National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hvac heating ventilation

  1. Multi-objective optimization of the HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) system performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Multi-objective optimization of the HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) system, ventilation, and air conditioning) system in a typical office facility is presented. A multi-layer perceptron. 1. Introduction HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) systems are designed to maintain

  2. Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel

  3. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of an HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system for Building 3862

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of an HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system for Building 3862

  4. MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in supplying ventilation and air conditioning. This paper explores mechanisms that cause particle deposition energy and indoor air quality degradation for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems

  5. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

  6. Value impact analysis of Generic Issue 143, Availability of Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Chilled Water Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Marler, J.E.; Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.; Friley, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This study evaluates the values (benefits) and impacts (costs) associated with potential resolutions to Generic Issue 143, ``Availability of HVAC and Chilled Water Systems.`` The study identifies vulnerabilities related to failures of HVAC, chilled water, and room cooling systems; develops estimates of room heatup rates and safety-related equipment vulnerabilities following losses of HVAC/room cooler systems; develops estimates of the core damage frequencies and public risks associated with failures of these systems; develops three proposed resolution strategies to this generic issue; and performs a value/impact analysis of the proposed resolutions. Existing probabilistic risk assessments for four representative plants, including one plant from each vendor, form the basis for the core damage frequency and public risk calculations. Both internal and external events were considered. It was concluded that all three proposed resolution strategies exceed the $1,000/person-rem cost-effectiveness ratio. Additional evaluations were performed to develop ``generic`` insights on potential design-related and configuration-related vulnerabilities and potential high-frequency ({approximately}1E-04/RY) accident sequences that involve failures of HVAC/room cooling functions. It was concluded that, although high-frequency accident sequences may exist at some plants, these high-frequency sequences are plant-specific in nature or have been resolved through hardware and/or operational changes. The plant-specific Individual Plant Examinations are an effective vehicle for identification and resolution of these plant-specific anomalies and hardware configurations.

  7. Microsoft Word - HVAC_20100824.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design for the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility's heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. Critical to facility operations, the HVAC system will...

  8. Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices 2012 DOE...

  9. Predicting particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, J A; Nazaroff, William W

    2003-01-01

    Processing 75 (1), 121-127. Muyshondt, A. , Nutter, D. ,Bott and Bemrose, 1983; Muyshondt et al. , 1998). However,HVAC heat exchanger fouling (Muyshondt et al. , 1998). It is

  10. CO2 - Based Demand-Controlled Ventilation Control Strategies for Multi-Zone HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.

    2011-01-01

    CO2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV strategy offers a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC systems while providing the required ventilation. However, implementing CO2-based DCV under ASHRAE 62.1.2004 through 2010...

  11. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Tony Bouza, U.S. Department of Energy View...

  12. Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2004-01-01

    Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy (IVSE) Field StudyImproving Ventilation and Saving Energy (IVSE) Field StudyImproving Ventilation and Saving Energy (IVSE) Field Study

  13. Gray-box model for energy-efficient selection of set point hysteresis in heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Energy efficiency Gray-box model a b s t r a c t Many heating, ventilation, air conditioning by Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVAC­R) systems [1]. HVAC­R energy consumption, for instance, may use up to 80% of the total energy consumed in the supermarket [3]. Moreover, Air Conditioning

  14. Heat recovery and the economizer for HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anantapantula, V.S. . Alco Controls Div.); Sauer, H.J. Jr. )

    1994-11-01

    This articles examines why a combined heat reclaim/economizer system with priority to heat reclaim operation is most likely to result in the least annual total HVAC energy. PC-based, hour-by-hour simulation programs evaluate annual HVAC energy requirements when using combined operation of heat reclaim and economizer cycle, while giving priority to operation of either one. These simulation programs also enable the design engineer to select the most viable heat reclaim and/or economizer system for any given type of HVAC system serving the building internal load level, building geographical location and other building/system variables.

  15. Modeling particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Fouling of fin-and-tube heat exchangers by particle deposition leads to diminished effectiveness in supplying ventilation and air conditioning. This paper explores mechanisms that cause particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces. We present a model that accounts for impaction, diffusion, gravitational settling, and turbulence. Simulation results suggest that some submicron particles deposit in the heat exchanger core, but do not cause significant performance impacts. Particles between 1 and 10 {micro}m deposit with probabilities ranging from 1-20% with fin edge impaction representing the dominant mechanism. Particles larger than 10 {micro}m deposit by impaction on refrigerant tubes, gravitational settling on fin corrugations, and mechanisms associated with turbulent airflow. The model results agree reasonably well with experimental data, but the deposition of larger particles at high velocities is underpredicted. Geometric factors, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy.

  16. Cooling and Dehumidification HVAC Technology for 1990s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Desiccant Cooling and Dehumidification HVAC Technology for 1990s HVAC: Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Desiccant Cooling Group Solar Energy Research Institute Golden, Colorado #12;Table of Contents * Background and Fundamentals * SERI Desiccant Research * Status of Desiccant Technology * Future

  17. Pre-Commercial Demonstration of Cost-Effective Advanced HVAC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Center Optimal control coordination of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment can reduce energy by more than 20% over current building...

  18. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder P% postconsumer waste #12;iii Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot

  19. ETME 422 -REFRIGERATION & HVAC SYSTEMS FALL 2011 LEC -10:00 -10:50am M W F RH 312

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    , fans, compressors, heat exchangers, heaters, refrigerators, etc.) of heating, ventilation, air Load - Introduction HVAC Systems Comfort and Health Solar Radiation Radiant Time Series Method Moist

  20. Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes - Business Case Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D

    2007-05-01

    The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Dramatic efficiency improvements are necessary to enable progress toward the NZEH goals, and will require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, 'HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment', ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. Table 1 summarizes the energy savings potential of the highest scoring options from the 2005 study for all five locations. All system options were scored by the ORNL building equipment research team and by William Goetzler of Navigant Consulting. These scores were reviewed by DOE/BT's Residential Integration program leaders and Building America team members. Based on these results, the two centrally ducted integrated heat pump (IHP) systems (air source and ground source versions) were selected for advancement to Stage 2 (Exploratory Development) business case assessments in FY06. This report describes results of these business case assessments. It is a compilation of three separate reports describing the initial business case study (Baxter 2006a), an update to evaluate the impact of an economizer cooling option (Baxter 2006b), and a second update to evaluate the impact of a winter humidification option (Baxter 2007). In addition it reports some corrections made subsequent to release of the first two reports to correct so

  1. Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on biological contamination on HVAC coils. Muyshondt et al. (1998) discuss the HVAC system as both a source

  2. Commercial HVAC and Water-Heating Equipment Minimum Efficiency Standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasseri, Cyrus H.; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2001-08-01

    ABSTRACT In 1992, Federal legislation mandated that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) set the efficiency levels in the then-current ASHRAE Standard 90.1 as mandatory minimums for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and service water-heating (SWH) equipment sold in the U.S. market, as well as a process for revising the minimum equipment efficiency standards to comply with requirements in an updated Standard 90.1. Because Standard 90.1 was updated in October 1999 (Standard 90.1-1999), DOE is now undertaking a rulemaking process for these equipment categories. In January 2001, DOE published a final rule adopting Standard 90.1-1999 levels as uniform national standards for 18 product categories of commercial HVAC and SWH equipment. For 11 other categories of commercial products, DOE has signaled its intention to consider more stringent standards than those adopted by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE). DOE has now initiated a formal rulemaking process to further analyze these equipment categories.

  3. Fouling of HVAC fin and tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, Jeffrey; Carey, Van P.

    2001-07-01

    Fin and tube heat exchangers are used widely in residential, commercial and industrial HVAC applications. Invariably, indoor and outdoor air contaminants foul these heat exchangers. This fouling can cause decreased capacity and efficiency of the HVAC equipment as well as indoor air quality problems related to microbiological growth. This paper describes laboratory studies to investigate the mechanisms that cause fouling. The laboratory experiments involve subjecting a 4.7 fins/cm (12 fins/inch) fin and tube heat exchanger to an air stream that contains monodisperse particles. Air velocities ranging from 1.5-5.2 m/s (295 ft/min-1024 ft/min) and particle sizes from 1--8.6 {micro}m are used. The measured fraction of particles that deposit as well as information about the location of the deposited material indicate that particles greater than about 1 {micro}m contribute to fouling. These experimental results are used to validate a scaling analysis that describes the relative importance of several deposition mechanisms including impaction, Brownian diffusion, turbophoresis, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and gravitational settling. The analysis is extended to apply to different fin spacings and particle sizes typical of those found in indoor air.

  4. Expert system for the design of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, P.J.

    1989-12-01

    Expert systems are computer programs that seek to mimic human reason. An expert system shelf, a software program commonly used for developing expert systems in a relatively short time, was used to develop a prototypical expert system for the design of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings. Because HVAC design involves several related knowledge domains, developing an expert system for HVAC design requires the integration of several smaller expert systems known as knowledge bases. A menu program and several auxiliary programs for gathering data, completing calculations, printing project reports, and passing data between the knowledge bases are needed and have been developed to join the separate knowledge bases into one simple-to-use program unit.

  5. RF propagation in an HVAC duct system: impulse response characteristics of the channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    RF propagation in an HVAC duct system: impulse response characteristics of the channel Pavel V, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) duct system in buildings is a complex network of hollow at RF and microwave frequencies of com- mon interest. HVAC ducts can be used as a wireless communication

  6. Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    AE26 Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1 D. E and preventive maintenance procedures for ventilation, evaporative cooling and heating systems. Ventilation a ventilation system is not operating properly, the results can be pockets of stagnant air, inadequate cooling

  7. Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and water heating products into tables that mirror American Society of...

  8. Natural Refrigerant High-Performance Heat Pump for Commercial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (DE-FOA-0000823) Project Objective This project aims to develop a regenerative air source heat pump for commercial and industrial heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC)...

  9. Strategy Guideline: Transitioning HVAC Companies to Whole House Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2012-05-01

    This report describes the findings from research IBACOS conducted related to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) companies who have made the decision to transition to whole house performance contracting (WHPC).

  10. A Quasi-Dynamic HVAC and Building Simulation Methodology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Clinton Paul

    2012-07-16

    This thesis introduces a quasi-dynamic building simulation methodology which complements existing building simulators by allowing transient models of HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems to be created in an analogous way...

  11. Strategy Guideline. Transitioning HVAC Companies to Whole House Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Arlan

    2012-05-01

    This report describes the findings from research IBACOS conducted related to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) companies who have made the decision to transition to whole house performance contracting (WHPC).

  12. Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D

    2006-11-01

    The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Dramatic efficiency improvements are necessary to enable progress toward the NZEH goals, and will require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, 'HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment,' ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. Table 1 summarizes the energy savings potential of the highest scoring options from the 2005 study for all five locations.

  13. 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification...

  14. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Residential Building Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetzler, William; Zogg, Robert; Young, Jim; Schmidt, Justin

    2012-10-01

    This report is an assessment of 135 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. residential buildings to identify and provide analysis on 19 priority technology options in various stages of development. The analyses include an estimation of technical energy-savings potential, descriptions of technical maturity, descriptions of non-energy benefits, descriptions of current barriers for market adoption, and descriptions of the technology's applicability to different building or HVAC equipment types. From these technology descriptions, are suggestions for potential research, development and demonstration (RD&D) initiatives that would support further development of the priority technology options.

  15. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Commercial Building Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report covers an assessment of 182 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. commercial buildings to identify and provide analysis on 17 priority technology options in various stages of development. The analyses include an estimation of technical energy-savings potential, description of technical maturity, description of non-energy benefits, description of current barriers for market adoption, and description of the technology’s applicability to different building or HVAC equipment types. From these technology descriptions, are suggestions for potential research, development and demonstration (RD&D) initiatives that would support further development of the priority technology options.

  16. Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Ian

    2001-09-01

    Many biologically active materials are transported as bioaerosols 1-10 {micro}m in diameter. These particles can deposit on cooling and heating coils and lead to serious indoor air quality problems. This paper investigates several of the mechanisms that lead to aerosol deposition on fin and tube heat exchangers. A model has been developed that incorporates the effects of several deposition mechanisms, including impaction, Brownian and turbulent diffusion, turbophoresis, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and gravitational settling. The model is applied to a typical range of air velocities that are found in commercial and residential HVAC systems 1 - 6 m/s (200 - 1200 ft/min), particle diameters from 1 - 8 {micro}m, and fin spacings from 3.2 - 7.9 fins/cm (8 - 16 fins/inch or FPI). The results from the model are compared to results from an experimental apparatus that directly measures deposition on a 4.7 fins/cm (12 FPI) coil. The model agrees reasonably well with this measured data and suggests that cooling coils are an important sink for biological aerosols and consequently a potential source of indoor air quality problems.

  17. Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts point to serve one floor and its staircase region achieves the best handover performance for IWN]. An alternative approach to transmitt/receive the RF signal is to use heating, ventilation, and airconditioning

  18. Minimization of energy consumption in HVAC systems with data-driven models and an interior-point method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    -driven approach is applied to minimize energy consumption of a heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems have been recognized as major consumers of energy air conditioning system. Parameshwaran et al. [9] developed a genetic fuzzy optimization method

  19. Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain

    2001-01-01

    ASHRAE IAQ ’88, pp. 10-24. Muyshondt, A. , D. Nutter, and M.contamination on HVAC coils. Muyshondt et al. (1998) discussdynamic simulations of Muyshondt et al. (1998). The current

  20. Fouling of HVAC Fin and Tube Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Van P. Carey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-47668 Fouling of HVAC Fin and Tube Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Van P. Carey FIN AND TUBE HEAT EXCHANGERS Jeffrey Siegel1,2 and Van P. Carey2 1 Lawrence Berkeley National, USA; E-mail: vcarey@euler.me.berkeley.edu ABSTRACT Fin and tube heat exchangers are used widely

  1. ASHRAE $1000 Scholarship Application (02/26/2013) The Utah Chapter of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Berg, Jur

    of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers is offering multiple $1,000 scholarships automation or controls, heating, ventilating, refrigeration or air conditioning (HVAC) principles are invited

  2. Dynamic Modeling and Wavelet-Based Multi-Parametric Tuning and Validation for HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shuangshuang

    2014-07-10

    Dynamic Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system models are used for the purpose of control design, fault detection and diagnosis, system analysis, design and optimization. Therefore, ensuring the accuracy ...

  3. Development of HVAC System Performance Criteria Using Factorial Design and DOE-2 Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, D.; Jones, J. W.; Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    A new approach is described for the development of Heating, Ventilating, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) System Performance Criteria for the Texas Building Energy Design Standard. This approach integrates a design of experimental methodology and DOE-2...

  4. Direct Digital Control- A Tool for Energy Management of HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, K.

    1993-01-01

    Direct digital control (DDC) applied to heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems corrects many of the deficiencies of conventional automatic temperature control systems. By applying new control sequences, ...

  5. Seamless Handover in Buildings Using HVAC Ducts: A New System Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    Seamless Handover in Buildings Using HVAC Ducts: A New System Architecture Ariton E. Xhafa, Paisarn ducts for wireless communications. The proposed solution is based on a new system architecture design of the indoor wireless networks that use the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts

  6. Detection and diagnosis of faults and energy monitoring of HVAC systems with least-intrusive power analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Dong, 1966-

    2001-01-01

    Faults indicate degradation or sudden failure of equipment in a system. Widely existing in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, faults always lead to inefficient energy consumption, undesirable indoor ...

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY AMONG HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM, COMPLETE GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND CONVENTIONAL HVAC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Zhu; Yong X. Tao

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, a hotel with hybrid geothermal heat pump system (HyGSHP) in the Pensacola is selected and simulated by the transient simulation software package TRNSYS [1]. To verify the simulation results, the validations are conducted by using the monthly average entering water temperature, monthly facility consumption data, and etc. And three types of HVAC systems are compared based on the same building model and HVAC system capacity. The results are presented to show the advantages and disadvantages of HyGSHP compared with the other two systems in terms of energy consumptions, life cycle cost analysis.

  8. Advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration systems—An overview: Part I: Hard control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

    2011-02-01

    A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) is presented in this article. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and on the fusion or hybrid of hard- and soft-control techniques. Thus, it is to be noted that the terminology “hard” and “soft” computing/control has nothing to do with the “hardware” and “software” that is being generally used. Part I of a two-part series focuses on hard-control strategies, and Part II focuses on softand fusion-control in addition to some future directions in HVAC&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omission of other works is purely unintentional.

  9. Combined solar and internal load effects on selection of heat reclaim-economizer HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, H.J. Jr.; Howell, R.H.; Wang, Z. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    The concern for energy conservation has led to the development and use of heat recovery systems which reclaim the building internal heat before it is discarded in the exhaust air. On the other hand, economizer cycles have been widely used for many years in a variety of types of HVAC systems. Economizer cycles are widely accepted as a means to reduce operating time for chilling equipment when cool outside air is available. It has been suggested that heat reclaim systems should not be used in conjunction with an HVAC system which incorporates an economizer cycle because the economizer operation would result in heat being exhausted which might have been recovered. Others suggest that the economizer cycle can be used economically in a heat recovery system if properly controlled to maintain an overall building heat balance. This study looks at potential energy savings of such combined systems with particular emphasis on the effects of the solar load (amount of glass) and the internal load level (lights, people, appliances, etc.). For systems without thermal storage, annual energy savings of up to 60 percent are predicted with the use of heat reclaim systems in conjunction with economizers when the heat reclaim has priority. These results demonstrate the necessity of complete engineering evaluations if proper selection and operation of combined heat recovery and economizer cycles are to be obtained. This paper includes the basic methodology for making such evaluations.

  10. A testing and HVAC design methodology for air-to-air heat pipe heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, P.; Ciepliski, D.L.; Besant, R.W. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Air-to-air heat pipe heat exchangers were tested using ASHRAE Standard 84-1991 as a guide. Some changes are introduced for the test facility and methods of calculating effectiveness. ASME PTC 19.1-1985 is used as a guide for uncertainty analysis. Tests were done for a range of mass flux [1.574 to 2.912 kg/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s)], ratios of mass flow rates (0.6 to 1.85), supply air temperatures ({minus}10 C to 40 C), and heat exchanger tilt angles ({minus}8.9{degree} to 11.2{degree}). Because humidity changes in the exhaust and supply air streams were negligible, only the effectiveness of sensible and of total energy was considered. Measured and calculated results show significant variations in the effectiveness of sensible and of total energy, and uncertainties with each independent variable. For balanced exhaust and supply flow rates at {minus}10 C supply air temperature and 1.574 kg/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s) mass flux, the measured effectiveness for sensible and total energy was calculated to be 0.48 and 0.44, respectively, with uncertainties of 0.057 and 0.052. These measurements decreased to 0.42 and 0.37, with uncertainties of 0.016 and 0.018 for a mass flux of 2.912 kg/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s). Because water vapor condensation effects were small or negligible, the difference between the effectiveness for the sensible and total energy was within the overlapping uncertainty range of each. Based on counterflow heat exchanger theory and convective heat transfer equations, expressions are presented to extrapolate the effectiveness data between and beyond the measured data points. These effectiveness equations, which represent the variation in effectiveness with several independent operating variables, are used for HVAC design that is aimed at achieving minimum life-cycle costs.

  11. Continuous Energy Management of the HVAC&R System in an Office Building System Operation and Energy Consumption for the Eight Years after Building Completion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akashi, Y.; Shinozaki, M.; Kusuda, R.; Ito, S.

    2006-01-01

    The authors continuously studied the energy consumption of a heating, ventilating, air- conditioning and refrigerating (HVAC&R) system in an office for the operation of the system in terms of its expected performance. A fault in the system control...

  12. VOLUME 11, NUMBER 2 HVAC&R RESEARCH APRIL 2005 Ground-Source Heat Pump System Research--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VOLUME 11, NUMBER 2 HVAC&R RESEARCH APRIL 2005 165 EDITORIAL Ground-Source Heat Pump System Research-- Past, Present, and Future J.D. Spitler, PhD, PE Fellow ASHRAE Ground-source heat pump (GSHP to Heinrich Zoelly is the first known reference to ground-source heat pump systems.2 In the US, some ground-source

  13. The Effect of Optimal Tuning of the Heating/Cooling Curve in AHU of HVAC System in Real Practice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    TNO Bouw, The Netherlands Page: 1 of 12 THE EFFECT OF OPTIMAL TUNING OF THE HEATING-/ COOLING CURVE IN AHU OF HVAC SYSTEM IN REAL PRACTISE P.A. (Bert) Elkhuizen(1), J.E. (Jan Ewout) Scholten(1), H.C. (Henk) Peitsman(1), A (Ad) Kooijman (2... of the heating/ cooling curve in the central Air Handling Unit?s (AHU?s) of HVAC systems without loss of comfort. In most cases the number of complaints will also be reduced. The method can be used in both new and existing buildings. The approach will generate...

