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1

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Kokanee Stocking and Monitoring in Flathead Lake, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork-of the Flathead River reduced the reproductive success of kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) spawning in the Flathead River. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) authored a mitigation plan to offset those losses. The mitigation goal, stated in the Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributed to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, is to: {open_quotes}Replace lost annual production of 100,000 kokanee adults, initially through hatchery production and pen rearing in Flathead Lake, partially replacing lost forage for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Flathead Lake.{close_quotes}

Fredenberg, Wade; Carty, Daniel (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Kalispell, MT); Cavigli, Jon (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and other features necessary for a long-term implementation plan.

Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); DosSantos, Joseph M. (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Determination of Fishery Losses in the Flathead System Resulting from the Construction of Hungry Horse Dam, 1986 Final Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's residential fish and wildlife plan, which is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife resources caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River basin. The major goal of this study was to provide estimates of fishery losses to the Flathead system as a result of the completion of Hungry Horse Dam and to propose mitigation alternatives for enhancing the fishery. Construction of Hungry Horse Dam had the greatest adverse impacts on cutthroat and full trout from Flathead Lake and mitigative measures should be taken to offset these losses, if biologically and economically feasible. Also, other losses to fish and wildlife have been documented in the Flathead basin due to hydroelectric facilities and their operation. Some of these research projects will not be completed until 1989, when mitigation will be recommended using a basin-wide approach. Since HHR is at the headwaters of the Columbia system, mitigative measures may also affect downstream projects. Therefore, we presented an array of possible mitigation alternatives for consideration by decision-makers, with suggestions on the ones we feel are the most cost effective. Possible mitigation measures are included.

Zubik, Raymond J.; Fraley, John

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System; Technical Addendum to the Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This addendum to the Final Report presents results of research on the zooplankton and fish communities of Flathead Lade. The intent of the Study has been to identify the impacts of hydroelectric operations at Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee an to propose mitigation for these impacts. Recent changes in the trophic ecology of the lake, have reduced the survival of kokanee. In the last three year the Study has been redirected to identify, if possible, the biological mechanisms which now limit kokanee survival, and to test methods of enhancing the kokanee fishery by artificial supplementation. These studies were necessary to the formulation of mitigation plans. The possibility of successfully rehabilitating the kokanee population, is the doubt because of change in the trophic ecology of the system. This report first presents the results of studies of the population dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, upon which planktivorous fish depend. A modest effort was directed to measuring the spawning escapement of kokanee in 1988. Because of its relevance to the study, we also report assessments of 1989 kokanee spawning escapement. Hydroacoustic assessment of the abundance of all fish species in Flathead Lake was conducted in November, 1988. Summary of the continued efforts to document the growth rates and food habits of kokanee and lake whitefish are included in this report. Revised kokanee spawning and harvest estimates, and management implications of the altered ecology of Flathead Lake comprise the final sections of this addendum. 83 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

Beattie, Will; Tohtz, Joel

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproduction Success of Kokanee in the Flathead River System, 1986 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1985 kokanee spawning run in the Flathead system was the strongest in five years. Escapement to the Flathead River system was 147,000 fish, including 123,000 in McDonald Creek and an estimated 20,000 in the main stem. Enumeration of spawners and redds in the Flathead River was hindered by high fall flows and early freezing in November. The upstream spawning migration from Flathead Lake began in late August. Schools of kokanee were seen six miles above the lake on September 4. We counted 1,156 redds in Flathead Lake, distributed primarily along the southeastern shore. An unusually high proportion (90 percent) of lakeshore spawning occurred in the zone above minimum pool, where egg mortality is very high because of exposure from drawdown. Escapement to the Swan River was 1,350 fish. Four year old (III+) fish comprised 95 percent of the spawning run in the Flathead system. This continues a five-year trend toward dominance of the III+ year class. The age composition of spawners has varied considerably for the past 15 years. The average size of spawning fish was 365 mm, which is identical to the average size of the parent year class in 1981. One of the goals of managing Flathead kokanee is to produce mature fish 300-330 mm in length. In the main stem Flathead River, pre-emergent survival was 80 percent. Survival in McDonald Creek, unaffected by hydroelectric operations, was 83 percent. Sampling showed few hatched alevins, probably due to unusually cold winter temperatures. Egg survival at Blue Bay, a spawning area on Flathead Lake where redds are concentrated below minimum pool, varied in relation to depth and dissolved oxygen concentration in the substrate. Eggs survived 78 days at 2,880 feet where dissolved oxygen was 5.7 mg/l. Eggs survived 35 days at 2,870 feet where dissolved oxygen concentration averaged 2.9 mg/l. Low dissolved oxygen contributed to poor survival to emergence at all elevations in Blue Ray. Experiments in Skidoo Bay confirmed that survival of eggs above minimum pool depends on redds being wetted by groundwater seeps. After 40 days exposure by drawdown, eggs in groundwater seeps showed 86 percent survival, whereas outside of the groundwater seeps eggs survived less than six days. These results confirm that exposure by drawdown is the primary factor that limits kokanee reproductive success in redds above minimum pool. We surveyed the west and south shoreline of Flathead Lake to locate potential kokanee spawning habitat. We found conditions which could support incubating eggs at two sites in South Ray and two sites on the west shore of the lake. Seven other sites on the west shore were not suitable due to low groundwater discharge or low dissolved oxygen. In all these areas suitable substrate existed only within the drawdown zone. The lake should be drafted earlier in the fall, and filled earlier in the spring to improve recruitment from lakeshore spawning. We conducted creel surveys during 1985, and estimated that anglers caught 192,000 kokanee. Anglers harvested 49,200 fish during the ice fishery in Skidoo Bay, 129,000 fish during the summer fishery on the lake, and 13,800 during the fall river fishery. Estimated fishing pressure for the year exceeded 188,000 angler hours. The abundance of mysid shrimp in Flathead Lake, measured at six index stations, increased to 130/mIf in 1986. My&Is increased tenfold from 1984 to 1985, and about threefold from 1985 to 1986. Monitoring of mysid shrimp and zooplankton populations in Flathead Lake is supplementing an investigation of the growth and survival of juvenile kokanee. Kokanee and mysid shrimp feed primarily on planktonic crustaceans. This work was designed to detect a potential decline in kokanee recruitment or growth brought about by competitive interaction with mysid shrimp. Fluctuation in adult kokanee year class strength is in part attributable to the negative effects of hydroelectric dam operation on reproductive success in the main stem Flathead River and in Flathead Lake. Our results show that egg survival in the river has improved in response to sta

Beattie, Will; Clancey, Patrick

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

Casey, Daniel

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Quantification of Hungry Horse Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1985 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act passed in 1980 by Congress has provided a mechanism which integrates and provides for stable energy planning in the Pacific Northwest. The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council and charged the Council with developing a comprehensive fish and wildlife program to protect and enhance fish and wildlife impacted by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Implementation of the plan is being carried out by the Bonneville Power Administration. The Hungry Horse Reservoir study is part of that Council's plan. This study proposes to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance principal gamefish species in Hungry Horse Reservoir. The specific study objects are listed below. (1) Quantify the amount of reservoir habitat available at different water level elevations; (2) Estimate recruitment of westslope cutthroat trout juveniles from important spawning and nursery tributaries; (3) Determine the abundance, growth, distribution and use of available habitat by major game species in the reservoir; (4) Determine the abundance and availability of fish food organisms in the reservoir; (5) Quantify the seasonal use of available food items by major fish species; (6) Develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat used by fish and fish food organisms; and (7) Estimate the impact of reservoir operation on major gamefish species.

May, Bruce

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Kokanee Stocking and Monitoring in Flathead Lake, 1993-1997 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results and conclusions of a 6-year evaluation of the test of reestablishment of kokanee in Flathead lake.

Fredenberg, Wade; Hansen, Barry; Deleray, Mark

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Original article Breeding evaluation of arab horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Breeding evaluation of arab horses from their racing results in Tunisia by a BLUP was to estimate the breeding value of Arab horses in Tunisia. Racing results (36203) were available corresponding to 2432 horses issued from 811 dams and 218 sires registered in the Tunisian stud book and in the races

Boyer, Edmond

19

EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam through restoring habitat, improving fish passage, protecting and recovering native fish populations, and reestablishing fish...

20

Appendix 68 Bull Trout Data for Hungry Horse and South Fork of the Flathead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4632 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 No.Redds #12;Figure 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Composting Horse Manure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncontrolled stockpiles of horse manure can be an unsightly, smelly and fly-infested mess. However, composting manure can eliminate the messy problems and provide a modest additional income for horse enthusiasts, operators of equine facilities...

Auvermann, Brent W.; McDonald, Lanny; Devin, Robert; Sweeten, John M.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

OIKOS 100: 311316, 2003 Hungry predators render predator-avoidance behavior in tadpoles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIKOS 100: 311­316, 2003 Hungry predators render predator-avoidance behavior in tadpoles ineffective Res Altwegg Altwegg, R. 2003. Hungry predators render predator-avoidance behavior in tadpoles render the behavioral responses in their prey ineffective. Nevertheless, most studies investigating

Altwegg, Res

23

Dam Safety Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

24

Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

25

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. ...

27

Dam Safety (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety,...

28

Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may be subject to periodic inspections. The...

29

Power Plant Dams (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across...

30

Dams – Fishways (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No permanent dam or obstruction may be placed in the waters of the state without providing for fish passage.

31

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Dam Safety Program (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

33

Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations govern the permitting, construction, operation, inspection, and hazard classifications of dams, dikes, and other water impoundments. The Dam Safety page of the State Water...

34

Dam Safety Standards (New Jersey)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules set forth procedures for application to construct, repair or modify a dam and set standards for design and maintenance of dams. These rules also establish a dam inspection procedure....

35

Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes the state's interest in the construction of dams for water control and regulation and for hydropower generation purposes. It regulates dam construction, operation, and...

36

Dams (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dam construction in South Dakota requires a Location Notice or a Water Right Permit. A Location Notice is a form that must be filed with the County Register of Deeds, and is the only paperwork...

37

Regulation of Dams (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The owner of a dam is required to maintain the structure in good condition, and notify the Department of Environmental Management upon the sale or transfer of ownership of the structure. The...

38

Dam Safety (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule requires that anyone who desires to construct a dam that is 6 feet or more in height and impounds 5 surface acres or more at the design flood elevation, must first obtain a permit from...

39

Dam Safety (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A, Subchapter 2K lays out further regulations for the design, approval, construction, maintenance, and inspection of dams to ensure public safety and...

40

Feeding the Arena Performance Horse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 1,100 200 140 Two-year olds b 26.3 2.5 50 27 20,000 800 150 100 (in training) a From The National Research Council (1989) b Requirements from recent research by Nielson et al. (1998) and Stephens et al. (2001) Nutrition influences a horse?s body... programs. Young horses: During the initial stages of train- ing, young horses appear to need 30 to 35 percent more calcium and phosphorus and 80 to 100 per- cent more magnesium than is recommended in current National Research Council (NRC) guidelines 12, 13...

Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.; Scott, Brett D.

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Flood Protection and Dam Safety (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All dams in Virginia are subject to the Dam Safety Act and Dam Safety Regulations unless specifically excluded. A dam is excluded if it: (a) is less than six feet high; (b) has a maximum capacity...

42

Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws outlines procedures to settle disputes regarding the construction and operation of dams on non-navigable waters. Dam construction or alteration is...

43

Horse Theft Awareness and Prevention - Identification of Horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permanently identifying horses can deter theft and help prove ownership. This publication discusses hot-iron branding, freeze branding, electronic identification, lip tattoos, and using photographs, illustrations, parentage verification and brand...

Gibbs, Pete G.; Wall, Leman H.; Householder, Doug

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Plumpton College Horse riding displays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plumpton College · Horse riding displays · Forestry demonstrations · Small animals · Tractor: enquiries@plumpton.ac.uk Tel: 01273 890454 www.plumpton.ac.uk Advice on all courses and career opportunities

Bontcheva, Kalina

45

A hungry brain slurps up a kid's energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information Of The Transiel Method OnA hungry brain

46

Rigging a horse and rider: simulating the predictable and repetitive movement of the rider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

????????????????????. 6.1 Horse?s Foot Support??????.???..?????...???.. 6.2 Horse?s Height and Rear Rotation?????????????? 6.3 Horse?s Foot Position Forward or Backward?????????? 7. CHARACTER... is the greatest??????????????????.????.?.. 28. Analyzing the horse?s rear foot position??????????????.?. 29. Analyzing the horse?s front foot position??????????????.? 30. The height of the horse?s fore feet?????????????????? 31. Rider?s seat shifts backward...

Kuhnel, Jennifer Lynn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This establishes requirements relating to the design, placement, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, abandonment, and repair of dams and also establishes requirements to govern the...

