Asphaltene Precipitation in Reservoir Fluids Jianzhong Wu and John M Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 A pre®iously described molecular-thermodynamic framework, based on colloid. Gi®en the composition of the medium, and asphaltene and resin concentra- tions, the molecular

Firoozabadi, Abbas

152

Beyond Definition: Organising Semantic Information in Bilingual Dictionaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.tlg.uci.edu/ and also available on CD-ROM. 6 The protocols developed by the DGE are described in Adrados and Somolinos (1994), and Somolinos and Berenguer (2005). The GI used search software designed by the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa: see snsgreek.sns.it/sns...

Fraser, Bruce L

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

A matrix-free cone complementarity approach for solving large-scale, nonsmooth, rigid body dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Structural Integrity Laboratory, IRSN­CNRS­UM2, France 3 Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear., 8, 100-104. 2. Barenblatt, G.I. (1962) The mathematical theory of equilibrium of cracks in brittle of hydrided Zircaloy. In: Zhou, Yu and Xu (eds.), Structural mechanics in reactor technology, 18, Atomic

Anitescu, Mihai

154

Calculating reactor transfer functions by Pade approximation via Lanczos algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Analytis, G.Th., 1983. Ann. Nucl. Energy 10, 31±40. Bell, G.I., Glasstone, S., 1970. Nuclear Reactor Theory to the complexity of the dynamic problem, unlike for static cases, most problems of reactor noise theory are treated reactor while the detector is at three dierent positions. Z. Kuang et al. / Annals of Nuclear Energy 28

Pázsit, Imre

155

Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2009 287 Development of computational methods and their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-3 PWR', to be submitted to Nucl. Tech. Bell, G.I. and Glasstone, S. (1970) Nuclear Reactor Theory@nephy.chalmers.se Abstract: A specificity of nuclear reactors is their multiphysics and multiscale character of nuclear reactors and are presented in this paper. The use of such techniques for both time

Demazière, Christophe

156

On the possibility of the space-dependence of the stability indicator (decay ratio) of a BWR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Nuclear Engineering and Design 205 (1­2), 91­105. Bell, G.I., Glasstone, S., 1970. Nuclear Reactor Theory perturbation theory for the analysis of boiling water reactor regional instabilities. Annals of Nuclear Energy reactor. Annals of Nuclear Energy 26 (13), 1183­1204. Lansa°ker, P., 1997. Forsmark Internal Report, FT

Demazière, Christophe

157

KBase_Brettin.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K Base i nfrastructure g rows - Dependent o n l evel o f c ontribu5on f rom A LCF a nd OLCF * Expect s imilar d emands t o J GI o nce K Base i s generally a vailable? RAST MG-RAST...

158

StPln-5;.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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159

Multi-Agent Approach to Electrical Distribution Networks Control Sbastien Rumley*, Elvira Kgi*, Hugh Rudnick, Alain Germond*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution networks is proposed. Traditionally, the medium-voltage part of the electrical grid is operatedMulti-Agent Approach to Electrical Distribution Networks Control Sébastien Rumley*, Elvira Kägi (i.e. bulk distribution) is too complex. Furthermore, the great amount of data to be handled on- line

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

160

50 2sBe?t3X%7%s%]%8%&%`!&FAEgBg3X!$2005 G/8 7n2 F--GLn N g I/j Langlands BP1~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(K/Q) $NCf$G6&Lr$G$"$k$+$i!$$H$/$KK/Q Abel 3H Bg$J$i$PFrP HGP p N GDj j rGp, Frp GI/ Frp Gp N G j p OK G [K

Yoshino, Yuji

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161

Understanding the Role of O-GlcNAc Modifications in Plant Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has contributed towards understanding the role of O-GlcNAc (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) transferases (OGTs) in plants. Through analyses of single and double mutants, we have investigated the unique and overlapping functions of SECRET AGENT (SEC) and SPINDLY (SPY), the arabidopsis OGTs. This work showed that SEC functions as negative regulators of the long-day flowering pathway. SEC also has a positive role in regulation of rosette. An E. coli co-expression system that allows potential substrates to be co-expressed with and O-GlcNAc modified by SEC was developed. We showed that SEC is a bona fide OGT that modifies itself with single O-linked GlcNAc(s). Using this system, we tested a number of proteins that were hypothesized to be substrates of SEC and identified a number of substrates include GIGANTEA (GI), a component of the long day flowering pathway. The hypothesis that O-GlcNAc modification controls GI activity was tested by first mapping where E. coli-expressed SEC modifies GI and then assessing the activity of a non-modifiable mutant form of GI. The activity of the mutant form of GI was indistinguishable from that of wild type suggesting that either O-GlcNAc does not regulate GI activity or that additional modification sites exist on GI. In collaboration with Dr. Juan Antonio Garcia at Universidad Autnoma de Madrid the role of O-GlcNAc modification of the plum pox virus coat protein (PPV-CP) was investigated. SEC was shown to O-GlcNAc modify PPV-CP and the modification was shown to facilitate the infection process. E. coli-expressed SEC was shown to modify the same PPV-CP sites that are modified in plants. SEC has a large protein interaction domain called the TPR domain that has been hypothesized to have a role in determining the substrate specificity of the enzyme and/or to regulate its activity. A mutational analysis of the TPR domain did not find evidence for a role in substrate specificity but did obtain evidence that the domain regulates enzyme activity.

Olszewski, Neil, E.

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Way to Understand the Mass Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explain how the "maximally broken" family gauge theory may work; that is, the family gauge symmetry is respected at the Lagrangian level but broken spontaneously - also as a way to understand the mass-generation mechanism. We use the language of Hwang and Yan to write down an extended Standard Model - using renormalizable quantum field theory as the framework; to start with certain basic units together with a certain gauge group. Specifically we use the left-handed and right-handed spinors to form the basic units together with SUc(3) x SUL(2) x U(1) x SUf(3) as the gauge group. As shown in this paper, the scalar fields phi(1,2)(the standard Higgs), phi(3,1), and phi(3,2) (mainly the "project-out" neutral sector, as seen in the U-gauge), with the first family index and the second SUL(2) index, would do the job - that is, to make certain that all family particles are (very) massive and the phenomena of three generations, including neutrino oscillations, are there, and nothing more

W-Y. Pauchy Hwang

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Killoran, Joseph H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Crowley, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Efficient and reliable 3D dose quality assurance for IMRT by combining independent dose calculations with measurements  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy treatments require appropriate quality assurance (QA) to verify 3D dose distributions. Moreover, increase in patient numbers demand efficient QA-methods. In this study, a time efficient method that combines model-based QA and measurement-based QA was developed; i.e., the hybrid-QA. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the model-based QA and to evaluate time efficiency of the hybrid-QA method. Methods: Accuracy of the model-based QA was determined by comparison of COMPASS calculated dose with Monte Carlo calculations for heterogeneous media. In total, 330 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans were evaluated based on the mean gamma index (GI) with criteria of 3%/3mm and classification of PASS (GI {<=} 0.4), EVAL (0.4 < GI > 0.6), and FAIL (GI {>=} 0.6). Agreement between model-based QA and measurement-based QA was determined for 48 treatment plans, and linac stability was verified for 15 months. Finally, time efficiency improvement of the hybrid-QA was quantified for four representative treatment plans. Results: COMPASS calculated dose was in agreement with Monte Carlo dose, with a maximum error of 3.2% in heterogeneous media with high density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3}). Hybrid-QA results for IMRT treatment plans showed an excellent PASS rate of 98% for all cases. Model-based QA was in agreement with measurement-based QA, as shown by a minimal difference in GI of 0.03 {+-} 0.08. Linac stability was high with an average GI of 0.28 {+-} 0.04. The hybrid-QA method resulted in a time efficiency improvement of 15 min per treatment plan QA compared to measurement-based QA. Conclusions: The hybrid-QA method is adequate for efficient and accurate 3D dose verification. It combines time efficiency of model-based QA with reliability of measurement-based QA and is suitable for implementation within any radiotherapy department.

Visser, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands); Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen 9714 CE (Netherlands); Wauben, D. J. L.; Godart, J.; Langendijk, J. A.; Veld, A. A. van't; Korevaar, E. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands); Groot, M. de [Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen 9714 CE (Netherlands)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Evaluation of the Gastrointestinal Microbiota in Response to Dietary and Therapeutic Factors in Cats and Dogs Using Molecular Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cats and dogs is inhabited by many different types of microorganisms, known as the GI microbiota. Mounting evidence suggests that the administration of certain dietary and/or therapeutic agents can alter the composition and activity of the GI microbiota, thus influencing gastrointestinal health and disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastrointestinal microbiota in response to dietary and therapeutic interventions in cats and dogs. A multi-species synbiotic formulation, containing a total of 5x109 colony forming units of a mixture of seven probiotic bacterial strains and a blend of prebiotics, was administered daily for 21 days to healthy cats and dogs. Fecal samples were collected before, during, and up to three weeks after discontinuation of the administration of the synbiotic. The fecal microbiota was analyzed using 454-pyrosequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative real-time PCR, and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. The results showed that the synbiotic led to increased concentrations of probiotic bacteria in the feces but did not alter the predominant bacterial phyla. Additionally, we investigated the effect of age, body weight, and baseline abundance of probiotic related bacterial genera, as potential predictors of intestinal colonization by the ingested microorganisms. The results suggested that cats having a low abundance of fecal probiotic genera before consuming probiotics may have a higher concentration of the probiotic groups in feces during consumption of the symbiotic formulation. Also, a proton-pump inhibitor, aimed at suppressing the secretion of gastric acid, was administered daily for 15 days to healthy dogs. Changes in the GI microbiota were analyzed using 454-pyrosequencing, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggested that inhibition of gastric acid secretion can alter the abundance of several gastric, duodenal, and fecal bacterial groups. However, these changes were not associated with major qualitative modifications of the overall composition of the GI microbiota. These studies showed that dietary and therapeutic agents can alter the composition of the GI microbiota and suggest that these changes could be associated with particular characteristics of the host. The clinical significance of these results needs further investigation.

Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

U.S. DEPARTlVIENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gi.ol) Gi.ol) EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlVIINATION RECIPIENT:WA Dept. of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT SEP ARRA - Washington State Ferries Biodiesel Project - Phase I TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000052 EE0000139 GFO-0000139-027 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analYSis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analy1ical energy supply

167

New Rate Schedule CV-GID1 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GID1 GID1 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATE FOR GENERATOR IMBALANCE SERVICE Effective: October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2016. Available: Within the marketing area served by the Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (SNR). Applicable: To generators receiving Generator Imbalance Service (GI). Character and Conditions of Service: GI is provided when a difference occurs between the scheduled and actual delivery of energy from an eligible generation resource within the Sub-Balancing Authority (SBA), over an hour, or in accordance with approved policies. The deviation in megawatts is the net scheduled amount of generation minus the net metered output from the generator's (actual generation)

168

Chromatin Regulation and Low Dose Irradiation: A Two-Way Street ?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chromatin Regulation and Low Dose Irradiation: A Two-Way Street ? Chromatin Regulation and Low Dose Irradiation: A Two-Way Street ? Irene Chiolo, Sylvain Costes and Gary H. Karpen. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA Goal: We are trying to understand the impact of exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation on epigenetic mechanisms, chromatin organization and functional responses, and how these processes affect the response to low-dose radiation. Background/Significance: Genomic instability (GI) is one of the hallmarks of cancer that contributes to genetic diversity and has been associated with exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) (1,2). Radiobiology dogma has focused on DNA as the likely target for GI effects of radiation, but until fairly recently, without incorporating roles for chromatin.

169

"Omics of the mammalian gut new insights into function  

SciTech Connect

To understand the role of gut microbes in host health, it is imperative to probe their genetic potential, expression, and ecological status. The current high-throughput sequencing revolution, in addition to advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, have recently enabled deep access to these complex environments, and are revealing important insights into the roles of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in host physiology and health. This review discusses examples of how the integration of cutting-edge meta-omics technologies are providing new knowledge about the relationships between host health status in mammals and the microbes inhabiting the GI tract. In addition, we address some promises that these techniques hold for future therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

Lamendella, Regina [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Jansson, Janet [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Neither in vivo MRI nor behavioural assessment indicate a therapeutic efficacy for a novel 5HT1A agonist in rat models of ischaemic stroke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Michel Bernanos1, Andrew McCreary3, Michel M Modo1 and Steve CR Williams1 Address: 1Neuroimaging Research Group, Clinical Neuroscience PO42, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK, 2... lo gi ca l s co re Plac MK-801 Plac MK-801 Plac MK-801 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Ne u ro lo gi ca l S co re 1 3 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 DU123015 Placebo Time-points (days) % in fa rc t v o lu m e 1 3 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 MK-801 Placebo Time...

Ashioti, Maria; Beech, John S; Lowe, Andrew S; Bernanos, Michel; McCreary, Andrew; Modo, Michel M; Williams, Steve C R

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Chromatin Regulation and Low Dose Irradiation: A Two-Way Street?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chromatin Regulation and Low Dose Irradiation: A Two-Way Street? Chromatin Regulation and Low Dose Irradiation: A Two-Way Street? Irene Chiolo Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Abstract Goal: We are trying to understand the impact of exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation on epigenetic mechanisms, chromatin organization and functional responses, and how these processes affect the response to low-dose radiation. Background/Significance: Genomic instability (GI) is one of the hallmarks of cancer that contributes to genetic diversity and has been associated with exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) (1,2). Radiobiology dogma has focused on DNA as the likely target for GI effects of radiation, but until fairly recently, without incorporating roles for chromatin. Eukaryotic genomes contain two major chromatin domains: heterochromatin and

172

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Hourly load profiles are available for over all TMY3 locations in the United States here. Browse files in this dataset, accessible as individual files and as commercial and residential downloadable ZIP files. This dataset is approximately 4.8GiB compressed or 19GiB uncompressed. July 2nd, 2013 update: Residential High and Low load files have been updated from 366 days in a year for leap years to the more general 365 days in a normal year.