  14. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    outside pump circulating heat transfer fluid air make-up inside exhaust 24 Cogged V Belts A major N.C. Manufacturer Tested 2-17 Months (yr 1985) .052KWH (.13 EP) 2700 Hours...

  15. Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes -- Update to Include Analyses of an Economizer Option and Alternative Winter Water Heating Control Option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D

    2006-12-01

    The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Dramatic efficiency improvements are necessary to enable progress toward the NZEH goals, and will require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment, ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. In 2006, the two top-ranked options from the 2005 study, air-source and ground-source versions of an integrated heat pump (IHP) system, were subjected to an initial business case study. The IHPs were subjected to a more rigorous hourly-based assessment of their performance potential compared to a baseline suite of equipment of legally minimum efficiency that provided the same heating, cooling, water heating, demand dehumidification, and ventilation services as the IHPs. Results were summarized in a project report, Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes, ORNL/TM-2006/130 (Baxter 2006). The present report is an update to that document. Its primary purpose is to summarize results of an analysis of the potential of adding an outdoor air economizer operating mode to the IHPs to take advantage of free cooling (using outdoor air to cool the house) whenever possible. In addition it provides some additional detail for an alternative winter water heating/space heating (WH/S

  16. Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

  17. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £Space Heating

  18. Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH), Four Pipe Fan Coil Unit (FC), Four Pipe Induction Unit (FI), and Single Zone (SZ) Systems, Revised June 2002 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Saman, N. F.

    2001-01-01

    This report contains engineering calculations for seven (7) air-side, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems (HVAC) systems, including: dual duct constant volume (DDCAV), dual duct variable volume (DDVAV), ...

  19. Energy-Efficient Building HVAC Control Using Hybrid System LBMPC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aswani, Anil; Taneja, Jay; Krioukov, Andrew; Culler, David; Tomlin, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Improving the energy-efficiency of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems has the potential to realize large economic and societal benefits. This paper concerns the system identification of a hybrid system model of a building-wide HVAC system and its subsequent control using a hybrid system formulation of learning-based model predictive control (LBMPC). Here, the learning refers to model updates to the hybrid system model that incorporate the heating effects due to occupancy, solar effects, outside air temperature (OAT), and equipment, in addition to integrator dynamics inherently present in low-level control. Though we make significant modeling simplifications, our corresponding controller that uses this model is able to experimentally achieve a large reduction in energy usage without any degradations in occupant comfort. It is in this way that we justify the modeling simplifications that we have made. We conclude by presenting results from experiments on our building HVAC testbed, which s...

  20. FAULT DETECTION IN HVAC SYSTEMS USING MODEL-BASED FEEDFORWARD CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    the controller with a simulated dual-duct air-handling unit. We also discuss recent experiences of implementing, Comfort/Energy, Control/Simulation/Field Tests, Air-Conditioning Systems, Feedforward Control, Diagnostics 1 INTRODUCTION Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are typically controlled

  1. Duty-Cycling Buildings Aggressively: The Next Frontier in HVAC Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    network across an entire floor of a university building and our data shows several periods of low energy savings of 7.59% to 12.85% for the HVAC system by controlling just one floor of our four floor- sumers can be lighting, computing infrastructure, or what is most often the case, heating ventilation

  2. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 14 - HVAC. A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Hand, James R.; Love, Pat M.

    2011-08-01

    This guide, which is part of a series of Best Practices guides produced by DOE’s Building America program, describes ways homeowners can reduce their energy costs and improve the comfort, health, and safety of their homes by upgrading their heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment.

  3. Theoretical Minimum Energy Use of a Building HVAC System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanskyi, O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the theoretical minimum energy use required by the HVAC system in a particular code compliant office building. This limit might be viewed as the "Carnot Efficiency" for HVAC system. It assumes that all ventilation and air...

  4. Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes - Update to Include Evaluation of Impact of Including a Humidifier Option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D

    2007-02-01

    The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment, ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. In 2006, the two top-ranked options from the 2005 study, air-source and ground-source versions of a centrally ducted integrated heat pump (IHP) system, were subjected to an initial business case study. The IHPs were subjected to a more rigorous hourly-based assessment of their performance potential compared to a baseline suite of equipment of legally minimum efficiency that provided the same heating, cooling, water heating, demand dehumidification, and ventilation services as the IHPs. Results were summarized in a project report, Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes, ORNL/TM-2006/130 (Baxter 2006a). The present report is an update to that document which summarizes results of an analysis of the impact of adding a humidifier to the HVAC system to maintain minimum levels of space relative humidity (RH) in winter. The space RH in winter has direct impact on occupant comfort and on control of dust mites, many types of disease bacteria, and 'dry air' electric shocks. Chapter 8 in ASHRAE's 2005 Handbook of Fundamentals (HOF) suggests a 30% lower limit on RH for indoor temperatures in the range of {approx}68-69F based on comfort (ASHRAE 2005). Table 3 in chapter 9 of the same reference suggests a 30-55% RH range for winter as established by a Canadian study of exposure limits for residential indoor environments (EHD 1987). Harriman, et al (2001) note that for RH levels of 35% or higher, electrostatic shocks are minimized and that dust mites cannot live at RH levels below 40%. They also indicate that many disease bacteria life spans are minimized when space RH is held within a 30-60% range. From the foregoing it is reasonable to assume that a winter space RH range of 30-40% would be an acceptable compromise between comfort considerations and limitation of growth rates for dust mites and many bacteria. In addition it reports som

  5. Comparison of freezing control strategies for residential air-to-air heat recovery ventilators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, E.G.; Bradley, L.C. ); Chant, R.E. ); Fisher, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison of the energy performance of defrost and frost control strategies for residential air-to-air heat recovery ventilators (HRV) has been carried out by using computer simulations for various climatic conditions. This paper discusses the results and conclusions from the comparisons and their implications for the heat recovery ventilator manufacturers and system designers.

  6. Particle loading rates for HVAC filters, heat exchangers, and ducts Nomenclature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    particle mass emission rate distribution func- tion for resuspension (mg/lm h) Es particle mass emission The results in this paper suggest important factors that lead to particle deposition on HVAC components

  7. Economic Analysis and Optimization of Exterior Insulation Requirements for Ventilated Buildings at Power Generation Facilities with High Internal Heat Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Douglas E.

    2010-12-17

    Industrial buildings require a large amount of heating and ventilation equipment to maintain the indoor environment within acceptable levels for personnel protection and equipment protection. The required heating and ventilation equipment...

  8. Integrated high efficiency blower apparatus for HVAC systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaoyue; Weigman, Herman; Wang, Shixiao

    2007-07-24

    An integrated centrifugal blower wheel for a heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) blower unit includes a first blade support, a second blade support, and a plurality of S-shaped blades disposed between the first and second blade supports, wherein each of the S-shaped blades has a trailing edge bent in a forward direction with respect to a defined direction of rotation of the wheel.

  9. The Impact of CO2-Based Demand-Controlled Ventilation on Energy Consumptions for Air Source Heat Pumps in Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AlRaees, N.; Nassif, N.

    2013-01-01

    There have been increasingly growing concerns for many years over the quality of the air inside buildings and the associated energy use. The CO2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV offers a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC...

  10. Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water Heating, Appliances, and Low-GWP Refrigerants Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water...

  11. Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Category B: a survey of decision-makers in the HVAC marketplace. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of the market for solar heating and cooling products for new and retrofit markets is reported. The emphasis is on the analysis of solar knowledge among HVAC decision makers and a comprehensive evaluation of their solar attitudes and behavior. The data from each of the following sectors are described and analyzed: residential consumers, organizational and manufacturing buildings, HVAC engineers and architects, builders/developers, and commercial/institutional segments. (MHR)

  12. Proposed Adjudication of the Contract for the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Installations for the ISR Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1968-01-01

    Proposed Adjudication of the Contract for the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Installations for the ISR Buildings

  13. Chapter 19: HVAC Controls (DDC/EMS/BAS) Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romberger, J.

    2014-11-01

    The HVAC Controls Evaluation Protocol is designed to address evaluation issues for direct digital controls/energy management systems/building automation systems (DDC/EMS/BAS) that are installed to control heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in commercial and institutional buildings. (This chapter refers to the DDC/EMS/BAS measure as HVAC controls.) This protocol may also be applicable to industrial facilities such as clean rooms and labs, which have either significant HVAC equipment or spaces requiring special environmental conditions. This protocol addresses only HVAC-related equipment and the energy savings estimation methods associated with installing such control systems as an energy efficiency measure. The affected equipment includes: Air-side equipment (air handlers, direct expansion systems, furnaces, other heating- and cooling-related devices, terminal air distribution equipment, and fans); Central plant equipment (chillers, cooling towers, boilers, and pumps). These controls may also operate or affect other end uses, such as lighting, domestic hot water, irrigation systems, and life safety systems such as fire alarms and other security systems. Considerable nonenergy benefits, such as maintenance scheduling, system component troubleshooting, equipment failure alarms, and increased equipment lifetime, may also be associated with these systems. When connected to building utility meters, these systems can also be valuable demand-limiting control tools. However, this protocol does not evaluate any of these additional capabilities and benefits.

  14. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-08

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  15. Definition and means of maintaining the ventilation system confinement portion of the PFP safety envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, J.D.; Grover, G.A.; O`Brien, P.M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-05

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant Heating Ventilation and Cooling system provides for the confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and provides for the confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. This document identifies the components and procedures necessary to ensure the HVAC system provides these functions. Appendices E through J provide a snapshot of non-safety class HVAC equipment and need not be updated when the remainder of the document and Appendices A through D are updated.

  16. Evaluation of Existing Technologies for Meeting Residential Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................ 8 4. Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV

  17. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

  18. HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters

  19. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systemsfor Occupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: the EPA BASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2006-10-01

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in office buildings that increase risk of indoor contaminants or reduce effectiveness of ventilation may cause adverse exposures and subsequent increase in these symptoms among occupants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. EPA from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations adjusted for potential personal and building confounders. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and selected HVAC system characteristics. Among factors of HVAC design or configuration: Outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground were associated with approximately doubled odds of most symptoms assessed. Sealed (non-operable) windows were associated with increases in skin and eye symptoms (ORs= 1.9, 1.3, respectively). Outdoor air intake without an intake fan was associated with an increase in eye symptoms (OR=1.7). Local cooling coils were associated with increased headache (OR=1.5). Among factors of HVAC condition, maintenance, or operation: the presence of humidification systems in good condition was associated with an increase in headache (OR=1.4), whereas the presence of humidification systems in poor condition was associated with increases in fatigue/difficulty concentrating, as well as upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=1.8, 1.5). No regularly scheduled inspections for HVAC components was associated with increased eye symptoms, cough and upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=2.2, 1.6, 1.5). Less frequent cleaning of cooling coils or drip pans was associated with increased headache (OR=1.6). Fair or poor condition of duct liner was associated with increased upper respiratory symptoms (OR=1.4). Most of the many potential risk factors assessed here had not been investigated previously, and associations found with single symptoms may have been by chance, including several associations that were the reverse of expected. Risk factors newly identified in these analyses that deserve attention include outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground, lack of operable windows, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lack of scheduled inspection for HVAC systems. Infrequent cleaning of cooling coils and drain pans were associated with increases in several symptoms in these as well as prior analyses of BASE data. Replication of these findings is needed, using more objective measurements of both exposure and health response. Confirmation of the specific HVAC factors responsible for increased symptoms in buildings, and development of prevention strategies could have major public health and economic benefits worldwide.

  20. Variable Refrigerant Flow HVAC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, S.

    2013-01-01

    Variable refrigerant flow technology HVAC CATEE 2013 San Antonio, TX ESL-KT-13-12-33 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 What is the acronym VRF? ? Variable Refrigerant Flow Operates like a... heat pump utilizing VFD Inverter Compressors and LEV’s Unlike conventional commercial and residential HVAC systems in the USA The predominate method of cooling and heating in the world ESL-KT-13-12-33 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency...

  1. Project title: Natural ventilation, solar heating and integrated low-energy building design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-10

    emissions targets. That is why the Cambridge-MIT Institute set up a project to design buildings that consume less energy. The Challenge Their work focuses on the design of energy efficient buildings that use natural ventilation processes, solar... Awards E-stack brings a breath of fresh air to UK schools HOME ABOUT US FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES PROJECTS EDUCATION NEWS EVENTS DOWNLOADS CONTACT US PROJECTS Natural Ventilation Solar Heating and Integrated Low-Energy Building Design SEARCH: Go Page 1...

  2. Identifying Models of HVAC Systems Using Semiparametric Regression Anil Aswani, Neal Master, Jay Taneja, Virginia Smith, Andrew Krioukov, David Culler, and Claire Tomlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAuliffe, Jon

    , and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems use a large amount of energy, and so they are an interesting area models that incorporate such nonlinearities. I. INTRODUCTION Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning for efficiency improvements. The focus here is on the use of semiparametric regression to identify models, which

  3. Discussion of an Optimization Scheme for the Ground Source Heat Pump System of HVAC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu, W.; Wang, S.; Pan, S.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    With the implementation of the global sustainable development strategy, people pay more attention to renewable energy resources such as ground source heat pumps. The technology of ground source heat pump is widely applied to heat and cold...

  4. Quantitative Methods for Comparing Different HVAC Control Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aswani, Anil; Taneja, Jay; Krioukov, Andrew; Culler, David; Tomlin, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Experimentally comparing the energy usage and comfort characteristics of different controllers in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is difficult because variations in weather and occupancy conditions preclude the possibility of establishing equivalent experimental conditions across the order of hours, days, and weeks. This paper is concerned with defining quantitative metrics of energy usage and occupant comfort, which can be computed and compared in a rigorous manner that is capable of determining whether differences between controllers are statistically significant in the presence of such environmental fluctuations. Experimental case studies are presented that compare two alternative controllers (a schedule controller and a hybrid system learning-based model predictive controller) to the default controller in a building-wide HVAC system. Lastly, we discuss how our proposed methodology may also be able to quantify the efficiency of other building automation systems.

  5. Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Non-Vapor-Compression HVAC Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-03-01

    While vapor-compression technologies have served heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) needs very effectively, and have been the dominant HVAC technology for close to 100 years, the conventional refrigerants used in vapor-compression equipment contribute to global climate change when released to the atmosphere. This Building Technologies Office report: --Identifies alternatives to vapor-compression technology in residential and commercial HVAC applications --Characterizes these technologies based on their technical energy savings potential, development status, non-energy benefits, and other factors affecting end-user acceptance and their ability to compete with conventional vapor-compression systems --Makes specific research, development, and deployment (RD&D) recommendations to support further development of these technologies, should DOE choose to support non-vapor-compression technology further.

  6. Energy Renovations: Volume 14: HVAC - A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbride, Theresa L.; Baechler, Michael C.; Hefty, Marye G.; Hand, James R.; Love, Pat M.

    2011-08-29

    This report was prepared by PNNL for DOE's Building America program and is intended as a guide that energy performance contractors can share with homeowners to describe various energy-efficient options for heating, cooling, and ventilating existing homes. The report provides descriptions of many common and not-so-common HVAC systems, including their advantages and disadvantages, efficiency ranges and characteristics of high-performance models, typical costs, and climate considerations. The report also provides decision trees and tables of useful information for homeowners who are making decisions about adding, replacing, or upgrading existing HVAC equipment in their homes. Information regarding home energy performance assessments (audits) and combustion safety issues when replacing HVAC equipment are also provided.

  7. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling[Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses results from TE HVAC project to add detail to a human thermal comfort model and further allow load reduction in the climate control energy through a distributed TE network

  8. Field-Evaluation of Alternative HVAC Strategies to Meet Ventilation, Comfort and Humidity Control Criteria at Three Full-Serve Restaurants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yborra, S. C.; Spears, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Lighting and ventilation represent the majority of the air conditioning loads in office buildings in hot humid climates. Use of motion sensors is one way to minimize the energy used for these loads. This paper describes the methods used...

  9. Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present...

  10. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  11. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. In this project, Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent).

  12. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS IN TANK FARMS OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS DOCUMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERGLIN, E J

    2003-06-23

    This report provides the technical basis for high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) for Hanford tank farm ventilation systems (sometimes known as heating, ventilation and air conditioning [HVAC]) to support limits defined in Process Engineering Operating Specification Documents (OSDs). This technical basis included a review of older technical basis and provides clarifications, as necessary, to technical basis limit revisions or justification. This document provides an updated technical basis for tank farm ventilation systems related to Operation Specification Documents (OSDs) for double-shell tanks (DSTs), single-shell tanks (SSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, and various other miscellaneous facilities.

  13. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £Space HeatingEmerging

  14. Strategic Plan Progress Report Prepared by Energy Division,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...................................................................................................17 6 Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC).........................................19 7

  15. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2011-01-01

    heat recovery ventilator [HRV], central fan integratedfor a period of time. Heat recovery ventilator (HRV).A residential HRV includes both supply and exhaust airflows

  16. Screening Analysis for EPACT-Covered Commercial HVAC and Water-Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, Sriram; Armstrong, Peter R; Belzer, David B; Gaines, Suzanne C; Hadley, Donald L; Smith, David L; Winiarski, David W

    2000-04-25

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) establishes that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulate efficiency levels of certain categories of commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equipment. EPACT establishes the initial minimum efficiency levels for products falling under these categories, based on ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 requirements. EPCA states that, if ASHRAE amends Standard 90.1-1989 efficiency levels, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in the amended Standard 90.1 and that it can establish higher efficiency levels if they would result in significant additional energy savings. 011Standard 90.1-1999 increases minimum efficiency levels for some of the equipment categories covered by EPCA 92. DOE conducted a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential for EPACT-covered products meet and exceeding these levels. This paper describes the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis.

  17. Screening Analysis for EPACT-Covered Commercial HVAC and Water-Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, Sriram; Armstrong, Peter R.; Belzer, David B.; Gaines, Suzanne C.; Hadley, Donald L.; Katipumula, S.; Smith, David L.; Winiarski, David W.

    2000-04-25

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) establishes that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulate efficiency levels of certain categories of commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equip-ment. EPACT establishes the initial minimum efficiency levels for products falling under these categories, based on ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 requirements. EPCA states that, if ASHRAE amends Standard 90.1-1989 efficiency levels, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in the amended Standard 90.1 and that it can establish higher efficiency levels if they would result in significant additional energy savings. Standard 90.1-1999 increases minimum efficiency levels for some of the equipment categories covered by EPCA 92. DOE conducted a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential for EPACT-covered products meet and exceeding these levels. This paper describes the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis.

  18. 2014-12-22 Issuance: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, refrigeration, and water heating equipment , as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on December 22, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  19. Modeling and Simulation of HVAC Faulty Operations and Performance Degradation due to Maintenance Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Liping; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Almost half of the total energy used in the U.S. buildings is consumed by heating, ventilation and air conditionings (HVAC) according to EIA statistics. Among various driving factors to energy performance of building, operations and maintenance play a significant role. Many researches have been done to look at design efficiencies and operational controls for improving energy performance of buildings, but very few study the impacts of HVAC systems maintenance. Different practices of HVAC system maintenance can result in substantial differences in building energy use. If a piece of HVAC equipment is not well maintained, its performance will degrade. If sensors used for control purpose are not calibrated, not only building energy usage could be dramatically increased, but also mechanical systems may not be able to satisfy indoor thermal comfort. Properly maintained HVAC systems can operate efficiently, improve occupant comfort, and prolong equipment service life. In the paper, maintenance practices for HVAC systems are presented based on literature reviews and discussions with HVAC engineers, building operators, facility managers, and commissioning agents. We categorize the maintenance practices into three levels depending on the maintenance effort and coverage: 1) proactive, performance-monitored maintenance; 2) preventive, scheduled maintenance; and 3) reactive, unplanned or no maintenance. A sampled list of maintenance issues, including cooling tower fouling, boiler/chiller fouling, refrigerant over or under charge, temperature sensor offset, outdoor air damper leakage, outdoor air screen blockage, outdoor air damper stuck at fully open position, and dirty filters are investigated in this study using field survey data and detailed simulation models. The energy impacts of both individual maintenance issue and combined scenarios for an office building with central VAV systems and central plant were evaluated by EnergyPlus simulations using three approaches: 1) direct modeling with EnergyPlus, 2) using the energy management system feature of EnergyPlus, and 3) modifying EnergyPlus source code. The results demonstrated the importance of maintenance for HVAC systems on energy performance of buildings. The research is intended to provide a guideline to help practitioners and building operators to gain the knowledge of maintaining HVAC systems in efficient operations, and prioritize HVAC maintenance work plan. The paper also discusses challenges of modeling building maintenance issues using energy simulation programs.