48

Advancing Medicine for Horses and Humans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancing Medicine for Horses and Humans Animal Reproduction and Biotechnology Laboratory-Tech Helping Hand Dr. Patrick McCue From Dairy Farm to Horse Farm: A Love of Teaching and Clinical Work Come, Researcher's Enthusiasm Is Infectious Dr. Edward Squires Love of Horses Brought Researcher to Life's Work

49

Abstract--The emergence of cloud computing has established a trend towards building massive, energy-hungry, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the load at locations where they are built. Dynamic energy pricing policies in the recently proposed smart, energy-hungry, and geographically distributed data centers. Due to their enormous energy consumption centers in regions with cheaper electricity or with excessive electricity generated by renewable energy

Pedram, Massoud

50

Huub van Dam | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC HistoryVeteranstoHuub van Dam Recent Highlights

51

Huub van Dam | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmasSandy-Nor'easter Situation ReportsHuub van Dam Recent

52

Regulations and Permits Related to Dams (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Vermont law requires a permit, or a dam order, for the construction, alteration, or removal of dams impounding more than 500,000 cubic feet of water, including any accumulated sediments. Dam...

53

War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

Nonveiller, E. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; Rupcic, J. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia); Sever, Z. [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

55

Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all...

56

Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dams may be constructed, improved, or repaired on private, non-navigable waters subject to certain timelines; however, previously-developed hydropower mechanisms cannot be disrupted. The State may...

57

Feeding Young Horses For Sound Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

futurity contenders and for foals entering race training as yearlings, and while size itself is not a marketing factor for some disciplines such as cutting and reining, rigors of early training place great demands on young skeletal systems. Horse owners... and joint problems known as developmental orthopedic diseases (DOD) are a major concern of horse owners. 29 DOD appears to be heritable. 22 Horses with genetic predispositions for large mature size often develop skeletal problems regardless of how...

Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

HorsesHorses Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service West Lafayette IN, 47907  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and rhinopneumonitis. Depending on your location, the number of horses on your facility, the age of the horses to transport the horse across state lines, state transportation laws require that you have a Coggins test organisms. Proper manure disposal, proper composting, removal of standing water, and keeping the area

59

Texas 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl Supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

number: 26 Division: Both A. Nutrition Question: An adult horse?s body is about what per- centage of water? Answer: 50 percent, or 1 /2 Source: ?Horse Science? Page number: 28 Division: Senior A. Nutrition Question: What does TDN stand for? Answer: Total...? Page number: 36 Division: Both F. Management Question: How much does a healthy hoof grow per month? Answer: 3 /8 to 1 /2 inch Source: ?Horses and Horsemanship? Page number: 36 Division: Both F. Management Question: What does a farrier do? Answer...

Howard, Jeff W.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

60

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE/BP-00005043-1 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Department of Energy, as part of BPA's program to protect, mitigate Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Project Number represent the views of BPA. Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 #12;South

62

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retirement of Dams and Hydroelectric Facilities. ASCE, Newon the Allier River, a hydroelectric plant in France. Thethe dam generating hydroelectric power versus the ecological

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Georgia Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Georgia Safe Dams Act is to provide regulation, inspection and permitting of dams to the State. The Director of the Environmental Protection Division (EPD) is responsible for...

64

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control....

65

Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation, Lactation and Weaning Increases Ethanol examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary ethanol consumption by their adolescent young. We found that exposure to an ethanol-ingesting dam

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

66

Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to dams that are not owned by the U.S. government and (a) have a structural height of more than 6 feet and a maximum storage capacity of 50 acre–feet or more of water, (b)...

67

Horsing Around on Saturn Robert J. Vanderbei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horsing Around on Saturn Robert J. Vanderbei Operations Research and Financial Engineering effect of a few of the inner moons acting as so-called shepherds. Of course, a simpler explanation would

Vanderbei, Robert J.

68

Discrimination reversal learning in yearling horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISCRIMINATION REVERSAL LEARNING IN YEARLING HORSES A Thesis by JEANNA CHASTAIN FISKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976... Major Subjects Animal Science DISCRIMINATION REVERSAL LEARNING IN YEARLING HORSES A Thesis by JEANNA CHASTAIN FISKE Approved as to style and content by& Chai an o Committee ad oi epartment Member Nem er December 1976 ABSTRACT Discrimination...

Fiske, Jeanna Chastain

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Do you have the X-Factor? Are you an energetic, hungry, and results oriented individual who's self-motivated and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do you have the X-Factor? Are you an energetic, hungry, and results oriented individual who's self: www.findyourXfactor.ca. Join the other 170 new grads that joined our team last year. Account Manager Responsibilities: Achieve sales targets for new business sales and renewals. Market full-line of Xerox products

70

Destruction or Alteration of a Dam (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Permission from the Environmental Protection Commission is required prior to the removal, destruction, or alteration that results in a lower water level of any existing dam.

71

Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activity of group-transported horses was evaluated during onboard rest stops to determine if horses derive meaningful rest. A single-deck semi-trailer separated into three compartments was used for all shipments. In Experiment One, twelve video...

Keen, Heidi A.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

US Army Corps of Engineers

73

Habitat Suitability Model for Bighorn Sheep and Wild Horses in Bighorn Canyon and the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Habitat Suitability Model for Bighorn Sheep and Wild Horses in Bighorn Canyon and the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range October 6, 2003 Gary Wockner1 , Francis Singer2 , Kate Schoenecker2 1 Natural a tool that will help managers and other researchers better manage bighorn sheep and wild horses

MacDonald, Lee

74

Texas 4-H Horse Project Teaching Outlines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?s Reference Guide Time required Section I: Feeding Management 30 minutes THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM OF THE HORSE Subject Matter Outline Youth should be able to: a73 Identify the digestive system of the horse a73 List the parts of the foregut and hindgut a73... in about 30 to 90 minutes. B. The hindgut includes the cecum, large colon, small colon and rectum. 1. The cecum is a large, sock-shaped pouch between the small and large intestines. It is important in cel- lulose digestion. During or immediately after eat...

Howard, Jeff W.; Johnson, Ken; Mason, Vanessa; Mitchell, Julianne

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Bacterial Bleeding Canker of Horse Chestnut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a tree in phloem and cambium Horse chestnut bleeding canker ph ph + ca #12;Summary of Infection Pae;· Bacterial diseases represent an increasing threat to Britain's forest, woodland and amenity trees · The Pae epidemic provides an ideal opportunity to develop a system for tackling newly emerging tree diseases · We

76

Civil Engineering Explore the environmental impact of dams.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dams Civil Engineering Objective · Explore the environmental impact of dams. · Discuss the need for dams, and how environmental engineers mitigate some impacts. Standards and Objectives · Earth Systems humans' standard of living and environmental impacts. · The basic concept of constructing a dam

Provancher, William

77

This book describes the responsibilities of show personnel and outlines the job descriptions of various positions for the NH 4-H State Horse Show (or any other 4-H horse show).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of various positions for the NH 4-H State Horse Show (or any other 4-H horse show). June 2013 #12;Table of Contents Organizing a 4-H Horse Show ........................................................................................... 1 State 4-H Horse Show Philosophy................................................................ 1

New Hampshire, University of

78

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply, flood control, hydropower, and recreation. However,as changes induced by hydropower, flood control, or waterFERC requires private hydropower dams to provide “equal

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Safe Dams Act of 1973 (SDA) gives the Commissioner of the Department of Environment and Conservation the power to issue certificates authorizing the construction, alteration, or operation of a...

80

Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act sets the standards and criteria for the siting and design of dams, water obstructions and encroachments considering both existing and projected conditions. It requires operational plans to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This law grants authority to the secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection to control and exercise regulatory jurisdiction over dams as indicated in the subsections of the law. This...

82

Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a...

83

Providing protection: Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Providing protection Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams along with local partners, can apply for grant funds, he said. Construction of the dams began through four federal authorizations... totaling about $11 million. Of the 343 dams currently classified as high hazard, Scattered across Texas are almost 2,000 nondescript, earthen dams built on private land to protect property, roads, and bridges from flood damages. Some of these dams...

Wythe, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comparative Genomics of Mongolian Purebred and Hybrid Horses: Conserving an Important Breed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?s horse as the out group. In this tree the Mongolian horse was grouped closely with the Kyrgyzstan horse, Yakut, and Altai native horse. All three of these horse breeds are inner Asian breeds. The bootstrap values for the tree were low, less than 90..., shows the Mongolian purebred to be closely related to the other inner Asian horse breeds (Kyrgyzstan horse, Yakut, and Altai native horse) but not any of the common Western breeds. This is due to the Mongolian breed having founders? that were not 24...

Wright, Taryn

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

I don't own a horse, but . . . . . . . . Directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elect to enroll in the 4-H Horse Self-determined Project. Horseless horse project members are eligible VIRGINIA STATE UNIVERSITY Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all affiliation. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension

Liskiewicz, Maciej

86

MFR PAPER 1222 Effects of Dams on Pacific Salmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Their numbers were few and their total effect was relatively minor. In the 1880's dams for hydroelectric power. In the 1930's major hydroelectric dams were built on the mainstem Columbia River (Fig. I), initiating

87

Horse Butte Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName Housing Cooperation JumpKongHoosierHopland,Horse

88

Original article Effect of a horse's month of birth on its future sport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Effect of a horse's month of birth on its future sport performance. II. Effect supports the idea that the effect of month of birth in racing horses results mainly from real age differences between horses from the same 'administrative' age class. Any lingering effect in horses older than

Boyer, Edmond

89

with Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy present 2014 NORTHEAST WILD HORSE ADOPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy present 2014 NORTHEAST WILD HORSE ADOPTION Management Wild Horses Friday, March 28 7:00PM­ 9:00PM Viewing of "Wild Horse, Wild Ride" and Discussion of Extreme Mustang Makeover (free and open to the public in Varis Lecture Hall) -Kris and Nik Kokal, Horse

Dennett, Daniel

90

Design of a Sediment Mitigation System for Conowingo Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of a Sediment Mitigation System for Conowingo Dam Rayhan Ain, Kevin Cazenas, Sheri Gravette as enhanced erosion of sediment due to significantly increased flow rates and constant interaction of water with the Dam. During these events, the sediment build up at Conowingo Dam in the Lower Susquehanna River has

91

Chapter 13 Water Resources Hoover Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management Water shortage linked to food supply Learning Objectives #12; The global water cycleChapter 13 Water Resources #12;Hoover Dam #12;The Colorado River Basin Population growth Urbanization Climate change #12; Water cycle Water use Surface water and groundwater processes Water

Pan, Feifei

92

EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL downstream were virtually undetectable. One year after dam removal, substrates of bars and riffles within 400 m downstream of the dam coarsened and a dominance of gravel and cobble sediments replaced previously

Tullos, Desiree

93

Sustainable Energy Dam: research into possible improvement of dam/dike safety by application of sustainable energy on dams/dikes:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A study on the use of the Afsluitdijk (or more generic, enclosure dams in general) for the generation of energy. Focus in this study in… (more)

Wondergem, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

C:\\Public\\CECarter\\Horse\\AdvCouncil\\2009\\11Minutes.doc 4-H Horse Advisory Council 4 November 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C:\\Public\\CECarter\\Horse\\AdvCouncil\\2009\\11Minutes.doc 4-H Horse Advisory Council 4 November 2009, and of course is not something we can solve if N.H. is not hosting the Regional meet. Judging: Kids were be an issue; some horses are possibly just not ready for show like State (multi-day, of this size, full

New Hampshire, University of

95

Pharmacokinetics of ranitidine HCL in horses and foals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma pharmacokinetics of ranitidine HCl were investigated after intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administration of drug to six healthy adult horses and six healthy foals. Concentrations of ranitidine were determined using normal phase high...

Holland, Patricia Susan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Plasma Citrulline Levels in Horses at Risk of Acute Laminitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma citrulline concentrations. Citrulline is an ?-amino acid circulated in the plasma that is produced mainly by intestinal epithelial cells. We hypothesized that horses in the developmental stage of laminitis would have reduced plasma citrulline...

Jackson, Amy Lynn

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

african horse sickness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vectors may carry the virus into AHS-free regions. Some authors speculate that global warming could increase the risk for spread of arthropod-borne diseases such as African horse...

98

african horse sickness virus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vectors may carry the virus into AHS-free regions. Some authors speculate that global warming could increase the risk for spread of arthropod-borne diseases such as African horse...

99

Original article Characterization of pentraxin 3 in the horse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulatory mechanism in inflammatory and bronchial epithelial cells and offer therapeutically interesting perspectives. PTX3 / horse / airway / inflammation 1. INTRODUCTION The respiratory tract is continuously chal- lengedwithpotentiallyinfectivemicroorganisms and noxious airborne substances. An effective defense system is necessary for protecting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Evaluation of pulmonary ventilation in horses during methoxyflurane anesthesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF PULMONARY VENTILATION IN HORSES DURING METHOXYFLURANE ANESTHESIA A Thesis by DON REED McDONALD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Veterinary Medicine and Surgery EVALUATION OF PULMONARY VENTILATION IN HORSES DURING METHOXYFLURANE ANESTHESIA A Thesis by DON REED McDONALD Approved as to style and content by; Chairman o Committee Head...

McDonald, Don Reed

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Searching for the Spirit of Crazy Horse: A Rhetorical Analysis of Competing Myths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Crazy Horse: Stephen Ambrose’s Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors (1975), Joseph Marshall’s The Journey of Crazy Horse: A Lakota History (2004), and Thomas Power’s The Killing of Crazy Horse (2010). Although... these three books only scratch the surface of all that has been written about Crazy Horse, they do represent three important and distinct perspectives on the Crazy Horse myth— from an award-winning historian (Ambrose), a Lakota Indian (Marshall), and a...