173

SGang steng Catalogue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

byaba/ 184-187 (274b-282a) Revue d'Etudes Tibtaines18 Colophon : // rgyud kyi rgyal po mi nub rgyal mtshan rje btsan dam pardo rje od phro bai rgyud rdzogs so//. 24. rDo rje sems dpa' nam mkha' che rgyas pa'i yi ge med pa'i rgyud/187-190 (282a-284b... cing theg pa mtha dag gi don bkod pa/ byang chubkyi sems bsam gtan nges pai rgyal po/ rje btsan dam pa rdzogs so//. 26. Mi 'gyur ba'i thig le tig / 189-191 (285a-287a)Colophon : /byang chub kyi sems mi gyur bai thig le tig rdzogs so//. 27. Srog gi...

Cathy Cantwell; Mayer, Rob; Kowalewski, Michael; Achard, Jean-Luc

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Buddhist princess and the woolly turban: non-Buddhist others in a 15th century biography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rnams la di ni bdag gis kun tu mi bzod kyis/ rdo ba dang phongs la rab tu bskrod cig ces bsgoo/khor rnams kyis kyang le lo ma yin par de bzhin du bgyis pa las/ bya gag gi phreng pa zhig pa bzhin du gyur nas rnga dang bshang la sogs pa rnams ni gzhi... dbus su ci nang bgyid par zhus nas/ de dang dei las la jug pa na rgyal bai dbang mos rang gi lhai de nyid dran par byes te blta stangs kyi gzir bas gshen rabs kyi rgyal mtshan chang ba yon mchod khor dang bcas pa thams cad la shing tu mi zad pa...

Diemberger, Hildegard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) June 2010 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2008 2008 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table S1a. Energy Price Estimates by Source, 2008 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and

176

GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF ROTATING, PRESSURE-CONFINED, POLYTROPIC GAS DISKS WITH VERTICAL STRATIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the gravitational instability (GI) of rotating, vertically stratified, pressure-confined, polytropic gas disks using a linear stability analysis as well as analytic approximations. The disks are initially in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium and bounded by a constant external pressure. We find that the GI of a pressure-confined disk is in general a mixed mode of the conventional Jeans and distortional instabilities, and is thus an unstable version of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. The Jeans mode dominates in weakly confined disks or disks with rigid boundaries. On the other hand, when the disk has free boundaries and is strongly pressure confined, the mixed GI is dominated by the distortional mode that is surface-gravity waves driven unstable under their own gravity and thus incompressible. We demonstrate that the Jeans mode is gravity-modified acoustic waves rather than inertial waves and that inertial waves are almost unaffected by self-gravity. We derive an analytic expression for the effective sound speed c{sub eff} of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. We also find expressions for the gravity reduction factors relative to a razor-thin counterpart that are appropriate for the Jeans and distortional modes. The usual razor-thin dispersion relation, after correcting for c{sub eff} and the reduction factors, closely matches the numerical results obtained by solving a full set of linearized equations. The effective sound speed generalizes the Toomre stability parameter of the Jeans mode to allow for the mixed GI of vertically stratified, pressure-confined disks.

Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Young Min; Hong, Seung Soo, E-mail: jgkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: seo3919@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: sshong@astro.snu.ac.kr [FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Comparison of Acute and Chronic Toxicity for Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy or {sup 125}I Permanent Implant  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the toxicity and biochemical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and {sup 125}I transperineal permanent prostate seed implant ({sup 125}I) for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, a total of 374 low-risk patients (prostate-specific antigen < 10 ng/ml, T1c-T2b, Gleason score of 6 or less, and no neoadjuvant hormones) were treated at Fox Chase Cancer Center (216 IMRT and 158 {sup 125}I patients). Median follow-up was 43 months for IMRT and 48 months for {sup 125}I. The IMRT prescription dose ranged from 74-78 Gy, and {sup 125}I prescription was 145 Gy. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was recorded by using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Freedom from biochemical failure was defined by using the Phoenix definition (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2.0 ng/ml). Results: Patients treated by using IMRT were more likely to be older and have a higher baseline American Urological Association symptom index score, history of previous transurethral resection of the prostate, and larger prostate volumes. On multivariate analysis, IMRT was an independent predictor of lower acute and late Grade 2 or higher GU toxicity and late Grade 2 or higher GI toxicity. Three-year actuarial estimates of late Grade 2 or higher toxicity were 2.4% for GI and 3.5% for GU by using IMRT compared with 7.7% for GI and 19.2% for GU for {sup 125}I, respectively. Four-year actuarial estimates of freedom from biochemical failure were 99.5% for IMRT and 93.5% for {sup 125}I (p = 0.09). Conclusions: The IMRT and {sup 125}I produce similar outcomes, although IMRT appears to have less acute and late toxicity.

Eade, Thomas N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu; Ruth, Karen [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K.; D'Ambrosio, David J.; Feigenberg, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, David Y.T. [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Poincare_and_DNA - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V 9I&H%F-$!31#=)4@@B!G\\"F-7%$\\"3g?FMQNPFSF-$!3t(*f$e&p*y\\"RF-$\\"3,bZu; y) fi'F[[t7%$\\"3!R!GiY2([d%F-$!3QJ

179

Dynamics of inelastic and reactive gas-surface collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dynamics of inelastic and reactive collisions in atomic beam-surface scattering are presented. The inelastic scattering of hyperthermal rare gaseous atoms from three alkali halide surfaces (LiF, NaCl, GI)was studied to understand mechanical energy transfer in unreactive systems. The dynamics of the chemical reaction in the scattering of H(D) atoms from the surfaces of LIF(001) and the basal plane of graphite were also studied.

Smoliar, L.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Dosimetry and preliminary acute toxicity in the first 100 men treated for prostate cancer on a randomized hypofractionation dose escalation trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The {alpha}/{beta} ratio for prostate cancer is postulated to be between 1 and 3, giving rise to the hypothesis that there may be a therapeutic advantage to hypofractionation. The dosimetry and acute toxicity are described in the first 100 men enrolled in a randomized trial. Patients and Methods: The trial compares 76 Gy in 38 fractions (Arm I) to 70.2 Gy in 26 fractions (Arm II) using intensity modulated radiotherapy. The planning target volume (PTV) margins in Arms I and II were 5 mm and 3 mm posteriorly and 8 mm and 7 mm in all other dimensions. The PTV D95% was at least the prescription dose. Results: The mean PTV doses for Arms I and II were 81.1 and 73.8 Gy. There were no differences in overall maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity acutely. However, there was a slight but significant increase in Arm II GI toxicity during Weeks 2, 3, and 4. In multivariate analyses, only the combined rectal DVH parameter of V65 Gy/V50 Gy was significant for GI toxicity and the bladder volume for GU toxicity. Conclusion: Hypofractionation at 2.7 Gy per fraction to 70.2 Gy was well tolerated acutely using the planning conditions described.

Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]. E-mail: Alan.Pollack@FCCC.edu; Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Feigenberg, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Greenberg, Richard E. [Department of Urology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Uzzo, Robert G. [Department of Urology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, C.-M. Charlie [Department of Radiation Physics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McNeeley, Shawn W. [Department of Radiation Physics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Physics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Hypofractionated High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Multi-Institutional Phase II Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. The 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.

Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Soete, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Rappe, Bernard [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium)] [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of prebiotics on growth performance, nutrient utilization and the gastrointestinal tract microbial community of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of experiments examined the effects of four potential prebiotics-- GroBiotic-A (a mixture of partially autolyzed brewers yeast, dairy components and dried fermentation products), mannanoligosaccharide (MOS), galactooligosaccharide (GOS), and inulin/ fructooligosaccharide (FOS)--on the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts microbial community in hybrid striped bass and red drum. The first in vitro experiment applied denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to examine responses of red drum GI tract microbiota to anaerobic incubation with brewers yeast, FOS, and GroBiotic-A. Brewers yeast and GroBiotic-A produced unique microbial communities compared to that associated with the basal diet. Volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles did not differ among treatments, with acetate being the major fermentation product. A second in vitro experiment examined effects of GroBiotic-A, MOS, GOS, and FOS on the GI tract microbiota of hybrid striped bass. None of the prebiotics altered the culturable microbial community, but all tended to lower acetate production and increase butyrate production. A third experiment examined the effects of the four prebiotics fed to juvenile hybrid striped bass for 8 weeks. Growth, feed efficiency ratio (FER) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were not affected by the different prebiotics, but the GI tracts microbial community was altered from that associated with the basal diet. The fourth experiment consisted of an 8-week feeding trial and one 6-week feeding trial in which the effects of GroBiotic-A and FOS on growth performance and microbial community composition were compared for red drum living in independent tanks versus tanks with a shared water system. Neither the intestinal microbial community nor growth performance were significantly altered by the prebiotics in these trials; fish in independent and shared water tanks produced similar results. The final experiment examined the effects of GroBiotic-A, FOS, MOS and GOS on nutrient and energy digestibility of sub-adult red drum fed diets containing fish meal and soybean meal. The prebiotics generally increased protein, organic matter, and energy digestibility, with the exception of FOS/inulin. Lipid digestibility was decreased by GOS, MOS and FOS. These studies are the first to establish that prebiotics can alter the GI tract microbial community of these fish and influence nutrient digestibility.

Burr, Gary Stephen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Gastrointestinal toxicity and its relation to dose distributions in the anorectal region of prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To study the correlations between the dose distributions in the anorectal region and late GI symptoms in patients treated for localized prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from a randomized study were analyzed. In this trial, patients were treated with either rectangular or conformal fields with a dose of 66 Gy. Data concerning GI symptoms were collected from questionnaires of 197 patients. The distributions of the anorectal region were projected on maps, and the dose parameters were calculated. The incidences of complaints were studied as a function of the dose-area parameters and clinical parameters, using a proportional hazard regression model. Finally, we tested a series of dose parameters originating from different parts of the anorectal region. Results: Analyzing the total region, only a statistically significant dose-area effect relation for bleeding was found (p < 0.01). Defining subareas, we found effect relations for bleeding, soiling, fecal incontinence, and mucus loss. For bleeding and mucus loss, the strongest correlation was found for the dose received by the upper 70-80% of the anorectal region (p < 0.01). For soiling and fecal incontinence, we found the strongest association with the dose to the lower 40-50% (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We found evidence that complaints originate from specific regions of the irradiated lower GI tract. Bleeding and mucus loss are probably related to irradiation of the upper part of the rectum. Soiling and fecal incontinence are more likely related to the dose to the anal canal and the lower part of the rectum.

Heemsbergen, Wilma D. [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: wheems@nki.nl; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hart, Guus A.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lebesque, Joos V. [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koper, Peter C.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Toward an ontology framework supporting the integration of geographic information with modeling and simulation for critical infrastructure protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protecting the nation's infrastructure from natural disasters, inadvertent failures, or intentional attacks is a major national security concern. Gauging the fragility of infrastructure assets, and understanding how interdependencies across critical infrastructures affect their behavior, is essential to predicting and mitigating cascading failures, as well as to planning for response and recovery. Modeling and simulation (M&S) is an indispensable part of characterizing this complex system of systems and anticipating its response to disruptions. Bringing together the necessary components to perform such analyses produces a wide-ranging and coarse-grained computational workflow that must be integrated with other analysis workflow elements. There are many points in both types of work flows in which geographic information (GI) services are required. The GIS community recognizes the essential contribution of GI in this problem domain as evidenced by past OGC initiatives. Typically such initiatives focus on the broader aspects of GI analysis workflows, leaving concepts crucial to integrating simulations within analysis workflows to that community. Our experience with large-scale modeling of interdependent critical infrastructures, and our recent participation in a DRS initiative concerning interoperability for this M&S domain, has led to high-level ontological concepts that we have begun to assemble into an architecture that spans both computational and 'world' views of the problem, and further recognizes the special requirements of simulations that go beyond common workflow ontologies. In this paper we present these ideas, and offer a high-level ontological framework that includes key geospatial concepts as special cases of a broader view.

Ambrosiano, John J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Linger, Steve P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph [Division of Urology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

OWNER(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

------ - ------ - Past: ~~~-~~~-~~~~~~~~~~rrent: Owner contacted q yes tina;-. ____ c-lti&pJ-~ lf yes, date contacted -_---__---___ TYPE OF OPERATION -_-----_--_--____ q Research & Development 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process : 'Theoretical Studier Sample & Analysis G Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ~-~~~----~~----_ &, Facility Type q Manufacturing 0 University a Research Organizaticn a Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee,, unit price, -_---- yryoi -37 J-1 4:~zL~~:~:q~&- ,-antract,purchase Order # ,L,U,-37-?\- ---------------------------- --------------------_____________ my~mx~~ai_~Gi~~~Q : _I 7 v 3 _ I 9 V-Y, ---_--_------------------------------ OWNERSHIP: AEC/MED AEC/MED GOUT GOUT

187

India in 'Dzam-Gling Rgyas-Bshad'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~?Parsis). This is almost the same opinion as above but it is a matter for further research. Broadly speaking, the country of rGya.-Gar (India is situated in the southern part of Jambudvipa. (In the Centre) it extends southwards from bSil-Ri (Snowy... book and experience of the Acharyas, there are several sNgon-Byung-Gi-rNam-Thar (ancient eventful stories) engraved on the stones in the railings. Therefore it is decidedly a very important Holy Place. Thang-Zing has written that here in addition...