  20. HVAC Equipment Design Options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes (NZEH) -A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D

    2005-11-01

    Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Conventional unitary equipment and system designs have matured to a point where cost-effective, dramatic efficiency improvements that meet near-zero-energy housing (NZEH) goals require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. This report describes results of a scoping assessment of HVAC system options for NZEH homes. ORNL has completed a preliminary adaptation, for consideration by The U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office, Building Technologies (BT) Program, of Cooper's (2001) stage and gate planning process to the HVAC and Water Heating element of BT's multi-year plan, as illustrated in Figure 1. In order to adapt to R&D the Cooper process, which is focused on product development, and to keep the technology development process consistent with an appropriate role for the federal government, the number and content of the stages and gates needed to be modified. The potential federal role in technology development involves 6 stages and 7 gates, but depending on the nature and status of the concept, some or all of the responsibilities can flow to the private sector for product development beginning as early as Gate 3. In the proposed new technology development stage and gate sequence, the Stage 2 'Scoping Assessment' provides the deliverable leading into the Gate 3 'Scoping Assessment Screen'. This report is an example of a Stage 2 deliverable written to document the screening of options against the Gate 3 criteria and to support DOE decision making and option prioritization. The objective of this scoping assessment was to perform a transparent evaluation of the HVAC system options for NZEH based on the applying the Gate 3 criteria uniformly to all options.

  1. Outdoor Air, Heat Wheels and JCPenney: A New Approach to Retail Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, C. S.; Bartlett, T. A.

    1998-01-01

    grains/lbat) Winter 70°F Dry Bulb Ventilation Rates 0.3 cWSF for the 1" Floor 0.2 cWSF for the 2"* Floor Design Electrical Loading 2.3 W/SF average over the sales area - Ambient Design Conditions Summer 95°F Design Dry Bulb 77°F Mean... with the heat wheel were significant at approximately $1 1,000, they were limited by the low utility rate of hs location. Neither the energy charge nor the electrical demand charge were significantly high. This lower utility rate lengthened the simple...

  2. Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1972-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  3. Information Concerning the Contract for the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1974-01-01

    Information Concerning the Contract for the Heating and Ventilation Installations for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  4. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and installation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning facilities for the new "Polymer Laboratory" (Building 771)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and installation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning facilities for the new "Polymer Laboratory" (Building 771)

  5. 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding certification of commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning, water-heating, and refrigeration equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 7, 2014.

  6. General Motors LLC Final Project Report: Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozeman, Jeffrey; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    2014-12-09

    On November 3, 2009, General Motors (GM) accepted U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement award number DE-EE0000014 from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). GM was selected to execute a three-year cost shared research and development project on Solid State Energy Conversion for Vehicular Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC) and for Waste Heat Recovery.

  7. Wireless RF Distribution in Buildings using Heating and Ventilation Ducts Christopher P. Diehl, Benjamin E. Henty, Nikhil Kanodia, and Daniel D. Stancil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    Wireless RF Distribution in Buildings using Heating and Ventilation Ducts Christopher P. Diehl in buildings is proposed in which the heating and ventilation ducts are used as waveguides. Because to a lower-cost system. Initial experimental results are presented that demonstrate duct-assisted propagation

  8. HVAC Market Study:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HVAC Market Study: Understanding how energy efficient products get to market Fall 2014 through Winter 2015 Research Manager: Carrie Cobb, clcobb@bpa.gov, 503-230-4985 HVAC systems...

  9. Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

    2008-06-18

    The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

  10. Airflow reduction during cold weather operation of residential heat recovery ventilators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGugan, C.A.; Edwards, P.F.; Riley, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory measurements of the performance of residential heat recovery ventilators have been carried out for the R-2000 Energy Efficient Home Program. This work was based on a preliminary test procedure developed by the Canadian Standards Association, part of which calls for testing the HRV under cold weather conditions. An environmental chamber was used to simulate outdoor conditions. Initial tests were carried out with an outdoor temperature of -20/sup 0/C; subsequent tests were carried out at a temperature of -25/sup 0/C. During the tests, airflows, temperatures, and relative humidities of airstreams entering and leaving the HRV, along with electric power inputs, were monitored. Frost buildup in the heat exchangers and defrost mechanisms, such as fan shutoff or recirculation, led to reductions in airflows. The magnitude of the reductions is dependent on the design of the heat exchanger and the defrost mechanism used. This paper presents the results of tests performed on a number of HRVs commercially available in Canada at the time of the testing. The flow reductions for the various defrost mechanisms are discussed.

  11. The Histoty of Ventilation and Air Conditioning is CERN Up to Date with the latest Technological Developments?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühnl-Kinel, J

    2000-01-01

    The invention of ventilation cannot be ascribed to a certain date. It started with simple aeration when man brought fire into his abode and continued through different stages including air cooling using ice to finally arrive at the time when ventilation and air conditioning has become an essential part of our life and plays an important role in human evolution. This paper presents the history of ventilation and air conditioning, explains the key constraints over the centuries, and shows its influence on everyday life. Some examples of previous air-conditioning plants are described and different approaches to the way of calculation of ventilation systems discussed. It gives an overview of the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) installations at CERN and points out their particularities. It also compares them with the latest technological developments in the field as well as showing the new trends that are being applied at CERN.

  12. VARIABLE SPEED INTEGRATED INTELLIGENT HVAC BLOWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shixiao Wang; Herman Wiegman; Wilson Wu; John Down; Luana Iorio; Asha Devarajan; Jing Wang; Ralph Carl; Charlie Stephens; Jeannine Jones; Paul Szczesny

    2001-11-14

    This comprehensive topical report discusses the key findings in the development of a intelligent integrated blower for HVAC applications. The benefits of rearward inclined blades over that of traditional forward inclined blades is well documented and a prototype blower design is presented. A comparison of the proposed blower to that of three typical units from the industry is presented. The design of the blower housing is also addressed and the impact of size limitations on static efficiency is discussed. Issues of air flow controllability in the rearward inclined blower is addressed and a solution to this problem is proposed. Several motor design options are discussed including inside-out radial flux designs and novel axial flux designs, all are focused on the various blower needs. The control of the motor-blower and airflow through the use of a high density inverter stage and modern digital signal processor is presented. The key technical challenges of the approach are discussed. The use of the motor as a sensor in the larger heating/ventilating system is also discussed. Diagnostic results for both the motor itself and the blower system are presented.

  13. Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael

    2009-06-17

    This paper presents a freely available Modelica library for building heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The library is based on the Modelica.Fluid library. It has been developed to support research and development of integrated building energy and control systems. The primary applications are controls design, energy analysis and model-based operation. The library contains dynamic and steady-state component models that are applicable for analyzing fast transients when designing control algorithms and for conducting annual simulations when assessing energy performance. For most models, dimensional analysis is used to compute the performance for operating points that differ from nominal conditions. This allows parameterizing models in the absence of detailed geometrical information which is often impractical to obtain during the conceptual design phase of building systems. In the first part of this paper, the library architecture and the main classes are described. In the second part, an example is presented in which we implemented a model of a hydronic heating system with thermostatic radiator valves and thermal energy storage.

  14. ZonePAC: Zonal Power Estimation and Control via HVAC Metering and Occupant Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    Ventillation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems ac- count for nearly 40% of primary energy consumption Measurement, Human Factors, Design Keywords HVAC, Thermostat, Energy Estimation, Variable Air Volume, User buildings [2], and is one of the prime targets for improving building energy efficiency. Several studies

  15. Promising Technology: Demand Control Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand control ventilation (DCV) measures carbon dioxide concentrations in return air or other strategies to measure occupancy, and accurately matches the ventilation requirement. This system reduces ventilation when spaces are vacant or at lower than peak occupancy. When ventilation is reduced, energy savings are accrued because it is not necessary to heat, cool, or dehumidify as much outside air.

  16. Particle deposition from turbulent flow: Review of published research and its applicability to ventilation ducts in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-06-01

    This report reviews published experimental and theoretical investigations of particle deposition from turbulent flows and considers the applicability of this body of work to the specific case of particle deposition from flows in the ducts of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Particle deposition can detrimentally affect the performance of HVAC systems and it influences the exposure of building occupants to a variety of air pollutants. The first section of this report describes the types of HVAC systems under consideration and discusses the components, materials and operating parameters commonly found in these systems. The second section reviews published experimental investigations of particle deposition rates from turbulent flows and considers the ramifications of the experimental evidence with respect to HVAC ducts. The third section considers the structure of turbulent airflows in ventilation ducts with a particular emphasis on turbulence investigations that have been used as a basis for particle deposition models. The final section reviews published literature on predicting particle deposition rates from turbulent flows.

  17. Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under contract Guideline for Residential HVAC Retrofits (http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/building, two of the houses were evaluated by an independent energy efficiency contractor. One of the test

  18. R&D Opportunity Assessment: Joining Technologies in HVAC&R -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HVAC&R More Documents & Publications Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Advanced Rotating Heat Exchangers Working Fluids Low...

  19. Grundfos HVAC OEM Efficient water hydraulics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .7 mio. integrated water circuits are running already in boiler systems . Efficient water hydraulics HVAC complexity ·20 years of experience in hydraulics for the Boiler System industry. ·Key success factor is our of boiler capacity the flow requirements for heat pumps are up to 4 times bigger. With UPML GEO we

  20. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrigan, P.

    2014-03-01

    BSC worked directly with the David Weekley Homes - Houston division to redesign three floor plans in order to locate the HVAC system in conditioned space. The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space. In addition, BSC conducted energy analysis to calculate the most economical strategy for increasing the energy performance of future production houses. This is in preparation for the upcoming code changes in 2015. The builder wishes to develop an upgrade package that will allow for a seamless transition to the new code mandate. The following research questions were addressed by this research project: 1. What is the most cost effective, best performing and most easily replicable method of locating ducts inside conditioned space for a hot-humid production home builder that constructs one and two story single family detached residences? 2. What is a cost effective and practical method of achieving 50% source energy savings vs. the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for a hot-humid production builder? 3. How accurate are the pre-construction whole house cost estimates compared to confirmed post construction actual cost? BSC and the builder developed a duct design strategy that employs a system of dropped ceilings and attic coffers for moving the ductwork from the vented attic to conditioned space. The furnace has been moved to either a mechanical closet in the conditioned living space or a coffered space in the attic.

  1. 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  2. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrigan, P.

    2014-03-01

    Building Science Corporation (BSC) worked directly with the David Weekley Homes - Houston division to develop a cost-effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space. In addition, BSC conducted energy analysis to calculate the most economical strategy for increasing the energy performance of future production houses in preparation for the upcoming code changes in 2015. This research project addressed the following questions: 1. What is the most cost effective, best performing and most easily replicable method of locating ducts inside conditioned space for a hot-humid production home builder that constructs one and two story single family detached residences? 2. What is a cost effective and practical method of achieving 50% source energy savings vs. the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for a hot-humid production builder? 3. How accurate are the pre-construction whole house cost estimates compared to confirmed post construction actual cost?

  3. Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

    2011-07-31

    The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

  4. Optimization of the Fin Heat Pipe for Ventilating and Air Conditioning with a Genetic Algorithm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper illustrates that use of a heat pipe as a heat-reclaiming device can significantly influence the air-conditioning system. It analyzes the heat transfer model of the uniform annular fin heat pipe under the condition of air conditioning...

  5. Building HVAC Requirements Overview Page 4-1 4 Building HVAC Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heating, radiant floor systems, evaporative cooling, gas cooling, ground-source heat pumps, and wood space.1.1 Introduction and Organization This chapter addresses the requirements for heating, ventilating, and air the following topics: 1. Heating Equipment. The first section addresses the requirements for heating equipment

  6. Solar forecasting review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Richard Headen

    2012-01-01

    water heating systems, Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems, wind speed predictions, control in power

  7. Realt-Time Building Occupancy Sensing for Supporting Demand Driven HVAC Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekwevugbe, T.; Brown, N.; Pakka, V.

    2013-01-01

    use. Previous research have proposed up to 56% HVAC related energy savings with improvements in operation and management of HVAC systems (Sun et al., 2011, Tachwali et al., 2007). Real- time building occupancy sensing is useful for efficient.... The area enjoys good natural lighting due to its large side windows, although it is shaded from the direct effect of the sun by an adjacent part of the building. It is ventilated with three glazed roof vents. The vents are controlled together by room...

  8. Lighting/HVAC interactions and their effects on annual and peak HVAC requirements in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, A.O.; Huang, Y.J.

    1994-08-01

    Lighting measures is one effective strategy for reducing energy use in commercial buildings. Reductions in lighting energy have secondary effects on cooling/heating energy consumption and peak HVAC requirements; in general, they increase the heating and decrease cooling requirements of a building. Net change in a building`s annual and peak energy requirements, however, is difficult to quantify and depends on building characteristics, operating conditions, climate. This paper characterizes impacts of lighting/HVAC interactions on annual and peak heating/cooling requirements of prototypical US commercial buildings through computer simulations using DOE-2.1E building energy analysis program. Ten building types of two vintages and nine climates are chosen to represent the US commercial building stock. For each combination, a prototypical building is simulated with two lighting power densities, and resultant changes in heating and cooling loads are recorded. Simple concepts of Lighting Coincidence Factors are used to describe the observed interactions between lighting and HVAC requirements. (Coincidence Factor (CF) is ratio of changes in HVAC loads to those in lighting loads, where load is either annual or peak load). The paper presents tables of lighting CF for major building types and climates. These parameters can be used for regional or national cost/benefit analyses of lighting- related policies and utility DSM programs. Using Annual CFs and typical efficiencies for heating and cooling systems, net changes in space conditioning energy use from a lighting measure can be calculated. Similarly, Demand CFs can be used to estimate the changes in HVAC sizing, which can then be converted to changes in capital outlay using standard-design curves; or they can be used to estimate coincident peak reductions for the analysis of the utility`s avoided costs. Results from use of these tables are meaningful only when they involve a significantly large number of buildings.

  9. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    1980, but its thermal solar and storage systems received achiller. A 30 m heat storage tank solar decouples heatfacility with thermal storage and solar- assisted HVAC for

  10. An implementation of co-simulation for performance prediction of innovative integrated HVAC systems in buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trcka, Marija

    2010-01-01

    Heating and Cooling Task 12B and IEA Energy Conservation inNeymark, J. and Judkoff, R. 2002. IEA HVAC BESTEST volume 1,Technical report of a IEA Solar Heating and Cooling

  11. Investigation of a radiantly heated and cooled office with an integrated desiccant ventilation unit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xiangyang

    2009-05-15

    compares the heating load and comfort level as measured by uniformity of operative temperature for two different layouts of radiators in the same geometric space. The air exchange rate has been identified as an important factor which affects energy saving...

  12. Heat transfers in a double-skin roof ventilated by natural convection in summer time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biwole, Pascal; Pompeo, C

    2013-01-01

    The double-skin roofs investigated in this paper are formed by adding a metallic screen on an existing sheet metal roof. The system enhances passive cooling of dwellings and can help diminishing power costs for air conditioning in summer or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers are investigated. Depending on its surface properties, the screen reflects a large amount of oncoming solar radiation. Natural convection in the channel underneath drives off the residual heat. The bi-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters for the system's efficiency. They are, by order of importance, the sheet metal surface emissivity, the screen internal and external surface emissivity, the insulation thickness and the inclination angle for a channel width over 6 cm. The influence of those parameters on Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers is also investigated. Temperature and air velocity profiles on seve...

  13. HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

  14. Automotive Thermoelectric Generators and HVAC | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generators and HVAC Automotive Thermoelectric Generators and HVAC Provides overview of DOE-supported projects in automotive thermoelectric generators and heatersair conditioners...

  15. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits.? Confirming these findings in intervention studies is recommended. ? Energy costs of heating/cooling unoccupied classrooms statewide are modest, but a large portion occurs in relatively few classrooms.

  16. EVALUATION OF EMERGING DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS FOR COMMERCIAL HVAC SYSTEMS Hannah Friedman Mary Ann Piette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management control systems (EMCS), utility demand metering, and dedicated monitoring systems. By combining and Electric's Universal Translator, UC Berkeley's Fan System Tools, and Silicon Energy's Enterprise Energy, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems (Gregerson, 1997, Claridge et al., 2000). If these energy

  17. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  18. City of Coral Springs, Florida 9551 West Sample Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vendor HVAC Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning IACP International Association of Chiefs of Police

  19. Table of Contents Eligibility Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transfer Protocol is a secure file transfer system H HVAC ­ Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning I IDS

  20. Energy Recovery Ventilator Membrane Efficiency Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees, Jennifer Anne

    2013-05-07

    A test setup was designed and built to test energy recovery ventilator membranes. The purpose of this test setup was to measure the heat transfer and water vapor transfer rates through energy recover ventilator membranes and find their effectiveness...

  1. Ventilative cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

    1999-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

  2. HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method - Building America Top Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method - Building America Top Innovation HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method - Building America Top Innovation While HVAC installers have improved...

  3. Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

    2007-01-01

    Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation...

  4. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  5. Thermal Comfort of Neutral Ventilated Buildings in Different Cities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, X.; Zhou, Z.; Lian, Z.; Wen, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Jiang, C.

    2006-01-01

    .Jiang. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated houses in Beijing. Journal of HVAC [J], 1999, 29(2):1-5. (In Chinese) [16] N.Zhu. Studies on some key issues of thermal ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature..., China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ Vol. I-1-2 Thermal Comfort of Neutral Ventilated Buildings in Different Cities1 Xiaojiang Ye Zhaoxiao Zhou Zhiwei Lian Yuangao Wen Zhengping Zhou Chunxiao...

  6. Buoyancy and stratification in Boussinesq flow with applications to natural ventilation and intrusive gravity currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid buildings combine passive summer-time cooling by natural venti- lation with active winter-time heating by conventional HVAC systems.

  7. Software Verification & Validation Report for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YEH, T.

    2002-11-20

    This document reports on the analysis, testing and conclusions of the software verification and validation for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization ventilation system. Automation control system will use the Allen-Bradley software tools for programming and programmable logic controller (PLC) configuration. The 244-AR Interim Stabilization Ventilation System will be used to control the release of radioactive particles to the environment in the containment tent, located inside the canyon of the 244-AR facility, and to assist the waste stabilization efforts. The HVAC equipment, ducts, instruments, PLC hardware, the ladder logic executable software (documented code), and message display terminal are considered part of the temporary ventilation system. The system consists of a supply air skid, temporary ductwork (to distribute airflow), and two skid-mounted, 500-cfm exhausters connected to the east filter building and the vessel vent system. The Interim Stabilization Ventilation System is a temporary, portable ventilation system consisting of supply side and exhaust side. Air is supplied to the containment tent from an air supply skid. This skid contains a constant speed fan, a pre-filter, an electric heating coil, a cooling coil, and a constant flow device (CFD). The CFD uses a passive component that allows a constant flow of air to pass through the device. Air is drawn out of the containment tent, cells, and tanks by two 500-cfm exhauster skids running in parallel. These skids are equipped with fans, filters, stack, stack monitoring instrumentation, and a PLC for control. The 500CFM exhaust skids were fabricated and tested previously for saltwell pumping activities. The objective of the temporary ventilation system is to maintain a higher pressure to the containment tent, relative to the canyon and cell areas, to prevent contaminants from reaching the containment tent.

  8. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    B. , and Gan, G. 1998 “Heat Recovery with Low Pressure LossSherman, M.H. 2003. “Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes. ”1998. “Field Survey of Heat Recovery Ventilation Systems. ”

  9. Natural Ventilation for Energy Savings in California Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    hybrid natural ventilation system was unable to provide ample cooling during the winter months, which caused a heat pump

  10. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    HRV) efficient systems (i.e. , ERV or HRV systems) will not workHeat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) In this system, the primary

  11. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Location: Tyler, TX Partners: University of Texas, TxAIRE, uttyler.edutxairehouses Building Science Corporation, buildingscience.com Building Component: Heating, ventilating,...

  12. Pedernales Electric Cooperative- HVAC Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pedernales Electric Cooperative offers equipment rebates to its members who install energy efficient HVAC equipment. Eligible equipment includes:

  13. Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

    2012-01-01

    The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

  14. Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worbs, H. E.

    1987-01-01

    . Another consideration is the high ventilation loads due to cooling the moist air prevalent in semi-tropical climates. This paper describes a computer program which assesses all the pertinent variables which comprise the annual heating and cooling energy...

  15. Promising Technology: Energy Recovery Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy recovery ventilation (ERV) systems exchange heat between outgoing exhaust air and the incoming outdoor air. Using exhaust air to pre-condition supply air can reduce the capacity of the heating and cooling system and save heating and cooling energy consumption.