Kimbrell, Tyler

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling the costs and benefits of dam construction from a multidisciplinary perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, energy, and environmental protection well into the future, a broader view of dams is needed. We thus and to articulate priorities associated with a dam project, making the decision process about dams more informed dams, the next generation may witness a renewed intensity in large dam development in the U.S. More

Tullos, Desiree

103

Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or Dikes Generally; ExemptionsLegal Abstract Section...

104

EA-1994: Malheur Resource Area Jonesboro Diversion Dam Replacement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Burns Paiute Tribe for replacement of an existing diversion dam and installation of a fish passage structure. BPA's proposed action was to fund the project. PUBLIC COMMENT...

105

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix DOE-STD-3009-2014ofOutline of RemarksType text] Dams and

106

Milner Dam Wind Park | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: Energy Resources JumpMicrelBirds JumpMilner Dam Wind Park Jump to:

107

McNary Dam hits the rewind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMissionreal-timeMaRIEMcNary-Dam-hits-the-rewind Sign In About |

108

Potential Geomorphic and Ecological Impacts of Marmot Dam Removal, Sandy River, OR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marmot Dam is a 13-meter (42 ft) high hydroelectric diversion dam on the Sandy River that is owned Run Hydroelectric project and began the process of creating a decommissioning plan for the dam

109

The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framework for Interpreting Downstream Effects of Dams onF. and N. Shin, 2001. The downstream effects of dams on theG.P. and M.G. Wolman, 1984. Downstream Effects of Dams on

Minear, Justin Toby

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The distribution of dams in Costa Rica and their hydrologic impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dam construction has increased exponentially over the past century, primarily in temperate environments. While the impacts of dams in temperate regions have been well-documented, a parallel level of research on dam impacts has not been achieved...

Laurencio, Laura Richards

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Diffusion of the Texas Cooperative Extension's horse theft awareness and prevention initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the horse. Stolen horses are sold at auction houses, slaughterhouses, or by private treaty. 3 The Horse Theft Awareness and Protection Act (Texas House Bill 2396) was passed in 1997 and challenged Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE) to develop.... The initial advisory committee was held in McLennan County in 1998. Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE) developed this ongoing initiative to increase awareness and promote prevention of horse theft. Outcome measures have provided some evaluation...

Swaim, Pattrick Lee, Jr.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

Seasonal variations and feeding selectivity in the diets of the horses (Equus caballus) of the Camargue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Differences in the diets of individual horses were found, and were attributed through statistical analyses to the horses' season of grazing, age classes, and herd membership. The selective feeding behavior of the horses was evaluated through... degree of selectivity in exploiting their environment. Differences in the diets of the two herds were strikingly small, implying that there is a "preferred diet" that the horses sought out within the confines of their home range. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I...

Skelton, Stephen Taylor

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

114

Original article Effect of a horse's month of birth on its future sport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Effect of a horse's month of birth on its future sport performance. I. Effect of birth was tested through variance analysis and was significant in every case. Horses that are born early in the year had an advantage and performed better than horses born later. The effect varied in magnitude

Boyer, Edmond

115

Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration #12;ii FOREWORD This report was prepared by Argonne Canyon Dam (GCD) conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration (Western. The facilities known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects include dams equipped for power

Kemner, Ken

116

GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geosynthetic liners for dams involves heads much larger than those in environmental applications. Accordingly. Geosynthetics have been used in a large number of geotechnical, transportation, environmental and hydraulic and industrial use. As dams age, deterioration and structural damage are of major concern as they can lead

Zornberg, Jorge G.

117

Processes affecting the spatial and temporal variability of methane in a temperate dammed river system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas emissions from a hydroelectric reservoir (Brazil’sgas emissions from hydroelectric dams: controversies provideP. M. , 2005a. Do hydroelectric dams mitigate global

Bilsley, Nicole A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania TOLERABLE RISK FOR DAMS: HOW SAFE IS SAFE ENOUGH?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and value judgements. ICOLD (2005) ABSTRACT Risk assessment provides an opportunity to manage dam safety for the tolerability of risk developed by the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is summarized. The important role and Environmental Engineering and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management, Utah State University, Logan

Bowles, David S.

119

Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

120

Muscle glycogen utilization and exercise performance in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, during which horses were adapted to a control diet and a diet supplemented with 10% fat (10FS), while maintaining fitness. The second experiment consisted of a 10-day glycogen depletion and repletion regimen (DPRP), in an attempt to produce muscle... and glucose concentrations. Horses adapted to the 10FS diet had greater pre-ET glycogen stores than after adapting to the control diet (P&. 01) and the DPRP regimen (P&. 04), and used more glycogen during the ET (P&. 03) than when adapted to the control...

Oldham, Shannon Lee

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

body condition score Evaluating your miniature horse's body  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, fresh water daily. Water should range in temperature from 45 to 65 degrees F -- neither very hot nor so that any chaff will fall into the feed pan. This chaff is high in protein and is desirable are feeding, and one that can be fed in very small amounts. Water Miniature horses also need access to clean

122

4-H Horse Advisory Committee Member Service Description And Agreement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Responsibilities · Follow all guidelines and policies of University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension 4-H4-H Horse Advisory Committee Member Service Description And Agreement Purpose · To serve to the scope of the duties defined in this service description. Accountable to Extension staff

New Hampshire, University of

123

Mature, Senior and Geriatric Horses: Management, Care and Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

horses with recurrent ex- ertional rhabdomyolysis performing a standardized exercise test.? Equine Veterinary Journal Supplement 30: 458. ? F.D. De La Corte, S.J. Valberg, J.R. Mickelson and M. Hower-Moritz. 1999. ?Blood glucose clear- ance after...

Martin, M. T.; Scrutchfield, W. L.; Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Experimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a fluid hits the dam (fluid impact load). The former tends to cause partial break of the concrete damExperimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1 lwao Miyoshi2 ABSTRACT When a dam is struck by mud or debris flow, it is put under a great impact load and sometimes is destroyed. To prevent

Standiford, Richard B.

126

TSSGNEO suggestions for refinement of safety criteria for dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of radial-displacements of the dam, measured by direct and inverted plumb lines, indicates that curves of the variation in radial displacements of the dam at different elevations make it possible to plot diagrams of increases in the radial displacement over the entire height of the dam, i.e., inclines of the axis of the dam to the vertical.

Savich, A. I.; Gaziev, E. G. [Expert Commission on Assessment of the 'Dam - Bed' System at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP (Russian Federation)] [Expert Commission on Assessment of the 'Dam - Bed' System at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall downstream from the dam and in an upstream control reach using aerial photos (1994­2008) and in the field

Tullos, Desiree

128

Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

129

CARL J. BAUER* Dams and Markets: Rivers and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a variety of new thermal power plants.3 The proposed dams in Patagonia have gotten the headlines and caused the most public conflict, both within Chile and internationally.4 Patagonia is the rugged and remote region

130

Rules and Regulations for Dam Safety (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules and regulations seek to provide for the safety of dams to protect the public, real property, and natural resources by establishing reasonable standards and creating a public record for...

131

Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chapter 31 of the Wisconsin Statutes lays out the regulations relevant to dams and bridges on or near navigable waters. This statute establishes that the Department of Natural Resources has...

132

Power benefits of the lower Snake River dams - FACT SHEET  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dams to have been built in the Federal Columbia River Power System. The FCRPS is the largest source of electricity in the Pacifi c Northwest and the largest source of renewable...

133

Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications for the Age and Evolution of the Valles Caldera Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

134

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Robustness of two-way quantum communication protocols against Trojan horse attack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the robustness of two-way quantum communication protocols against Trojan horse attack and introduce a novel attack, delay-photon Trojan horse attack. Moreover, we present a practical way for two-way quantum communication protocols to prevent the eavesdropper from stealing the information transmitted with Trojan horse attacks. It means that two-way quantum communication protocols is also secure in a practical application.

Fu-Guo Deng; Ping Zhou; Xi-Han Li; Chun-Yan Li; Hong-Yu Zhou

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

136

Trojan horse particle invariance: The impact on nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the current picture of nuclear astrophysics indirect methods and, in particular, the Trojan Horse Method cover a crucial role for the measurement of charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest, in the energy range required by the astrophysical scenarios. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The key to the method is the quasi-free break-up and some of its properties will be investigated in the present work. In particular, the Trojan Horse nucleus invariance will be studied and previous studies will be extended to the cases of the binary d(d, p)t and {sup 6}Li(d,?){sup 4}He reactions, which were tested using different quasi-free break-up's, namely {sup 6}Li and {sup 3}He. The astrophysical S(E)-factor were then extracted with the Trojan Horse formalism applied to the two different break-up schemes and compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen spectator particle also for these reactions.

Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Universitá di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN (Italy); Bertulani, C. A. [Texas A and M University, Commerce (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Blokhintsev, L. D. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lamia, L.; Spartá, R. [Universitá di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Tumino, A. [Universitá Kore, Enna (Italy)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - arch dams Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

infectious secretions from both the vagina and anus, the dental dam is a popular safer sex tool. Dental dams... now come in different colors, scents, sizes and even flavors How...

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis model dam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water from Yongdam Dam. The advantages of a model such as the one... , irrigation, hydropower, and recreation. Two major dams are ... Source: Kim, Young-Oh - Department of Civil...

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - arch dams including Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

part of the East Branch Dam Safety Initiative in Elk County, Pa. The site development work went to Tab... seepage-related dam safety concerns at East Branch Clarion River Lake in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Flathead River Creel Report, 1992-1993. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A roving creel survey was conducted on the Flathead River system, May 1992 through May 1993, as part of Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, funded by Bonneville Power Administration. The Flathead River system is a tributary to the Clarks Fork of the Columbia River originating in northwest Montana and southern British Columbia. The river creel survey was conducted in conjunction with a Flathead Lake creel survey. This document summarizes the creel survey on the river system. The purpose of these creel surveys was to quantify fishery status prior to mitigation efforts and provide replicative survey methodology to measure success of future mitigation activities. 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Hanzel, Delano

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Effects of density and water availability on the behavior, physiology, and weight loss of slaughter horses during transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high, medium, and low density (5000, 4000, and 3000 kg per compartment, respectively) groups of slaughter horses. A total of six shipments containing 23 to 30 horses per shipment were transported in June and July of 2004 for 18 to 20 h. Horses were a...

Iacono, Christa Marie

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

143

The utility of instructor evaluations, reactivity tests and plasma neuroendocrine measures in selecting horses for use in therapeutic riding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A total of 103 horses (76 from therapeutic riding programs and 27 non-therapeutic riding horses from four sites) were used in this experiment. After a pretest of the methodology, surveys that determined the temperament of each horse were filled out...

Bjorge, Marsha Kay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

Influence of Confinement Housing on the Cecal Environment of the Horse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eight cecally cannulated Quarter Horse geldings were utilized in a crossover design with two 28 d periods with a 21 d washout period between. Horses were adapted to dietary treatments from d 1 to 19, dry matter intake was determined from d 20 to 24...

Wolford, Ashley

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Vitamin A and beta-carotene supplementation in horses on different forage systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vitamin A and beta-carotene supplementation in horses on different forage systems KM Greiwe in the horse. Its dietary precursor, beta-carotene progressively deteriorates in pastures after they stop were supplemented with vitamin A palmitate at twice the NRC requirement (A) ; 5 mares were given beta

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Body composition and nutrient metabolism in juvenile athletic horses treated with exogenous equine somatotropin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that of the control horses with a significant difference at d128 (p<.05). Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) was lowered by d 14 in the eST treated horses, but seemed to be affected by confinement during total collections of feces and urine. Urinary nitrogen...

Sutfin, Jonathan Arthur

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Selection and Use of Hay and Processed Roughage in Horse Feeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Animal Science. 53:1671. 26. Hintz, H.F. and R.G. Loy. 1966. Effects of pelleting on the nutritive value of horse rations. Journal of Animal Science. 25:1059. 27. Hintz, H.F. 1983. Horse Nutrition-A Practical Guide. New York: Arco Publishing. 28...

Gibbs, Pete G.

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

The effects of complete pasture management at Equilibrium Horse Center, Gambrills, Maryland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ed. ). The Iowa State University Press, Ames, IA. Hintz, H. F. 1983. Horse Nutrition. Arco Publishing, Inc. , New York. Householder, D. D. , P. G. Gibbs, G. D. Potter and K. E. Davison. 1993. Feeding Management Points for Texas Horse Owners. In...

Templeton, Jennifer J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Study of nitrogen digestion from different hays by the mobile nylon bag technique in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of nitrogen digestion from different hays by the mobile nylon bag technique in horses D digestibility of 7 hays of different qualities was measured by the mobile nylon bag technique (MNBT) in fistulated horses in the precaical part and the total digestive tract. The comparison between in sacco result

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

150

Economic analysis of Quarter Horse and Thoroughbred yearling production in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The horse industry in Texas generates $1.5-2.0 billion dollars of total economic activity per year. Combined with related service industries, the horse industry is a major component of a multibillion dollar industry in the State. Prior economic...