Rhaldi, Lama Sherab

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A Structured Approach to Develop Concurrent Programs in UML  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This paper presents a methodology to develop synchronization code based on the global invariant (GI) approach in the context of the Unified Process in UML. This approach has the following advantages: (1) it is a formal approach that enables formal verification of programs being developed, (2) the most important activity in the programming process lies at a high level; namely, specification of GIs, (3) GIs are platform independent, and (4) existing GIs may be composed to produce GIs for more complex synchronization. We provide a set of useful GIs which work as basic patterns. Programmers can compose these GIs to produce appropriate GIs for specific applications. 1

Masaaki Mizuno Gurdip; Masaaki Mizuno; Gurdip Singh; Mitchell Neilsen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Erlangen Program at Large--2: Inventing a wheel. The parabolic one  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss parabolic versions of Euler's identity e^{it}=cos t + i sin t. A purely algebraic approach based on dual numbers is known to produce a very trivial relation e^{pt} = 1+pt. Therefore we use a geometric setup of parabolic rotations to recover the corresponding non-trivial algebraic framework. Our main tool is Moebius transformations which turn out to be closely related to induced representations of the group SL(2,R). Keywords: complex numbers, dual numbers, double numbers, linear algebra, invariant, computer algebra, GiNaC

Vladimir V. Kisil

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2007, 182 consecutive patients with positive resection margins and/or pT3-4, node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma underwent postoperative conformal RT. The prescribed median dose to the prostate/seminal vesicle bed was 66.6 Gy (range 50-70). Hormone therapy (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue and/or antiandrogen) was administered to 110/182 (60.5%) patients with high-risk features. Biochemical relapse was defined as an increase of more than 0.2 ng/mL over the lowest postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured on 3 occasions, each at least 2 weeks apart. Results: Median follow-up was 55.6 months (range 7.6-141.9 months). The 3- and 5-year probability of biochemical relapse-free survival were 87% and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, more advanced T stages, preoperative PSA values {>=}10 ng/mL, and RT doses <70 Gy were significant factors for biochemical relapse. Pre-RT PSA values >0.2 ng/mL were significant for distant metastases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for biochemical relapse were higher preoperative and pre-RT PSA values, hormone therapy for under 402 days and RT doses of <70 Gy. Higher pre-RT PSA values were the only independent predictor of distant metastases. Acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 72 (39.6%) and 91 (50%) patients, respectively. There were 2 cases of Grade III GI toxicity but no cases of Grade IV. Late GU and GI toxicities occurred in 28 (15.4%) and 14 (7.7%) patients, respectively: 11 cases of Grade III toxicity: 1 GI (anal stenosis) and 10 GU, all urethral strictures requiring endoscopic urethrotomy. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity.

Bellavita, Rita, E-mail: ritabellavita@libero.it [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Massetti, Michela [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Abraha, Iosief [Regional Health Authority of Umbria, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Regional Health Authority of Umbria, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Lupattelli, Marco [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Mearini, Luigi [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Farneti, Alessia; Palumbo, Isabella [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Porena, Massimo [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Aristei, Cynthia [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tagore au Tibet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modernit loccidentale.50 Quoi quil en soit, 47 Tagore 2002b : 99.48 Gru gzings 2001 : 152 (Brtsams chos nang gi mi sna gtso bo Rgya gar chos lugs pa Kar la ni rgyalgces kyi snying stobs shugs drag... cing / rang gshis brtan zhing brling bai na gzhon zhig yin / Slobchen mthar phyin ma thag Rgya gar rgyal gces pai mthun tshogs kyi dbu bzhugs su bsdad pas / mirigs bcings grol gyi ched du dbyin jii mi ser spel mkhan mthar skrod gtong ba khur du...

Robin, Francoise

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

NUG2013UserSurvey.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 NERSC User 2 NERSC User Survey Results --- 1 --- NUG 2 013 2 Response Profile 481 r espondents ( + 7 1 J GI o nly) * 6 7.6% " big u ser" r esponse r ate * 3 6.2% " medium u ser" r esponse r ate * 1 1.8% o verall r esponse r ate BER HEP Respondants b y R ole Pis --- 2 5.4% Proxies --- 15.2% Users --- 59.5% Respondants b y O ffice ASCR --- 7 .9% BER --- 2 0.6% BES --- 34.5% FES --- 1 3.5% HEP --- 1 4.6% NP --- 8 .3% BES FES NP ASCR HEP BER PIs Users Proxies 2012 Survey Question & Scores * 97 saTsfacTon quesTons scored on a 7---point scale * Average s core: 6 .32 ( excludes J GI o nly) * Minimum s aTsfactory s core 5 .25 3 Satisfaction score meaning Num times selected 7 Very satisfied 10,843 (57.1%) 6 Mostly satisfied 5,477 (28.8%) 5 Somewhat satisfied 1,264 (6.7%) 4 Neutral 898 (4.7%) 3 Somewhat dissatisfied

193

The Gut Microbiota: Ecology and Function  

SciTech Connect

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is teeming with an extremely abundant and diverse microbial community. The members of this community have coevolved along with their hosts over millennia. Until recently, the gut ecosystem was viewed as black box with little knowledge of who or what was there or their specific functions. Over the past decade, however, this ecosystem has become one of fastest growing research areas of focus in microbial ecology and human and animal physiology. This increased interest is largely in response to studies tying microbes in the gut to important diseases afflicting modern society, including obesity, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. Although the importance of a resident community of microorganisms in health was first hypothesized by Pasteur over a century ago (Sears, 2005), the multiplicity of physiological changes induced by commensal bacteria has only recently been recognized (Hooper et al., 2001). The term 'ecological development' was recently coined to support the idea that development of the GI tract is a product of the genetics of the host and the host's interactions with resident microbes (Hooper, 2004). The search for new therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers has escalated the need to understand the identities and functions of the microorganisms inhabiting the gut. Recent studies have revealed new insights into the membership of the gut microbial community, interactions within that community, as well as mechanisms of interaction with the host. This chapter focuses on the microbial ecology of the gut, with an emphasis on information gleaned from recent molecular studies.

Willing, B.P.; Jansson, J.K.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (between 15% and 30% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method for preparing polyaniline fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Sante Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Overview of the SOFIA Data Cycle System: An integrated set of tools and services for the SOFIA General Investigator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne astronomical observatory comprised of a 2.5 meter infrared telescope mounted in the aft section of a Boeing 747SP aircraft that flies at operational altitudes between 37,000 and 45,00 feet, above 99% of atmospheric water vapor. During routine operations, a host of instruments will be available to the astronomical community including cameras and spectrographs in the near- to far-IR; a sub-mm heterodyne receiver; and an high-speed occultation imager. One of the challenges for SOFIA (and all observatories in general) is providing a uniform set of tools that enable the non-expert General Investigator (GI) to propose, plan, and obtain observations using a variety of very different instruments in an easy and seamless manner. The SOFIA Data Cycle System (DCS) is an integrated set of services and user tools for the SOFIA Science and Mission Operations GI Program designed to address this challenge. Program activities supported by the DCS inclu...

Shuping, R Y; Lin, Lan; Sun, Li; Krzaczek, Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

High-Dose Radiotherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Cancer Control and Toxicity Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of short-course androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on cancer control outcomes and toxicity in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (high-dose radiotherapy [HDRT]). Methods and Materials: Demographic, disease, and treatment characteristics of prostate cancer patients at 2 institution consortiums were charted. Of 296 men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (defined as {>=}T2b, prostate-specific antigen level >10 ng/mL, or Gleason score [GS] of 7, with none of the following: {>=}T3, prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, GS {>=}8, or positive nodes) treated with HDRT to a dose of 72 Gy or greater, 123 received short-course ADT and 173 did not. Univariate and multivariate analyses on biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) (including subset analysis by disease factors) and on overall survival (OS) were performed, as were comparisons of gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates. Results: For the whole group, the median dose was 75.6 Gy; the minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the median follow-up was 47.4 months. For ADT vs. no ADT, the 5-year BFFS rate was 86% vs. 79% (p = 0.138) and the 5-year OS rate was 87% vs. 80% (p = 0.159). On multivariate analysis, percent positive cores (PPC) (p = 0.002) and GS (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with BFFS, with ADT showing a trend (p = 0.055). The impact of ADT was highest in the subsets with PPC greater than 50% (p = 0.019), GS 4+3 (p = 0.078), and number of risk factors greater than 1 (p = 0.022). Only intensity-modulated radiotherapy use (p = 0.012) and GS (p = 0.023) reached significance for OS, and there were no significant differences in GU or GI toxicity. Conclusions: Although the use of ADT with HDRT did not influence BFFS, our study suggests a benefit in patients with PPC greater than 50%, GS 4+3, or multiple risk factors. No OS benefit was shown, and ADT was not associated with additional radiotherapy-related GI or GU toxicity.

Edelman, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liauw, Stanley L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rossi, Peter J.; Cooper, Sherrie [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh B., E-mail: abjani@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ferrihydrite as an Enterosorbent for Arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic in drinking water is a problem in many developing nations such as Taiwan and Bangladesh. Currently, no oral binding agent exists for the mitigation of arsenic toxicity. The goals of this research were to 1) screen a variety of sorbents for their ability to sorb As from water and screen for potential nutrient interactions with vitamin A (VA) and riboflavin (RF) isotherms; 2) further describe the sorption of As to ferrihydrite using isothermal analysis and a simulated gastrointestinal model (GI), and by testing ferrihydrites ability to protect Hydra from As toxicity; 3) verify ferrihydrites safety and efficacy in a short term rodent model. Ferrihydrite was found to be the most effective sorbent for both As(III) and As(V). Exchanging SWy-2 with sulfur containing organic groups increased the sorption of both As(V) and As(III) compared to the parent clay, though the total As sorbed was much less than As sorption by ferrihydrite. Ferrihydrite and an industrially produced ferrihydrite (IPF) both sorbed As(V) and As(III) with high capacity. Both ferrihydrites also sorbed As(V) and As(III) at high capacity in the simulated GI model. Fe measured in the simulated GI tract was below tolerable daily limits for both ferrihydrite and IPF. Ferrihydrite at 0.25 percent w/w was found to protect Hydra up to 200 times the minimal effective concentration (MEC) for As(III) and over 2.5 times the MEC for As(V), while IPF at 0.25 percent w/w protected Hydra up to 200 times the MEC for As(III) and just over 2 times the MEC for As(V). IPF was apparently safe and well tolerated by the rats in our study over a period of 2 weeks. No statistically significant differences were seen in serum biochemistry, serum Fe, serum VA, or serum vitamin E between rats fed control diet versus those fed 0.5 percent w/w IPF. Ferrihydrite was found to reduce urinary As after a single gavage of 0.5 mL of 500 ppm As(III) or As(V). These results verify in vitro findings and suggest that ferrihydrite is apparently safe and effective as an enterosorbent for As.

Taylor, John Floyd

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

CALORIC: A readout chip for high granularity calorimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very-front-end electronics has been developed to fulfil requirements for the next generation of electromagnetic calorimeters. The compactness of this kind of detector and its large number of channels (up to several millions) impose a drastic limitation of the power consumption and a high level of integration. The electronic channel proposed is first of all composed of a low-noise Charge Sensitive Amplifier (CSA) able to amplify the charge delivered by a silicon diode up to 10 pC. Next, a two-gain shaping, based on a Gated Integration (G.I.), is implemented to cover the 15 bits dynamic range required: a high gain shaper processes signals from 4 fC (charge corresponding to the MIP) up to 1 pC, and a low gain filter handles charges up to 10 pC. The G.I. performs also the analog memorization of the signal until it is digitalized. Hence, the analog-to-digital conversion is carried out through a low-power 12-bit cyclic ADC. If the signal overloads the high-gain channel dynamic range, a comparator selects the low-gain channel instead. Moreover, an auto-trigger channel has been implemented in order to select and store a valid event over the noise. The timing sequence of the channel is managed by a digital IP. It controls the G.I. switches, generates all needed clocks, drives the ADC and delivers the final result over 12 bits. The whole readout channel is power controlled, which permits to reduce the consumption according to the duty cycle of the beam collider. Simulations have been performed with Spectre simulator on the prototype chip designed with the 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology from Austriamicrosystems. Results show a non-linearity better than 0.1% for the high-gain channel, and a non-linearity limited to 1% for the low-gain channel. The Equivalent Noise Charge referred to the input of the channel is evaluated to 0.4 fC complying with the MIP/10 limit. With the timing sequence of the International Linear Collider, which presents a duty cycle of 1%, the power consumption of the complete channel is limited to 43 {mu}W thanks to the power pulsing. The total area of the channel is 1.2 mm{sup 2} with an analog memory depth of 16. (authors)

Royer, L.; Bonnard, J.; Manen, S.; Gay, P.; Soumpholphakdy, X. [LPC Clermont-Ferrand, 24 Avenue des Landais, Aubiere Cedex (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Fuel Cell Freeze Startup and Landscape of FC Freeze Patents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze Startup Freeze Startup and Landscape of FC Freeze Patents DOE Workshop on Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Phoenix, Arizona February 1, 2005 Ahmad Pesaran Tony Markel Gi-Heon Kim Keith Wipke 2 Content * NREL's FC Freeze Project * Patent Search - Initial Results * System Perspective Evaluation * Summary * Appendix (Supporting Slides) 3 NREL's FY05 FC Freeze Project As part of a Task in the FY05 AOP to DOE's HFCIT. Objective * Investigate and evaluate strategies for rapid startup of PEM fuel cells from sub-freezing temperatures. Approach * Collect data/information through literature search and collaborations - Patent search * Perform energy analysis to bracket energy/power requirements for startup. * Use component/system models to evaluate merits of various solutions