  16. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program. This program was funded by the California of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Project Management: Cathy Higgins, Program Director for New Buildings

  17. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    performance of a solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energyfor rows of fixed solar thermal collectors using flatassisted by a 232 m solar thermal array providing heat to a

  18. Building America Expert Meeting Report: Transitioning Traditional HVAC Contractors to Whole House Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2011-10-01

    This report outlines findings resulting from a U.S. Department of Energy Building America expert meeting to determine how HVAC companies can transition from a traditional contractor status to a service provider for whole house energy upgrade contracting. IBACOS has embarked upon a research effort under the Building America Program to understand business impacts and change management strategies for HVAC companies. HVAC companies can implement these strategies in order to quickly transition from a 'traditional' heating and cooling contractor to a service provider for whole house energy upgrade contracting. Due to HVAC service contracts, which allow repeat interaction with homeowners, HVAC companies are ideally positioned in the marketplace to resolve homeowner comfort issues through whole house energy upgrades. There are essentially two primary ways to define the routes of transition for an HVAC contractor taking on whole house performance contracting: (1) Sub-contracting out the shell repair/upgrade work; and (2) Integrating the shell repair/upgrade work into their existing business. IBACOS held an Expert Meeting on the topic of Transitioning Traditional HVAC Contractors to Whole House Performance Contractors on March 29, 2011 in San Francisco, CA. The major objectives of the meeting were to: Review and validate the general business models for traditional HVAC companies and whole house energy upgrade companies Review preliminary findings on the differences between the structure of traditional HVAC Companies and whole house energy upgrade companies Seek industry input on how to structure information so it is relevant and useful for traditional HVAC contractors who are transitioning to becoming whole house energy upgrade contractors Seven industry experts identified by IBACOS participated in the session along with one representative from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The objective of the meeting was to validate the general operational profile of an integrated whole house performance contracting company and identify the most significant challenges facing a traditional HVAC contractor looking to transition to a whole house performance contractor. To facilitate the discussion, IBACOS divided the business operations profile of a typical integrated whole house performance contracting company (one that performs both HVAC and shell repair/upgrade work) into seven Operational Areas with more detailed Business Functions and Work Activities falling under each high-level Operational Area. The expert panel was asked to review the operational profile or 'map' of the Business Functions. The specific Work Activities within the Business Functions identified as potential transition barriers were rated by the group relative to the value in IBACOS creating guidance ensuring a successful transition and the relative difficulty in executing.

  19. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2010-10-27

    Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

  20. Chapter 5: Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing High-Performance Engineering Design Lighting System Design Mechanical System Design Central Plant Systems Plumbing and Water Use Building Control...

  1. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--HVAC Conservation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Those commercial buildings that used HVAC conservation features...

  2. Columbia Water & Light- Residential HVAC Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light (CWL) provides residential customers with rebates on energy efficient HVAC equipment. Customers should submit the mechanical permit from a Protective Inspection, a copy...

  3. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    conditioning. Figure 2: Wireless discharge air temperatureWireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems Cliffordcontrol software and wireless hardware that could enable

  4. Building America Expert Meeting: Transitioning Traditional HVAC...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    validate the general business models for traditional HVAC companies and whole house energy upgrade companies Review preliminary findings on the differences between the structure...

  5. Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, X.; Gao, J.; Wu, W.

    2006-01-01

    with double heat sources are numerically simulated. The model is verified by experimental data. The results of the study show that thermal stratification characteristics exist in indoor temperature fields. The paper also analyzes the influence of different...

  6. Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HVAC Systems This report assesses 135 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. residential buildings to identify and provide...

  7. Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building HVAC This report assesses 182 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. commercial buildings to identify and provide...

  8. Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop Improved Next...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    research and development of the next generation of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) technologies. The R&D will focus on developing regionally appropriate HVAC...

  9. Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution - Building America Top Innovation Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution - Building...

  10. Development of a High-Efficiency Zonal Thermoelectric HVAC System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a High-Efficiency Zonal Thermoelectric HVAC System for Automotive Applications Development of a High-Efficiency Zonal Thermoelectric HVAC System for Automotive Applications...

  11. Improving efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling, zonal design, and thermoelectric devices Improving efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling, zonal...

  12. Modeling particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Vol. 11, pp 943-945. Muyshondt A, Nutter D, and Gordon M.particle deposition (Muyshondt et al. , 1998). The purposedynamic simulations of Muyshondt et al. (1998). Despite some

  13. Hybrid Heat Pumps Using Selective Water Sorbents (SWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, M. R.

    2006-11-30

    The development of the ground-coupled and air-coupled Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system is essential in meeting the goals of Zero Energy Houses (ZEH), a viable concept vigorously pursued under DOE sponsorship. ORNL has a large Habitat for Humanity complex in Lenoir City where modem buildings technology is incorporated on a continual basis. This house of the future is planned for lower and middle income families in the 21st century. The work undertaken in this CRADA is an integral part of meeting DOE's objectives in the Building America program. SWS technology is a prime candidate for reducing the footprint, cost and improve the performance of ground-coupled heat pumps. The efficacy of this technique to exchange energy with the ground is a topic of immense interest to DOE, builders and HVAC equipment manufacturers. If successful, the SWS concept will become part of a packaged ZEH kit for affordable and high-end houses. Lennox Industries entered into a CRADA with Oak Ridge National Laboratory in November 2004. Lennox, Inc. agreed to explore ways of using Selective Water Sorbent materials to boost the efficiency of air-coupled heat pumps whereas ORNL concentrated on ground-coupled applications. Lennox supplied ORNL with heat exchangers and heat pump equipment for use at ORNL's Habitat for Humanity site in Lenoir City, Tennessee. Lennox is focused upon air-coupled applications of SWS materials at the Product Development and Research Center in Carrollton, TX.

  14. Computer Modeling VRF Heat Pumps in Commercial Buildings using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raustad, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are increasingly used in commercial buildings in the United States. Monitored energy use of field installations have shown, in some cases, savings exceeding 30% compared to conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. A simulation study was conducted to identify the installation or operational characteristics that lead to energy savings for VRF systems. The study used the Department of Energy EnergyPlus? building simulation software and four reference building models. Computer simulations were performed in eight U.S. climate zones. The baseline reference HVAC system incorporated packaged single-zone direct-expansion cooling with gas heating (PSZ-AC) or variable-air-volume systems (VAV with reheat). An alternate baseline HVAC system using a heat pump (PSZ-HP) was included for some buildings to directly compare gas and electric heating results. These baseline systems were compared to a VRF heat pump model to identify differences in energy use. VRF systems combine multiple indoor units with one or more outdoor unit(s). These systems move refrigerant between the outdoor and indoor units which eliminates the need for duct work in most cases. Since many applications install duct work in unconditioned spaces, this leads to installation differences between VRF systems and conventional HVAC systems. To characterize installation differences, a duct heat gain model was included to identify the energy impacts of installing ducts in unconditioned spaces. The configuration of variable refrigerant flow heat pumps will ultimately eliminate or significantly reduce energy use due to duct heat transfer. Fan energy is also studied to identify savings associated with non-ducted VRF terminal units. VRF systems incorporate a variable-speed compressor which may lead to operational differences compared to single-speed compression systems. To characterize operational differences, the computer model performance curves used to simulate cooling operation are also evaluated. The information in this paper is intended to provide a relative difference in system energy use and compare various installation practices that can impact performance. Comparative results of VRF versus conventional HVAC systems include energy use differences due to duct location, differences in fan energy when ducts are eliminated, and differences associated with electric versus fossil fuel type heating systems.

  15. Measurements of Smoke Characteristics in HVAC Ducts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolin, Steven D; Ryder, Noah L; Leprince, Frederic; Milke, James; Mowrer, Frederick; Torero, Jose L

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of smoke traveling in an HVAC duct have been observed along with the response of selected duct smoke detectors. The simulated HVAC system consists of a 9 m long duct, 0.45 m in diameter. An exhaust fan is placed at one end...

  16. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2008-04-04

    An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

  17. Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ventilation can help keep your home cool during hot days. To avoid heat buildup in your home, plan ahead by landscaping your lot to shade your house. If you replace your roof,...

  18. Floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Nobukazu, 1967-

    2001-01-01

    Research on indoor environments has received more attention recently because reports of symptoms and other health complaints related to indoor environments have been increasing. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning ...

  19. Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Virginia Smith, Tamim Sookoor, and Kamin Whitehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    temperatures has to be predicted. Making such a prediction is complicated by the fact that weather has a larger the influence of the HVAC system. We present a technique for dynamically estimating the heat load due to weather rooms at a comfortable temperature without wasting any energy conditioning unoccupied rooms. Many homes

  20. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  1. High-performance commercial building systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    heat pump-based HVAC system (HPAC) and a continuously ventilating, and potentially more energy efficient Advanced Hybrid

  2. Microsoft Word - BMPPlan Botts

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    -- gallon per minute GSA -- General Services Administration HVAC -- Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning ISO -- International Standards Organization IWPF -- Industrial Wastewater...

  3. Trends in the cost of efficiency for appliances and consumer electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2013-01-01

    energy efficiency programs around the world focus on consumer goods such as appliances, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning)

  4. Interdisciplinary Innovation and Vision in the HVAC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hecker, T.

    2008-01-01

    potentials for optimizing costs can be found in the HVAC systems when calculated over the total Life-Cycle-Cost (LCC) of a building incorporating planning through to facility management. This requires an accurate plan specifying an efficient technical...

  5. Higher Efficiency HVAC Motors | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and the world leader in HVAC and refrigeration solutions. QM Power's Parallel Path Magnetic Technology(tm) (PPMT(tm)) uses permanent magnets in a novel yet simple magnetic...

  6. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    was assumed that a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) was usedand that the HRV was connected to the home’s central heating

  7. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Conclusion, Summary of HVAC Contractor Insights.

  8. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  9. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  10. Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect...

  11. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HVAC FAULTS IN ENERGYPLUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basarkar, Mangesh

    2013-01-01

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cbecs/ EnergyPlus. 2011, http://of HVAC Results in EnergyPlus Mangesh Basarkar, XiufengOF HVAC FAULTS IN ENERGYPLUS Mangesh Basarkar, Xiufeng Pang,

  12. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition. Maintenance of building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) balancing was critical to ensure proper airflow and worker safety. Approximately 103 m{sup 3} of equipment and materials were recovered or generated by the project. Low level waste accounted for approximately 37.4 m{sup 3}. Where possible, ducting was free released for metal recycling. Contaminated ducts were compacted into B-1000 containers and stored in a Shielded Modular Above-Ground Storage Facility (SMAGS) on the WL site awaiting final disposition. The project is divided into three significant phases, with Phases 1 and 2 completed. Lessons learned during the execution of Phases 1 and 2 have been incorporated into the current ventilation removal. (authors)

  13. System-Level Monitoring and Diagnosis of Building HVAC System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Siyu

    2013-01-01

    and global relationships between end-use energy consumptionHVAC Energy Consumption Due to rapid global population

  14. Implementation and main results Ecient Management of HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    Motivation Implementation and main results Ecient Management of HVAC Systems Mirco Rampazzo Management of HVAC Systems #12;Motivation Implementation and main results Outline 1 Motivation HVAC Systems Multiple-chiller systems 2 Implementation and main results Models, Control and Optimization Examples Mirco

  15. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Testing Ductless Heat Pumps in High-Performance Affordable Housing, the Woods at Golden Given - Tacoma, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    The Woods is a 30-home, high- performance, energy efficient sustainable community built by Habitat for Humanity (HFH). With Support from Tacoma Public Utilities, Washington State University (part of the Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction) is researching the energy performance of these homes and the ductless heat pumps (DHP) they employ. This project provides Building America with an opportunity to: field test HVAC equipment, ventilation system air flows, building envelope tightness, lighting, appliance, and other input data that are required for preliminary Building Energy Optimization (BEopt™) modeling and ENERGY STAR® field verification; analyze cost data from HFH and other sources related to building-efficiency measures that focus on the DHP/hybrid heating system and heat recovery ventilation system; evaluate the thermal performance and cost benefit of DHP/hybrid heating systems in these homes from the perspective of homeowners; compare the space heating energy consumption of a DHP/electric resistance (ER) hybrid heating system to that of a traditional zonal ER heating system; conduct weekly "flip-flop tests" to compare space heating, temperature, and relative humidity in ER zonal heating mode to DHP/ER mode.

  16. Development of a High Latent Effectiveness Energy Recovery Ventilator with Integration into Rooftop Package Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory M. Dobbs; Norberto O. Lemcoff; Frederick J. Cogswell; Jeffrey T. Benolt

    2006-03-01

    This Final Report covers the Cooperative Program carried out to design and optimize an enhanced flat-plate energy recovery ventilator and integrate it into a packaged unitary (rooftop) air conditioning unit. The project objective was to optimize the design of a flat plate energy recovery ventilator (ERV) core that compares favorably to flat plate air-to-air heat exchanger cores on the market and to cost wise to small enthalpy wheel devices. The benefits of an integrated unit incorporating an enhanced ERV core and a downsized heating/cooling unit were characterized and the design of an integrated unit considering performance and cost was optimized. Phase I was to develop and optimize the design of a membrane based heat exchanger core. Phase II was the creation and observation of a system integrated demonstrator unit consisting of the Enhanced Energy Recovery Ventilator (EERV) developed in Phase I coupled to a standard Carrier 50HJ rooftop packaged unitary air conditioning unit. Phase III was the optimization of the system prior to commercialization based on the knowledge gained in Phase II. To assure that the designs chosen have the possibility of meeting cost objectives, a preliminary manufacturability and production cost study was performed by the Center for Automation Technologies at RPI. Phase I also included a preliminary design for the integrated unit to be further developed in Phase II. This was to assure that the physical design of the heat exchanger designed in Phase I would be acceptable for use in Phase II. An extensive modeling program was performed by the Center for Building Performance & Diagnostics of CMU. Using EnergyPlus as the software, a typical office building with multiple system configurations in multiple climatic zones in the US was simulated. The performance of energy recovery technologies in packaged rooftop HVAC equipment was evaluated. The experimental program carried out in Phases II and III consisted of fabricating and testing a demonstrator unit using Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) based controls. Augmenting the control signals, CCN was also used to monitor and record additional performance data that supported modeling and conceptual understanding. The result of the testing showed that the EERV core developed in Phase I recovered energy in the demonstrator unit at the expected levels based on projections. In fact, at near-ARI conditions the core recovered about one ton of cooling enthalpy when operating with a three-ton rooftop packaged unit.

  17. Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Controlling summer attic heat gain is important to reducing air conditioning energy use in homes in hot-humid climates. Both heat transfer through ceilings and t attic duct systems can make up a large part of peak cooling demand, Attic ventilation...

  18. Airflow Simulation and Energy Analysis in Ventilated Room with a New Type of Air Conditioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01

    Airflow simulation in one ventilated room with radiant heating and natural ventilation has been carried out. Three cases are compared: the closed room, the room with full openings, and the room with small openings. The ...

  19. This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (http://www.hvac.okstate.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D., and J. Cullin. 2008. Misconceptions Regarding Design of Ground-source Heat Pump Systems. Proceedings of Ground-source Heat Pump Systems Prof. Jeffrey Spitler1 & James Cullin1 1 School of Mechanical-405-744-7873. Email: spitler@okstate.edu, http://www.hvac.okstate.edu 1 Introduction Ground-source heat pump (GSHP

  20. READ THIS: Before You Ventilate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-12-08

    This document reviews ventilation strategies for different climate zones and includes schematic drawings and photographs of various ventilation installations.

  1. Advantages of enhanced synchronous motors in heating, refrigerating, and air conditioning applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morash, R.T. [Precise Power Corp., Bradenton, FL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A new synchronous motor is a high-efficiency AC machine that has a low starting current. It may be used for conventional loads and also to start high inertia loads, delivering a constant torque during starting. Acceleration to synchronous speed can be allowed to take several minutes, if necessary, because the low starting current precludes excessive heating in the motor. Some of these motors are constructed with integral high inertia rotors that act as flywheels. These synchronous motors can ride through power sags and interruptions up to 30 seconds or more while still delivering useful load to pumps, fans, blowers, and compressors. The motors also restart instantly and resynchronize when utility power recovers. The motor can be useful in many heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) applications including those where machines and processes might otherwise be forced to shut down during momentary power interruptions.

  2. Case study for ARRA-funded ground-source heat pump (GSHP) demonstration at Oakland University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, a ground-source variable refrigerant flow (GS-VRF) system installed at the Human Health Building at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, maintenance records, construction costs, and simulations of the energy consumption of conventional central heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems providing the same level of space conditioning as the demonstrated GS-VRF system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GS-VRF system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the GS-VRF system compared with conventional HVAC systems. This case study also identified opportunities for reducing uncertainties in the performance evaluation, improving the operational efficiency, and reducing the installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future.

  3. On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hung-Wen

    2014-01-01

    space temperature, occupant thermal comfort, cooling and heating loads, HVAC equipment sizes, energy consumption, utility cost, air emissions, water usage, renewable

  4. An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-01-01

    space temperature, occupant thermal comfort, cooling and heating loads, HVAC equipment sizes, energy consumption, utility cost, air emissions, water usage, renewable

  5. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance HVAC Systems, Part II: Low-Load HVAC Systems for Single and Multifamily Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript for the Nov. 16 webinar, High Performance HVAC Systems, Part II: Low-Load HVAC Systems for Single and Multifamily Applications.

  6. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  7. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2011-10-31

    The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

  8. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    columns indicate the energy and cost savings for  demand class size.   (The energy costs  of classroom ventilation $6.2 M in increased energy costs.   Further VR  increases 

  9. Energy and IAQ Implications of Residential Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the energy, humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of residential ventilation cooling in all U.S. IECC climate zones. A computer modeling approach was adopted, using an advanced residential building simulation tool with airflow, energy and humidity models. An economizer (large supply fan) was simulated to provide ventilation cooling while outdoor air temperatures were lower than indoor air temperatures (typically at night). The simulations were performed for a full year using one-minute time steps to allow for scheduling of ventilation systems and to account for interactions between ventilation and heating/cooling systems.

  10. R&D Opportunity Assessment: Joining Technologies in HVAC&R -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R&D Opportunity Assessment: Joining Technologies in HVAC&R - Workshop on Joining Technologies in HVAC&R R&D Opportunity Assessment: Joining Technologies in HVAC&R - Workshop on...

  11. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) HVAC System Component Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DICK, J.D.

    2000-02-28

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) WAC System includes sub-systems 25A through 25K. Specific system boundaries and justifications are contained in HNF-SD-CP-SDD-005, ''Definition and Means of Maintaining the Ventilation System Confinement Portion of the PFP Safety Envelope.'' The procurement requirements associated with the system necessitates procurement of some system equipment as Commercial Grade Items in accordance with HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services.'' This document lists safety class and safety significant components for the Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning and specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items, as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item.

  12. Pitfalls in Building and HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gidwani, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    AND HVAC SYSTEMS B. N. Gidwani, P.E. Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT The purpose of an energy audit is to identify and analyze areas of energy consumption and to pro pose methods of conservation. In the process... opportunities for energy savings. When performing a detailed energy audit, the fol lowing areas should be examined with respect to the building envelope: Walls ? Roofs ? Windows ? Doors ? Ceiling Height ? In order to minimize energy losses through...

  13. Higher Efficiency HVAC Motors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls - Building America Topa HighHigher Efficiency HVAC

  14. Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2002-01-01

    Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings. American= pitch of the flexible duct (longitudinal distance between49700. ACCA. 1995. Residential Duct Systems. Manual D. Air

  15. Columbia Water & Light- HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain...

  16. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: HVAC Cabinet Air...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Science Solutions Optimized Comfort Solutions HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method (top left) Building America teams evaluated several testing methods to identify...

  17. HVAC component data modeling using industry foundation classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Forester, James; Haves, Philip; Sucic, Darko; Xu, Peng

    2002-01-01

    of HVAC components, such as boilers and actuators, with allTable 1. actuator air handler boiler chiller coil controllerattribute lists for the boiler and actuator components. A

  18. Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork, Roseville, California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for HVAC Ductwork Roseville, California PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Long-Term Monitoring of Occupied Test House Location: Roseville, CA Partners: K. Hovnanian Homes,...

  19. Research and Development Roadmap for Emerging HVAC Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that focus on systems-level approach to HVAC sizingdesign 2 Develop an open-source building automation system to drive innovation 1 Develop optimized components for...

  20. Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  1. Low-Global Warming Potential HVAC System with Ultra-Small Centrifugal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Warming Potential HVAC System with Ultra-Small Centrifugal Compression Low-Global Warming Potential HVAC System with Ultra-Small Centrifugal Compression Mechanical...

  2. Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric Devices and Comfort Modeling Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric...

  3. Recommended Ventilation Strategies for Energy-Efficient Production Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, J.; Brown, R.; Koomey, J.; Warner, J.; Greenberg, S.