Sayles, Rebekah Clare

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

US Army Corps of Engineers

153

Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South: Channels; Geometry; Dams; Korea, South; Sediment transport. Author keywords: Alluvial channels; Downstream

Julien, Pierre Y.

154

STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Six new generating unit.s were added in t.he powerhouse (locat.ed on the left. side of t.he dam returns from below and above dam releases were compared; data failed to show that the dam caused losses

155

Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and lacustrine December 2006 Abstract. The effects of high-alpine hydropower damming on lacustrine sedimentation impact, such as by hydropower dam construction that form artifi- cial sediment sinks acting as manmade

Gilli, Adrian

156

Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004 ANCOLD 2004 Conference Page 1 TRANSPORTATION MODEL FOR EVACUATION IN ESTIMATING DAM FAILURE and requiring only a reasonable level of effort to #12;Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams

Bowles, David S.

157

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIII Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow III

158

Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIII Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow IIIWind

159

Infectious Anaemia of the Horse: A Preliminary Report.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~lege, in Brazos county. The postofice adT --- :s College Station, Texa- " -7rts and bulletins are sent free tpplication to t7ze Directo aress upon 1NFECTIOUS ANAEMIA OF THE HORSE. (A PRELIMINARY REPORT.) M. FRAECIS AND R. P. MARSTELLER. That part..., ranging f 95"- to 98". Then there is apparent recovery, with some improven in condition, but it is only temporary, as sooner or later another at1 occurs which leaves the animal weaker and inore emaciated than before. The pulse is usually rapid and weak...

Francis, M. (Mark); Marsteller, R. P. (Ross Perry)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insight into the gamut of shallow water waves, including kinematic, diffusion, dynamic, and gravity wavesDam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad Taher-shamsi2 ; and Ampar V. Shetty3 Abstract: An analytical model of flood wave propagation is used

Ponce, V. Miguel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

James W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scenarios, ... · Diagnostics ­ High time/space resolution, velocity distribution measurements, ... · Plasma · Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes · Internal plasma diagnostic #12;Page 12 USBPO · Plasma ions and electrons: ­ TiJames W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization US ITER Project Office Institute for Fusion Studies

162

Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

INCORPORATING UNCERTAINTY INTO DAM SAFETY RISK Sanjay S. Chauhan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Reclamation are using risk assessment as a decision support tool. This paper summarizes an approach to incorporating input uncertainties into risk analysis model. Input uncertainties are captured by using for uncertainty analysis in dam safety risk assessment, and demonstrates some useful formats for presenting

Chauhan, Sanjay S.

164

Surrounding Area Restaurants...Hungry  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4Superhard CoatingNovemberDecemberSurface and

165

Surrounding Area Restaurants...Hungry  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at Young -Final»EnergySupportSurrounding Area

166

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Enlargement of concrete blocks of arch dams with allowance of the formation of radial thermal cracks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable acceleration of the construction of arch dams with the use of highly productive continuous concreting mechanisms is possible with enlargement of the blocks and allowance of the formation of thermal radial cracks in them. A theoretical analysis and the results of on-site observations show that under the effect of the hydrostatic head of water, radial joints and cracks in compressed zones of an arch dam close and the dam in these zones works as a solid dam. Thermal cracking in concrete blocks of arch dams enlarged in plan should be controlled by making radial notches to concentrate tensile stresses providing the formation of radial cracks at prescribed places and through the usual methods of thermal regulation. The block size along the face of an arch dam is then no longer limited by the condition of crack resistance but is determined by the rate of concreting. The technical and economic effects from concreting arch dams are cited.

Verbetskii, G.P.; Chogovadze, G.I.; Daneliya, A.I.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evaluation of Stress Before, During, and After Transport in Naive Yearling Horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

months of age be given 0.9 ? 1.0 m 2 per horse and adult horses over the age of 24 months be allowed 1.2 m 2 per horse (ARMCANZ, 1987). While this code is much more specific than the 9 CFR Chapter 88 published in the U.S., it is only a set... (? SEM) by dietary supplement treatment during the 6 hour transport period of Trials 1 and 2. .................................... 39 Table 10 Least squares means of cortisol, corticosterone and DHEA concentrations (? SEM) for dietary...

Garey, Shannon M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Dam constructions as sealing systems in rock salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dam constructions represent an essential component of the multibarrier safety concept in the Federal Republic of Germany for a repository of radioactive waste in salt formations. They enhance safety during the operational phase as well as in the post operational phase of the repository. In the framework of a joint R and D-project between BGR, DBE and GSF the components of a suitable dam have been developed and will be constructed and tested in the GSF-Asse salt mine in Lower-Saxony. The aims of the investigation program, its realization and some results on the development of construction materials will be presented and discussed. Experiences gained during these tests in laboratory and in situ will be described.

Engelmann, H.J.; Bollingerfehr, W.; Fischer, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

171

Seismic safety of earth dams: A probabilistic approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaluation of the potential for slope sliding and/or liquefaction failure of earthen dams subjected to earthquake loadings is most often based on deterministic procedures of both the excitation input and of the physical model. Such treatment provides answers in the form of either factor of safety values or a yes or no as to whether liquefaction will occur or not. Uncertainties in the physical properties of the soil in the embankment and the foundation layers underlying the dam are typically treated with parametric studies. Consideration of probabilities pertaining to the uncertainties of the earthquake and of the site characterization is expected to augment the prediction of failure potential by associating slope and liquefaction failure to generic properties of the earthquake and of the site characterization. In this study, the procedures for conditional slope failure/liquefaction probabilities are formulated based on a series of simulated deterministic analyses of a dam cross section . These synthetic earthquakes emanate from a 1-D stationary stochastic process of zero mean and an analytical form of power spectral density function. The response of the dam section is formed upon a dynamic finite element approach which provides the temporal variations of the stresses, strains and pore water pressure throughout the model. The constitutive response of the granular soil skeleton and its coupling with the fluid phase is formulated based on the Biot dynamic equations of motion with nonlinear terms compensated for into soil hysteretic damping. Lastly, a stochastic approach to liquefaction based on the transferring of the input motion statistics to the cross section is presented.

Simos, N.; Costantino, C.J.; Reich, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

City of Coulee Dam, Washington (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (Utility Company) Jump to:Chicopee,Colman Place:Cornell,Coulee Dam,

173

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2000 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by lower than average spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased unclipped yearling and subyearling chinook smolts, and 8,300,546 smolts collected and transported compared to 5,882,872 in 1999. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above Lower Granite Dam, we can no longer accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Although some table titles in this report still show ''wild'' column headings, the numbers in these columns for 1999 and 2000 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. The increases over previous years reflect the increased supplementation. A total of 8,300,546 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, 187,862 fish were bypassed back to the river and 7,950,648 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 7,778,853 by barge and 171,795 by truck. A total of 151,344 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 1,361,006 smolts (16.4% of the total collection).

Morrill, Charles; Ross, Doug; Mensik, Fred

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Evolution, Systematics, and Phylogeography of Pleistocene Horses in the New World: A Molecular Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rich fossil record of horses has made them a classic example of evolutionary processes. However, while the overall picture of equid evolution is well known, the details are surprisingly poorly understood, especially ...

Weinstock, Jaco; Willerslev, Eske; Sher, Andrei; Tong, Wenfei; Ho, Simon Y.W.; Rubenstein, Dan; Storer, John; Burns, James A.; Martin, Larry D.; Bravil, Claudio; Prieto, Alfredo; Froese, Duane; Scott, Eric; Lai, Xulong; Cooper, Alan

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and...

177

Imflammatory response in horses fed diets containing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study was conducted to characterize the inflammatory response of horses to chronic and acute exercise as influenced by dietary fat supplementation. Different ratios of omega 6 vs. omega 3 fatty acid supplementation were provided in the diets...

Wilson, Kristopher Ray

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Growth and bone development in weanling quarter horses fed diets supplemented with sodium zeolite-A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH AND BONE DEVELOPMENT IN WEANLING QUARTER HORSES FED DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH SODIUM ZEOLITE-A A Thesis by KIMBERLY SUZANNE FREY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Nutrition GROWTH AND BONE DEVELOPMENT IN WEANLING QUARTER HORSES FED DIETS SUPPLER WITH SODIUM ZEOLITE-A A Thesis by KIMBERLY SUZPZPK FREY Approved as to style and content by...

Frey, Kimberly Suzanne

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Blood Levels of Zinc in Creole Horses Used in Sera Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using Neutron Activation Analysis Zn concentrations were determined in blood of horses (Creole breed). No significant difference was observed between male (0.0029{+-}.0007 gL{sup -1}) and female (0.0031{+-}.0011 gL{sup -1}) animals. These data are an important support to understand the physiological functions of Zn in blood during the process of sera production at Butantan Institute (Sao Paulo, Brazil) using horses.

Baptista, Tatyana S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto Butantan, Av Vital Brasil 1500 05503-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B.; Kovacs, Luciana [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Freitas, M. G.; Marcelino, Jose R. [Instituto Butantan, Av Vital Brasil 1500 05503-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

Prececal, postileal and total tract digestion of cottonseed and soybean protein in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRECECAL, POSTILEAL AND TOTAL TRACT DIGESTION OF COTTONSEED AND SOYBEAN PROTEIN IN HORSES A Thesis by RONALD GENE HALEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Animal Science PRECECAL, POSTILEAL AND TOTAL TRACT DIGESTION OF COTTONSEED AND SOYBEAN PROTEIN IN HORSES A Thesis by RONALD GENE HALEY Approved as to style and content by: (Chairm n of mmittee ( ea...

Haley, Ronald Gene

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Effect of Dietary Starch Concentration on Glycogen Replenishment in Performance Horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2010). Whereas humans and rodents can replenish their glycogen stores in as little as 4-6 h (Jentjens and Jeukendrup, 2003), horses can require up to 48 h for complete replenishment (Lacombe et al., 2003). Researchers have successfully up... overheating, dehydration, lactate buildup and limited energetic substrate availability (Lacombe et al., 2003). Dietary starch concentration may affect how quickly performance horses recover from fatigue by affecting the rate of skeletal muscle glycogen...

Vonderohe, Caitlin

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of Dietary Magnesium Status on Indices of Muscular Dysfunction in Exercising Horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF DIETARY MAGNESIUM STATUS ON INDICES OF MUSCULAR DYSFUNCTION IN EXERCISING HORSES A Thesis by CASSIDY ANNALIESE KURTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2009 Major Subject: Animal Science EFFECT OF DIETARY MAGNESIUM STATUS ON INDICES OF MUSCULAR DYSFUNCTION IN EXERCISING HORSES A Thesis by CASSIDY ANNALIESE KURTZ...

Kurtz, Cassidy A.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

The induction of toxin neutralizing antibodies to Clostridium perfringens types C and D toxins in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INDUCTION OF TOXIN NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODIES TO CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS TYPES C AND D TOXINS IN HORSES A Thes1s by FRANCES LYNN BROOKS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology THE INDUCTION OF TOXIN NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODIES TO CLOSTRIDIUN PERFRINGENS TYPES C AND D TOXINS IN HORSES A Thesis by FRANCES LYNN BROOKS Approved as to style...

Brooks, Frances Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Interstitial fluid pressure within the coronary dermis of the horse with chronic laminitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(IFP) in the coronary band at the toe and heel positions of the catheter in the forefeet of normal horses (Group 1, N 10) and horses with chronic laminitis (Group 2, N~10) 28 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page I. Wick-in-needle catheter 17 2. Mean... manifestations including pain, various endocrine and electrolyte imbalances , hypertension, renal dysfunction& anorexia and depression 2, 3, 11-17 are also encountered The affected foot may undergo mechanical collapse as the relationship of the structures...

Olivier, Ann

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Estimating the seismic stability of the arch dam in the Chirkeiskaya hydrosystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A calculation analysis of the arch dam constructed in an area with standardized seismicity of magnitude 9-10 is presented.

Khrapkov, A. A.; Skomorovskaya, E. Ya

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam Relicensing Consumers Protection Act (1986), which instructs federal regulators to ``balance'' hydropower

Kotchen, Matthew J.

187

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2005. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of two studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 16 and July 15, 2005, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, and (2) smolt approach and fate at B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C from the B1 forebay. Some of the large appendices are only presented on the compact disk (CD) that accompanies the final report. Examples include six large comma-separated-variable (.CSV) files of hourly fish passage, hourly variances, and Project operations for spring and summer from Appendix E, and large Audio Video Interleave (AVI) files with DIDSON-movie clips of the area upstream of B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C (Appendix H). Those video clips show smolts approaching the outlet, predators feeding on smolts, and vortices that sometimes entrained approaching smolts into turbines. The CD also includes Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Files (PDF) of the entire report and appendices.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hughes, James S.; Bouchard, Kyle E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Schilt, Carl R.; Hanks, Michael E.; Kim, Jina; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Nagy, William T.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

EIS-0352: U.S. 93 Hoover Dam Bypass Project,  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) served as a cooperating agency for this Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) due to WAPA’s role in the relocation of several transmission lines. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) prepared an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for construction of a new segment of U.S. Highway 93 for the purpose of improving congestion and hazardous vehicle/pedestrian conflicts where the highway crosses the Colorado River over Hoover Dam. As a cooperating agency for the EIS, Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposed modifications to its transmission system and facilities to accommodate the construction of the new highway and bridge spanning the Colorado River.