202

Frequently Asked Questions on the Department of Energy's National Environmental Policy Act Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lh[)E Lh[)E F 1W:i Gi IW-6K!1 IMmwdl :wklltt!!s c;([)l\i'K!rrllrrlt!l'lt r)fi:~)i:lrtrllc!rlt d IF1'l(wqf .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ...:............................::.......... . . !"'111'111 (1!Ili''llll''llll 'c)11''!iall 11'''1111 (i 111,,)1111'''l111lll [l@il%: ww,:f m ANN IOF SIIJIWEC:V "1-cl ; A'll[gl;lst :?!1.j II '9 w ... . .. . .. ,!! 'Cmk (20 f ,N]b, 1+ A ,J" (:) ![ 1[ c, y and, ,!4,:! ~; ~,',? " ., ,,. I . ) >'ii L.ll,u.r . hWl[Ik: : 6-'! 1'{!11 :?!41 :k:l?i,:$d ""~][(:(:llL]f::~)lt~[:}r ihkd '[)tl:l(:$ti![]l[ ]l$ (Ml 'thE: ]~(fl~)~l]~lt~~l(:~lit ([]~f ~][]k:][[?jf $ (lDcws:)

203

Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

National Laboratory National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 DERIVATION OF I,]RANIUM RESIDUAL RADIOACTTVE I\{ATERIAL GI]IDELINES FOR THE ALIQIJIPPA FORGE SITE by F. Monette, L. Jones, and C. Yu Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Division September 1992 work sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy DOE Field Office Forrner Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge, Tennessee CONTEI{TS SUMMARY 1 INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF HISTORY 1.1 Site Description and Setting 1.2 Site History 1.3 Derivation of Cleanup Guidelines 2 SCENARIO DEFINITIONS 3 DOSE/SOURCE CONCENTRATION RATIOS . . 4 RESIDUAL RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL GUIDELINES 5 REFERENCES Appendix: Parameters Used in the Analysis of the Aliquippa Forge site . TABLES Summary of Pathways for Scenarios A, B, C, and D at the Aliquippa Forge Site

204

Le nom des naksatrani en tibetain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drug ma drug bu, mang po skyes k?ttik?s agni ? maewX? *mmru? 2 snar ma skye dguvi bdag po, dal bavi lha ldan ma, bi rdzi rohi?? (br?hm?) praj?- pati ? pjit ? *pit 3 mgo mgo skyes, smal bo, zla skyes, ri dwags mgo m?ga?iras (?grah?ya??) soma ? tsje... gi lha mo sv?t? v?yu ? khangH ? *kkha?-s 14 sa ga brgyad ldan ma, dbang povi lha ldan vi??khe (r?dh?) indr?gn? ? tej ? *ttij 15 lhamtshams mdza bo anur?dh?s mitra ? bjang ? *ba? Revue dEtudes Tibtaines 6 16 snron gang bu, ldevu, lha ldan, lha...

Jacques, Guillaume

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation Munira Kadhim Oxford Brookes University Abstract Radiation-induced responses at the cellular and whole body levels are influenced by genetic predisposition, with implications for environmental and potentially, diagnostic exposures. Currently, the extent to which genetic background play a role in the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in radiation-induced delayed Genomic Instability (GI) is not fully understood. In previous studies, our results have shown that the CBA/H and C57BL/6 mouse strains, have differing sensitivities in the induction of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) in terms of chromosomal instability, following exposure to high dose-high LET and high dose-low LET

207

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia Partner World Bank Development Grant Facility (DGF), Asian Development Bank (ADB), the German Development Cooperation (GiZ), Energy Foundation, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Institute for Transport Policy Studies (ITPS), Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), United Nations Centre for Regional Development (UNCRD), Veolia Energy Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -TNA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

208

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Empirical Model of Aerosol Uplifting from the Arid Area Empirical Model of Aerosol Uplifting from the Arid Area Gorchakov, G.I., Shukurov, K.A., and Golitsyn, G.S., A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The model enables to make the estimates of the vertical fluxes of arid aerosol using measured data of the wind velocity. The model includes the following main elements: 1. The parameterization of the microstructure of the aerosol uplifted from the area. 2. Relationship between wind velocity and the submicron aerosol concentration. 3. The aerosol uplifting rates. It is found that there is the synchronism of the submicron and coarse aerosol fluctuation in convective conditions at the arid area. Vertical turbulent fluxes of the aerosol were determined regarding two regimes of aerosol

209

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table A6. Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity, and Heat Content of Electricity (Btu per Kilowatthour) Approximate Heat Rates a for Electricity Net Generation Heat Content j of Electricity k Fossil Fuels b Nuclear h Noncombustible Renewable Energy g,i Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Total Fossil Fuels f,g 1950 .............................. NA NA NA 14,030 - - 14,030 3,412 1955 .............................. NA NA NA 11,699 - - 11,699 3,412 1960 .............................. NA NA NA 10,760 11,629 10,760 3,412 1965 .............................. NA NA NA 10,453 11,804 10,453 3,412 1970 .............................. NA NA NA 10,494 10,977 10,494 3,412 1975 .............................. NA NA NA

210

Microsoft PowerPoint - Annual Review Presentation-Vahdat.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION TRAINING & GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION TRAINING & GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION TRAINING & GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION TRAINING & RESEARCH PROGRAM IN CAPTURE AND TRANSPORT: DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOST TRANSPORT: DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOST ECONOMICAL SEPARATION METHOD FOR CO 2 CAPTURE CAPTURE Project No.: DE-FE0001953; Project Manager: Dawn Deel Nader Vahdat Chemical Engineering Department Tuskegee University Tuskegee University TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY  PhD granting private institution  PhD granting private institution  About 3000 students with 5 colleges C ll g f E gi i g & Ph i l S i h  College of Engineering, & Physical Sciences has about 600 students and 50 faculties  Chemical Engineering Department has 130 students and 7 faculties PROJECT OVERVIEW PROJECT OVERVIEW DOE Funding

211

Moose Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moose Food Moose Food Name: Mrs. Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My husband & I own 30 acres of prime moose habitat. Unfortunately they have just about eaten up all of the aquatic browse. Either that or the hard winters in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the fact that we have a shallow lake has killed these plants the moose like. What would be best to plant native to our lakes in michigan for the moose? They like aquatic plants the best that we have observed from afar, but what kinds. Hope you can help. The biologist for our area is new & didn't have any names of aquatic plants. Replies: Dear Mrs. The following sites may be useful: http://www.mooseworld.com/moosebrowse.htm http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/910.html http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/taxbre/value_and_use.html

212

STATES GOVERI TO :H. J. He&man, Chief, Tonaw&da Sub-Of&e DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

STATES GOVERI STATES GOVERI TO :H. J. He&man, Chief, Tonaw&da Sub-Of&e DATE: ,i; .; .c. sgmbo1: PPS:W:mjf .. ,i. -'. ~ i:.. :: (PPS447-53) I ~..-:;..c. ' .~.I-!,-.. .~ i .,,. " :, ,, .T.~ . Confirming the c&versatioti b? March 6, 1953,'bheen Gi Hughes Ii. Sturza, please cut a four'(h)-inch length of l$ inch norm& uranium rod (approximately3.3 pounds) and ship immediately to t following address: ,NavalRese'arch Laboratory Nuclconics Division Washington 25, D.C. Attn: Dr. F. N. D. Kurie SF accountability should be transferred to Station COL. Please send notification of shipment to this office and consigne . . " cc: 'Dr. F.N.D. 'Kurie - Navd Research Lab Nucleonics Div Dr. I. Vigness - Navdl'Research Lab Mechanics Div Ft. de Rensis - NY00

213

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements for NERSC repository m327: "Parallel Simulation of Electron Cooling Physics and Beam Transport" Work supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, including grant No.'s DE-FC02-07ER41499 and DE-SC0000835. Resources of NERSC were used. Workshop: Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics May 26, 2011 Presenter: D.L. Bruhwiler, 1 Contributors: B.T. Schwartz, 1 V.H. Ranjbar, 1 G.I. Bell 1 Other m327 users: J. Qiang, 4 S. White, 2 Y. Luo 2 Collaborators: R. Ryne, 4 V.N. Litvinenko, 2 W. Fischer, 2 G. Wang, 2 Y. Hao, 2 K. Paul, 1 I. Pogorelov 1 1. Tech-X Corporation 2. Brookhaven National Lab 3. Thomas Jefferson National Lab

214

I~  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

__, I,- __.j .^,, ~~.,l~, _I.x__ . ,,,,, ,_^_ ,,_xx,. ,~.__~_x -,-.. _1 ,.,., __, I,- __.j .^,, ~~.,l~, _I.x__ . ,,,,, ,_^_ ,,_xx,. ,~.__~_x -,-.. _1 ,.,., - I~ .c \ -- - g-' . @ ~--~Z~, Ls-u &. 0 -*,- hiK ,,-& b TO FILE ' = .-. r. AUG 2 9 1945 A~TPPHC~~~ METALS COPUDOP~TIO~ '* ~,ci~ly~1~~ 41 BROAD STREET (In duplicate) November 6, 1942 The District Engineer, u. s . Zngineer Office, Zanhattarn District, P. 0. 30x 4.2, Station P., i?C:: York, X.Y. Attention: Idajo- Thomas T. Crenshav:. Gentlemen: Classification Cancc!!A ZG? ;~yp~~ Follo~5.nS our conversation of yesterday, P;e here*oy confirm gi-ang you optior., vslid up to tine erd of Xcver.ssr 19LZ2, for the purchase cf: - :fbmm.I;1T,: _, ..I-- ASout 42 short tons of Sodi- Uranate Cranze, holding about 83-l/2$ of U30 ; packed in ooxes. . About 64 short tons of Sodium Uranate Yello:,

215

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' a 7 > 3gI, q OH.I-r7.-I (jt' , ""7 MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM: ' 'Y OIL&i cz ,,,',, -------we- SUBJECT: SITE NAME: _____ CITY:-AQY&- --------------e----e-- OWNER(S) Owner contacted n yes =urr="t: ----- -Llz2-:---,-- -----___ &,&/4$- '1 :) ' if yes, data contacted ------------- TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- a Research t Development lti- Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Manufacturing 5 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility Cl Pilot Scale Cl Bench Scale Process : Theoretical Studies Sample SC Analysis 0 Production 0 Di 3posal /Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT -------------w-e BP rime 54, 1; cl Subcontractor a Purchase Order cs dL+f' d~ a 0 Other --------------------- Other information (i.e., cost

216

Coordinate-Space Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Solvers for Super fluid Fermi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordinate-Space Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Solvers for Super fluid Fermi Coordinate-Space Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Solvers for Super fluid Fermi Systems in Large Boxes Submitted by mkaczmar on March 29, 2013 - 12:53 Authors: Pei, J.C., Fann, G.I., Harrison, R.J., Nazarewicz, W., Hill, J., Galindo, D., Jia, J. The self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov problem in large boxes can be solved accurately in the coordinate space with the recently developed solvers HFB-AX (2D) and MADNESS-HFB (3D). This is essential for the description of superfluid Fermi systems with complicated topologies and significant spatial extend, such as fissioning nuclei, weakly-bound nuclei, nuclear matter in the neutron star rust, and ultracold Fermi atoms in elongated traps. The HFB-AX solver based on B-spline techniques uses a hybrid MPI and OpenMP programming model for parallel computation for

217

Brahmanism and Buddhism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

told this fact to Rshi Gautama Haridcumata (Clla. Upa., ) v. 4 ~nd so he was accepted as a Brahmin pupil by the sage. In the 6th/5th centuries B.C. when Prince Siddhartha GautaJ1la was born, Brahmanism had deteriorated into Varm... of ours. Brhadaranyaka Upa (iv.4-.7):- lJ~ ~~ 'S(~~ CfiT+TT its~~ &:fG' f~w: ON ~lJ1Sli6) llGI"f~ awr ~ ~~'l~ II (When all desires, which entered into one's heart, are eschewed, there does the mortal become immortal and he attains Brahman). Mundaka...

Dutt, Nalinaksha

218

La premiere somme philosophique du bouddhisme tibetain. Origines litteraires, philosophiques et mythologiques des Neuf etatpes de la Voie (theg pa rim pa dgu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ 'dul ba dgongs pa gsang ba dang/ rang bzhin gsang ba'i donrnams ni/ zhes gsung te/ rtsal 'phang mtho dman gyi khyad par gyis/ so so'i blo'i rtogs tshod kyi don'di rnams kyang phyin ci ma log pa'i don rtogs pa'i man ngag gi gzhi yin pas/ de bas na man... 'en haut (tib. lha) et d'en bas (tib. klu). Cf. Stein, 1996 : 141. Les Neuf Etapes de la Voie 97 dorigine cleste et munis de capacits surhumaines, descendaient etremontaient au ciel par le moyen d'une chelle qui se trouvait sur le sommetd'une montagne...

Mestanza, Ferran

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Detonation product equation-of-state directly from the cylinder test  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-analytic method is presented for obtaining the detonation-product expansion isentrope directly from cylinder test data. The idea actually dates to G.I. Taylor`s invention of the cylinder test--though he did not implement it for lack of data--but has received little attention since. The method uses the fact that the pressure may be determined from the measured wall trajectory, whereupon the associated specific volume follows from the equations of continuity and momentum. Using the HMX-based explosive PBX9501 as an example, the method makes a good prediction of the detonation pressure and the basic form of {gamma}, the isentropic exponent. However, the model isentrope is slightly low in the mid-range, perhaps because the standard cylinder test is not optimal for this analysis. A better-suited design is proposed, and a simple ad-hoc correction is offered that reconciles the standard test.