    1998-12-01

    This report evaluates residential ventilation systems for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} Homes program and recommends mechanical ventilation strategies for new, low-infiltration, energy-efficient, single-family, ENERGY STAR production (site-built tract) homes in four climates: cold, mixed (cold and hot), hot humid, and hot arid. Our group in the Energy Analysis Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab compared residential ventilation strategies in four climates according to three criteria: total annualized costs (the sum of annualized capital cost and annual operating cost), predominant indoor pressure induced by the ventilation system, and distribution of ventilation air within the home. The mechanical ventilation systems modeled deliver 0.35 air changes per hour continuously, regardless of actual infiltration or occupant window-opening behavior. Based on the assumptions and analysis described in this report, we recommend independently ducted multi-port supply ventilation in all climates except cold because this strategy provides the safety and health benefits of positive indoor pressure as well as the ability to dehumidify and filter ventilation air. In cold climates, we recommend that multi-port supply ventilation be balanced by a single-port exhaust ventilation fan, and that builders offer balanced heat-recovery ventilation to buyers as an optional upgrade. For builders who continue to install forced-air integrated supply ventilation, we recommend ensuring ducts are airtight or in conditioned space, installing a control that automatically operates the forced-air fan 15-20 minutes during each hour that the fan does not operate for heating or cooling, and offering ICM forced-air fans to home buyers as an upgrade.

  4. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    M. and Wang, D. (1999) Duct systems in large commercialin ventilation air supply ducts. Proceedings of Indoor Air ‘filtration efficiency of in-duct ventilation air cleaners.

  5. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 4th Civil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    e ciency was gained through the installation's first variable refrigerant flow heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system, which provides highly e cient heat and...

  6. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 4th Civil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    efficiency was gained through the installation's first variable refrigerant flow heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system, which provides highly efficient heat and...

  7. Advanced Technologies and Practices - Building America Top Innovations...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    practices that improve the building envelope; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC); water heating components; and indoor air quality and safety issues....

  8. Technology Solutions Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the "fresh" air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the normal leakage paths through the building envelope disappear. Researchers from the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. In this project, the CARB team evaluated the four different strategies for providing make-up air to multifamily residential buildings and developed guidelines to help contractors and building owners choose the best ventilation systems.

  9. Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Zuluaga, M.

    2014-07-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the "fresh" air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent. CARB researchers have found that most new high performance, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. In this research project, CARB evaluated the four ventilation strategies in the field to validate system performance.

  10. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

    2012-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  11. HVAC & Building Management Control System Energy Efficiency Replacements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, Adriana

    2012-09-21

    The project objective was the replacement of an aging, un-repairable HVAC system which has grown inefficient and a huge energy consumer with low energy and efficient HVAC units, and installation of energy efficient building control technologies at City's YMCA Community Center.

  12. Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California an efficient demand response HVAC control strategy, actual room usage must be considered. Temperature and CO2 are used for simulations but not for predictive demand response strategies. In this paper, we develop

  13. M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Gas Vapor Mixtures and HVAC 1 Gas Vapor Mixtures and HVAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    to the vapor pressure: Tdp = Tsat@ Pv Sling Psychrometer: a rotating set of thermometers one of which measuresM. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Gas Vapor Mixtures and HVAC 1 Gas Vapor Mixtures and HVAC Atmospheric air normally contains some water vapor (moisture). The dry-air contains no water. Although the amount

  14. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Introduction.

  15. CFD-based design of the ventilation system for the PHENIX detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parietti, L.; Martin, R.A.; Gregory, W.S.

    1996-10-01

    The three-dimensional flow and thermal fields surrounding the large PHENIX sub-atomic particle detector enclosed in the Major Facility Hall are simulated numerically in this study using the CFX finite volume, commercial, computer code. The predicted fields result from the interaction of an imposed downward ventilation system cooling flow and a buoyancy-driven thermal plume rising from the warm detector. An understanding of the thermal irregularities on the surface of the detector and in the flow surrounding is needed to assess the potential for adverse thermal expansion effects in detector subsystems, and to prevent ingestion of electronics cooling air from hot spots. With a computational model of the thermal fields on and surrounding the detector, HVAC engineers can evaluate and improve the ventilation system design prior to the start of construction. This paper summarizes modeling and results obtained for a conceptual MFH ventilation scheme.

  16. Ventilation Air Preconditioning Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khattar, M.; Brandemuehl, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Increased outside ventilation air requirements demand special attention to how that air will be conditioned. In winter, the incoming air may need preheating; in summer. the mixed air may be too humid for effective dehumidification. Part...

  17. Why We Ventilate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  18. A simplified approach to describe complex diffusers in displacement ventilation for CFD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    for displacement ventilation systems include, but not lim ited to, quarter -circular-perforated, grille , floor dif fusers under cooling or heating conditions. The distributio ns of air v elocity, temperature in the 1970s. Due to the wide use of di splacement ventilation, ASHRAE (the Am erican Society of Heating

  19. C-106 tank process ventilation test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    Project W-320 Acceptance Test Report for tank 241-C-106, 296-C-006 Ventilation System Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-SD-W320-012, C-106 Tank Process Ventilation Test, was an in depth test of the 296-C-006 ventilation system and ventilation support systems required to perform the sluicing of tank C-106. Systems involved included electrical, instrumentation, chiller and HVAC. Tests began at component level, moved to loop level, up to system level and finally to an integrated systems level test. One criteria was to perform the test with the least amount of risk from a radioactive contamination potential stand point. To accomplish this a temporary configuration was designed that would simulate operation of the systems, without being connected directly to the waste tank air space. This was done by blanking off ducting to the tank and connecting temporary ducting and an inlet air filter and housing to the recirculation system. This configuration would eventually become the possible cause of exceptions. During the performance of the test, there were points where the equipment did not function per the directions listed in the ATP. These events fell into several different categories. The first and easiest problems were field configurations that did not match the design documentation. This was corrected by modifying the field configuration to meet design documentation and reperforming the applicable sections of the ATP. A second type of problem encountered was associated with equipment which did not operate correctly, at which point an exception was written against the ATP, to be resolved later. A third type of problem was with equipment that actually operated correctly but the directions in the ATP were in error. These were corrected by generating an Engineering Change Notice (ECN) against the ATP. The ATP with corrected directions was then re-performed. A fourth type of problem was where the directions in the ATP were as the equipment should operate, but the design of the equipment was not correct for that type of operation. To correct this problem an ECN was generated against the design documents, the equipment modified accordingly, and the ATP re-performed. The last type of problem was where the equipment operated per the direct ions in the ATP, agreed with the design documents, yet violated requirements of the Basis of Interim Operation (BIO). In this instance a Non Conformance Report (NCR) was generated. To correct problems documented on an NCR, an ECN was generated to modify the design and field work performed, followed by retesting to verify modifications corrected noted deficiencies. To expedite the completion of testing and maintain project schedules, testing was performed concurrent with construct on, calibrations and the performance of other ATP`s.

  20. The Impact of Uncertain Physical Parameters on HVAC Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yannan; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lu, Shuai; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-03-01

    HVAC units are currently one of the major resources providing demand response (DR) in residential buildings. Models of HVAC with DR function can improve understanding of its impact on power system operations and facilitate the deployment of DR technologies. This paper investigates the importance of various physical parameters and their distributions to the HVAC response to DR signals, which is a key step to the construction of HVAC models for a population of units with insufficient data. These parameters include the size of floors, insulation efficiency, the amount of solid mass in the house, and efficiency of the HVAC units. These parameters are usually assumed to follow Gaussian or Uniform distributions. We study the effect of uncertainty in the chosen parameter distributions on the aggregate HVAC response to DR signals, during transient phase and in steady state. We use a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method with linear regression and Prony analysis to evaluate sensitivity of DR output to the uncertainty in the distribution parameters. The significance ranking on the uncertainty sources is given for future guidance in the modeling of HVAC demand response.

  1. Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Zuluaga, M.

    2014-07-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the 'fresh' air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the 'normal leakage paths through the building envelope' disappear. CARB researchers have found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, and the assumption is that products will perform similarly in the field. Proper application involves matching expected performance at expected building pressures, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. This research effort, which included several weeks of building pressure monitoring, sought to provide field validation of system performance. The performance of four substantially different strategies for providing make-up air to apartments was evaluated.

  2. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    HVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory StudyHVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory StudyHVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory Study

  3. Increased Natural Ventilation Flow Rates through Ventilation Shafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D.

    Buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in ventilation shafts is investigated with a small scale physical experiment within a duct and CFD simulations of an office building. For a fixed exhaust opening, smaller shafts lead to ...

  4. Demonstration of HVAC chiller control for power grid frequency regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Po-An (Po-An Leo)

    2015-01-01

    Secondary frequency regulation is a necessary electric grid ancillary service that balances electric power system supply and demand on short time intervals of seconds to minutes. Commercial HVAC chillers may be well ...

  5. Review of Residential Low-Load HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott A.; Thornton, Brian; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building America Program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an investigation to inventory commercially available HVAC technologies that are being installed in low-load homes. The first step in this investigation was to conduct a review of published literature to identify low-load HVAC technologies available in the United States and abroad, and document the findings of existing case studies that have evaluated the performance of the identified technologies. This report presents the findings of the literature review, identifies gaps in the literature or technical understanding that must be addressed before low-load HVAC technologies can be fully evaluated, and introduces PNNL’s planned research and analysis for this project to address identified gaps and potential future work on residential low-load HVAC systems.

  6. The Optimization of Control Parameters for VAV HVAC System Commissioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, S.; Maehara, K.; Sagara, N.

    2006-01-01

    kind of commissioning technique as follows. We identified the dynamic characteristics of components of an actual VAV HVAC system such as rooms, VAV dampers, two way valves and chilled water coils, and verified the behaviors of the models and choose...

  7. Industrial HVAC Air-to-Air Energy Recovery Retrofit Economics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Retrofitting air-to-air energy recovery equipment is relatively simply to design and easy to install. Additionally, HVAC energy recovery is almost risk free when compared to process retrofit. Life cycle cost analysis is the best way to illustrate...

  8. Case Study of an Innovative HVAC System with Integral Dehumidifier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirey, D. B.; Raustad, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    . Although this technology is not new, the integration of a dehumidification system with a standard air conditioner is an innovative strategy that can be used to address moisture control in buildings. This new HVAC configuration would provide a low...

  9. Evaluation of Emerging Diagnostic Tools for Commercial HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, H.; Piette, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares and evaluates the capabilities of six emerging diagnostic tools for commercial HVAC systems. We present a brief description of the diagnostic tools, and then focus on evaluating the features of the tools. We include the following...

  10. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    , ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system in an office building is presented. A neural network (NN reserved. 1. Introduction Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, account for over 50 air volume air conditioning system using a genetic algorithm. HVAC systems are complex, nonlinear

  11. Connexus Energy - Residential Efficient HVAC Rebate Program ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Connexus Energy Website https:www.connexusenergy.comresidentialrebates Expiration Date 12312015...

  12. Monitored energy use of homes with geothermal heat pumps: A compilation and analysis of performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.R.; Meier, A.

    1997-12-01

    The performance of residential geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) was assessed by comparing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and whole house energy use of GHP houses and control houses. Actual energy savings were calculated and compared to expected savings (based on ARI ratings and literature) and predicted savings (based on coefficient of performance - COP - measurements). Differences between GHP and control houses were normalized for heating degree days and floor area or total insulation value. Predicted savings were consistently slightly below expected savings but within the range of performance cited by the industry. Average rated COP was 3.4. Average measured COP was 3.1. Actual savings were inconsistent and sometimes significantly below predicted savings. No correlation was found between actual savings and actual energy use. This suggests that factors such as insulation and occupant behavior probably have greater impact on energy use than type of HVAC equipment. There was also no clear correlation between climate and actual savings or between climate and actual energy use. There was a trend between GHP installation date and savings. Newer units appear to have lower savings than some of the older units which is opposite of what one would expect given the increase in rated efficiencies of GHPs. There are a number of explanations for why actual savings are repeatedly below rated savings or predicted savings. Poor ground loop sizing or installation procedures could be an issue. Given that performance is good compared to ASHPs but poor compared to electric resistance homes, the shortfall in savings could be due to duct leakage. The takeback effect could also be a reason for lower than expected savings. Occupants of heat pump homes are likely to heat more rooms and to use more air-conditioning than occupants of electric resistance homes. 10 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Ventilation technologies scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-09-30

    This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the needs of California, determining residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and level of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  14. Fouling of HVAC fin and tube heat exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey; Carey, Van P.

    2001-01-01

    leads to increasing Re duct and thus increasing duct turbulence. This turbulence might cause resuspension

  15. Fouling of HVAC fin and tube heat exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey; Carey, Van P.

    2001-01-01

    Vol. 42, pp. 943-945. Muyshondt, A. , Nutter, D. and Gordon,of electric air cleaners. Muyshondt et al. (1998) used adynamic simulations of Muyshondt et al. (1998). A rigorous

  16. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Publications | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMatFermiGuido DeHoratiis12-08)

  17. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMatFermiGuido DeHoratiis12-08)Department of

  18. Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesyEducation Data JamDepartment ofEEREPrecipitator

  19. Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water Heating,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities Energy Efficiency CompetitionDepartment ofdoeTons

  20. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContracting OversightEMS Policy HQ EMS Policy OfficeHQHVAC,

  1. Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper was written to describe an innovative “on-demand” industrial ventilation system for woodworking, metalworking, food processing, pharmaceutical, chemical, and other industries. Having analyzed existing industrial ventilation in 130...

  2. Natural ventilation generates building form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shaw-Bing

    1996-01-01

    Natural ventilation is an efficient design strategy for thermal comfort in hot and humid climates. The building forms can generate different pressures and temperatures to induce natural ventilation. This thesis develops a ...

  3. RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    best available data, the energy liability as- sociated with providing the current levels of ventilationRESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS* Max Sherman Nance Matson Energy Performance of Buildings Group Energy and Environment Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California

  4. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage A. Mammoli a , M.HVAC system with thermal storage. Energy and Buildings, 42(ASSISTED HVAC SYSTEM WITH THERMAL STORAGE A. Mammoli a , M.

  5. HVAC Energy Recovery Design and Economic Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnier, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    to approximate the annual heating fuel savings utilizing the equation which follows: where EH annual winter energy savings QT hourly energy saved, MBH D number of degree days ~t building and outside air temperature difference, T3 - Tl, ?FDB n rated full... load heating efficiency, where EH is expressed in MBH for electric heat, n = 1.0 and for gas heat, n = .8 V heating value of fuel, where EH is expressed in MBH, V = 3.413 M BTU/KW for electric heat and is not used for gas heat Interim Correction...

  6. Research & Development Opportunities for Joining Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    joining technologies for heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) equipment has the potential to increase lifetime equipment operating efficiency,...

  7. DOE Announces More Than $76 Million for Advanced Energy-Efficient...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    savings and performance. Residential and Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Crosscutting Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Research (11,144,592...

  8. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Inverted...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    along the attic floor, which saves energy by placing heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) ductwork within the home's thermal boundary. Inverted Attic Bulkhead for...

  9. FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (ECMs): solar photovoltaic (PV) and simple one-for-one heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system replacement (small building systems). Examples of equipment that...

  10. Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Low Global Warming...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Refrigerants Refrigerants are used in a wide variety of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) equipment. The current generation of refrigerants,...

  11. EnergyPlus Model Appendix G -EnergyPlus Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home B) C_ela 55.66 51.51 ELA (in.2) 38.83 35.93 The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC

  12. Senior U.S. Energy Department Official to Tour Daikin McQuay...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Daikin McQuay - the world's largest producer of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment - received 1.4 million in Advanced Manufacturing Tax Credits...

  13. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01

    Sun Description The HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) relay mote serves three primary purposes: relay control, temperature sensing, and power

  14. Country Review of Energy-Efficiency Financial Incentives in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Stephane de la Rue du

    2011-01-01

    Energy-Efficiency Resource Standards ESCO Energy Services Company FI financial incentive GHG greenhouse gas HVAC heating, ventilation, and air conditioning

  15. U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Impact FR Federal Register Ge-68 germanium-68 GHG greenhouse gas HEPA high-efficiency particulate air HMP Habitat Management Plan HVAC heating, ventilation, and cooling...

  16. Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy DOE-SR DOE-Savannah River Operations Office FWCL Field Welding Checklist HVAC Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning ITP Inspection and Test Plan MRIR Material...

  17. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ballasts, advanced lighting controls, and connection to the building management system to control heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) demand. The roofing was replaced...

  18. Demonstrations of Integrated Advanced Rooftop Unit Controls and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    confirmed that advanced RTU controllers can achieve heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) energy and cost savings of more than 40% over the typical packaged air...

  19. Pre-Packaged Commercial Property-Accessed Clean Energy Financing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    simple, prepackaged technologies-such as lighting and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC)-can be accurately estimated without the need for a detailed energy audit....

  20. Partner with DOE and Emerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) seeks partnerships to research and develop energy efficient building technologies, including advanced lighting, heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC),...

  1. The impact of demand-controlled and economizer ventilation strategies on energy use in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandemuehl, M.J.; Braun, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies for constant-air-volume (CAV) systems in commercial buildings. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation, and energy analyses were performed for four typical building types, eight alternative ventilation systems, and twenty US climates. Only single-zone buildings were considered so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates and for buildings that have relatively low internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 20% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger but were strongly dependent upon the building type and occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules and large internal gains (i.e., restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was virtually eliminated by demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates. For both heating and cooling, the savings associated with demand-controlled ventilation are dependent on the fixed minimum ventilation rate of the base case at design conditions.

  2. An Application of State-Of-The-Art HVAC and Building Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.

    1988-01-01

    This case study describes the successful application of state-of-the-art HVAC and building systems at a large commercial office and industrial facility. The facility's exterior envelope systems, HVAC systems, lighting ...

  3. CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  4. CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  5. Critical Question #4: What are the Best Off-the-Shelf HVAC Solutions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4: What are the Best Off-the-Shelf HVAC Solutions for Low-Load, High-Performance Homes and Apartments? Critical Question 4: What are the Best Off-the-Shelf HVAC Solutions for...

  6. Issue #7: What are the Best HVAC Solutions for Low-Load, High...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7: What are the Best HVAC Solutions for Low-Load, High Performance Homes? Issue 7: What are the Best HVAC Solutions for Low-Load, High Performance Homes? What components and...

  7. Sentinel: Occupancy Based HVAC Actuation using Existing WiFi Infrastructure within Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    , Control Keywords Sentinel, HVAC, occupancy, buildings, energy efficiency 1. INTRODUCTION Commercial.00. As a result, improving the energy-efficiency of building HVAC systems is key from both a cost saving

  8. Variable-Speed, Low-Cost Motor for Residential HVAC Systems ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HVAC Systems Variable-Speed, Low-Cost Motor for Residential HVAC Systems Lower-Cost, Variable-Speed Electric Motor Improves Energy Efficiency In 2011, the U.S. industrial,...

  9. CoolCab Thermal Load Reduction Project: CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Load Reduction Project: CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development CoolCab Thermal Load Reduction Project: CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: HVAC Design...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder In this...

  11. Flexibility of Commercial Building HVAC Fan as Ancillary Service for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maasoumy, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Efficient Building Control Systems, Smart Grid and AircraftCommercial Building HVAC Fan as Ancillary Service for Smart

  12. The impact of demand-controlled ventilation on energy use in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, J.E.; Brandemuehl, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation controls and energy analyses were performed for a range of typical buildings, systems, and climates. Only single zone buildings were considered, so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates, and for buildings that have low relative internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 10% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger, but were strongly dependent upon the occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules (e.g., stores and restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was reduced by a factor of 10 with demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates.

  13. Smart Ventilation - RIVEC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4 »DigitalanDepartmentSecondary Ventilation Activity Inputs

  14. Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvestingRenewableTeachDevelopment |of EnergyVentilation

  15. Hydronic Heating Coil Versus Propane Furnace, Rehoboth Beach, Delaware (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    Insight Homes constructed two houses in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, with identical floor plans and thermal envelopes but different heating and domestic hot water (DHW) systems. Each house is 1,715-ft2 with a single story, three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and ductwork located in conditioned crawlspaces. The standard house, which the builder offers as its standard production house, uses an air source heat pump (ASHP) with supplemental propane furnace heating. The Building America test house uses the same ASHP unit with supplemental heat provided by the DHW heater (a combined DHW and hydronic heating system, where the hydronic heating element is in the air handler). Both houses were occupied during the test period. Results indicate that efficiency of the two heating systems was not significantly different. Three issues dominate these results; lower system design performance resulting from the indoor refrigerant coil selected for the standard house, an incorrectly functioning defrost cycle in the standard house, and the low resolution of the natural gas monitoring equipment. The thermal comfort of both houses fell outside the ASHRAE Standard 55 heating range but was within the ACCA room-to-room temperature range when compared to the thermostat temperature. The monitored DHW draw schedules were input into EnergyPlus to evaluate the efficiency of the tankless hot water heater model using the two monitored profiles and the Building America House Simulation Protocols. The results indicate that the simulation is not significantly impacted by the draw profiles.