189

Women @ Energy: Kerstin Kleese van Dam | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| WEATHERIZATION5Iski WomenKerstin Kleese van Dam Women @

190

Four Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlintFluxInputDam Pool Power Agency FDPPA Jump

191

Cardiolipin modulates allosterically peroxynitrite detoxification by horse heart cytochrome c  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Cardiolipin binding to cytochrome c. {yields} Cardiolipin-dependent peroxynitrite isomerization by cytochrome c. {yields} Cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex plays pro-apoptotic effects. {yields} Cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex plays anti-apoptotic effects. -- Abstract: Upon interaction with bovine heart cardiolipin (CL), horse heart cytochrome c (cytc) changes its tertiary structure disrupting the heme-Fe-Met80 distal bond, reduces drastically the midpoint potential out of the range required for its physiological role, binds CO and NO with high affinity, and displays peroxidase activity. Here, the effect of CL on peroxynitrite isomerization by ferric cytc (cytc-Fe(III)) is reported. In the absence of CL, hexa-coordinated cytc does not catalyze peroxynitrite isomerization. In contrast, CL facilitates cytc-Fe(III)-mediated isomerization of peroxynitrite in a dose-dependent fashion inducing the penta-coordination of the heme-Fe(III)-atom. The value of the second order rate constant for CL-cytc-Fe(III)-mediated isomerization of peroxynitrite (k{sub on}) is (3.2 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The apparent dissociation equilibrium constant for CL binding to cytc-Fe(III) is (5.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -5} M. These results suggest that CL-cytc could play either pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic effects facilitating lipid peroxidation and scavenging of reactive nitrogen species, such as peroxynitrite, respectively.

Ascenzi, Paolo, E-mail: ascenzi@uniroma3.it [Department of Biology and Interdepartmental Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, University Roma Tre, I-00146 Roma (Italy)] [Department of Biology and Interdepartmental Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, University Roma Tre, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Ciaccio, Chiara [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma 'Tor Vergata', I-00133 Roma (Italy) [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma 'Tor Vergata', I-00133 Roma (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for the Research on the Chemistry of Metals in Biological Systems, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma 'Tor Vergata', I-00133 Roma (Italy)] [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma 'Tor Vergata', I-00133 Roma (Italy); Coletta, Massimo [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma 'Tor Vergata', I-00133 Roma (Italy) [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma 'Tor Vergata', I-00133 Roma (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for the Research on the Chemistry of Metals in Biological Systems, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wild Horse 69-kV transmission line environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc. (Hill County) proposes to construct and operate a 69-kV transmission line from its North Gildford Substation in Montana north to the Canadian border. A vicinity project area map is enclosed as a figure. TransCanada Power Corporation (TCP), a Canadian power-marketing company, will own and construct the connecting 69-kV line from the international border to Express Pipeline`s pump station at Wild Horse, Alberta. This Environmental Assessment is prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) as lead federal agency to comply with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as part of DOE`s review and approval process of the applications filed by Hill County for a DOE Presidential Permit and License to Export Electricity to a foreign country. The purpose of the proposed line is to supply electric energy to a crude oil pump station in Canada, owned by Express Pipeline Ltd. (Express). The pipeline would transport Canadian-produced oil from Hardisty, Alberta, Canada, to Caster, Wyoming. The Express Pipeline is scheduled to be constructed in 1996--97 and will supply crude oil to refineries in Wyoming and the midwest.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado Victor G. deWolfe a May 2007 Abstract To reduce the hazards from debris flows in drainage basins burned by wildfire, erosion control measures such as construction of check dams, installation of log erosion barriers (LEBs

194

Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam on voluntary ethanol rats as subjects, we examined effects of exposure during weaning to a dam consuming ethanol on adolescents' later affinity for ethanol. In a preliminary experiment, we offered rat pups a choice between 8

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

195

Continuous Monitoring of an Ice Sheet in a Reservoir Upstream of Beaumont Dam, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted at the Beaumont hydroelectric dam owned and operated by Hydro-Québec. This power plant has six find- ings will help to harmonize the different standards that are used to manage hydroelectric power considerable economic savings related to minimizing production losses, optimizing dam reinforcement works

Santerre, Rock

196

A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER ­ RIO, and restoration efforts. Cochiti Dam was constructed on the main stem of the Rio Grande in 1973 for flood control minnow. Recent restoration strategies include removal of non-native riparian vegetation, mechanical

Julien, Pierre Y.

197

PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant exchange in route to the next downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the general finding from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow the formulation of optimal daily water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. A generalized TDG exchange model can also be applied to other hydropower dams that affect TDG pressures in tailraces and can be used to develop alternative operational and structural measures to minimize TDG generation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases. TDG data from hydropower facilities located throughout the northwest region of the United States will be used to identify relationships between TDG exchange and relevant dependent variables. Data analysis and regression techniques will be used to develop predictive TDG exchange expressions for various structural categories.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i CEE 491University of Hawai`i CEE 491  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Karun 3 Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i ­ CEE 491University of Hawai`i ­ CEE;Location #12;Description/Background Hydroelectric dam on Karun River Help with national energy needs

Prevedouros, Panos D.

199

Water quality and sedimentation implications of installing a hydroelectric dam on the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HidroAysen, a Chilean corporation operated by energy giant Endesa, has proposed to build two hydroelectric dams on the Rio Baker in the Aysin Region of Chilean Patagonia. The proposed dams have been met with a variety of ...

Leandro, Gianna Dee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

and 19% of the stomachs of late-lifted fish were Food of the striped bass at Holyoke Dam was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

below hydroelectric dams and feed on the parts of fish (anadromous or freshwater species) that die Kaplan turbine at a low-head hydroelectric dam. North Am. J. Fish. Manage. 5:33-38. HOLLIS, E. H. 1952

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Introduction This project is designed for senior 4-H horse project members who have the experience, resources, and ability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as life skills and science skills. · The project may or may not include the use of a horse, but must. Science Skills: Throughout this project you will investigate at least four of the twelve processesIntroduction · This project is designed for senior 4-H horse project members who have

Liskiewicz, Maciej

202

Physiological responses to training and racing in two year-old Quarter Horses fed Sodium Zeolite A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Table 82A Page Packed cell volume ('/0) at recovery 10 minutes in two- year-old Quarter Horses fed varying amounts of Sodium Zeolite A Table 83A. Packed cell volume (/o) at recovery 20 minutes in two- year-old Quarter Horses fed varying amounts...

Reynolds, Judith Amy Lundgren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin probed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin probed by time-resolved X-ray solution-slicing Structural dynamics Myoglobin a b s t r a c t Here we report sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart to the measurement and subsequent deconvolution, we investigate the protein structural dynamics that occur faster

Ihee, Hyotcherl

204

Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decisions and Management DRAFT FOR REVIEW ONLY Portfolio Risk Assessment: A Tool for Managing Dam SafetyICOLD 20th Congress Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety in the Context of the Owner's Business David S. Bowles Professor and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk

Bowles, David S.

205

Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A study of the use of methoxyflurane general anesthesia in the horse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF THE USE OF METHOXYFLURANE GENERAL ANESTHESIA IN THE HORSE A Thesis By ROBERT STEPHEN TITUS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1964 Ma)or Sub)ect: Veterinary Medicine and Surgery A STUDY OF THE USE OF METHOXYFLURANE GENERAL ANESTHESIA IN THE HORSE A Thesis By ROBERT STEPHEN TITUS Approved as to style and content 'by: hairman of Committee) (Head of Department...

Titus, Robert Stephen

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The use of beta-tricalcium phosphate in surgically created subchondral bone defects in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Butazolidin, Wellcome Animal Health, Kansas City, MO. 18 imaged at 4 weeks postoperative. Each horse was administered 100 mi i)i curie intravenously of Tc (as the methylene d1phosphonate 99m complex L Tc-MDP]) . Nuclear scans were obtained from the 99m n... Duncan test was performed to evaluate the s1gnificance of position (dorsopalmar, lateral). The Group I horses were compared at week 4 and week 13. Tc-Nethylene D1phosphonate, Mallinckrodt, St. Louis, NO. GE Portacamera, General Electric Co. , Medical...

Rose, Patricia Lee

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead (Oncoryhnchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1--August 31, 1996. This was the twelfth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish collected by species, (2) number of fin clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) total number of fish showing signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT), (4) percent of descaled fish, and (5) daily average river flow, powerhouse {number_sign}1 flow, powerhouse {number_sign}2 flow and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the water budget, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows during the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids.

McDonald, Robert (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effects of density on displacement, falls, injuries, and orientation during horse transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trial), using the middle 2.44 X 7.32 m compartment of a large semi-tractor trailer. The horses were transported for two laps around a 7.28-km course, averaging 25 min and 36±89 sec. Each lap consisted of two 60? turns, four 90? turns, two 120? turns...

Collins, Maranda Nicole

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

How to safely compost Cameraria ohridella-infested horse chestnut leaf litter on private compost heaps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to safely compost Cameraria ohridella-infested horse chestnut leaf litter on private compost the deposition of pest-infested litter on private compost heaps was dissuaded because of the risk of leafminer emergence in the following spring. Thus, the aim of this study was to test safe ways to compost pest

Richner, Heinz

216

Effect of n-3 PUFAs on markers of inflammation in arthritic horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixteen horses with at least one arthritic joint were randomly divided into two groups. The control group (n=8) was fed a control ration at 1% BW in grain. The treatment group (n=8) was fed an isocaloric diet similar to the control diet...

Manhart, Denise Rae

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

The role of andragogy and self-directed learning in the draft horse industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or are middle aged men and women. This finding melds well with another finding that determined the draft horse business was the second, third, or fourth career of the participants in this study. Many of the participants operate their businesses in rural non-farm...

Hynes, James William

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Physiological responses of reining horses to interval training versus conventional training procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

training. B~AW i ht. T hl 4 h th tth h dy lght rth h did t change as a result of either training regimen, While in the conventional treatment, the horses consumed 2% of their mean body weight per day which resulted in a mean digestible energy intake...

Haney, Elizabeth anne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Experimental study to explore the $\\rm ^8Be$ induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan Horse Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To explore a possible indirect method for $\\rm ^8Be$ induced astrophysical reactions, the $\\rm ^9Be=({}^8Be+\\it n)$ cluster structure was studied via the Trojan Horse Method. It is the first time to study a super short life nucleus $\\rm ^8Be$ via the Trojan Horse Method, and it is the first time to make a valid test for $l=1$ Trojan-horse nucleus. The $\\rm ^9Be$ nucleus is assumed to have a ($\\rm {}^8Be+\\it n$) cluster structure and used as the Trojan-horse nucleus. The $\\rm ^8Be$ nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual $\\rm ^8Be +{\\it d}\\rightarrow \\alpha + {}^6Li$ reaction via a suitable 3-body reaction $\\rm ^9Be +{\\it d}\\rightarrow \\alpha + {}^6Li +\\it n$. The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside $\\rm ^9Be$ was reconstructed. The agreement between experimental and theoretical momentum distribution indicates that there should be a ($\\rm {}^8Be+\\it n$) cluster structure inside $\\rm ^9Be$. Therefor the experimental study of $\\rm ^8Be$ induced reactions, for example the experimental measurement of the $\\rm ^8Be +\\alpha \\rightarrow {}^{12}C$ reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

Wen Qun-Gang; Li Cheng-Bo; Zhou Shu-Hua; Bakhadir Irgaziev; Fu Yuan-Yong; Claudio Spitaleri; Marco La Cognata; Zhou Jing; Meng Qiu-Ying; Livio Lamia; Marcello Lattuada

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Leading a Horse to Water: Using Automated Reminders to Increase Use of Online Decision Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leading a Horse to Water: Using Automated Reminders to Increase Use of Online Decision Support during the course of clinical care. For example, Ely and colleagues found that physicians in clinical appropriate information resources in the course of patient care. Indeed, this is the method primarily used

Cimino, James J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A unique program for horse business owners Tuesdays, February 5 -March 19 (seven weeks)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A unique program for horse business owners Tuesdays, February 5 - March 19 (seven weeks) 6:00pm ­ 9 budgeting plan by the end of the seven-week course. The course is offered by Dr. Carey Williams, Equine@njaes.rutgers.edu, 848-932-3229 $70.00 per person Dinner and Companion workbook included. Equine Business Planning Course

Goodman, Robert M.

222

Georgia O'Keeffe: Horse's Skull with Pink Rose, 1931 Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Georgia O'Keeffe: Horse's Skull with Pink Rose, 1931 Syllabus Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates Biology 453 Tentative: Autumn Quarter 2014 Course Web Page: http://courses'll want to cover your eyes with safety glasses or wear glasses on dissection lab days. Goals My course

Carrington, Emily

223

Georgia O'Keeffe: Horse's Skull with Pink Rose, 1931 Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Georgia O'Keeffe: Horse's Skull with Pink Rose, 1931 Syllabus Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates Biology 453 Winter Quarter 2014 Course Web Page: http://courses.washington.edu/chordate/hmpg-biol453.html glasses on dissection lab days. Goals My course goals begin with learning the vocabulary of anatomy; you

Carrington, Emily

224

The Economic Impact of the Charles Town Thoroughbred Horse Racing Industry on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Impact of the Charles Town Thoroughbred Horse Racing Industry on the Jefferson County Research Assistant Tom S Witt, Director and Associate Dean Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia University November 2011 Funding for this research was provided

Mohaghegh, Shahab

225

Development of a three-dimensional finite element model of a horse's foot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The horse's foot, defined as the hoof wall and all the structures within it, is subjected to intense load-bearing and energy-absorbing demands. The foot is actually a complex assembly of components that deform as they support loads and absorb energy...