Hill, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Data:7d443375-e6dc-4013-9504-3d12f376757f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e6dc-4013-9504-3d12f376757f e6dc-4013-9504-3d12f376757f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Consumers Energy Co Effective date: 2012/06/08 End date if known: Rate name: GPD-Interruptible Service Provision (GI) Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.consumersenergy.com/tariffs.nsf/ELECTRIC_TARIFFS/A51F2662524B2EBC85257A28005E11E6/$FILE/elerates.pdf?Open Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hwang gi suk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IPR":15-2008 09:22 From: IPR":15-2008 09:22 From: To: 912025862805 P.2/5 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY HUNTSMAN ADVANCED MATERIALS AMERICAS, INC. (HUNTSMAN) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RlGI-iTS UNDER DOE GRANT NO. DE-FG36-07G017012~ W(A)-08-004 The Petitioner, Huntsman, has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the ahove referenced grant entitled "Next Generation "Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells." The Petitioner will be collaborating with GraiTech International, Ltd., Ballard Power Systems ("Ballard"), and Case Westem Reserve University. Ballard is subject to this waiver request. GrafTeeh is the prime awardee under the grant, with Ballard and Huntsman as sub-

222

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation in Primary Haemopoietic Cells.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation in Primary Haemopoietic Cells. Munira Kadhim 1 , Stefania Militi 1 , Debbie Bowler 1 , Denise Macdonald 1 and Kevin Prise 2 1 Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, MRC, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0RD, UK 2 Gray Cancer Institute ,PO Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Because the human population is genetically heterogeneous, it is important to understand the role that heterogeneity may play in radiation response. Exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to a suite of changes, including increased mutation rate, delayed reproductive cell death, and delayed chromosomal aberrations, all of which are manifestations of the complex genomic instability (GI) phenotype. Following exposure to either high LET

223

Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Plasma Citrulline Levels in Horses at Risk of Acute Laminitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laminitis is a painful and irreversible disease in horses in which the soft tissue structures of the foot, called the laminae (connecting the coffin bone to the hoof wall), lose blood flow and deteriorate. Without the support of these laminae the coffin bone rotates downward, applying pressure to the sole of the foot and crushing the underlying structures, resulting in severe pain. Laminitis typically progresses through three stages: the early developmental stage is treatable yet undetectable, while the later acute and chronic stages are symptomatic but irreversible. Therefore, the identification of a diagnostic marker capable of detecting the developmental stage would allow earlier and more effective treatment. Laminitis is often triggered by unrelated events occurring elsewhere in the body such as gastrointestinal (GI) upset episodes, typically called colic, which involve intestinal epithelial cell death. Human studies have concluded that intestinal epithelium health can be measured using plasma citrulline concentrations. Citrulline is an ?-amino acid circulated in the plasma that is produced mainly by intestinal epithelial cells. We hypothesized that horses in the developmental stage of laminitis would have reduced plasma citrulline concentrations resulting from intestinal epithelial cell death occurring from a GI upset episode. In this study, blood samples were collected from control horses (n=23) and horses at risk for developing laminitis (n=20). Plasma citrulline concentration was measured using chromatography based amino acid analysis. The normal range was then calculated from the control group and compared to the concentrations from horses that did or did not develop laminitis. Five of the 20 cases developed laminitis symptoms and also had reduced plasma citrulline concentrations. If decreased citrulline levels correlate with laminitis onset across a large set of samples, a simple and affordable blood test could be developed in the future to predict the likelihood of the disease progression to the acute and chronic (irreversible) stages. This would allow veterinarians to begin treatments that could significantly reduce the chance of the horse developing the condition, greatly improving their prognosis.

Jackson, Amy Lynn

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

MIGRATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of migration in gravitationally unstable disks is necessary to understand the fate of protoplanets formed by disk instability. As part of a larger study, we are using a three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics code to investigate how an embedded gas giant planet interacts with a gas disk that undergoes gravitational instabilities (GIs). This Letter presents results from simulations with a Jupiter-mass planet placed in orbit at 25 AU within a 0.14 M{sub sun} disk. The disk spans 5-40 AU around a 1 M{sub sun} star and is initially marginally unstable. In one simulation, the planet is inserted prior to the eruption of GIs; in another, it is inserted only after the disk has settled into a quasi-steady GI-active state, where heating by GIs roughly balances radiative cooling. When the planet is present from the beginning, its own wake stimulates growth of a particular global mode with which it strongly interacts, and the planet plunges inward 6 AU in about 10{sup 3} years. In both cases with embedded planets, there are times when the planet's radial motion is slow and varies in direction. At other times, when the planet appears to be interacting with strong spiral modes, migration both inward and outward can be relatively rapid, covering several AUs over hundreds of years. Migration in both cases appears to stall near the inner Lindblad resonance of a dominant low-order mode. Planet orbit eccentricities fluctuate rapidly between about 0.02 and 0.1 throughout the GI-active phases of the simulations.

Michael, Scott; Durisen, Richard H. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Boley, Aaron C., E-mail: scamicha@indiana.edu, E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: aaron.boley@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2 6:00-8:00 pm R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d N Ne et tw wo or rk ki in ng g R Re ec ce ep pt ti io on n ( (l li ig gh ht t f fa ar re e) ) THURSDAY, APRIL 3 7:00 am R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d C Co on nt ti in ne en nt ta al l B Br re ea ak kf fa as st t 8:00 am W We el lc co om me e 8:10 am P Pa an ne el l S Se es ss si io on n I I: : L Le es ss so on ns s f fr ro om m t th he e A AF FV V E Ex xp pe er ri ie en nc ce e Moderator: Dan Sperling, UC Davis Marc Melaina, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Stephe Yborra, NGV America Joan Ogden, US Davis Discussion 9:25 am B Br re ea ak k 9:40 am P Pa an ne el l S Se es ss si io on n I II I: : L Le es ss so on ns s f fr ro om m H Hy yd dr ro og ge en n S St ta at ti io on n D De em mo on ns st tr ra at ti io on n P Pr ro oj je ec ct ts s Moderator: John Garbak, U.S. Department of Energy Puneet Verma, Chevron

227

PLANETESIMAL FORMATION AT THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN STEADY SUPER/SUB-KEPLERIAN FLOW CREATED BY INHOMOGENEOUS GROWTH OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied formation of planetesimals at a radial pressure bump in a protoplanetary disk created by radially inhomogeneous magnetorotational instability (MRI), through three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations including dust particles. In our previous papers, we showed that the inhomogeneous MRI developing in non-uniform structure of magnetic field or magnetic resistivity can transform the local gas flow in the disk to a quasi-steady state with local rigid rotation that is no longer unstable against the MRI. Since the outer part of the rigid rotation is super-Keplerian flow, a quasi-static pressure bump is created and dust concentration is expected there. In this paper, we perform simulations of the same systems, adding dust particles that suffer gas drag and modulate gas flow via the back-reaction of the gas drag (dust drag). We use {approx}O(10{sup 7}) super-particles, each of which represents {approx}O(10{sup 6})-O(10{sup 7}) dust particles with sizes of centimeter to meter. We have found that the dust drag suppresses turbulent motion to decrease the velocity dispersion of the dust particles while it broadens the dust concentrated regions to limit peaky dust concentration, compared with the simulation without the dust drag. We found that the positive effect for the gravitational instability (GI), reduction in the velocity dispersion, dominates over the negative one, suppression in particle concentration. For meter-size particles with the friction time {tau}{sub f} {approx_equal} 1/{Omega}, where {Omega} is Keplerian frequency, the GI of the dust particles that may lead to planetesimal formation is expected. For such a situation, we further introduced the self-gravity of dust particles to the simulation to demonstrate that several gravitationally bound clumps are actually formed. Through analytical arguments, we found that planetesimal formation from meter-sized dust particles is possible at {approx}5 AU, if dust spatial density is a few times larger than that in the minimum mass solar nebula.

Kato, M. T.; Ida, S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-1-12-I2-10, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Fujimoto, M., E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronomical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Yoshinodai 3-1-1 Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Electromagnetic Induction for Improved Target Location and Segregation Using Spatial Point Pattern Analysis with Applications to Historic Battlegrounds and UXO Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remediation of unexploded ordnance (UXO) and prioritization of excavation procedures for archaeological artifacts using electromagnetic (EM) induction are studied in this dissertation. Lowering of the false alarm rates that require excavation and artifact excavation prioritization can reduce the costs associated with unnecessary procedures. Data were taken over 5 areas at the San Jacinto Battleground near Houston, Texas, using an EM-63 metal detection instrument. The areas were selected using the archaeological concepts of cultural and natural formation processes applied to what is thought to be areas that were involved in the 1836 Battle of San Jacinto. Innovative use of a Statistical Point Pattern Analysis (PPA) is employed to identify clustering of EM anomalies. The K-function uses point {x,y} data to look for possible clusters in relation to other points in the data set. The clusters once identified using K-function will be further examined for classification and prioritization using the Weighted K-function. The Weighted K-function uses a third variable such as millivolt values or time decay to aid in segregation and prioritization of anomalies present. Once the anomalies of interest are identified, their locations are determined using the Gi-Statistics Technique. The Gi*-Statistic uses the individual Cartesian{x, y} points as origin locations to establish a range of distances to other cluster points in the data set. The segregation and location of anomalies supplied by this analysis will have several benefits. Prioritization of excavations will narrow down what areas should be excavated first. Anomalies of interest can be located to guide excavation procedures within the areas surveyed. Knowing what anomalies are of greater importance than others will help to lower false alarm rates for UXO remediation or for archaeological artifact selection. Knowing significant anomaly location will reduce the number of excavations which will subsequently save time and money. The procedures and analyses presented here are an interdisciplinary compilation of geophysics, archaeology and statistical analysis brought together for the first time to examine problems associated with UXO remediation as well as archaeological artifact selection at historic battlegrounds using electromagnetic data.

Pierce, Carl J.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Discovery and Structure Determination of the Orphan Enzyme Isoxanthopterin Deaminase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a (gi|44585104) and NYSGXRC-9236b (gi|44611670), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ). This protein folds as a distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s{sup -1}, 8.0 {micro}M, and 1.3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (k{sub cat}, K{sub m}, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site residues were used to identify 24 other genes which are predicted to deaminate isoxanthopterin.

Hall, R.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Hitchcock, D.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

FORMING PLANETESIMALS BY GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY. I. THE ROLE OF THE RICHARDSON NUMBER IN TRIGGERING THE KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY  

SciTech Connect

Gravitational instability (GI) of a dust-rich layer at the midplane of a gaseous circumstellar disk is one proposed mechanism to form planetesimals, the building blocks of rocky planets and gas giant cores. Self-gravity competes against the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI): gradients in dust content drive a vertical shear which risks overturning the dusty subdisk and forestalling GI. To understand the conditions under which the disk can resist the KHI, we perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified subdisks in the limit that dust particles are small and aerodynamically well coupled to gas, thereby screening out the streaming instability and isolating the KHI. Each subdisk is assumed to have a vertical density profile given by a spatially constant Richardson number Ri. We vary Ri and the midplane dust-to-gas ratio {mu}{sub 0} and find that the critical Richardson number dividing KH-unstable from KH-stable flows is not unique; rather, Ri{sub crit} grows nearly linearly with {mu}{sub 0} for {mu}{sub 0} = 0.3-10. Plausibly, a linear dependence arises for {mu}{sub 0} << 1 because in this regime the radial Kepler shear replaces vertical buoyancy as the dominant stabilizing influence. Why this dependence should persist at {mu}{sub 0} > 1 is a new puzzle. The bulk (height-integrated) metallicity is uniquely determined by Ri and {mu}{sub 0}. Only for disks of bulk solar metallicity is Ri{sub crit} {approx} 0.2, which is close to the classical value. Our empirical stability boundary is such that a dusty sublayer can gravitationally fragment and presumably spawn planetesimals if embedded within a solar metallicity gas disk {approx}4x more massive than the minimum-mass solar nebula; or a minimum-mass disk having {approx}3x solar metallicity; or some intermediate combination of these two possibilities. Gravitational instability seems possible without resorting to the streaming instability or to turbulent concentration of particles.

Lee, Aaron T.; Chiang, Eugene [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Asay-Davis, Xylar [Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Barranco, Joseph, E-mail: a.t.lee@berkeley.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Long-Term Results of a Prospective, Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Ablation, Pelvic Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Boost, and Adjuvant Docetaxel in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103. One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a multi-institutional setting.

DiBiase, Steven J., E-mail: sdibiase@dvullc.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine and Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Hussain, Arif [Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kataria, Ritesh; Amin, Pradip; Bassi, Sunakshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dawson, Nancy [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Kwok, Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Chemopreventive Potential of Sorghum with Different Phenolic Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiological evidence has correlated consumption of sorghum with reduced incidences of gastrointestinal (GI) tract cancer, especially esophageal cancer. There is little evidence on how phenols of sorghum may affect chemoprevention. Seventeen sorghum varieties were screened for phenolic profiles and antioxidant capacity. The ability of crude sorghum extracts to induce NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QR, a phase II protective enzyme), and inhibit proliferation of colon (HT-29) and esophageal (OE33) carcinoma cells using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and PicoGreen assays, were determined in vitro. 3- Deoxyanthocyanidins, apigeninidin, luteolinidin and their methoxylated derivatives were also investigated for antioxidant capacity, QR inducing and antiproliferative potential. Tannin sorghum generally showed higher antioxidant capacity than non-tannin sorghum varieties. Sorghum varieties containing extractable condensed tannins did not show any significant QR inducing potential; on the other hand, non-tannin sorghums increased QR activity by 1.5-2.7 times; black sorghum (Tx430) was most potent (doubled QR activity at 25 mg/mL, 2.7-fold increase at 100 mg/mL). All sorghum extracts showed relatively strong antiproliferation activity with IC50s (the concentration needed to inhibit cancer cell growth by 50%) of 49.7-883 mg/mL. Tannin-containing sorghums had stronger cancer cell proliferation inhibitory potential (IC50s 49.7-131 mg/mL) than non-tannin sorghums (IC50s 141-883 mg/mL). Total phenol content and antioxidant capacity of crude sorghum extracts positively correlated with their antiproliferative potential (r2 0.71-0.97). Among tested 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, methoxylation on A-ring improved QR inducing potency. 5,7-Dimethoxyluteolinidin had the greatest QR inducing potency (4.3- fold at 100 mM). Methoxylation also improved their antiproliferation potential; the IC50s trend was di-methoxylated (8.3-105 mM) > mono-methoxylated (40.1-192 mM) > apigeninidin and luteolinidin (81.5-284 mM). This study provides information for how phenolic compositions of sorghum and 3-deoxyanthocyanidin structure affect their capacity to induce QR activity and inhibit GI tract cancer cell proliferation. The information is useful to promote the utilization of sorghum in functional foods, beverages, dietary supplements, and other health-related industries. Further study will focus on, fractioned and isolated sorghum phenols, the effect of food processing on their chemopreventive potential, as well as cellular mechanisms involved.