  16. COMPREHENSIVE DIAGNOSTIC AND IMPROVEMENT TOOLS FOR HVAC-SYSTEM INSTALLATIONS IN LIGHT COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abram Conant; Mark Modera; Joe Pira; John Proctor; Mike Gebbie

    2004-10-31

    Proctor Engineering Group, Ltd. (PEG) and Carrier-Aeroseal LLP performed an investigation of opportunities for improving air conditioning and heating system performance in existing light commercial buildings. Comprehensive diagnostic and improvement tools were created to address equipment performance parameters (including airflow, refrigerant charge, and economizer operation), duct-system performance (including duct leakage, zonal flows and thermal-energy delivery), and combustion appliance safety within these buildings. This investigation, sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, a division of the U.S. Department of Energy, involved collaboration between PEG and Aeroseal in order to refine three technologies previously developed for the residential market: (1) an aerosol-based duct sealing technology that allows the ducts to be sealed remotely (i.e., without removing the ceiling tiles), (2) a computer-driven diagnostic and improvement-tracking tool for residential duct installations, and (3) an integrated diagnosis verification and customer satisfaction system utilizing a combined computer/human expert system for HVAC performance. Prior to this work the aerosol-sealing technology was virtually untested in the light commercial sector--mostly because the savings potential and practicality of this or any other type of duct sealing had not been documented. Based upon the field experiences of PEG and Aeroseal, the overall product was tailored to suit the skill sets of typical HVAC-contractor personnel.

  17. Florida Public Utilities- Residential HVAC Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida Public Utilities offers rebates to electric residential customers who improve the efficiency of homes. Central air conditioners and heat pumps which meet program requirements are eligible...

  18. Enthalpy Wheels Come of Age: Applying Energy Recovery Ventilation to Hospitality Venues in Hot, Humid Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellford, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Energy recovery ventilation systems, including rotary heat exchangers or enthalpy wheels, utilize mature technologies that are routinely applied in commercial buildings. Energy recovery is particularly important in buildings with significant outdoor...

  19. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    Heat Recovery Ventilation (HRV) systems (that are requireduse about 50 W. Similarly an HRV sized to produce the same50 W on average. A common HRV installation also uses the

  20. Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    latent heat, they normally are used in conjunction with an independent ventilation system, which is capable of decoupling the space sensible and latent loads. Condensation concerns limit the application of radiant cooling. This paper studies...

  1. HVAC component data modeling using industry foundation classes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Forester, James; Haves, Philip; Sucic, Darko; Xu, Peng

    2002-07-01

    The Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) object data model of buildings is being developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI). The aim is to support data sharing and exchange in the building and construction industry across the life-cycle of a building. This paper describes a number of aspects of a major extension of the HVAC part of the IFC data model. First is the introduction of a more generic approach for handling HVAC components. This includes type information, which corresponds to catalog data, occurrence information, which defines item-specific attributes such as location and connectivity, and performance history information, which documents the actual performance of the component instance over time. Other IFC model enhancements include an extension of the connectivity model used to specify how components forming a system can be traversed and the introduction of time-based data streams. This paper includes examples of models of particular types of HVAC components, such as boilers and actuators, with all attributes included in the definitions. The paper concludes by describing the on-going process of model testing, implementation and integration into the complete IFC model and how the model can be used by software developers to support interoperability between HVAC-oriented design and analysis tools.

  2. Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation Tim Salsbury and Rick This paper describes the concept of using simulation as a tool for performance validation and energy analysis and supervision of building systems in order to optimize operational performance. The paper describes one way

  3. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-01-01

    particles in turbulent duct flows. Chemical EngineeringDeposition in Ventilation Ducts. Ph.D. Dissertation,Deposition in Ventilating Duct Systems. Ph.D. Dissertation,

  4. Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Loads Building America Webinar: Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar Building America Webinar: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory-Built Housing...

  5. Status of Revisions to ASHRAE Standard 62 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, F. M.

    1998-01-01

    The American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62- 1989 "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor air Quality", adopted in 1989, is widely used by HVAC engineers to determine ventilation rates for various...

  6. Gosselin, J.R. and Chen, Q. 2008. "A dual airflow window for indoor air quality improvement and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372. A Dual Airflow Window for Indoor Air with exhausted indoor air. The energy needed to condition outdoor air is reduced because of the counterflow heat, the dual airflow window has a great potential for conserving energy and improving indoor air quality

  7. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    -linear model a b s t r a c t The energy consumption of a heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC seen significant growth in the energy consumed by heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC network to optimize air conditioning setback scheduling in publi

  8. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Keywords: Sensor modeling Heating Ventilation Air conditioning systems Sensor monitoring Data mining Neural indoor-air-quality (IAQ) sensors used in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems en- sure good quality air inside buildings. Statistics show that main

  9. Honing in on CO2 to Determine Who’s in the 'House'

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Heating and cooling a building seems like a straightforward task. But many buildings’ heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems waste energy and don’t pay any attention to indoor air quality. To combat this common problem, Aircuity developed a demand control ventilation (DCV) system that increases the efficiency of commercial buildings’ HVAC systems and ensures high indoor environmental quality.

  10. Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to mold growth and structural damage. The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) has determined that a home's living area should be...

  11. Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moisture, which can lead to mold growth and structural damage. The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) has determined that a home's...

  12. Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

    1986-01-01

    is based on the specific heat of water rather than the latent 'heat of fusion of ice as in ice storage, it requires about 4 times the storage capacity of an equivalent ice storage system. ? Salt Storage: This system utilizes eutectic salts which... freeze and melt around 47 o F. Exist ing chillers can be easily retrofitted for salt storage or chilled water storage. For ice stor age systems, a direct refrigerant system or glycol chillers are suitable. This paper discusses the details of each...

  13. Optimization Control Strategies for HVAC Terminal Boxes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Y.; Batten, T.; Noboa, H.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.; Zhou, J.; Cameron, C.; Keeble, D.; Hirchak, R.

    2000-01-01

    was limited for some boxes due to the existing box design setting. In some cases, the boxes can only supply a certain amount of hot air even in the full heating mode even though the hot duct of the boxes can allow more air flow through. Instead, the boxes..., > CFMb(due to hot duct inlet size limit) Figure 3- 1. The new VAV box operation control schedule when minimum CFM requirements exceed hot duct capacity -Heating Load Cooling Load - If CFMmi, = CFM h,, Figure 3-2 The new VAV box operation control...

  14. Designing Forced-Air HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-08-31

    This guide explains proper calculation of heating and cooling design loads for homes.used to calculated for the home using the protocols set forth in the latest edition of the Air Conditioning Contractors of America’s (ACCA) Manual J (currently the 8th edition), ASHRAE 2009 Handbook of Fundamentals, or an equivalent computation procedure.

  15. Proceedings of the Intern. Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture (PLEA), Toulouse (2002) 577 Cost efficiency of ventilation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gieseler, Udo D. J.

    2002-01-01

    . Conference topic : design strategies Keywords : cost efficiency, earth heat exchanger, heat recovery of a heat exchanger where the energy of the extract air is directly transferred to the fresh air before its) 577 Cost efficiency of ventilation systems for low-energy buildings with earth-to-air heat exchange

  16. A Real Time Self-Tuning Algorithm for PI Control of the Heating and Cooling Coils in Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qianghua

    1999-01-01

    Proportional and Integral (PI) controllers are used widely in HVAC applications. It is necessary to choose suitable values for PI gains for PI control of the heating and cooling coils in buildings. Consequently, suitable ...

  17. Literature Review of Displacement Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Performance Evaluation and Design Guidelines for Displacement Ventilation” by Chen and Clicksman (2003), were used to begin the literature search. Their references include papers, articles, and web sites presenting major contributions to the understanding...

  18. Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

    2013-02-01

    During the course of this project, an affordable and high performance ductwork system to directly address the problems of thermal losses, poor efficiency, and air leakage was designed. To save space and enable direct connections between different floors of the building, the ductwork system was designed in such a way that it occupied interior or exterior frame wall cavities. The ductwork system satisfied building regulations for structural support when bridging multiple floors, the spread of fire and smoke, and insulation to reduce the heat flow into or out of the building. Retrofits of urban residential buildings will be the main focus for the application of this ductwork system. Highly reflective foils and insulating materials were used to aid in the increase of the overall R-value of the ductwork itself and the wall assembly. It is expected that the proposed system will increase the efficiency of the HVAC system and the thermal resistance of the building envelope. The performance of the proposed ductwork design was numerically evaluated in a number of different ways. Our results indicate that the duct method is a very cost attractive alternative to the conventional method.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Low Load High Efficiency HVAC Webinar (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home webinar, Low Load High Efficiency HVAC, presented in May 2014.

  20. Model Predictive Control of HVAC Systems: Implementation and Testing at the University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haves, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    plants  with  thermal  storage.   The  project objectives systems with  active thermal storage systems in commercial of  HVAC  systems  with  thermal  storage.   Modulation  of 

  1. Development of a High-Efficiency Zonal Thermoelectric HVAC System for Automotive Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Identify a technical and business approach to accelerate the deployment of light-duty automotive TE HVAC technology, maintain occupant comfort, and improve energy efficiency.

  2. Energy efficiency in building sector in India through Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;Energy efficiency in building sector in India through Heat Pump Technology By Mr Pradeep Kumar sector in India · Residential building sector in India · HVAC growth in residential sector. · Heat Pump, Sustainable habitat, Biotechnology, Renewable energy, Water technology, Industrial research, Social

  3. DIPARTIMENTO DI INGEGNERIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    ;#12;Summary The interest in HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning) technology has rapidly increased in this thesis. Energy Efficient Control of Ice Thermal Energy Storage Systems HVAC plants have recently begun. In particular, in HVAC cooling systems, a common thermal storage medium is ice. From a control and optimisation

  4. Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobsMotionHeat & Cool » Water Heating » SelectingDesignWeatherize »

  5. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    of a solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energy andsolar thermal collectors using flat reflective surfaces. Solar Energy,of a solar-assisted HVAC system with thermal storage. Energy

  6. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  7. Short communication Optimization of hybrid ground coupled and air source heat pump systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    Short communication Optimization of hybrid ­ ground coupled and air source ­ heat pump systems 2008 Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 28 January 2010 Keywords: Ground coupled heat pump Air to water heat pump Thermal storage device Hybrid HVAC system Energy efficiency Numerical simulation a b

  8. Multi-carrier Signal Transmission through HVAC Ducts: Experimental Results for Channel Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    Multi-carrier Signal Transmission through HVAC Ducts: Experimental Results for Channel Capacity) ducts based on multi-carrier transmission technique and mea- sured channel frequency responses in the 2 through a building HVAC duct system demonstrate the ability to transmit with a spectral efficiency of 3

  9. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes Building America-funded research by teams and national laboratories that resulted in the development of an ASHRAE standard and a standardized testing method for testing the air leakage of HVAC air handlers and furnace cabinets and has spurred equipment manufacturers to tighten the cabinets they use for residential HVAC systems.

  10. Electric, Gas, and Electric/Gas Energy Options for Cold-Air HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1989-01-01

    An important aspect of the design of cost-effective HVAC systems today is (a) sensitivity to the cost impact of the interplay of utility demand charges, time-of-day rates, gas rates, and gas/electric utility incentive programs vis-ŕ-vis HVAC system...

  11. UGA DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL REQUIREMENTS & STANDARDS GENERAL MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS (HVAC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    UGA DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL REQUIREMENTS & STANDARDS GENERAL MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS (HVAC) JANUARY 16, 2015 23 00 001 23 00 00 GENERAL MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS (HVAC) 1. GENERAL A. Related sections: i. 00 00 07 ­ Design Professional Design Process Requirements ii. 00 00

  12. A LIBRARY OF HVAC COMPONENT MODELS FOR USE IN AUTOMATED1 DIAGNOSTICS2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A LIBRARY OF HVAC COMPONENT MODELS FOR USE IN AUTOMATED1 DIAGNOSTICS2 3 4 Peng Xu, Philip Haves a library of equipment reference models developed for automated fault detection and diagnosis of secondary of automatic documentation methods in the library. INTRODUCTION The increasing complexity of building HVAC

  13. Review of Pre- and Post-1980 Buildings in CBECS - HVAC Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winiarski, David W.; Jiang, Wei; Halverson, Mark A.

    2006-12-01

    PNNL was tasked by DOE to look at HVAC systems and equipment for Benchmark buildings based on 2003 CBECS data. This white paper summarizes the results of PNNL’s analysis of 2003 CBECS data and provides PNNL’s recommendations for HVAC systems and equipment for use in the Benchmark buildings.

  14. Design of Mechanical Systems for Sustainable Buildings, Professor Jorge Gonzalez Fall 2014 Syllabus (Subject to refinement/updating)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    , and industrial spaces. Heating, ventilating, air conditioning. Psychrometric chart processes. Design projects Handbooks ­ Fundamentals & HVAC Applications, American Society of Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, Georgia. 2. F.C. McQuiston and J.D. Parker, Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning

  15. Hybrid Ventilation Optimization and Control Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Ventilation Optimization and Control Research and Development Hybrid Ventilation Optimization and Control Research and Development Credit: Massachusetts Institute of...

  16. Energy Savings From System Efficiency Improvements in Iowa’s HVAC SAVE Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, S.; Baker, J.; Brand, L.; Wells, J.

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this project is to explore the energy savings potential of maximizing furnace and distribution system performance by adjusting operating, installation, and distribution conditions. The goal of the Iowa HVAC System Adjusted and Verified Efficiency (SAVE) program is to train contractors to measure installed system efficiency as a diagnostic tool to ensure that the homeowner achieves the energy reduction target for the home rather than simply performing a tune-up on the furnace or having a replacement furnace added to a leaky system. The PARR research team first examined baseline energy usage from a sample of 48 existing homes, before any repairs or adjustments were made, to calculate an average energy savings potential and to determine which system deficiencies were prevalent. The results of the baseline study of these homes found that, on average, about 10% of the space heating energy available from the furnace was not reaching the conditioned space. In the second part of the project, the team examined a sample of 10 homes that had completed the initial evaluation for more in-depth study. For these homes, the diagnostic data shows that it is possible to deliver up to 23% more energy from the furnace to the conditioned space by doing system tune ups with or without upgrading the furnace. Replacing the furnace provides additional energy reduction. The results support the author's belief that residential heating and cooling equipment should be tested and improved as a system rather than a collection of individual components.

  17. Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of iStockphotobrebca. A whole-house ventilation...

  18. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

    1980-08-25

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

  19. Index to Evaluate Energy Efficiency of the Building HVAC System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, L.; Wang, L.; Claridge,D.

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency of the Entire Building HVAC System Presented by Dr. Claridge Date: 09/15/2014 ESL-IC-14-09-15 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 2Outline •Why we need the Energy.../Load Ratio •How to get the Energy/Load Ratio •Methodology Adjustment •Case Study •Results Showed by tables and Plots ESL-IC-14-09-15 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 3...

  20. Research & Development Roadmap: Emerging HVAC Technologies | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale Power RateEnergySection 1222Energy HVAC

  1. A systems approach to retrofitting residential HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, J.A.; Walker, I.S.

    2004-05-01

    A Best Practices Guide for retrofitting residential HVAC systems has recently been completed by DOE. The guide uses diagnostics and checklists to guide the user to specific retrofit packages that maximize retrofit energy savings, comfort and safety potential. The guide uses a systems approach to retrofitting where the interaction of different building components is considered throughout the retrofit selection process. For example, added building envelope insulation reduces building loads so that smaller capacity HVAC systems can be used. In this study, several houses were surveyed using the Best Practices Guide and a single house was selected for retrofitting. The objectives were to demonstrate how a successful system-wide retrofit can be carried out and to provide feedback to improve the guide. Because it represents a departure from current practice, a key aspect of this study was to investigate the interactions with contractors and code officials who are unfamiliar with the systems approach. The study found that the major barrier to the systems approach in retrofits was in changing the working practices of contractors and code officials.

  2. Numerical study of variable lung ventilation strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav, Reena; Hiremath, Kirankumar; Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is used for patients with a variety of lung diseases. Traditionally, ventilators have been designed to monotonously deliver equal sized breaths. While it may seem intuitive that lungs may benefit from unvarying and stable ventilation pressure strategy, recently it has been reported that variable lung ventilation is advantageous. In this study, we analyze the mean tidal volume in response to different `variable ventilation pressure' strategies. We found that uniformly distributed variability in pressure gives the best tidal volume as compared to that of normal, scale- free, log normal and linear distributions.

  3. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2007-02-01

    The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amerisips Homes, Charleston...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    walls and 8.25-in. SIPs in the floor and roof. The HVAC system includes an air-to-water heat pump with fan coil that provides heat, ventilation, and hot water at 4.5 COP, plus a...

  5. ThermoSense: Occupancy Thermal Based Sensing for HVAC Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    , 15] ap- plications. However, ventilation, used to control CO2 levels and indoor pollutants, depends on the number of people oc- cupying a space. One method is to simply regulate CO2 levels directly with a CO2-authors. Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use

  6. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Bergman, W.; Ford, H.W.; Lipska, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect HEPA filters in exit ventilation ducts from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Several methods for partially mitigating the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified through testing and analysis. These independently involve controlling the fuel, controlling the fire, and intercepting the smoke aerosol prior to its sorption on the HEPA filter. Exit duct treatment of aerosols is not unusual in industrial applications and involves the use of scrubbers, prefilters, and inertial impaction, depending on the size, distribution, and concentration of the subject aerosol. However, when these unmodified techniques were applied to smoke aerosols from fires on materials, common to experimental laboratories of LLNL, it was found they offered minimal protection to the HEPA filters. Ultimately, a continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. This technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modificaton of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has a particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, we laminated rolling filter media with the desired properties. It is not true that the use of rolling prefilters solely to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols is cost effective in every type of containment system, especially if standard fire-protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

  7. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings Dortheof passive stack ventilation in residential buildings Dorthepassive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings

  8. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

  9. Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    home factories between 1996 and 2003. The recommended measures included mastic sealing ducts, installing properly sized high-efficiency HVAC, thoroughly air sealing the building...

  10. Final Scientific/Technical Report [Recovery Act: Districtwide Geothermal Heating Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterton, Mike

    2014-02-12

    The Recovery Act: Districtwide Geothermal Heating Conversion project performed by the Blaine County School District was part of a larger effort by the District to reduce operating costs, address deferred maintenance items, and to improve the learning environment of the students. This project evaluated three options for the ground source which were Open-Loop Extraction/Re-injection wells, Closed-Loop Vertical Boreholes, and Closed-Loop Horizontal Slinky approaches. In the end the Closed-Loop Horizontal Slinky approach had the lowest total cost of ownership but the majority of the sites associated with this project did not have enough available ground area to install the system so the second lowest option was used (Open-Loop). In addition to the ground source, this project looked at ways to retrofit existing HVAC systems with new high efficiency systems. The end result was the installation of distributed waterto- air heat pumps with water-to-water heat pumps installed to act as boilers/chillers for areas with a high ventilation demand such as they gymnasiums. A number of options were evaluated and the lowest total cost of ownership approach was implemented in the majority of the facilities. The facilities where the lowest total cost of ownership approaches was not selected were done to maintain consistency of the systems from facility to facility. This project had a number of other benefits to the Blaine County public. The project utilizes guaranteed energy savings to justify the levy funds expended. The project also developed an educational dashboard that can be used in the classrooms and to educate the community on the project and its performance. In addition, the majority of the installation work was performed by contractors local to Blaine County which acted as an economic stimulus to the area during a period of recession.

  11. Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of the HVAC system at the Willow Branch Intermediate School for the MEEN 685 class project. The school is located at College Station, Texas. A portion of the school belonged to Oakwood Intermediate School which...

  12. Energy Savings with Energy-Efficient HVAC Systems in Commercial Buildings of Hong Kong 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, J.; Chan, K.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    Kong for sustainable development. In this study, the major factors influencing the electricity use of HVAC systems are studied with the building energy simulation program EnergyPlus, which include chiller efficiency, space cooling temperature, variable...

  13. What are the Best HVAC Solutions for Low-Load, High Performance Homes?"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 26, 2012, and addressed the question ŤWhat are the best HVAC solutions for low-load, high performance homes?"

  14. Flexibility of Commercial Building HVAC Fan as Ancillary Service for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maasoumy, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    controlled loads for ancillary services,” in Proc. PSCC,P. Barooah, and S. Meyn, “Ancillary service for the grid viaBuilding HVAC Fan as Ancillary Service for Smart Grid Mehdi

  15. Building America Expert Meeting Report. Transitioning Traditional HVAC Contractors to Whole House Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-10-01

    This expert meeting was hosted by the IBACOS Building America research team to determine how HVAC companies can transition from a traditional contractor status to a service provider for whole house energy upgrade contracting.