Hanft, Joseph Thomas

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Comparative nutrient digestibility in horses fed a fat-supplemented, high-fiber diet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eight mature stock-type mares averaging 481.4 kg were used in a 4 x 2 switchback arrangement of treatments to determine nutrient density of an experimental diet. The horses were blocked by age into groups of four and then randomly assigned to a...

Dougherty, Jillian Joy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pinatubo Described In A Philippine Aborigine Legend Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And...

229

Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Factors affecting calf and dam weights and their effects on breeding programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS AFFECTING CALF AND DAM WEIGHTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON BREEDING PROGRAMS A Thesis By LAMRENCE ALLEN MADDOX, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulf illment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1964 Major Subject: Animal Breeding FACTORS AFFECTING CALF AND DAM WEIGHTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON BREEDING PROGRAMS A Thesis By IAWRENCE ALLEN MADDOX, JR Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commit ee) (Head...

Maddox, Lawrence Allen

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployments at Lookout Point and Cougar Dams, Willamette Valley Project, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) and the acoustic imaging system at Cougar Dam (CGR) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. The general approach was a multi-step process from mount design to final system configuration. The optimization effort resulted in successful deployments of hydroacoustic equipment at LOP and CGR.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

232

Non-powered Dams: An untapped source of renewable electricity in the USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower has been a source of clean, renewable electricity in the USA for more than 100 years. Today, approximately 2500 US dams provide 78 GW of conventional and 22 GW of pumped-storage hydropower. In contrast, another approximately 80 000 dams in the USA do not include hydraulic turbine equipment and provide non-energy related services, such as flood control, water supply, navigation, and recreation.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Battey, Hoyt [Department of Energy; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

234

EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

235

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at The Dalles Dam during spring 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay boat-restricted zone (BRZ) to the tailrace BRZ at The Dalles Dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam. The approach included releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of The Dalles Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below The Dalles Dam. A total of 4,298 yearling Chinook salmon and 4,309 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation. The dam passage survival results are summarized as follows: Yearling Chinook Salmon 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) and Steelhead 0.9535 (SE = 0.0097).

Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hydropower and the environment: A case study at Glen Canyon Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of hydroelectric resources in the Colorado River requires a balancing of hydrologic, social, natural and cultural resources. The resulting management often has to deal with inherently conflicting objectives, short and long-term goals, time frames and operational flexibility. Glen Canyon Dam, AZ, on the Colorado River, controls the release of water into the Grand Canyon. The dam has been under intense public scrutiny since it was completed in 1963. An Environmental Impact Statement evaluating the future operations and options for Glen Canyon Dam was initiated by the Department of the Interior in 1989 and completed in 1995. An Adaptive Management approach to future operational management has been developed as part of the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement process. Future operations at Glen Canyon Dam will take into consideration the need to balance water movement and hydroelectricity development with natural, recreation, Native American and cultural needs. Future management of rivers requires acknowledgement of the dynamic nature of ecosystems and the need to link scientific information into the decision-making process. Lessons learned and programs developed at Glen Canyon Dam may be applied to other river systems.

Wegner, D.L. [Denver Technical Service Center, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

Harmon, Jerrel R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Training distance to failure and density of the third metacarpal in young racing Quarter Horses fed sodium zeolite A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growing horses are also frequently afflicted with physitis (Wagner and Watrous, 1990b). Severely afflicted horses often demonstrate painful swelling in the area of the physis that sustains the greatest load. Defective bone develops as mechanical..., 1982). In order to repair microdamage, healing in the form of bone remodelling needs to occur. As the work load increases the bone must remodel itself to accommodate the new forces which are placed upon it. This process is known as Wolffs Law...

Nielsen, Brian Douglas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Dalles Dam, Columbia River: Spillway Improvement CFD Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that were applied to The Dalles spillway for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District. The models have been successfully validated against physical models and prototype data, and are suitable to support biological research and operations management. The CFD models have been proven to provide reliable information in the turbulent high-velocity flow field downstream of the spillway face that is typically difficult to monitor in the prototype. In addition, CFD data provides hydraulic information throughout the solution domain that can be easily extracted from archived simulations for later use if necessary. This project is part of an ongoing program at the Portland District to improve spillway survival conditions for juvenile salmon at The Dalles. Biological data collected at The Dalles spillway have shown that for the original spillway configuration juvenile salmon passage survival is lower than desired. Therefore, the Portland District is seeking to identify operational and/or structural changes that might be implemented to improve fish passage survival. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) went through a sequence of steps to develop a CFD model of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The first step was to identify a preferred CFD modeling package. In the case of The Dalles spillway, Flow-3D was as selected because of its ability to simulate the turbulent free-surface flows that occur downstream of each spilling bay. The second step in development of The Dalles CFD model was to assemble bathymetric datasets and structural drawings sufficient to describe the dam (powerhouse, non-overflow dam, spillway, fish ladder entrances, etc.) and tailrace. These datasets are documented in this report as are various 3-D graphical representations of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The performance of the CFD model was then validated for several cases as the third step. The validated model was then applied to address specific SIS design questions. Specifically, the CFD models were used to evaluate flow deflectors, baffle block removal and the effects of spillwalls. The CFD models were also used to evaluate downstream differences at other locations, such as at the Highway 197 bridge piers and Oregon shore islands, due to alterations in spill pattern. CFD model results were analyzed to quantitatively compare impacts of the spillwall that has subsequently been constructed between bays 6 and 7. CFD model results provided detailed information about how the spillwall would impact downstream flow patterns that complemented results from the 1:80 scale physical model. The CFD model was also used to examine relative differences between the juvenile spill pattern used in previous years and the anticipated spill pattern that will be applied once the wall is complete. In addition, the CFD model examined velocity magnitudes over the downstream basalt shelf to investigate potential for erosion under high flow conditions (e.g., 21 kcfs/bay for bays 1 through 6) with the spillwall in place. Several appendices follow the results and discussion sections of this report. These appendices document the large number of CFD simulations that have been performed by PNNL; both spillway improvement study (SIS) related and those performed for related biological tests.

Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Comparative performance of horses and cattle in the Hebb-Williams maze  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of six basic problems, each having a visual and nonvisual variation. Design ot the visual problems enabled animals to choose the correct pathway on the basis of visual evidence alone, while additional barriers on nonvisual problems prevented direct... visual solution. Nean total error scores for horses and heifers were 580. 1 and 354. 2, respectively, and were significantly different (P&. 05). The initial two reversals of pathways to the goal area, problems eight and 12, accounted for 66. 1...

Ingram, Roger Scott

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Immunological and epidemiological aspects of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in the horse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) August 1982 ABSTRACT Immunological and Epidemiological Aspects of Cor nebacterium seudotuberculosis Infection in the Horse. (August 1982) Charlotte Detch Dietz, B. S. , D. V. M. Oklahoma State University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. B... INTRODUCTION PAGE 1 LITERATURE REVIEW. MATERIALS AND NETHODS. Animals. Organism. Bacterin Production. Safety Testing of the Bacterin Vaccination and Serum Collection. Immune Response Evaluation Evaluation of Vaccine Effectiveness. 12 12 14...

Dietz, Charlotte Detch

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The pharmacokinetics of cimetidine in the horse: adult mares and foals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

secretagogues. At therapeutic blood levels (0. 5-1. 0 p. g/ml in humans), cimetidine raises gastric pH by inhibiting 804 of basal acid secretion and 504 of food stimulated acid secretion. Since its introduction in 1977, cimetidine has become widely used... pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of cimetidine were unknown bringing into question the appropriateness of these dosage regimens for therapeutic effect in the horse. Furthermore, marked differences exist in the pharmacokinetics of cimetidine between human...

Griffith, Gwendolyn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Absorption and retention of different chemical forms of trace minerals by mature horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro-minerals are gaining greater importance in ration balancing so as to enhance the growth and development of a wide range of tissue types in horses (Jackson, 1998; Ott and Johnson, 2001). Several different chemical formulations of trace mineral... in the oxidative phosphorylation process in mitochondria (Jackson, 1998). Zinc appears in numerous physiologic roles in the body. In concert with copper, zinc has been tied to bone formation and epithelial integrity, including hoof growth (Ott and Johnson, 2001...

Wagner, Elizabeth Lynn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Orphan Acres Horse Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Labor Day 2 Palouse Bicycle Collective 11 AM ­ 12:30 PM Palouse Clearwater Environmental Institute 2 PM:30 AM ­ 1:30 PM Palouse Conservation District 1:30 PM ­ 3:30 PM 6 Orphan Acres Horse Care 10 AM ­ 1 PM Humane Society of the Palouse Event 12 PM ­ 6:30 PM 8 WSU Organic Farm 11:30 AM ­ 1:30 PM Humane Society

Collins, Gary S.

245

Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the John Day Dam Tailrace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District required that a two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged and a three-dimensional (3D) free-surface numerical models to be developed and validated for the John Day tailrace. These models were used to assess potential impact of a select group of structural and operational alternatives to tailrace flows aimed at improving fish survival at John Day Dam. The 2D model was used for the initial assessment of the alternatives in conjunction with a reduced-scale physical model of the John Day Project. A finer resolution 3D model was used to more accurately model the details of flow in the stilling basin and near-project tailrace hydraulics. Three-dimensional model results were used as input to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory particle tracking software, and particle paths and times to pass a downstream cross section were used to assess the relative differences in travel times resulting from project operations and structural scenarios for multiple total river flows. Streamlines and neutrally-buoyant particles were seeded in all turbine and spill bays with flows. For a Total River of 250 kcfs running with the Fish Passage Plan spill pattern and a spillwall, the mean residence times for all particles were little changed; however the tails of the distribution were truncated for both spillway and powerhouse release points, and, for the powerhouse releases, reduced the residence time for 75% of the particles to pass a downstream cross section from 45.5 minutes to 41.3 minutes. For a total river of 125 kcfs configured with the operations from the Fish Passage Plan for the temporary spillway weirs and for a proposed spillwall, the neutrally-buoyant particle tracking data showed that the river with a spillwall in place had the overall mean residence time increase; however, the residence time for 75% of the powerhouse-released particles to pass a downstream cross section was reduced from 102.4 min to 89 minutes.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Relationship of the weaning weight of beef calves to the size of their dams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1964 Major Subject; Animal Breeding REIATIONSHIP OF THE WEANING WEIGHT OF BEEF CALVES TO THE SIZE OF THEIR DAMS A Thesis By JAMES EDWARD TANNER Approved as to style and content by: ';/ . (Chatrman o Committee) (Head... of age of dam within weight groups of Angus cows 20 Analyses of covariance of 200-day weight (lb. ? of Angus calves. Estimated least-squares constants for 200-day weight (lb. ) of Angus calves Least-squares means of 200-day weight (lb. ) of Angus...

Tanner, James Edward

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A biometrical evaluation of relationships between dam weight and progeny preweaning performance in beef cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A BIDMETRICA' EVALUA11ON Oi. RELATIONSV, IPS BFT'AEENI DAM W. IGHT AND PROGENY nREIfEANING PERFORMANCE IN BEEF CATILE A Thesis by GFRALD MAX SMITH Suf&mitfed to the Cradua'te Colleae of Texas Aiild University in pardial f. . lfillmen...& I TH App oved as Io style and content by: (Head of Doper t nant ) I Pie p1 be I' ) AoGnst ISSB ABS'IRAC) A P&ometricaI Bvaluation o~ Relationships Betweor Dam lrieight and Progeny Preweaning Performance in Beef Cattle. (Augusl I"GB) Gerald...