Yang, Liyi

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

NERSC-FE.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March March 1 9, 2 013 NERSC Overview --- 2 --- NERSC History 1974 Founded a t L ivermore t o s upport f usion research w ith a C DC s ystem 1978 Cray 1 i nstalled 1983 Expanded t o s upport t oday's D OE O ffice of S cience 1986 ESnet e stablished a t N ERSC 1994 Cray T 3D M PP t estbed 1994 --- 2000 TransiOoned u sers f rom v ector processing t o M PP 1996 Moved t o B erkeley L ab 1996 PDSF d ata i ntensive c ompuOng s ystem for n uclear a nd h igh e nergy p hysics 1999 HPSS b ecomes m ass s torage p laTorm 2006 Facility w ide filesystem 2010 CollaboraOon w ith J GI --- 3 --- Cray 1 --- 1 978 Cray 2 - 1 985 Cray T 3E M curie --- 1 996 IBM P ower3 S eaborg --- 2 001 NERSC collaborates with computer companies to deploy advanced HPC and data resources --- 4 --- We e mploy e xperts i n h igh p erformance c ompu

234

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

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235

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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236

JGI_Training_FileSystems_Feb2012.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jason Jason H ick Storage Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley Na:onal Lab 10 February 2012 A N ew 2 PB G PFS fi le s ystem f or the JGI "projectb" The n ew 2 PB " projectb" fi le s ystem i s a vailable o n Phoebe n ow * Some high level specs for users * 2.8 PB * Has a "per project" non--- purged, b acked---up por:on w ith s maller quota ( 1---5 T B) * And a " per u ser" p urged, not b acked---up p or:on with l arger q uota ( 10TB) File s ystems b est p rac:ces * Unfortunately d isk i s s :ll expensive * All o f t he J GI's d ata c an not c on:nue t o b e s tored on d isk w ithin t he c urrent budget * Archive a nd d elete d ata you no longer need * Disk u sage w ill b e controlled t hrough quotas i n s ome c ases a nd purging i n o thers There a re t wo a reas o f s torage w ithin

237

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l l M n y r-r \ REQUEST FOR I I n eccordance with the proviaions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request, including arnrmduumts, is ap roved except fnr items that ma be m a d "dis ositi011 wt apprw~d* I * ;Gi~uimwhn in c D P - 10. Toby Hedemon (SO-3 1 2 ) Rs - - -- 7 . I 10, ACTIaNP ITEM 8- DVEScRlrmoN OF ITEM AND PROPOSED DlSPOSlTlON SUPERSEDED TAKEN (NARA NO. JOB CITATION USE ONLY) Schedule coven all records-of the Department of no existing disposition authority .e., Strate@c Petroleum Reserve ewe Project Wee in New Orleans, and Dyn-McD ems, were reviewed for accuracy and c the records of Ule currently active 4 S attached 3 pages for S~hedule. t I I N ~ T E : JIemJIem3D of this schedule eanels Nc11434814 item 2 I I . 1 16-1 09 NSN 7540-00-634-4064 STANDARD FORM 115 (REV. 3-91

238

In Yuma County, Arizona and Imperial County, California RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintenance, vegetation removal and structure maintenance at multiple structures along the existing GiIa-Knob 161-kV transmission Line In Yuma County, Arizona and Imperial County, California RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes to conduct maintenance at structures 1/4, 2/4,3/2 , 3/7,4/1,6/2, 6/3,6/5 , 6/6,8/3,9/2 , 9/3,9/6, 10/6, 10/7, 10/8, 11/1, 11/2, 11/3,11/4, 12/3,12/4, 12/5,12/6,13/7,13/8, 14/3, 14/4, 15/2 , 15/5, 15/8,16/1 , 16/3, 16/4, 16/5, 19/1 of the existing Gila-Knob 161-kV transmission line and any other structures east of 16/5, identified by maintenance crews while out in the field . This work will consist of replacing transmission poles, cross arms, cross braces andlor vegetation removal. Western also needs to repair erosion on the Imperial Irrigation

239

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) June 2013 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2011 2011 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 3.09 5.66 26.37 22.77 25.54 27.12 13.18 19.42 25.90 0.61 3.01 8.75 2.56 27.08 19.85 Alaska 3.64 6.70 29.33 23.12 29.76 31.60 20.07 34.62 26.61 - 14.42 20.85 6.36 47.13 25.17 Arizona 1.99 7.07 27.73 22.84 31.95 26.97 17.00 17.23 26.71 0.75 6.31 10.79 2.16 28.46 25.23 Arkansas 1.93 6.94 26.37 22.45 26.66 27.35 17.35 33.22

240

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2009 2009 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2009 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 2.81 6.63 16.38 12.88 21.25 17.63 9.62 13.88 16.73 0.55 2.82 6.88 2.24 26.23 16.18 Alaska 2.81 6.39 20.85 13.24 26.28 22.73 10.74 24.01 17.57 - 9.57 14.30 4.26 44.29 18.23 Arizona 1.83 6.38 16.14 12.50 27.59 18.28 - 11.60 17.18 0.59 7.83 7.67 2.04 28.01 19.66 Arkansas 1.73 7.82 16.07 12.42 20.51 17.40 6.65 21.59 17.08 0.66

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241

Microsoft Word - 2010 Draft agenda.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Low Dose Investigators' Workshop Page 1 of 5 April 12 - 14, 2010 DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop IX Renaissance M St, Washington, DC New Hampshire Ballroom April 12-14, 2010 Sunday Evening, April 11 6:30 - 8:30 pm Registration, Poster Setup ( (City Center Ballroom) Mixer (Hors d'ouerves) ----------------------------- Monday, April 12 7:30 am R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ti io on n, , P Po os st te er r S Se et tu up p, , C Co on nt ti in ne en nt ta al l B Br re ea ak kf fa as st t 8:30 am Introductions and Welcome - (New Hampshire Ballroom) Chair: NF Metting Anna Palmisano, Associate Director, Office of Science, Director for Biological and Environmental Research Sharlene Weatherwax, Division Director, Biological Systems Science Division Noelle Metting, Manager, Low Dose Radiation Research Program PLENARY SESSION I-EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS AND RADIATION EXPOSURE Chair:

242

Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC User Services Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Group Services Group Using Modules at NERSC --- 1 --- September 10, 2013 NERSC Supported Software * NERSC p rovides a w ide r ange o f s cien=fic a nd c omputer programming s o@ware t o u sers - Scien)fic A pplica)ons: V ASP, A mber, N AMD, ABySS, ... - Compilers: p gi, i ntel, g cc, c ray - Scrip)ng L anguages: perl, p ython, R * and p ackages f or e ach! - SoIware L ibraries: b las/lapack ( MKL), b oost, h df5, n etcdf, ... - U)li)es: gnuplot, g it, m ercurial, 7 zip, c make, . .. - Debuggers & P rofilers: C rayPat, D DT, TotalView, g db, M AP, darshan - Visualiza)on: V isit, P araView, V MD, ... * See complete list: - hVp://www.nersc.gov/users/soIware/ --- 2 --- Software is Managed by Modules * NERSC p rovides m any v ersions o f m any s o@ware packages - To s upport d iverse w orkload o n s ystems * Maintaining

243

XL-A A.&lx A!i' X!Ii?Z IL';;i'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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244

JJ'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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245

Development of high-efficiency, thin-film CdTe solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 February 1992--30 November 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) to bring the polycrystalline CdTe cell efficiency a step closer to the practically achievable efficiency of 18% through fundamental understanding of detects and loss mechanisms, the role of chemical and heat treatments, and investigation of now process techniques. The objective was addressed by a combination of in-depth characterization, modeling, materials growth, device fabrication, and `transport analyses of Au/Cu/CdTe/CdS/SnO {sub 2} glass front-wall heterojunction solar cells. GiT attempted to understand the loss mechanism(s) in each layer and interface by a step-by-step investigation of this multilayer cell structure. The first step was to understand, quantify, and reduce the reflectance and photocurrent loss in polycrystalline CdTe solar calls. The second step involved the investigation of detects and loss mechanisms associated with the CdTe layer and the CdTe/CdS interface. The third stop was to investigate the effect of chemical and heat treatments on CdTe films and cells. The fourth step was to achieve a better and reliable contact to CdTe solar cells by improving the fundamental understanding. Of the effects of Cu on cell efficiency. Finally, the research involved the investigation of the effect of crystallinity and grain boundaries on Cu incorporation in the CdTe films, including the fabrication of CdTe solar calls with larger CdTe grain size.

Rohatgi, A.; Chou, H.C.; Kamra, S.; Bhat, A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Intracluster and Intragroup Entropy from Quasar Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the hierarchical merging of dark matter halos, the radiative cooling of baryons, and the energy feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei or quasars combine to govern the amount and the thermal state of the hot plasma pervading groups and clusters of galaxies. We show that by itself supernova preheating of the external gas flowing into clusters falls short of explaining the observed X-ray scaling relations of the plasma luminosity L_X or the plasma entropy K vs. the X-ray temperature T. To account for the scaling laws from rich to poor clusters it takes preheating enhanced by the energy input from active galactic nuclei. In groups, on the other hand, the internal impacts of powerful quasars going off in member galaxies can blow some plasma out of the structure. So they depress L_X and raise K to the observed average levels; meanwhile, the sporadic nature of such impulsive events generates the intrinsic component of the wide scatter apparent in the data. The same quasar feedback gi...

Lapi, A; Menci, N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effect of granular porous media on the composting of swine manure  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated the feasibility of a bulking agent of granular porous media (GPM) for the composting of swine manure. Two lab-scale composting reactors were operated to evaluate the general performances and maturity parameters using GPM made of wastes from the Portland cement manufacturing processes as an alternative bulking agent. The overall volatile solid (VS) removal was 38.5% (dry basis). During the experiments, moisture content ranged between 41% and 53%, ensuring feasibility of microbial activity in composting. Cured compost showed proper maturity and low phytotoxicity, despite the slight decreases of CO{sub 2} production and VS removal at the second batch operation. Various physico-chemical parameters of the cured compost met the regulatory standards reported elsewhere. The pH, carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, ammonia nitrogen and soluble organic carbon (SOC) of the cured compost were significantly correlated to the germination index (GI) using the seeds of Chinese cabbage and lettuce, indicating the progressive biodegradation of phytotoxins as well as organic matter. Consequently, the results obtained in this study demonstrate that GPM could contribute to the environmentally friendly and economical composting of problematic swine manure as a recyclable bulking agent.

Kim, Ku-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Woo [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sun-Kee [Department of Environmental Health, Korea National Open University, 169 Dongsung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Eung-Ju [Department of Environmental Engineering, Daegu University, Jinryang, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chae-Young [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Suwon, San 2-2, Wau-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 445-743 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hang-Sik [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hangshin@kaist.ac.kr

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Learning Geo-Temporal Non-Stationary Failure and Recovery of Power Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart energy grid is an emerging area for new applications of machine learning in a non-stationary environment. Such a non-stationary environment emerges when large-scale failures occur at power distribution networks due to external disturbances such as hurricanes and severe storms. Power distribution networks lie at the edge of the grid, and are especially vulnerable to external disruptions. Quantifiable approaches are lacking and needed to learn non-stationary behaviors of large-scale failure and recovery of power distribution. This work studies such non-stationary behaviors in three aspects. First, a novel formulation is derived for an entire life cycle of large-scale failure and recovery of power distribution. Second, spatial-temporal models of failure and recovery of power distribution are developed as geo-location based multivariate non-stationary GI(t)/G(t)/Infinity queues. Third, the non-stationary spatial-temporal models identify a small number of parameters to be learned. Learning is applied to two ...

Wei, Yun; Galvan, Floyd; Couvillon, Stephen; Orellana, George; Momoh, James

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reconsideration of EPAs Approval of Vermonts 2002 Lake Champlain Phosphorus Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) and Determination to Disapprove the TMDL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (Act) requires states to identify waters that do not or are not expected to meet applicable water quality standards after imposition of technology-based controls alone. In that event, the waters are considered impaired, and must be identified or listed under Section 303(d) of the Act. Once such waters are identified, states are to develop TMDLs for any pollutant that is causing the impairment, at a level necessary to attain and maintain the applicable state water quality standards with seasonal variations and a margin of safety that accounts for any lack of knowledge concerning the relationship between effluent limitations and water quality. The total maximum daily load that applies to a water segment is the sum of the load allocations (LA) of pollutants from nonpoint sources, the wasteload allocations (WLA) of pollutants from point sources, and a margin of safety. 1 See 40 C.F.R. 130.2(g)-(i), 130.2(c)(1). Once the public has had the opportunity to review and comment on such TMDLs, states are required to submit the TMDLs to EPA for review and approval. If EPA disapproves a TMDL, it must then establish the TMDL at the level necessary to implement the applicable water quality standards and the state must incorporate the TMDL into its continuing planning process.