  16. Application of Various HVAC Simulation Programs and Visual Tools to Commissioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, M.; Pan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Various existing HVAC system simulation programs and visualization tools are considered to be potentially powerful tools for commissioning. Although not originally developed as commissioning tools, these programs facilitate the confirmation...

  17. Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump Comfort Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, K.; Sehgal, N.; Akers, C.

    2013-03-01

    Field tests were conducted in two homes in Austin, TX to evaluate the comfort performance of ductless mini-split heat pumps (DMSHPs), measuring temperature and relative humidity measurements in four rooms in each home before and after retrofitting a central HVAC system with DMSHPs.

  18. Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump Comfort Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, K.; Sehgal, N.; Akers, C.

    2013-03-01

    Field tests were conducted in two homes in Austin, TX, to evaluate the comfort performance of ductless minisplit heat pumps (DMSHPs), measuring temperature and relative humidity measurements in four rooms in each home before and after retrofitting a central HVAC system with DMSHPs.

  19. Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump System Performance Test Bed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, M.

    1984-01-01

    of peak power and energy savings allowed by the innovative system. The main difference between the MSHHP and a conventional HVAC system is use of a chilled water "diversity" cooling loop interconnecting air to water coils (located at each water source heat...

  20. A Unified and Integrated Energy Management System for HVAC Spaces and Power House 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaya, A.; Debban, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    AND INTEGRATED ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR HVAC SPACES AND POWER HOUSE A.Kaya The University of Akron Mechanical Engineering Akron,OH 44325 ABSTRACT This paper describes a totally integrated energy management system throughout the plant and facilities.... The equipment involves: the power flant (boilers, cogeneration turbines, chillers); HVAC 0 buildings; air handling and other distribution systems. The energy management system has the architecture for data transmission and processing including multilevel...

  1. Energy Master Plans for Sustainable, High Performance HVAC and Associated Systems for Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maisey, G. E.; Milestone, B.

    2004-01-01

    for SUSTAINABLE, HIGH PERFORMANCE HVAC & ASSOCIATED SYSTEMS for HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES Grahame E. Maisey, P.E. Beverly Milestone Chief Engineer President GEMCO Energy Master Planners GEMCO Energy Master Planners Div. of Building... the pieces of true sustainable design and then assemble the pieces into whole sustainable, high performance HVAC systems. These are presented to the owner as the target to reach. A detailed, in depth energy master plan is the ideal way to achieve...

  2. Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Custom, HVAC and Motor Business...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Heaters Chillers Heat Pumps Air conditioners Heat recovery Compressed air Motor VFDs Agricultural Equipment CustomOthers pending approval Other EE Tankless Water...

  3. Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Construct a ground sourced heat pump, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system for the new Oakland University Human Health Sciences Building utilizing variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat pumps. A pair of dedicated outdoor air supply units will utilize a thermally regenerated desiccant dehumidification section. A large solar thermal system along with a natural gas backup boiler will provide the thermal regeneration energy.

  4. Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-09-01

    This case study focusing on a residence in northern California was undertaken as a demonstration of the potential of a systems approach to HVAC retrofits. The systems approach means that other retrofits that can affect the HVAC system are also considered. For example, added building envelope insulation reduces building loads so that smaller capacity HVAC system can be used. Secondly, we wanted to examine the practical issues and interactions with contractors and code officials required to accomplish the systems approach because it represents a departure from current practice. We identified problems in the processes of communication and installation of the retrofit that led to compromises in the final energy efficiency of the HVAC system. These issues must be overcome in order for HVAC retrofits to deliver the increased performance that they promise. The experience gained in this case study was used to optimize best practices guidelines for contractors (Walker 2003) that include building diagnostics and checklists as tools to assist in ensuring the energy efficiency of ''house as a system'' HVAC retrofits. The best practices guidelines proved to be an excellent tool for evaluating the eight existing homes in this study, and we received positive feedback from many potential users who reviewed and used them. In addition, we were able to substantially improve the energy efficiency of the retrofitted case study house by adding envelope insulation, a more efficient furnace and air conditioner, an economizer and by reducing duct leakage.

  5. Infiltration as Ventilation: Weather-Induced Dilution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2014-01-01

    LOGICS. 1999. Canadian Weather for Energy Calculations, In:natural ventilation rate with weather conditions, Renewablefor ASHRAE 136 [1/h] WSF Weather and Shielding Factor [1/h

  6. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max

    2011-01-01

    Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Maxmanufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitutethe University of California. Does Mixing Make Residential

  7. Building America Technologies Solutions Case Study: Ventilation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building America team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of various ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family lab homes at the University of Texas at...

  8. Technology Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings, New York, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-09-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the "fresh" air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the "normal leakage paths through the building envelope" disappear. Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings researchers have found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. This research effort included several weeks of building pressure monitoring to validate system performance of the different strategies for providing make-up air to apartments.

  9. Building America Case Study: Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings, New York, New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the 'fresh' air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the 'normal leakage paths through the building envelope' disappear. CARB researchers have found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, and the assumption is that products will perform similarly in the field. Proper application involves matching expected performance at expected building pressures, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. This research effort, which included several weeks of building pressure monitoring, sought to provide field validation of system performance. The performance of four substantially different strategies for providing make-up air to apartments was evaluated.

  10. Heating Energy Meter Validation for Apartments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, B.; Li, D.; Hao, B.

    2006-01-01

    Bedroom Dining No.1 Toilet room Bedroom Kitchen Dining room No.2 Toilet Kitchen Bedroom Fig 1 Standard cells? illustration 3 RELIABILITY ANALYZING OF HEAT METERS? DATA By the arduous work of workers, project group gain the data of 361 heat meters... and Building Saving Energy [M]. Beijing: Machine Industry Press, 2004.1, 269-414. (In Chinese) [3] Jinglang CAI, Zheng XU, Yingchao LI. Analyzing to Adjacent Rooms? Heat Transfer for Central Heating System [J]. Heating and Ventilating and Air...

  11. The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    two-phase zone, is the heat-pipe (i.e. , a zone of constant4a), when there is a heat pipe just above the emplacementduring ventilation, the heat-pipe signature is absent in

  12. Effects of Radiant Barrier Systems on Ventilated Attics in a Hot and Humid Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    was not sensitive to increased airflows. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barrier systems were between 25 and 34 percent, with 28 percent being the reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. All results presented...

  13. Wireless Ventilation Control for Large-Scale Systems: the Mining Industrial Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    minimization thanks to a continuous operation of the fans. The second one, based on a hybrid description strategies for fluid systems (pumps, fans and compressors) represent approximately 20 % of the total % or more of the energy consumed by the mining process may go into the ventilation (including heating

  14. Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric Devices and Comfort Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summarizes results from a study to identify and demonstrate technical and commercial approaches necessary to accelerate the deployment of zonal TE HVAC systems in light-duty vehicles

  15. Development and Application of a Procedure to Estimate Overall Building and Ventilation Parameters from Monitored Commercial Building Energy Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Song

    1997-01-01

    or net cooling load, Ec - measured whole-building cooling thermal energy supplied by the cooling coils, and EH - measured whole-building thermal heating energy supplied by the heating coils. The value (Ec - EH) can be viewed as the amount of comfort... energy which would be required had no mixing of cold and hot air streams taken place. This amount is, thus, a sort of absolute thermodynamic minimum. In reality, the building consumes total thermal energy amounting to (Ec + EH). 22 The ideal HVAC system...

  16. Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory This presentation was delivered at the...

  17. Critical Question #2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation Specific to Multifamily Buildings? Critical Question 2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation Specific to Multifamily...

  18. Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

    2009-01-01

    Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation inon energy consumption and the energy-saving potentials of amixing ventilation alone if energy-saving strategies are not

  19. Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AND MISCELLANEOUS Residential ventilation, ventilation controller, ASHRAE Standard 62.2, demand response Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full...

  20. Promising Technology: Variable-Air-Volume Ventilation System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Variable-air-volume (VAV) ventilation saves energy compared to a constant-air-volume (CAV) ventilation system, mainly by reducing energy consumption associated with fans.

  1. Case Study - The Challenge: Improving Ventilation System Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ventilation System Energy Efficiency in a Textile Plant Case Study - The Challenge: Improving Ventilation System Energy Efficiency in a Textile Plant This case study examines how...

  2. Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation This drawing shows simple...

  3. Building and Environment 42 (2007) 203217 Model-based analysis and simulation of airflow control systems of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    2007-01-01

    extracted from the room, and the temperature of the air exited of heat exchanger and supplied from for two different types of loading conditions. r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: HVAC, testing, operation, and management of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems rely

  4. Cost-Effective Integration of Efficient Low-Lift Baseload Cooling Equipment: FY08 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Armstrong, P. R.; Wang, Weimin; Fernandez, Nicholas; Cho, Heejin; Goetzler, W.; Burgos, J.; Radhakrishnan, R.; Ahlfeldt, C.

    2010-01-31

    Documentation of a study to investigate one heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system option, low-lift cooling, which offers potentially exemplary HVAC energy performance relative to American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004.

  5. POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    is electrical energy [1]. Of this total, 50% of the energy consumed in buildings is used for heating, air-conditioningPOEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System Varick L. Erickson Elect. Eng for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based

  6. Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-08-01

    This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  7. Natural Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    windows located near the top of the house, in clerestories, or in operable skylights. Passive solar homes are often designed to take advantage of convection to distribute heat...

  8. Grip Issue 30 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1988-01-01

    Heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems are a major component of worldwide energy consumption, and frequently consist of complex networks of interconnected components. The ubiquitous ...

  9. Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in the Clinical Science Building at UTMB 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the potential energy savings due to optimizing the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) operation schedule in the Clinical Science Building at University of Texas Medical Brach (UTMB...

  10. Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in the Basic Science Building at UTMB 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the potential energy savings due to optimizing the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) operation schedule in the Basic Science Building at University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB...

  11. Embedding Continuous Commissioning in an Energy Efficiency Retrofit Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, J. T.; Claridge, D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Turner, W. D.; Wei, G.; Verdict, M.

    2006-01-01

    and building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, as well as how deferred maintenance issues, key to the success of any commissioning project, were addressed and adminstered by the CC engineer....

  12. Applications of Optimal Building Energy System Selection and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    solar thermal SVOW: Storage Viability Web Service UCD: University of California, Davis campus, near Sacramento UNM: University of New Mexico,solar-assisted heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system of a University of New Mexico (

  13. Continuous Commissioning® and Energy Management Control Strategies at Alamo Community College District 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, J.; Verdict, M.; Baltazar, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of energy savings through the optimization of facility Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the college campuses of the Alamo Community College District. This Continuous Commissioning® process...

  14. Solutions to Surgical Suite Temperature and Humidity Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crooks, K. W.

    1996-01-01

    . Relative humidity (RH) must still be controlled at these lower temperatures per code guidelines and poses a major hurdle for facilities located throughout the southeastern United States. Heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment designed...

  15. Advance of Systematic Design Methods on Fuzzy Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system possesses some characteristics such as multi-parameters, nonlinear, and coupled parameters. Aimed at control problems, the author targets real-time fuzzy control and research systematically...

  16. Microsoft Word - VitPlantInstallsCrucialDuct_20110209.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment Plant, also known as the "Vit Plant," set a giant heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) duct in the High-Level Waste Facility. The nuclear-quality duct is...

  17. Improving energy efficiency in a pharmaceutical manufacturing environment -- production facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Endong, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    The manufacturing plant of a pharmaceutical company in Singapore had low energy efficiency in both its office buildings and production facilities. Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system was identified to ...

  18. ORGANIZATION CHART FACILITIES SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    & Refrigeration Campus Maintenance --Supervisor-- Tom Pike Environmental Services --Manager-- EJ Hook Operations HVAC Maintenance Maintenance Supervisor II Maintenance Engineer Repair Maintenance Heating, Ventilation Grounds Grounds Supervisor Groundskeepers Irrigation Manager Equipment Operator (Seasonal) Work Control

  19. Analysis of Above-Code (2009 IECC) Residential Energy Efficiency Measures in ONCOR Service Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdict, Malcolm; Haberl, Jeff S.; Liu, Zi; Kim, Hyojin

    2009-01-01

    were selected. These measures include Renewable Power Options, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Fenestration, Envelope, Lighting and Domestic Hot Water (DHW) options. Individual measures were then categorized into four groups: 0 to 5%, 5...

  20. 1736 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 51, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 Impulse Response of the HVAC Duct as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    of the HVAC Duct as a Communication Channel Pavel V. Nikitin, Member, IEEE, Daniel D. Stancil, Senior Member (HVAC) ducts in buildings behave as multimode waveguides when excited at radio frequencies and thus, can be used to distribute radio signals. The channel properties of the ducts are different from the properties

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 51, NO. 5, MAY 2003 945 Propagation Model for the HVAC Duct as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannaford, Blake

    for the HVAC Duct as a Communication Channel Pavel V. Nikitin, Member, IEEE, Daniel D. Stancil, Senior Member (HVAC) ducts in buildings are typically hollow metal pipes which can be used as waveguides to carry such a communication system. This paper presents a propagation model for a straight HVAC duct terminated at both ends

  2. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar will focus on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

  3. Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, I. S.; Sherman, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    ,” To be publicshed ASHRAE Trans. Sherman, M.H. and Matson, N.E “Residential Ventilation and Energy Characteristics,” ASHRAE Trans. 103(1), 1997, [LBNL- 39036]. Sherman M. H., “Over-ventilating in Hot, Humid Climates”, IAQ Applications, 7(1) pp. 1-4 ASHRAE, 2006...a. Sherman M. H. , “House Need to Breathe…Right?” Fine Homebuilding, April/May 2006; pp. 64-69, LBL Report 54496. Sherman M.H, Matson N.E. , “Air Tightness in New U.S. Housing” Proc. 22 nd AIVC Conference, Air Infiltration and Ventilation...

  4. Numerical Simulation of Displacement Ventilation in a Gymnasium in a Large Space Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, X.; Li, X.

    2006-01-01

    Since athletes' records can vary greatly depending on air velocities in sports halls, airflow patterns have played a very important role in HVAC design in gymnasiums. HVAC designers and researchers have paid more and more attention to this problem...

  5. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  6. EECBG Success Story: HVAC Upgrade Saving Money, Protecting History...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Saving Money, Protecting History November 2, 2010 - 5:37pm Addthis A new heating and cooling system at Chester County Historical Societys history center is saving the...

  7. Small Businesses Receive $2 Million to Advance HVAC Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    heat pump technology to develop a new generation of water heaters. This thin film, thermoelectric technology has the potential to significantly reduce the electrical...

  8. Scale model studies of displacement ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okutan, Galip Mehmet

    1995-01-01

    Displacement ventilation is an air conditioning method that provides conditioned air to indoor environments with the goal to improve air quality while reducing energy consumption. This study investigates the performance ...

  9. Demand Controlled Ventilation for Improved Humidity Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. K.

    1996-01-01

    , outside air can be minimized without exceeding recommended IAQ guidelines. INTRODUCTION The greatest single contributor to building energy loads in humid climates is the cooling and dehumidifying of outside air which is brought in for ventilation...

  10. A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilation—or the flux of ...

  11. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family lab homes at the University of Texas at Tyler. The only difference was that House 1 had a vented attic and House 2 had an...

  12. Application of real time transient temperature (RT{sup 3}) program on nuclear power plant HVAC analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Y.; Tomlins, V.A.; Haskell, N.L.; Giffels, F.W.

    1996-08-01

    A database oriented technical analysis program (RT) utilizing a lumped parameter model combined with a finite difference method was developed to concurrently simulate transient temperatures in single or multiple room(s)/area(s). Analyses can be seen for postulated design basis events, such as, 10CFR50 Appendix-R, Loss of Coolant Accident concurrent with Loss of Offsite Power (LOCA/LOOP), Station BlackOut (SBO), and normal station operating conditions. The rate of change of the air temperatures is calculated by explicitly solving a series of energy balance equations with heat sources and sinks that have been described. For building elements with heat absorbing capacity, an explicit Forward Time Central Space (FTCS) model of one dimensional transient heat conduction in a plane element is used to describe the element temperature profile. Heat migration among the rooms/areas is considered not only by means of conduction but also by means of natural convection induced by temperature differences through openings between rooms/areas. The program also provides a means to evaluate existing plant HVAC system performance. The performance and temperature control of local coolers/heaters can be also simulated. The program was used to calculate transient temperature profiles for several buildings and rooms housing safety-related electrical components in PWR and BWR nuclear power plants. Results for a turbine building and reactor building in a BWR nuclear power plant are provided here. Specific calculational areas were defined on the basis of elevation, physical barriers and components/systems. Transient temperature profiles were then determined for the bounding design basis events with winter and summer outdoor air temperatures.

  13. Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, Robb; Arena, Lois

    2013-02-01

    In an effort to improve housing options near Las Vegas, Nevada, the Clark County Community Resources Division (CCCRD) performs substantial renovations to foreclosed homes. After dramatic energy, aesthetic, and health and safety improvements are made, homes are rented or sold to qualified residents. This report describes the evaluation and selection of ventilation systems for these homes, including key considerations when selecting an ideal system. The report then describes CCCRD’s decision process with respect to ventilation.

  14. Industrial Ventilation Statistics Confirm Energy Savings Opportunity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2006-01-01

    ventilation designers, and factory owners alike. When asked how high the use of machinery is, they usually answer 90% of shift time. That’s far from the facts revealed by our measurements. The data published here is based on installed on...” design of ventilation systems, the constantly changing workflow and business demands (production increase, production decrease, new more effective machinery, and new production technology). I would like to prove that “the older the duct system...

  15. Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study concerned with different modes of heal transfer in fibrous and cellulose insulating material is presented. A series of experiments were conducted using an attic simulator to determine the effects of ventilation on attic heat...

  16. Invasive Mechanical Ventilation in California Over 2000-2009: Implications for Emergency Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    meta-analysis. BMJ. of mechanical ventilation: a population-NM, Dettmer M, et al. Mechanical ventilation and Westernet al. Invasive Mechanical Ventilation in California from

  17. Energy and Cost Associated with Ventilating Office Buildings in a Tropical Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rim, Donghyun; Schiavon, Stefano; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Energy and Cost Associated with VentilatingS, Nazaroff WW (2015) Energy and Cost Associated withcost on ventilation energy and cost; and 4) limitations and

  18. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

  19. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy Field Study Plan,Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study inVentilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field

  20. Corrosion of Aluminum-fin, Copper-tube Heat Exchange Coils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past several years the HVAC industry has experienced a large increase in instances of leaks in the central portion of aluminum-finned, coppertube heat exchange coils. These leaks are characterized as being very small in size and very high...

  1. A BEMS-Assisted Commissioning Tool to Improve the Energy Performance of HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choiniere, D.; Corsi, M.

    2003-01-01

    -ASSISTED COMMISSIONING TOOL TO IMPROVE THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF HVAC SYSTEMS Daniel Choiničre Technology Expert CANMET-Energy Technology Centre Natural Resources Canada 1615 Lionel-Boulet Blvd., P.O. Box 4800, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S6, Canada Maria Corsi1...

  2. Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    carrying out a proof of operation. In large modern buildings, the energy management and control system monitoring period following each change in setpoint, characterize system performance. These indicesAutomated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond Lawrence Berkeley

  3. Randomized Model Predictive Control for HVAC Systems Alessandra Parisio, Damiano Varagnolo, Daniel Risberg,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    temperature and CO2 con- centration levels. More specifically, we propose a random- ization technique Conditioning (HVAC) sys- tems play a fundamental role in maintaining acceptable ther- mal comfort and Indoor- pancy and weather conditions and uses them to build proba- bilistic constraints on the indoor

  4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP VOLUME 5: HEATING, VENTILATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and space conditioning systems in a cost effective efficient package Need information on energy performance and optimization Need for cost effective demand response capability...

  5. Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,Security Officer Program |quickHeather

  6. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Projects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,Security Officer Program |quickHeatherThermostats

  7. Systems and methods for controlling energy use in a building management system using energy budgets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wenzel, Michael J; Drees, Kirk H

    2014-09-23

    Systems and methods for limiting power consumption by a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) subsystem of a building are shown and described. A feedback controller is used to generate a manipulated variable based on an energy use setpoint and a measured energy use. The manipulated variable may be used for adjusting the operation of an HVAC device.

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building Indoor Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building of the effect on indoor climate, we verify that the controller achieves the energy efficiency improvements to heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems [1]. Energy-efficient control of HVAC systems

  9. Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating with Thermoelectric Devices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. 2014-04-28 Issuance: Certification of Commercial HVAC, Water Heating, and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 of 8 3 of 8 4 of 8Refrigeration

  11. Geothermal Energy and the Academic Environment University of British Columbia Okanagan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the frost line, stays at approximately 50 °F (10 °C) year round and a water- source heat pump uses that available heat in the winter and puts heat back into the ground in the summer. Geothermal heat pump systems Education Office 2000). A geothermal heat pump system is a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC

  12. Smart Sensing, Estimation, and Prediction for Efficient Building Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Yu-Han

    is accounted for in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Smart sensing and adaptive efficiency by continuously adapting to occupancy forecasts of each room. 1 Introduction Heating, ventilation the distribution of the new and existing sensors on the first floor of RGL. The BLEMS software will use

  13. Estimated costs of ventilation systems complying with the HUD ventilation standard for manufactured homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.; Conner, C.C.