Smith, Gerald Max

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Passing the Bonneville Dam Spillway in 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) funds numerous evaluations of fish passage and survival on the Columbia River. In 2007, the CENWP asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct an acoustic telemetry study to estimate the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon passing the spillway at Bonneville Dam. This report documents the study results which are intended to be used to improve the conditions juvenile anadromous fish experience when passing through the dams that the Corps operates on the river.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; McComas, Roy L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Eco-Design of River Fishways for Upstream Passage: Application for Hanfeng Dam, Pengxi River, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a scientific approach to eco-design of river fishways to allow upstream movement of fish past new and existing dams in China. This eco-design approach integrates principles of fish ecology/behavior and engineering, a scientific field also known as bio-engineering or eco-hydraulics. We define a fishway as a structure or mechanism to convey fish upstream past a dam. Man-made or natural stream beds can be part of the fishway mechanism. Fish include bony and non-bony fishes, and upstream passage is the concern here, not downstream passage. The problem is dams block access to upstream habitat used for spawning, rearing, and refuge, i.e., dams decrease habitat connectivity. A solution to alleviate this problem is to design fishways, preferably while the dam is being designed, but if necessary, as retrofits afterward to provide a route that fish can and will use to pass safely upstream without undue delay. Our eco-design approach for fishways involves eight steps: 1) identify the primary species of importance; 2) understand basic ecology and behavior of these fish; 3) characterize the environmental conditions where passage is or will be blocked; 4 identify fishway alternatives and select a preferred alternative; 5) establish eco-design criteria for the fishway, either from management agencies or, if necessary, developed specifically for the given site; 6) where needed, identify and perform research required to resolve critical uncertainties and finalize the eco-design criteria; 7) apply the eco-design criteria and site-specific considerations to design the fishway, involving peer-review by local stakeholders in the process; 8) build the fishway, monitor its effectiveness, and apply the lessons learned. Example fishways are described showing a range of eco-designs depending on the dam site and fish species of concern. We apply the eco-design principles to recommend an approach and next steps for a fishway to pass fish upstream at Hanfeng Dam, an existing regulating dam forming Hanfeng Lake on the Pengxi River near Kaixian, China.

Johnson, Gary E.; Rainey, William S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure. 25 figs.

Praeg, W.F.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Do impassable dams and flow regulation constrain the distribution of green sturgeon in the Sacramento River, California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, American River, and Yuba River. While dams block access to about 9% of historically available habitatDo impassable dams and flow regulation constrain the distribution of green sturgeon in the Sacramento River, California? By E. A. Mora1 , S. T. Lindley2 , D. L. Erickson3 and A. P. Klimley4 1 Joint

Klimley, A. Peter

258

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Evaluation of a Behavioral Guidance Structure at Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse including Passage Survival of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead using Acoustic Telemetry, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarizes research conducted at Bonneville Dam in 2008 to evaluate a prototype Behavioral Guidance Structure, that was deployed by the US Army Corps of Engineers in an effort to increase survival of outmigrating smolts at Bonneville Dam.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; McComas, Roy L.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Fischer, Eric S.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

265

Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Updating of Safety Criteria for Basic Diagnostic Indicators of Dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Values of diagnostic indicators [K]-limitations placed on radial displacements and turn angles of horizontal sections of the dam - which are permitted for each upper-pool level within the range from 520 to 539 m are determined and proposed for inclusion in the Declaration of Safety. Empirical relationships used to develop safety criteria K1 and K2 are modified.

Gordon, L. A.; Skvortsova, A. E. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS of downstream channels and lead to accumulation of fine sediments and habitat degradation. To investigate, we-sediment measures, and an intensive sampling scheme, this study found that channels downstream of diversions

Poff, N. LeRoy

268

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Sluiceway Operations to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing ice and trash sluiceways are commonly used to pass juvenile salmonids downstream at hydropower dams through a benign, non-turbine route. At The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River, managers undertook optimizing operations of sluiceway weirs to maximize survival of juvenile salmonids at the powerhouse. We applied fixed-location hydroacoustic methods to compare fish passage rates and sluiceway efficiencies for two weir configurations during 2004 and 2005: three weirs versus six weirs, located at the mid- versus east powerhouse, respectively. We also analyzed horizontal distributions of passage at the sluiceway and turbines and the effects of operating turbines beneath open sluiceway gates to provide supporting data relevant to operations optimization. Based on the findings, we recommend the following for long-term operations for the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam: open six rather than three sluiceway weirs to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway; open the three weirs above the western-most operating main turbine unit (MU) and the three weirs at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high; operate the turbine units below open sluiceway weirs as a standard procedure; operate the sluiceway 24 h/d year-round to maximize its benefits to juvenile salmonids; and use the same operations for spring and summer emigrants. These operational concepts are transferable to dams where sluiceway surface flow outlets are used protect downstream migrating fishes.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, J. R.; Klatte, Bernard A.

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

Monitoring of the stresses induced by AAR in the Beauharnois concrete gravity dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Beauharnois dam is a well known example of a large dam subjected to AAR attack. This particular dam was built in different stages and its powerhouse contains 3 sections having distinct AAR evolutions over time. It has been decided to monitor the stress variations in the different structural parts of the dam using a new technique; instrumented concrete inclusion (CIUS: Cylindre instruments de l`Universite de Sherbrooke) grouted into concrete mass. With the readings obtained from vibrating wire extensometers, it is possible to monitor the stress variations in two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D) taking into account the surrounding conditions (temperature, relative humidity, etc.). Three cylinders (2D) were installed in 1987 and seven (3D) in 1992. It appears that compressive stresses are induced in powerhouse numbers 1 and 3 and anisotropic conditions produced in powerhouse number 1, with large horizontal stresses due to closing of the expansive joints. It appears also that stresses are building around the injected inclusion very quickly, within a few months, and are close to the maximum tensile strength value of the concrete. These stress changes, when isotropic are comparable to variations of interstitial pressures in saturated soils during a loading processes.

Ballivy, G.; Bois, A.P. [Universite de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); Saleh, K.; Rivest, M. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of using mass releases of juvenile radio tags represents a new and potentially powerful research tool that could be effectively applied to juvenile salmonid passage problems at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. A system of detector antennas, strategically located, would automatically detect and record individually tagged juvenile salmonids as they pass through the spillway, powerhouse, bypass system, or tailrace areas below the dam. Accurate measurements of spill effectiveness, fish guiding efficiency (FGE), collection efficiency (CE), spillway survival, powerhouse survival, and bypass survival would be possible without handling large numbers of unmarked fish. A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam and at Lower Granite Dam. This report summarizes research to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of the prototype juvenile radio-tag system in a field situation and (2) to test the basic assumptions inherent in using the juvenile radio tag as a research tool.

Stuehrenberg, Lowell C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Durability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High Performance Computing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the viscoelastic parameters; 3D FEM analysis using High Performance Computing (parallel and vector features) to run Performance Computing. E. M. R. Fairbairn, E. Goulart, A. L. G. A. Coutinho, N. F. F. Ebecken COPPEDurability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

273

EA-1994: Malheur Resource Area Jonesboro Diversion Dam Replacement Project, Malheur County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bureau of Land Management, with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of the proposed authorization of a right of way to the Burns Paiute Tribe for replacement of an existing diversion dam and installation of a fish passage structure. BPA’s proposed action was to fund the project

274

EIFAC 2006: DAMS, WEIRS AND FISH Long-term effects of hydropower installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EIFAC 2006: DAMS, WEIRS AND FISH Long-term effects of hydropower installations and associated river on stocking lakes with elvers and fingerling eels. These were trapped at the hydropower facilities.) stocks is a matter of great concern and Guest editors: R. L. Welcomme & G. Marmulla Hydropower, Flood

McCarthy, T.K.

275

Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation, and Lepolt Linkimer Online Material: Plot of viable focal mechanisms and table of regional seismic velocity model. INTRODUCTION Rate and distribution of seismic activity are important indica- tors of the overall

Fouch, Matthew J.

276

Seismic vulnerability assessment to slight dam-age based on experimental modal parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic vulnerability assessment to slight dam- age based on experimental modal parameters Clotaire Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich, Switzerland. Michel C., Gueguen P., Causse M. 2011. Seismic higher modes and full seismic ground motion, (2) using a single-degree of freedom model considering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Ice storm impacts on woody debris and debris dam formation in northeastern U.S. streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice storm impacts on woody debris and debris dam formation in northeastern U.S. streams Clifford E and associated streams. During 1999 and 2000, tree canopy damage, stream physical habitat, and wood deposition were evaluated within 51 first-, second-, and third-order streams located within five eastern

Kraft, Clifford E.

278

LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas at Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clay liner (e.g. 10-9 m/s). In spite of their function as hydraulic barriers, geomembrane liners shouldLEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas was conducted to quantify leakage through a geomembrane liner system when subjected to high hydraulic heads

Zornberg, Jorge G.

279

The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reports that large dams influence local climate most in Mediterranean, and semiarid climates, while in impounded basins of the Mediterranean and arid climates of the United States. Citation: Degu, A. M., F, then it is physically plausible to expect a gradual change in the local climate and rainfall patterns in the impounded

Niyogi, Dev

280

FACTORS FOR DECLINE 3.4.5 EFFECTS OF HYDROELECTRIC DAMS ON VIABILITY OF WILD FISH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS FOR DECLINE 3.4.5 EFFECTS OF HYDROELECTRIC DAMS ON VIABILITY OF WILD FISH The existence and operation of the Columbia River Hydrosystem poses risks to wild populations of anadromous salmonids. Run-tagged hatchery fish or a mixture of hatchery and wild fish are used as indicator stocks. In the Snake River

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 General Motors 2 Variable Height Vehicle Air Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economy and aerodynamic drag requirements. Therefore we are required to use our creativity and figure out to increase the fuel economy of a particular vehicle at highway speeds. The dam must successfully divert air existing products and patents · Brainstorming, concept generation, refinement and selection · NO SITE VISIT

Demirel, Melik C.

282

PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1 , Andrew M. Parsons2 , Loren R. Anderson3 and Terry F. Glover4 ABSTRACT This paper summarises the Portfolio Risk Assessment (PRA and an initial prioritisation of future investigations and possible risk reduction measures. The PRA comprised

Bowles, David S.

283

Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two spill conditions were to be systematically performed in alternating 2-day test intervals over the course of the spring outmigration. High flow conditions in 2012 interrupted the spill study. Dam passage survival was therefore estimated season-wide regardless of spill conditions.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Lactic acid production in exercising horses fed N,N-dimethylglycine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly [P&. 05) lower than period 1 at 20 minutes of exercise and at 2, 5, 10, 20, and 60 minutes of recovery. At 30 minutes of exercise period 2 was lower (P&. 06) showing a 32$ decrease from period 1 to period 2. Period 3 mean lactic acid levels... minutes of exercise, and at 2, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 minutes of recovery. Heart rates were obtained for the entire 90 minutes of the SET using an electronic digital heart rate monitor attached to the horse. The electrodes were placed on the anterior...

Moffitt, Patricia Ghagan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Recent applications of the the Trojan Horse method to nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light elements lithium, beryllium and boron (LiBeB) have been used in the last years as possible probes for stellar structure. They are mainly destroyed by (p,a) reactions and cross section measurements for such channels are then needed. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) allows one to extract the astrophysical S(E)-factor without the experience of tunneling through the Coulomb barrier. In this work a resume of the recent new results about the {sup 11}B(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 4}He reactions are shown.

Spitaleri, Claudio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania University (Italy) and INFN-Laboratoti Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Survey of Potential Hanford Site Contaminants in the Upper Sediment for the Reservoirs at McNary, John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from a multi-agency cooperative environmental surveillance study. of the study looked at sediment from the pools upstream from dams on the Columbia River that are downstream from Hanford Site operations. The radiological and chemical conditions existing in the upper-level sediment found in the pools upstream from McNary Dam, John Day Dam, The Dalles Lock and Dam, and Bonneville Dam were evaluated. This study also evaluated beach sediment where available. Water samples were collected at McNary Dam to further evaluate potential Hanford contaminants in the lower Columbia River. Samples were analyzed for radionuclides, chemicals, and physical parameters. Results from this study were compared to background values from sediment and water samples collect from the pool upstream of Priest Rapids Dam (upstream of the Hanford Site) by the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project.

Patton, Gregory W.; Priddy, M; Yokel, Jerel W.; Delistraty, Damon A.; Stoops, Thomas M.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Blood Evaluation Of Cl and Na Concentration In Crioulo Breed Horses Using NAA: Comparison With Humans Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron Activation Analysis was utilized for determining the concentration of chlorine and sodium in blood of Crioulo breed horses used for hyperimmune sera production (Bothrops, Diphtheria and Tetanus) at Butantan Institute (Sao Paulo city, Brasil). These data are an important support for a toxicological control of adverse reactions in patients who will receive the hyperimmune serum.

Baptista, Tatyana S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto Butantan Av Vital Brasil 1500 05503-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B.; Medeiros, Jose Agostinho G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marcelino, Jose R.; Higashi, Hisako G.; Freitas, Monica G. [Instituto Butantan Av Vital Brasil 1500 05503-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Maintaining Healthy Horse PasturesC.D. Teutsch, Virginia Tech, and S.R. Smith, University of Kentucky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- quality feed source. Here a mature pleasure horse grazes con- tently in a field of annual ryegrass of well-drained area located near the barn. In most cas- es a rock pad will be required to keep area from becoming muddy (see diagram of rock pad). uSe electrified polytape to control grazing. For this type

Liskiewicz, Maciej

290

CAMBRIDGE, U.K., AND BARCELONA, SPAIN--As the horse-trading to select a site for the Inter-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAMBRIDGE, U.K., AND BARCELONA, SPAIN--As the horse-trading to select a site for the Inter studying four candidate sites, in Canada, Japan, France, and Spain. To boost its odds, the E.U. decided to put forward only one candidate--either Cadarache in France or Vandellòs in Spain--and asked David King

291

Indices of stress in exercising horses fed diets containing varying amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(B) and fat-supplemented diet with extruded/expelled soybean oil (C; N-3). Overall, heart rates were lower in horses fed the fat-supplemented diets compared to the control diet. On reining and cutting exercise days, heart rates were lower (P<.05...