A. Statutory; Regulatory Background

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Performance Analysis of Battery Power Management Schemes in Wireless Mobile Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the performance of battery power management schemes in wireless mobile devices using a queueing theory approach. We model the battery as a server with finite service capacity and data packets as customers to be served. With an intent to exploit the recharging capability of the battery when left idle, we allow the battery to go on intentional vacations during which the battery can recharge itself. The recharge thus built up can effectively increase the number of customers served (in other words, battery life can be extended). Such improved battery life performance would, however, come at the expense of increased packet delay performance. We quantify the battery life gain versus delay performance trade-off in this approach through analysis and simulations. By considering a continuous recharge model of the battery, we derive expressions for the number of customers served and the mean delay for an M=GI=1 queueing system without and with server vacations. We show that allowing intentional vacations during busy periods helps to increase battery life, and that this approach can be beneficial when applied on traffic of delay-tolerant applications. We also propose a packet delay constrained power saving algorithm that will exploit the recharge phenomenon when packet delay constraints are imposed. I.

Balakrishna J. Prabhu; A. Chockalingam; Vinod Sharma

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI{sub 50}) concentration of 2.35 {mu}M. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

Lin, Y.-J. [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hou, Y.C. [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A. [Department of Life Science, National Tsing Hua University, HsinChu, Taiwan (China); Sheu, Jim J.C. [Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lai, C.-H. [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, B.-H. [Faculty of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wan Lei [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: leiwan@mail.cmuh.org.tw; Tsai, F.-J. [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: d0704@mail.cmuh.org.tw

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

252

Solar Oblateness from Archimedes to Dicke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-spherical shape of the Sun has been invoked to explain the anomalous precession of Mercury. A brief history of some methods for measuring solar diameter is presented. Archimedes was the first to give upper and lower values for solar diameter in third century before Christ; we also show the method of total eclipses, used after Halleys observative campaign of 1715 eclipse; the variant of partial eclipses useful to measure different chords of the solar disk; the method of Dicke which correlates oblateness with luminous excess in the equatorial zone. PACS 95.10.Gi Eclipses, transits, and occultations-.95.30.Sf- Relativity and gravitation-95.55.Ev- Solar instruments 1. Archimedes Archimedes of Syracuse [1] gave out an evaluation of the angle subtended by the Sun with the vertex on the observers eye. He knew that a perfect determination is not possible due to the observer bias and systematic errors, so he proposed to find out the Fig. 1. Geometry of angular solar diameter measurement in case of point-like eye. Gray angle is the angular lower diameter, black angle is the upper limit. The ruler is the black horizontal line.

Costantino Sigismondi; Pietro Oliva; Piazzale Aldo Moro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Lya forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the BAO feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51-1.70 micron) spectra of 10^5 evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for ~15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. MARVELS will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m/s, ~24 visits per star) needed to detect gi...

Eisenstein, Daniel J; Agol, Eric; Aihara, Hiroaki; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anderson, Scott F; Arns, James A; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Balbinot, Eduardo; Barkhouser, Robert; Beers, Timothy C; Berlind, Andreas A; Bickerton, Steven J; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Bochanski, John J; Bolton, Adam S; Bosman, Casey T; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard J; Brandt, W N; Breslauer, Ben; Brinkmann, J; Brown, Peter J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burger, Dan; Busca, Nicolas G; Campbell, Heather; Cargile, Phillip A; Carithers, William C; Carlberg, Joleen K; Carr, Michael A; Chen, Yanmei; Chiappini, Cristina; Comparat, Johan; Connolly, Natalia; Cortes, Marina; Croft, Rupert A C; da Costa, Luiz N; Cunha, Katia; Davenport, James R A; Dawson, Kyle; De Lee, Nathan; de Mello, Gustavo F Porto; de Simoni, Fernando; Dean, Janice; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L; Edmondson, Edward M; Eiting, Jacob M; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Castella, Bruno Femenia; Ferreira, Leticia Dutra; Fitzgerald, Greg; Fleming, Scott W; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ford, Eric B; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Perez, Ana Elia Garcia; Gaudi, B Scott; Ge, Jian; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A; Gilmore, G; Girardi, Leo; Gott, J Richard; Gould, Andrew; Grebel, Eva K; Gunn, James E; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W; Hawley, Suzanne L; Hearty, Frederick R; Hernandez, Jonay I Gonzalez; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Holtzman, Jon A; Honscheid, Klaus; Inada, Naohisa; Ivans, Inese I; Jiang, Linhua; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A; Jordan, Cathy; Jordan, Wendell P; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kazin, Eyal; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark A; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Knapp, G R; Kochanek, C S; Koesterke, Lars; Kollmeier, Juna A; Kron, Richard G; Lang, Dustin; Lawler, James E; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Brian L; Lee, Young Sun; Leisenring, Jarron M; Lin, Yen-Ting; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C; Loomis, Craig P; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H; Ma, Bo; Ma, Zhibo; MacDonald, Nicholas; Mack, Claude; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A G; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Majewski, Steven R; Makler, Martin; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Maseman, Paul; Masters, Karen L; McBride, Cameron K; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Requejo, Olga Mena; Menard, Brice; Miralda-Escude, Jordi; Morrison, Heather L; Mullally, Fergal; Muna, Demitri; Murayama, Hitoshi; Myers, Adam D; Naugle, Tracy; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C; Nidever, David L; O'Connell, Robert W; Ogando, Ricardo L C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel J; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pandey, Parul; Parejko, John K; Paris, Isabelle; Pellegrini, Paulo; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Pfaffenberger, Robert; Pforr, Janine; Phleps, Stefanie; Pichon, Christophe; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Raddick, M Jordan; Ramos, Beatriz H F; Ryle, Celine; Reid, I Neill; Rich, James; Richards, Gordon T; Rieke, George H; Rieke, Marcia J; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J; Rockosi, Constance M; Roe, Natalie A; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossetto, Bruno; Sanchez, Ariel G; Santiago, Basilio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo; Schlegel, David J; Schlesinger, Katharine J; Schmidt, Sarah J; Schneider, Donald P; Sellgren, Kris; Shelden, Alaina; Sheldon, Erin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Silverman, John D; Simmerer, Jennifer; Simmons, Audrey E; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Skrutskie, M F; Slosar, Anze; Smee, Stephen; Smith, Verne V; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stassun, Keivan G; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stockett, Mark H; Stollberg, Todd; Strauss, Michael A; Tanaka, Masayuki; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tofflemire, Benjamin M; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy A; Magana, Mariana Vargas; Verde, Licia; Vogt, Nicole P; Wake, David A; Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A; White, Martin; White, Simon D M; Wilson, John C; Wisniewski, John P; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yanny, Brian; Yasuda, Naoki; Yeche, Christophe; York, Donald G; Young, Erick; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sudip Dosanjh! Director  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Today and NERSC Today and over the next Ten Years --- 1 --- February 1 3, 2 013 NERSC's Mission * Accelerate s cien5fic d iscovery a t t he D OE O ffice o f Science through high performance compu5ng and extreme d ata a nalysis --- 2 --- NERSC History 1974 F ounded a t L ivermore t o s upport f usion research w ith a C DC s ystem 1978 Cray 1 i nstalled 1983 Expanded t o s upport t oday's D OE O ffice of S cience 1986 ESnet e stablished a t N ERSC 1994 Cray T 3D M PP t estbed 1994 --- 2000 TransiOoned u sers f rom v ector processing t o M PP 1996 Moved t o B erkeley L ab 1996 PDSF d ata i ntensive c ompuOng s ystem for n uclear a nd h igh e nergy p hysics 1999 HPSS b ecomes m ass s torage p laTorm 2005 Facility w ide filesystem 2010 CollaboraOon w ith J GI --- 3 --- Cray 1 --- 1 978 Cray 2 - 1 985 Cray T 3E M curie --- 1 996 IBM

255

Hot electron dynamics in graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structure allotrope of carbon atoms, has a long history since the invention of the pencil [Petroski (1989)] and the linear dispersion band structure proposed by Wallace [Wal]; however, only after Novoselov et al. successively isolated graphene from graphite [Novoselov et al. (2004)], it has been studied intensively during the recent years. It draws so much attentions not only because of its potential application in future electronic devices but also because of its fundamental properties: its quasiparticles are governed by the two-dimensional Dirac equation, and exhibit a variety of phenomena such as the anomalous integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) [Novoselov et al. (2005)] measured experimentally, a minimal conductivity at vanishing carrier concentration [Neto et al. (2009)], Kondo effect with magnetic element doping [Hentschel and Guinea (2007)], Klein tunneling in p-n junctions [Cheianov and Falko (2006), Beenakker (2008)], Zitterbewegung [Katsnelson (2006)], and Schwinger pair production [Schwinger (1951); Dora and Moessner (2010)]. Although both electron-phonon coupling and photoconductivity in graphene also draws great attention [Yan et al. (2007); Satou et al. (2008); Hwang and Sarma (2008); Vasko and Ryzhii (2008); Mishchenko (2009)], the nonequilibrium behavior based on the combination of electronphonon coupling and Schwinger pair production is an intrinsic graphene property that has not been investigated. Our motivation for studying clean graphene at low temperature is based on the following effect: for a fixed electric field, below a sufficiently low temperature linear eletric transport breaks down and nonlinear transport dominates. The criteria of the strength of this field [Fritz et al. (2008)] is eE = T2/~vF (1.1) For T >?eE~vF the system is in linear transport regime while for T

Ling, Meng-Cheieh

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "??non-targeted"? responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell lineages will include the role of cytokines which have been shown to be in the initiation of instability. These studies also aim to uncover the possible mechanism of the initiation, perpetuation and delayed pathways of the instability response using relevant biological endpoints i.e. chromosomal instability, apoptosis induction, cytokine and gene array analysis. Integral to these studies will be an assessment of the role of genetic susceptibility in these responses, using CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J mice. The overall results suggest that low dose low LET X-irradiation induced delayed GI in both CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J haemopoeitic tissue. Using several biological approaches, some key strain and dose-specific differences have been identified in radiation-induced signalling in the initiation and perpetuation of the instability process. Furthermore, the induction of non-targeted radiation effects and genetic dependency may be linked to the use of alternative signalling pathways and mechanisms which have potential implications on evaluation of non-targeted effects in radiation risk assessment.

Kadhim, Munira A

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2011 . Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 3.09 5.66 26.37 22.77 25.54 27.12 13.18 19.42 25.90 0.61 3.01 8.75 2.56 27.08 19.85 Alaska 3.64 6.70 29.33 23.12 29.76 31.60 20.07 34.62 26.61 - 14.42 20.85 6.36 47.13 25.17 Arizona 1.99 7.07 27.73 22.84 31.95 26.97 17.00 17.23 26.71 0.75 6.31 10.79 2.16 28.46 25.23 Arkansas 1.93 6.94 26.37 22.45 26.66 27.35 17.35 33.22 27.02 0.64 3.31 10.54 2.13 22.02 19.63 California 3.13 7.08 27.34 22.51 31.21 30.02 20.92 21.45 27.51 0.71 4.88 17.99 3.32 38.35 24.14 Colorado 1.73 6.79 26.86 22.41 26.35

258

S Se  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Se Se er rp pe en nt ti in ne e S St ty yl le e C Co oi il l W Wi in nd di in ng gs s f fo or r B BE EP PC C- -I II I I IR R M Ma ag gn ne et t P Pr ro od du uc ct ti io on n V Viid de eo oc co on nffe er re en nc ce e B Be ettw we ee en n IIH HE EP P a an nd d B BN NL L S Sc ch he ed du ulle ed d ffo or r M Ma ar rc ch h 3 3,, 2 20 00 04 4 o on n B BE EP PC C- -IIII S SC C M Ma ag gn ne ett P Pr ro od du uc cttiio on n.. Presented by Brett Parker/BNL - SMD First SCQ Production Coil Winding 7 0 0 Z (mm) 300 200 100 θ (deg.) 5 0 0 Z (mm) θ (deg.) O Or ri ig gi in na al l D Do ou ub bl le e- -L La ay ye er r B BE EP PC C- -I II I C Co oi il l W Wi in nd di in ng g P Pa at tt te er rn ns s f fo or r S SC CB B a an nd d S SC CQ Q. . The plan had been to wind one coil pole and then stop winding to fill in gaps with G10 before adding new substrate and then continue winding the same pole in the second layer. This was maybe not so bad for SCB where we would have had to stop/start twice but for the four double-layer SCQ we would have had sixteen stop/starts

259

The Thermal Regulation of Gravitational Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks II. Extended Simulations with Varied Cooling Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to investigate mass transport and planet formation by gravitational instabilities (GIs), we have extended our 3-D hydrodynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks from a previous paper. Our goal is to determine the asymptotic behavior of GIs and how it is affected by different constant cooling times. Initially, Rdisk = 40 AU, Mdisk = 0.07 Mo, M* = 0.5 Mo, and Qmin = 1.8. Sustained cooling, with tcool = 2 orps (outer rotation periods, 1 orp ~ 250 yrs), drives the disk to instability in ~ 4 orps. This calculation is followed for 23.5 orps. After 12 orps, the disk settles into a quasi-steady state with sustained nonlinear instabilities, an average Q = 1.44 over the outer disk, a well-defined power-law Sigma(r), and a roughly steady Mdot ~ 5(-7) Mo/yr. The transport is driven by global low-order spiral modes. We restart the calculation at 11.2 orps with tcool = 1 and 1/4 orp. The latter case is also run at high azimuthal resolution. We find that shorter cooling times lead to increased Mdots, denser and thinner spiral structures, and more violent dynamic behavior. The asymptotic total internal energy and the azimuthally averaged Q(r) are insensitive to tcool. Fragmentation occurs only in the high-resolution tcool = 1/4 orp case; however, none of the fragments survive for even a quarter of an orbit. Ring-like density enhancements appear and grow near the boundary between GI active and inactive regions. We discuss the possible implications of these rings for gas giant planet formation.