    1993-11-01

    At the request of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory estimated the material, labor, and operating costs for ventilation equipment needed for compliance with HUD`s proposed revision to the ventilation standard for manufactured housing. This was intended to bound the financial impacts of the ventilation standard revision. Researchers evaluated five possible prototype ventilation systems that met the proposed ventilation requirements. Of those five, two systems were determined to be the most likely used by housing manufacturers: System 1 combines a fresh air duct with the existing central forced-air system to supply and circulate fresh air to conditioned spaces. System 2 uses a separate exhaust fan to remove air from the manufactured home. The estimated material and labor costs for these two systems range from $200 to $300 per home. Annual operating costs for the two ventilation systems were estimated for 20 US cities. The estimated operating costs for System 1 ranged from $55/year in Las Vegas, Nevada, to $83/year in Bismarck, North Dakota. Operating costs for System 2 ranged from a low of $35/year in Las Vegas to $63/year in Bismarck. Thus, HUD`s proposed increase in ventilation requirements will add less than $100/year to the energy cost of a manufactured home.

  14. Investigation of room ventilation for improved operation of a downdraft table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaraman, B.; Kristoffersen, A.; Finlayson, E.; Gadgil, A.

    2004-01-01

    Investigation of Room Ventilation for Improved Operation ofInvestigation of Room Ventilation for Improved Operation of

  15. Natural ventilation : design for suburban houses in Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tantasavasdi, Chalermwat, 1971-

    1998-01-01

    Natural Ventilation is the most effective passive cooling design strategy for architecture in hot and humid climates. In Thailand, natural ventilation has been the most essential element in the vernacular architecture such ...

  16. Study of natural ventilation in buildings with large eddy simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yi, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    With the discovery of many economic, environmental, and health problems in sealed and mechanically ventilated buildings, the concept of natural ventilation has been revived. "Buildings that breathe" have become more and ...

  17. A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

    1995-01-01

    Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

  18. Modeling buoyancy-driven airflow in ventilation shafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

    2012-01-01

    Naturally ventilated buildings can significantly reduce the required energy for cooling and ventilating buildings by drawing in outdoor air using non-mechanical forces. Buoyancy-driven systems are common in naturally ...

  19. Predictive modeling and optimization of a multi-zone HVAC system with data mining and firefly algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    . Sakulpipatsin et al. [6] proposed an extended method for energy and exergy analysis of HVAC systems data-driven framework is examined in the computational studies. A sensitivity analysis of the potential

  20. Optimized Fan Control In Variable Air Volume HVAC Systems Using Static Pressure Resets: Strategy Selection and Savings Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimla, John

    2010-07-14

    The potential of static pressure reset (SPR) control to save fan energy in variable air volume HVAC systems has been well documented. Current research has focused on the creation of reset strategies depending on specific ...

  1. BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.

    2001-01-01

    This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

  2. Strategy Guideline. Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  3. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  4. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  5. Building America Webinar: Ventilation Strategies for High Performance Homes, Part I: Application-Specific Ventilation Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Aug. 26, 2015, covered what makes high-performance homes different from a ventilation perspective and how they might need to be treated differently than traditional construction.

  6. Performance Test and Energy Saving Analysis of a Heat Pipe Dehumidifier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, X.; Li, Q.; Yun, C.

    2006-01-01

    , Dehumidifier Heat Pipes for Rice Drying and Storage, 6th International Heat Pipe Symposium, 2000,Chiang Mai, Thailand [3] Xia Yu, Wen Wang, Ruzhu Wang. Applications of heat pipe in Air conditions)in Chinese). Heating Ventilation and Air Conditions,2004,34(5):26-30 ...

  7. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-62700 Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation Systems Max H Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Air Distribution depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants

  8. Mixed-Mode Ventilation and Building Retrofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Ackerly, Katie

    2010-01-01

    of low-energy ventilation strategies in four generalized UKUK offices: How adaptive comfort theories might influence future low energy office refurbishment strategies’,UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions’ Energy Efficiency Best Practice Programme Numerous guidelines for developing the most appropriate design strategy

  9. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  10. Application Availability of Insulation Heat of the Terrace in a Rebuilt Refrigerator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, C.; Sun, Y.; Chen, Z.

    2006-01-01

    HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency Vol.IV-1-5 Associate Master Professor Application Availability of Insulation Heat of the Terrace in a Rebuilt Refrigerator Chunmin Qu Yong Sun Zhonghai Chen Master... refrigerator; insulation heat; saving energy 1. INTRODUCTION The homoiothermal refrigerators that are built early day need be rebuilt to the cryogenic refrigerators along with the development continuously of market economy. The matching...

  11. Comparisons of HVAC Simulations between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Sartor, Dale; Mathew, Paul; Yazdanian, Mehry

    2008-08-13

    This paper compares HVAC simulations between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for data centers. The HVAC systems studied in the paper are packaged direct expansion air-cooled single zone systems with and without air economizer. Four climate zones are chosen for the study - San Francisco, Miami, Chicago, and Phoenix. EnergyPlus version 2.1 and DOE-2.2 version 45 are used in the annual energy simulations. The annual cooling electric consumption calculated by EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 are reasonablely matched within a range of -0.4percent to 8.6percent. The paper also discusses sources of differences beween EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 runs including cooling coil algorithm, performance curves, and important energy model inputs.

  12. Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1985-01-01

    energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility...

  13. SY Tank Farm ventilation isolation option risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, T.B.; Morales, S.D.

    1994-03-01

    The safety of the 241-SY Tank Farm ventilation system has been under extensive scrutiny due to safety concerns associated with tank 101-SY. Hydrogen and other gases are generated and trapped in the waste below the liquid surface. Periodically, these gases are released into the dome space and vented through the exhaust system. This attention to the ventilation system has resulted in the development of several alternative ventilation system designs. The ventilation system provides the primary means of mitigation of accidents associated with flammable gases. This report provides an assessment of various alternatives ventilation system designs.

  14. Water Heating Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuel EfficiencyWashington ,Water Heating Products andHVAC,

  15. Analysis of the Design of an HVAC System in a Public Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, P.; Shao, Z.; Chen, H.

    2006-01-01

    Based on an example of the design of air conditioning system for a public building, this paper analyzes the characteristics of similar buildings, and introduces the air conditioning system, ventilating system, and the fire control system...

  16. Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A case study of photovoltaic attic ventilator fans was conducted on an occupied single family home in Central Florida. Two fans were installed at mid-summer in an instrumented home where attic air temperature, meteorological conditions and space cooling electric power were measured. The home already had an attic radiant barrier, but still experienced attic air temperatures in excess of 130oF.

  17. Passive heating and cooling strategies for single family housing in Fresno, California: a case study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winchester, Nathan James

    1995-01-01

    This study focuses on the integration of passive heating, cooling, and ventilating techniques for detached single family housing in Fresno, California. The energy use and patterns of energy use were simulated for a typical tract house in Fresno...

  18. Can ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 Requirements be Satisfied while Maintaining Moisture Control using Stock HVAC Equipment in Hot, Humid Climates? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, S. C.

    1996-01-01

    energy costs. Increased ventilation rates create real capital and operating costs for building owners and operators, with implications beyond energy costs relating to increased ventilation requirements. In hot, humid climates, increased ventilation rates...

  19. 170 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 45, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1998 Application of Functional Link Neural Network to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Mo-Yuen

    highlights the recent trend toward more effective and efficient heating, ventilating, and air- conditioning, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) sys- tems are a permanent part of everyday life in our industrialized society. A mere 1% improvement in energy efficiency of these systems translates into annual savings

  20. Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork, Roseville, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    K. Hovnanian Homes constructed a 2,253-ft single-story slab-on-grade ranch house for an occupied test house (new construction) in Roseville, California. One year of monitoring and analysis focused on the effectiveness of the space conditioning system at maintaining acceptable temperature and relative humidity levels in several rooms of the home, as well as room-to-room differences and the actual measured energy consumption by the space conditioning system. In this home, the air handler unit (AHU) and ducts were relocated to inside the thermal boundary. The AHU was relocated from the attic to a mechanical closet, and the ductwork was located inside an insulated and air-sealed bulkhead in the attic. To describe the performance and comfort in the home, the research team selected representative design days and extreme days from the annual data for analysis. To ensure that temperature differences were within reasonable occupant expectations, the team followed Air Conditioning Contractors of America guidance. At the end of the monitoring period, the occupant of the home had no comfort complaints in the home. Any variance between the modeled heating and cooling energy and the actual amounts used can be attributed to the variance in temperatures at the thermostat versus the modeled inputs.

  1. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2008-01-01

    In Review J. Indoor Air) 2007 LBNL-63193 Tarantola, Albert,Gas Measurement to Determine Air Movements in a House,Measurement Techniques”, Air Infiltration and Ventilation

  2. LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .........................................................10 11. Water Intrusion Control.............................................................10 What control and ventilation are key control means. People spend, on average, nearly 90% of their time indoors

  3. Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

    2009-01-01

    Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation inalone if energy-saving strategies are not applied. TheHowever, this energy- saving strategy can be recommended

  4. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America webinar, held on Sept. 24, 2014, focused on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

  5. AUTOMATIC VARIABLE VENTILATION CONTROL SYSTEMS BASED ON AIR QUALITY DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turiel, Isaac

    2011-01-01

    U"'"'''"'" - e "'~saon Automatic Variable Ventilation1979) LBL~8893 EEB Vent 79-3 Automatic variable ventilationmeasurement capabilities o Automatic operation o Low

  6. Energy Savings Potential of Flexible and Adaptive HVAC Distribution Systems for Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftness, Vivian; Brahme, Rohini; Mondazzi, Michelle; Vineyard, Edward; MacDonald, Michael

    2002-06-01

    It has been understood by architects and engineers that office buildings with easily re-configurable space and flexible mechanical and electrical systems are able to provide comfort that increases worker productivity while using less energy. Raised floors are an example of how fresh air, thermal conditioning, lighting needs, and network access can be delivered in a flexible manner that is not ''embedded'' within the structure. What are not yet documented is how well these systems perform and how much energy they can save. This area is being investigated in phased projects of the 21st Century Research Program of the Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute. For the initial project, research teams at the Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, documented the diversity, performance, and incidence of flexible and adaptive HVAC systems. Information was gathered worldwide from journal and conference articles, case studies, manufactured products and assemblies, and interviews with design professionals. Their report thoroughly describes the variety of system types along with the various design alternatives observed for plenums, diffusers, individual control, and system integration. Many of the systems are illustrated in the report and the authors provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons. Among conclusions regarding key design issues, and barriers to widespread adoption, the authors state that flexible and adaptive HVAC systems, such as underfloor air, perform as well if not better than ceiling-based systems. Leading engineers have become active proponents after their first experience, which is resulting in these flexible and adaptive HVAC systems approaching 10 percent of the new construction market. To encourage adoption of this technology that improves thermal comfort and indoor air quality, follow-on work is required to further document performance. Architects, professional engineers, and commercial real estate developers will benefit from the availability of information that quantifies energy savings, first cost construction differences, and additional operating costs created when office space must be reconfigured to accommodate new tenants.

  7. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  8. Predicting yearly energy savings using BIN weather data with heat-pipe heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, G.D. [Zexel USA Corp., Decatur, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In an earlier paper, the author had investigated the impact that a heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) has on the energy consumption and the peak demand on an existing air conditioning system. A detailed performance investigation was carried out for a number of cities for year round operation of the HVAC system with HPHE. Heating degree days and cooling hours were used for predicting the energy savings with the HPHE. In order to calculate the true energy savings, a more realistic approach is to use the BIN weather data. The author has developed a simulation program that can predict the energy savings by using the BIN weather data. The investigation has been carried out for 33 US cities with widely different climactic conditions and the results are presented in this paper. Economic analysis reveals that a simple retrofit on an existing HVAC system can pay for itself in less than a year. Based on this investigation, it is recommended that electric utilities use this technology as a demand side management strategy for reducing energy and peak demand.

  9. Model-based analysis and simulation of regenerative heat wheel Zhuang Wu a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    , which is used in many heat recovery systems. In this paper, a model-based analysis of a rotary Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery systems plays a vital role in securing optimum air quality, thermal heat recovery systems [3]. Such systems have a significant effect on the energy effectiveness

  10. A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

  11. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

  12. Guide to Closing and Conditioning Ventilated Crawlspaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, B.

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide explains the issues and concerns with conventional ventilated crawlspaces and provides prescriptive measures for improvements that will create healthier and more durable spaces. The methods described in this guide are not the only acceptable ways to treat a crawlspace but represent a proven strategy that works in many areas of the United States. The designs discussed in this guide may or may not meet the local building codes and as such will need to be researched before beginning the project.

  13. Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryinEnable LowNews VehicleDepartmentVentilation in

  14. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-01-01

    of Particles in Vertical Ducts with Smooth and RoughDeposition in Ventilation Ducts, Ph. D. Dissertation,Applicability to Ventilation Ducts in Commercial Buildings,

  15. Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation of Hydrogen from Buildings: Laboratory Test and Model Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Gawlik, K.

    2009-05-01

    Passive, buoyancy-driven ventilation is one approach to limiting hydrogen concentration. We explored the relationship between leak rate, ventilation design, and hydrogen concentrations.

  16. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and...

  17. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petithuguenin, T.D.P.

    2009-01-01

    and strength, on occupants’ behavior, on the ventilationSince the occupants’ behavior drives ventilation (viaa more realistic approach to occupant behavior and exposure

  18. HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder, Houston, Texas (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    BSC worked directly with the David Weekley Homes - Houston division to redesign three floor plans in order to locate the HVAC system in conditioned space. The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space. In addition, BSC conducted energy analysis to calculate the most economical strategy for increasing the energy performance of future production houses. This is in preparation for the upcoming code changes in 2015. The builder wishes to develop an upgrade package that will allow for a seamless transition to the new code mandate. The following research questions were addressed by this research project: 1. What is the most cost effective, best performing and most easily replicable method of locating ducts inside conditioned space for a hot-humid production home builder that constructs one and two story single family detached residences? 2. What is a cost effective and practical method of achieving 50% source energy savings vs. the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for a hot-humid production builder? 3. How accurate are the pre-construction whole house cost estimates compared to confirmed post construction actual cost? BSC and the builder developed a duct design strategy that employs a system of dropped ceilings and attic coffers for moving the ductwork from the vented attic to conditioned space. The furnace has been moved to either a mechanical closet in the conditioned living space or a coffered space in the attic.

  19. Improved Wireless Performance from Mode Scattering in Ventilation Ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    Improved Wireless Performance from Mode Scattering in Ventilation Ducts Benjamin E. Henty, PA 15230. henty@eirp.org and stancil@cmu.edu Abstract Ventilation ducts are a convenient undesirable in a ven- tilation duct setting. With this in mind we investigate the mode scattering effects

  20. Optimal decision making in ventilation control Andrew Kusiak*, Mingyang Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    . In addition, devices such as air-side economizers are also used in ventilation systems to reduce energy Accepted 24 July 2009 Available online 15 August 2009 Keywords: Ventilation Air quality Multi. Using the CO2 concentration as the major indoor air quality index and expected room occupancy schedule

  1. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  2. The Dwyer Series 640 air velocity transmitter is ideal for a wide range of HVAC measurement and control applications, particularly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    measurements, supply and exhaust fan tracking, industrial hygiene and clean-room systems, air pollution studiesThe Dwyer Series 640 air velocity transmitter is ideal for a wide range of HVAC measurement for use in reasonably clean and dry air streams, appli- cations include multi-point air velocity

  3. 7/11/00-draft copy: do not quote 1 of 30 New Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7/11/00-draft copy: do not quote 1 of 30 New Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts Burke Treidler, and are difficult to install in a manner which will insure no leaks. This report summarizes the potential for new technologies for ducts, duct fittings, and insulation. It begins with a review of what technology is currently

  4. www.ornl.gov Environmental Chambers at ORNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , desiccant systems, and small distributed generation/combined heat and power (CHP) systems with capacities conditioning, ventilation, water heating, and indoor environmental quality) with much greater energy efficiency-air HVAC system, heat pump water heaters, a dehumidifying water heater, solid-state lighting, hybrid solar

  5. Assessment and Prediction of the Thermal Performance of a Centralized Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Utilizing Artificial Neural Network 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sawi, A.; Haghighat, F.; Akbari, H.

    2013-01-01

    A simulation tool is developed to analyze the thermal performance of a centralized latent heat thermal energy storage system (LHTES) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The LHTES system is integrated with a mechanical ventilation system...

  6. Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

  7. Technology Solutions Case Study: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  8. Building America Webinar: Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    as a critical measure for reducing heating load in homes in cold climates. webinarhybridinsulation20111130.wmv More Documents & Publications Building America Webinar:...

  9. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. November,Control. ” Heating Air Conditioning and Refrigeration News.

  10. Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    big space or if cooling/heating floor/ceiling systems areheating system (radiant panels, convectors, radiators or fan coil units at floor

  11. Study of lubricant circulation in HVAC systems. Volume 1: Description of technical effort and results; Final technical report, March 1995--April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biancardi, F.R.; Michels, H.H.; Sienel, T.H.; Pandy, D.R.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this program was to conduct experimental and analytical efforts to determine lubricant circulation characteristics of new HFC/POE pairs and HFC/mineral oil pairs in a representative central residential HVAC system and to compare their behavior with the traditional HCFC-22/mineral oil (refrigerant/lubricant) pair. A dynamic test facility was designed and built to conduct the experimental efforts. This facility provided a unique capability to visually and physically measure oil circulation rates, on-line, in operating systems. A unique on-line ultraviolet-based measurement device was used to obtain detailed data on the rate and level of lubricant oil circulated within the operating heat pump system. The experimental and analytical data developed during the program are presented as a function of vapor velocity, refrigerant/lubricant viscosity, system features and equipment. Both visual observations and instrumentation were used to understand ``worst case`` oil circulation situations. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 contains a complete description of the program scope, objective, test results summary, conclusions, description of test facility and recommendations for future effort. Volume 2 contains all of the program test data essentially as taken from the laboratory dynamic test facility during the sequence of runs.

  12. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  13. HVAC Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowď‚—34 Revision 0August 9, 2012 ISMscientists

  14. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transcript of Building America webinar, "Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements," held on Sept. 24, 2014.

  15. New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forowicz, T

    1997-01-01

    New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

  16. Training Workers to use Localized Ventilation for Radiological Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-09-01

    Work on radiological systems and components needs to be accomplished using techniques that reduce radiation dose to workers, limit contamination spread, and minimize radioactive waste. One of the best methods to control contamination spread is to use localized ventilation to capture radioactive material and keep it from spreading. The Fluor Hanford ALARA Center teaches workers how to use ventilation in partnership with other engineered controls and this has resulted in improved work practices, minimized the impact on adjacent work operations, and decreased the amount of radioactive waste generated. This presentation will emphasize how the workers are trained to use localized ventilation for contamination control.

  17. Simulation of a High Efficiency Multi-bed Adsorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Humble, Paul H.; Sweeney, J. B.

    2012-05-01

    Attaining high energy efficiency with adsorption heat pumps is challenging due to thermodynamic losses that occur when the sorbent beds are thermally cycled without effective heat recuperation. The multi-bed concept described here effectively transfers heat from beds being cooled to beds being heated, which enables high efficiency in thermally driven heat pumps. A simplified lumped-parameter model and detailed finite element analysis are used to simulate the performance of an ammonia-carbon sorption compressor, which is used to project the overall heat pump coefficient of performance. The effects of bed geometry and number of beds on system performance are explored, and the majority of the performance benefit is obtained with four beds. Results indicate that a COP of 1.24 based on heat input is feasible at AHRI standard test conditions for residential HVAC equipment. When compared on a basis of primary energy input, performance equivalent to SEER 13 or 14 are theoretically attainable with this system.

  18. An inverse method for calculation of thermal inertia and heat gain in air conditioning and refrigeration systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    An inverse method for calculation of thermal inertia and heat gain in air conditioning for estimation of thermal inertia and heat gain in air conditioning and refrigeration systems using on Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration

  19. Natural ventilation in buildings : modeling, control and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ip Kiun Chong, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Natural ventilation in buildings has the potential to reduce the energy consumption usually associated with mechanical cooling while maintaining thermal comfort and air quality. It is important to know how building parameters, ...

  20. Outside Air Ventilation Controller - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    peak demand with no compromise in comfort. This automated night-cooling ventilation system can reduce cooling energy costs up to 40% and peak demand up to 50% in California's...