Annie C. Mejia; Richard H. Durisen; Megan K. Pickett; Kai Cai

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everyone is exposed to radiation every day. People are continuously exposed to low-level radiation found in food, soils, building materials, and the air and from outer space. All of this radiation originates from naturally occurring sources. For example, bananas contain naturally occurring radioactive potassium-40 and air contains radon, a radioactive gas. Your average natural background radiation dose * is about 3.0 mSv (300 mrem) each year (millisieverts and millirem are units of radiation dose, much like a gram or an ounce is a unit of weight). In addition to natural background radiation, you may be exposed to radiation from medical x rays and medical radiation tests or treatments. If you think, or there is a possibility, that you may be pregnant and need a medical x-ray or radiation procedure, the information below will help answer your question Does a medical procedure involving radiation increase my babys health risks? What are the health risks from medical x rays or radionuclide medical tests performed during pregnancy? There is a lot of reliable information about the effects of radiation exposure during pregnancy. Potential radiation effects vary depending on the fetal stage of development and the magnitude of the doses. Our best knowledge indicates that there is a threshold below which negative effects are not observed. According to the American College of Radiology, routine x rays of a mothers abdomen, back, hips, and pelvis are not likely to pose a serious risk to the child (ACR/RSNA 2010). However, certain procedures (such as a computerized tomography [CT scan] or a lower GI fluoroscope exam) to the mothers stomach or hips may give higher doses. If you are administered a radioactive drug (nuclear medicine), radioactivity in your urine or intestines could give a moderate dose to the fetus, and some compounds can cross the placenta *Words in italics are defined in the Glossary on page 3.

Melissa Arch; At Immanuel St. Josephs

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Genetic Variation in DNA of Coho Salmon from the Lower Columbia River : Final Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop techniques to provide the information needed to determine if Lower Columbia River coho salmon represent a 'species' under the Endangered Species Act. Our report features two new nuclear DNA approaches to the improved detection of genetic variation: (1) Studies of DNA-level genetic variation for two nuclear growth hormone genes; (2) Use of arbitrary DNA primers (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, or 'RAPD' primers) to detect variation at large numbers of nuclear genes. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify variable sections (introns) of two growth hormone genes (GH-I and G/f-Z) in several salmonid species. Coho salmon had three DNA length variants for G/-I intron C. Restriction analysis and sequencing provided valuable information about the mode of evolution of these DNA sequences. We tested segregation of the variants in captive broods of coho salmon, and demonstrated that they are alleles at a single Mendelian locus. Population studies using the GH-1 alleles showed highly significant frequency differences between Lower Columbia River and Oregon Coast coho salmon, and marginal differences among stocks within these regions. These new markers are adequately defined and tested to use in coho salmon population studies of any size. The nature of the variation at GH-1 (Variable Number Tandem Repeats, or 'VNTRs') suggests that more genetic variants will be found in coho salmon from other areas. GH-2 intron C also showed length variation in coho salmon, and this variation was found to be sex-linked. Because PCR methods require minute amounts of tissue, this discovery provides a technique to determine the gender of immature coho salmon without killing them. Chinook salmon had restriction patterns and sequence divergences similar to coho salmon. Thus, we expect that sex linkage of GH-2 alleles predates the evolutionary divergence of Pacific salmon species, and that gender testing with this system will work on the entire group. Rainbow trout do not show this sex-linked variation. Genetic markers detected by DNA amplification using arbitrary 10-basepair primers (Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA, or 'RAPD' markers), are the newest and most promising method of assessing variation at large numbers of genetic loci. We have demonstrated the inheritance of these markers in rainbow trout, and we have found multiple variable genetic markers in coho salmon. Feasibility studies on the use of RAPDs on large salmon collections are described.

Fobes, Stephen; Knudsen, Kathy; Allendorf, Fred

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Molecular and Macroscopic Modeling of CO2 Hydrate Formation and Dissolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

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263

CHP Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to engineer, design, fabricate, and field demonstrate a Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) that integrates a low-cost, clean burning, gas-fired simple-cycle (unrecuperated) 100 kWe (net) microturbine (SCMT) with a new ultra low-NOx gas-fired burner (ULNB) into one compact Combined Heat and Power (CHP) product that can be retrofit on new and existing industrial and commercial boilers in place of conventional burners. The Scope of Work for this project was segmented into two principal phases: (Phase I) Hardware development, assembly and pre-test and (Phase II) Field installation and demonstration testing. Phase I was divided into five technical tasks (Task 2 to 6). These tasks covered the engineering, design, fabrication, testing and optimization of each key component of the CHP system principally, ULNB, SCMT, assembly BBEST CHP package, and integrated controls. Phase I work culminated with the laboratory testing of the completed BBEST assembly prior to shipment for field installation and demonstration. Phase II consisted of two remaining technical tasks (Task 7 and 8), which focused on the installation, startup, and field verification tests at a pre-selected industrial plant to document performance and attainment of all project objectives. Technical direction and administration was under the management of CMCE, Inc. Altex Technologies Corporation lead the design, assembly and testing of the system. Field demonstration was supported by Leva Energy, the commercialization firm founded by executives at CMCE and Altex. Leva Energy has applied for patent protection on the BBEST process under the trade name of Power Burner and holds the license for the burner currently used in the product. The commercial term Power Burner is used throughout this report to refer to the BBEST technology proposed for this project. The project was co-funded by the California Energy Commission and the Southern California Gas Company (SCG), a division of Sempra Energy. These match funds were provided via concurrent contracts and investments available via CMCE, Altex, and Leva Energy The project attained all its objectives and is considered a success. CMCE secured the support of GI&E from Italy to supply 100 kW Turbec T-100 microturbines for the project. One was purchased by the projects subcontractor, Altex, and a second spare was purchased by CMCE under this project. The microturbines were then modified to convert from their original recuperated design to a simple cycle configuration. Replacement low-NOx silo combustors were designed and bench tested in order to achieve compliance with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 emission limits for NOx and CO when in CHP operation. The converted microturbine was then mated with a low NOx burner provided by Altex via an integration section that allowed flow control and heat recovery to minimize combustion blower requirements; manage burner turndown; and recover waste heat. A new fully integrated control system was designed and developed that allowed one-touch system operation in all three available modes of operation: (1) CHP with both microturbine and burner firing for boiler heat input greater than 2 MMBtu/hr; (2) burner head only (BHO) when the microturbine is under service; and (3) microturbine only when boiler heat input requirements fall below 2 MMBtu/hr. This capability resulted in a burner turndown performance of nearly 10/1, a key advantage for this technology over conventional low NOx burners. Key components were then assembled into a cabinet with additional support systems for generator cooling and fuel supply. System checkout and performance tests were performed in the laboratory. The assembled system and its support equipment were then shipped and installed at a host facility where final performance tests were conducted following efforts to secure fabrication, air, and operating permits. The installed power burner is now in commercial operation and has achieved all the performance goals.

Castaldini, Carlo; Darby, Eric

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Inter- and Intra-kingdom Signaling in Bacterial Chemotaxis, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell-cell communication between bacteria, belonging to the same species or to different species (Intra-kingdom signaling), or communication between bacteria and their animal host (Inter-kingdom signaling) is mediated through different chemical signals that are synthesized and secreted by bacteria or the host and is crucial for the survival of bacteria inside their host. The overall goal of this work was to understand the role of inter- and intra-kingdom signaling in phenotypes such as chemotaxis, colonization and biofilm formation, and virulence that are associated with infections caused by the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract pathogens. A part of our work also aimed at developing microfluidics-based models to study inter- and intra-kingdom signaling in biofilm formation, inhibition, and dispersal. We showed that norepinephrine (NE), an important host signal produced during stress, increases human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, motility, attachment, and virulence, and also showed that the actions of NE are mediated primarily through the LasR, and not the RhlR QS system. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the chemo-sensing of the intra-kingdom signal autoinducer-2 (AI-2) by pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by performing different chemotaxis assays (capillary, microPlug and microFlow assays), and discovered that AI-2 is a potent attractant for E. coli and S. typhimurium, and that the Tsr chemoreceptor and periplasmic AI-2 binding protein LsrB are necessary for sensing AI-2, although uptake of AI-2 into the cytoplasm is not required. We concluded that LsrB, when bound to AI-2, interacts directly with the periplasmic domain of Tsr primarily at the Thr-61 and Asp-63 residues of LsrB, making LsrB the first known periplasmic-protein partner for Tsr. We fabricated a simple user-friendly microfluidic flow cell (microBF) device that can precisely measure the effect of a wide range of concentrations of single or combinations of two or more soluble signals on bacterial biofilm formation and development. We also constructed a synthetic biofilm circuit that utilizes the Hha and BdcA dispersal proteins of E. coli along with a quorum sensing (QS) switch that works based on the accumulation of the signal N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-o-C12HSL) and implemented it in an upgraded ?BF device. We showed that a QS system may be utilized with biofilm dispersal proteins to control consortial biofilm formation by removing an existing biofilm and then removing the biofilm that displaced the first one. These types of synthetic QS circuits may be used to pattern biofilms by facilitating the re-use of platforms and to create sophisticated reactor systems that will be used to form bio-refineries.

Hegde, Manjunath

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Multifunctional Metallic and Refractory Materials for Energy Efficient Handling of Molten Metals  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project was to extend the lifetime of hardware submerged in molten metal by an order of magnitude and to improve energy efficiency of molten metal handling process. Assuming broad implementation of project results, energy savings in 2020 were projected to be 10 trillion BTU/year, with cost savings of approximately $100 million/year. The project team was comprised of materials research groups from West Virginia University and the Missouri University of Science and Technology formerly University of Missouri Rolla, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Secat and Energy Industries of Ohio. Industry partners included six suppliers to the hot dip galvanizing industry, four end-user steel companies with hot-dip Galvanize and/or Galvalume lines, eight refractory suppliers, and seven refractory end-user companies. The results of the project included the development of: (1) New families of materials more resistant to degradation in hot-dip galvanizing bath conditions were developed; (2) Alloy 2020 weld overlay material and process were developed and applied to GI rolls; (3) New Alloys and dross-cleaning procedures were developed for Galvalume processes; (4) Two new refractory compositions, including new anti-wetting agents, were identified for use with liquid aluminum alloys; (5) A new thermal conductivity measurement technique was developed and validated at ORNL; (6) The Galvanizing Energy Profiler Decision Support System (GEPDSS)at WVU; Newly Developed CCW Laser Cladding Shows Better Resistance to Dross Buildup than 316L Stainless Steel; and (7) A novel method of measuring the corrosion behavior of bath hardware materials. Project in-line trials were conducted at Southwire Kentucky Rod and Cable Mill, Nucor-Crawfordsville, Nucor-Arkansas, Nucor-South Carolina, Wheeling Nisshin, California Steel, Energy Industries of Ohio, and Pennex Aluminum. Cost, energy, and environmental benefits resulting from the project are due to: i) a reduced number of process shutdowns to change hardware or lining material, ii) reduced need to produce new hardware or lining material, iii) improved product quality leads to reduced need to remake product or manufacturing of new product, iv) reduction in contamination of melt from degradation of refractory and metallic components, v) elimination of worn hardware will increase efficiency of process, vi) reduced refractory lining deterioration or formation of a less insulating phase, would result in decreased heat loss through the walls. Projected 2015 benefits for the U.S. aluminum industry, assuming 21% market penetration of improved refractory materials, are energy savings of approximately 0.2 trillion BTU/year, cost savings of $2.3 billion/year and carbon reductions of approximately 1.4 billion tons/year. The carbon reduction benefit of the project for the hot-dip galvanize and aluminum industries combined is projected to be approximately 2.2 billion tons/year in 2015. Pathways from research to commercialization were based on structure of the projects industrial partnerships. These partnerships included suppliers, industrial associations, and end users. All parties were involved in conducting the project including planning and critiquing the trials. Supplier companies such as Pyrotech Metaullics, Stoody, and Duraloy have commercialized products and processes developed on the project.

Xingbo Liu; Ever Barbero; Bruce Kang; Bhaskaran Gopalakrishnan; James Headrick; Carl Irwin

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom and Switzerland), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report outlines the current design status of the GFR, and includes work done in the areas mentioned above for this fiscal year. In addition, this report fulfills the Level 2 milestones, ''Complete annual status report on GFR reactor design'', and ''Complete annual status report on pre-conceptual GFR reactor designs'' in work package GI0401K01. GFR funding for FY05 included FY04 carryover funds, and was comprised of multiple tasks. These tasks involved a consortium of national laboratories and universities, including the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Auburn University (AU), Idaho State University (ISU), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-M). The total funding for FY05 was $1000K, with FY04 carryover of $174K. The cost breakdown can be seen in Table 1.

K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems that are designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed the validity of physicist G.I. Taylor's 1938 frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) 5-megawatt turbine model to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution was applied to a frozen wind field that was used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements were also evaluated using a large eddy simulation (LES) of a stable boundary layer that was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The LIDAR measurement scenario investigated consists of a hub-mounted LIDAR that scans a circle of points upwind of the turbine in order to estimate the wind speed component in the mean wind direction. Different combinations of the preview distance that is located upwind of the rotor and the radius of the scan circle were analyzed. It was found that the dominant source of measurement error for short preview distances is the detection of transverse and vertical wind speeds from the line-of-sight LIDAR measurement. It was discovered in previous studies that, in the absence of wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances is the spatial averaging caused by the LIDAR's sampling volume. However, by introducing wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances was found to be the coherence loss caused by evolving turbulence. Different measurement geometries were compared using the bandwidth for which the measurement coherence remained above 0.5 and also the area under the measurement coherence curve. Results showed that, by increasing the intensity of wind evolution, the measurement coherence decreases. Using the coherence bandwidth metric, the optimal preview distance for a fixed-scan radius remained almost constant for low and moderate amounts of wind evolution. For the wind field with the simple wind evolution model introduced, the optimal preview distance for a scan radius of 75% blade span (47.25 meters) was found to be 80 meters. Using the LES wind field, the optimal preview distance was 65 meters. When comparing scan geometries using the area under the coherence curve, results showed that, as the intensity of wind evolution increases, the optimal preview distance decreases.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.; Kelley, N.; Jonkman, B.; Frehlich, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z