Howard, Alicia Dawn

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluating the technique of using nitrogen retention as a response criterion for amino acid studies in the horse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and randomly assigned to one of three concentrates fed with a medium quality Coastal Bermudagrass hay throughout the study. Diets were fed at approximately 1.9% of horse body weight per day, divided into twice daily feedings with a 60:40 concentrate: hay ratio...

Antilley, Teri Jill

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Feasibility of Using an Ultrasonic Fish Tracking System in the Tailrace of Lower Granite Dam in 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by PNNL in Spring 2002 at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District. Our goal was to determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic fish tracking in the untested environment of a hydroelectric dam tailrace. If fish tracking were determined to be feasible, we would track the movement of juvenile hatchery chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), juvenile hatchery steelhead (O. mykiss), and juvenile wild steelhead (O. mykiss) and relate their movement to dam operations. The majority of fish to be tracked were released as a part of a separate study conducted by the Biological Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (BRD), which was investigating the movement of juvenile salmon in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam in relation to Removable Spillway Weir (RSW) testing. The two studies took place consecutively from April 14 to June 7, 2002.

Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cash, Kenneth; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness.

Hoffman, Greg; Marotz, Brian L.; Dunnigan, James (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead at McNary Dam, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead at McNary Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. This study supports the USACE’s continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Hughes, James S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Batton, George; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Ingraham, John M.; Kim, Jin A.; Li, Xi; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

299

Scientific substantiation of safe operation of the Earthen Dams at the Votkinsk HPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over a period of 15 years, coworkers of the B. E. Vedeneev Scientific-Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering have conducted scientific accompaniment of the operation of the earthen dams at the Votkinsk HPP. During that time, basic performance characteristics associated with complex hydrogeologic and hydrochemical conditions, and the forms of their unfavorable manifestations influencing the reliability and safety of the structures were revealed, and, recommendations and measures were developed for their elimination.

Deev, A. P.; Fisenko, V. F. [Votkinsk HPP Branch of the JSC 'RusGidro,' Chaikovskii (Russian Federation); Sol'skii, S. V.; Lopatina, M. G.; Gints, A. V.; Aref'eva, A. N. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva', Branch of JSC 'RusGidro' (Russian Federation)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Framing India's Hydraulic Crises The Politics of the Modern Large Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framing India's Hydraulic Crises The Politics of the Modern Large Dam ROHAN D'SOUZA For several University Press, 2006). #12;I N D I A ' S H Y D R A U L I C C R I S I S 1 1 3 commentator on India, declared landscape.4 The TVA model was soon to mark a profound hydraulic departure by kick-starting the post

Sussex, University of

302

Oxygenation cost estimates in 1983 dollars for Cherokee and Douglas Dams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Reservoir Releases Program, estimates of costs associated with providing high purity oxygen injection systems at Cherokee and Douglas Dams were computed in 1983 dollars. This report presents results of the computations. An 8.125% interest rate, a 25-year economic life, and a 10-year diffuser life were assumed. Weekly average dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and turbine flowrate data were available for the years 1958 through 1980. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fain, T.G.; Boyd, J.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Alternatives for physically modifying John Sevier detention dam to allow fish passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies conducted in the vicinity of John Sevier Steam-Electric Plant (JSF) indicated some modification of the fish assemblage from that expected. By blocking movements of fish between Cherokee Reservoir and the upper Holston River, John Sevier detention dam has affected the fisheries in both systems. Providing passage for river-spawning fish at John Sevier detention dam might improve fish communities and fisheries in Cherokee Reservoir as well as upstream habitats. This would include enhanced reproductive success of river-spawning species found in Cherokee Reservoir (e.g., white bass and possibly striped bass and paddlefish) and repopulation of John Sevier Reservoir and the upper Holston River by several species presently found only downstream of the detention dam. TVA has identified and studied several alternatives that alone or in combination might improve the fisheries. Cost estimates were developed for three alternatives. These three alternatives with cost estimates are discussed briefly along with two other alternatives for which cost estimates have not been made. Merits of the three alternatives which have at least some possibility to improve migratory fish stocks are discussed in detail. 5 references.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2003 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam Juvenile Fish Facility (LGR) was characterized by water temperatures, total flows and spill that were below the five year average, low levels of debris, and increased smolt collection numbers compared to 2002 with the exception of unclipped sockeye/kokanee. There were 6,183,825 juvenile salmonids collected. Of these, 6,054,167 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 5,957,885 by barge and 96,282 by truck. An additional 102,340 fish were bypassed back to the river, primarily due to research projects with another 62,122 bypassed through the PIT-tag bypass system. According to the PTAGIS database, 152,268 PIT-tagged fish were detected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, Smolt Monitoring Staff recorded 345 PIT-tagged raceway and sample mortalities. Of the 6,183,825 total fish collected, 113,290 were PIT-tagged or radio tagged and 380 were sacrificed by researchers. The collection included 836,885 fish that had hatchery marks other than clipped fins (elastomer, freeze brands or Coded Wire Tags). An estimated 54,857 incidental fish were collected with an additional 8,730 adult salmonids removed from the separator.

Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Unsteady flow model of Priest Rapids Dam releases at Hanford Reach, Columbia River, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model was developed to simulate water levels at three locations on the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam River Mile 396.1 (River Kilometer 639.0) and River Mile 361.50 (River Kilometer 581.7). The model was calibrated and verified over a range of flows. The results of calibration and verification indicate that the model, with reasonable accuracy, simulates stages to within +-0.08 m (+- 0.25 ft) and surface wave timing to within +-20 min. The model can be used by researchers, river system managers, planners, and decision makers as a tool to predict fluctuating water levels at locations downstream of dams. Data produced by the model can be used to evaluate and quantify possible impacts on aquatic organisms, water supply, navigation, irrigation, recreation, and additional hydropower enhancement. Although the results of this model calibrationand the model simulations presented are site-specific, the methodology is generic. Therefore, the model can be adapted to reflect dam discharges and resulting river flows at other river systems affected by water-level fluctuations.

Sneider, S.C.; Skaggs, R.L.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of population density on estrous cycles of two-year old quarter horse mares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0. 8 O u) 06 IZ I- UJ o 04 D' C( D M O D- ? O CONTROL PEN UJ X 0. 0 2/21- 3/13- 4/2- 4/22- 5/1 2-, 6/2- 3/1 2 4/1 4/21 5/1 1 6/1 6/20 TIME PERIOD COMPRISED OF COMPARABLE CYCLES Figure 4. Seasonal effects of heat intensity. 30...EFFECTS OF POPULATION DENSITY ON ESTROUS CYCLES OF TWO-YEAR OLD QUARTER HORSE MARES A Thesis by DANIEL JOHN BURKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

Burke, Daniel John

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Risk analysis of Trojan-horse attacks on practical quantum key distribution systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An eavesdropper Eve may probe a quantum key distribution (QKD) system by sending a bright pulse from the quantum channel into the system and analyzing the back-reflected pulses. Such Trojan-horse attacks can breach the security of the QKD system if appropriate safeguards are not installed or if they can be fooled by Eve. We present a risk analysis of such attacks based on extensive spectral measurements, such as transmittance, reflectivity, and detection sensitivity of some critical components used in typical QKD systems. Our results indicate the existence of wavelength regimes where the attacker gains considerable advantage as compared to launching an attack at 1550 nm. We also propose countermeasures to reduce the risk of such attacks.

Nitin Jain; Birgit Stiller; Imran Khan; Vadim Makarov; Christoph Marquardt; Gerd Leuchs

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine.ani- mals received a constant infusion of 37.5 ?g/kg/min ofof intravenous lidocaine infusion in horses. Am J Vet Res

Nóbrega Neto, Pedro I; Luna, Stelio PL; Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Mama, Khursheed R; Steffey, Eugene P; Carregaro, Adriano B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Why is There a Naked Girl on a Horse at the Entrance to Low Rotunda? Draft for CCT Winter 2014-2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why is There a Naked Girl on a Horse at the Entrance to Low Rotunda goddess on another fluted Greek column. She is still there of course. Her texts of Greek philosophy were incorporated into the Roman course of instruction

Tong, Liang

312

Influence of an Intra-articular Lipopolysaccharide Challenge on Markers of Inflammation and Cartilage Metabolism and the Ability of Oral Glucosamine to Mitigate these Alterations in Young Horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project established an in vivo method to identify and manipulate expression of markers of osteoarthritis (OA). Specifically, strategies that predictably induce joint inflammation to evaluate dietary methods of OA prevention in young horses have...

Lucia, Jessica Lauren

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of the study was to provide fish passage and distribution data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. During the year-long study period - February 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011the objectives of the hydroacoustic evaluation of fish passage and distribution at LOP were to: 1. Estimate passage rates, run timing, horizontal distribution, and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for smolt-size fish. 2. Estimate passage rates, run timing and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for small-size fish. 3. Estimate passage rates and run timing at the regulating outlets for smolt-size fish. 4. Estimate vertical distribution of smolt-size fish in the forebay near the upstream face of the dam. The fixed-location hydroacoustic technique was used to accomplish the objectives of this study. Transducers (420 kHz) were deployed in each penstock intake, above each RO entrance, and on the dam face; a total of nine transducers (2 single-beam and 7 split-beam) were used. We summarize the findings from the hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011 as follows. • Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> ~90 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. • During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish ± 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. • Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. • Run timing for small-size fish (~65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Downstream passage of small-size juvenile fish was variable, occurring on two days in the spring, eight days in the summer, and at times throughout late fall and winter. A total of 7,017 ± 690 small-size fish passed through the turbine penstock intakes during the study period. • Relatively few fish passed into the ROs when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). • Fish were surface-oriented with 62-80% above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30-60%) was in the 5-10 m depth bin. We draw the following conclusions from the study. • The non-obtrusive hydroacoustic data from this study are reliable because passage estimates and patterns were similar with those observed in the direct capture data from the tailrace screw trap and were consistent with distribution patterns observed in other studies of juvenile salmonid passage at dams. • Fish passage at LOP was apparently affected but not dominated by dam operations and reservoir elevation. • The surface-oriented vertical distribution of fish we observed supports development of surface passage or collector devices. In summary, the high-resolution spatially and temporally data reported herein provide detailed estimates of vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal passage and distributions at LOP during March 2010 through January 2011. This information is applicable to management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collections devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above Lookout Point Dam.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Light-Emitting Tag Testing in Conjunction with Testing of the Minimum Gap Runner Turbine Design at Bonneville Dam Powerhouse 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study conducted by Tom Carlson of PNNL and Mark Weiland of MEVATEC Corp to test the feasibility of using light-emitting tags to visually track objects passing through the turbine environment of a hydroelectric dam. Light sticks were released at the blade tip, mid-blade, and hub in the MGR turbine and a Kaplan turbine at Bonneville Dam and videotaped passing thru the dam to determine visibility and object trajectories.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Weiland, Mark A.

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council calls for wildlife mitigation at hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River System. Beginning April, 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration funded a study of the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr Dams on the western Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffittii) inhabitating the Flathead Valley of northwest Montana. The study was conducted by personnel of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP), to: (1) identify the size and productivity of this population, (2) identify current habitat conditions and losses of nesting and brood-rearing areas, (3) describe the effects of water level fluctuations on nesting and brood-rearing, and (4) identify mitigation alternatives to offset these effects. Annual pair and nest surveys were used to document the location and fate of goose nests. The number of known nesting attempts varied from 44 in 1984 to 108 in 1985, to 136 in 1986 and 134 in 1987. Fifty-four percent of the annual meeting nesting effort took place on elevated sites which were secure from the flooding and dewatering effects of fluctuating water levels. An average of 15 nests were found on stumps in the remnant Flathead River delta, however, an area strongly influenced by the operation of Kerr Dam. Annual nest losses to flooding and predation attributable to fluctuations caused by the dam were recorded. 53 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

Casey, Daniel

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Use of the Hebb-Williams closed-field maze to determine learning ability in yearling horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ve fillies whi ch had never before been used on any learning study were compared. After a 10-day adjustment and training period, horses were presented a new problem each day for 12 days and were given eight trials on each problem. The following... learning parameters were calculated: (1) total excess entry scores (TExES), (2) rapi dity of learning score (XR), the percent of total excess entries occurring during the first four trials of each problem; (3) error elimination score (EES...

McCall, Cynthia Ann

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

New results on the Trojan Horse Method applied to the {sup 10,11}B+p reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light elements lithium, beryllium and boron (LiBeB) were used in the last years as 'possible probes' for stellar structure. They are mainly destroyed by (p,{alpha}) reactions and cross section measurements for such channels are then needed. In this work a resume of the recent results, obtained via Trojan Horse Method, about the {sup 11}B(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B(p,{alpha}){sup 7}Be reactions are shown.

Spitaleri, C.; Romano, S.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Sergi, M. L.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l'Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Del Szanto, M. G.; Carlin, N.; Munhoz, M. G.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Neto, R. Liguori; De Moura, M. M.; Souza, F. A. [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universitade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] (and others)

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Use of the portable infrared thermometer as a means of measuring limb surface temperature in the horse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation was made of the portable infrared thermometer to measure limb surface temperature in 3 horses--first standing in a stall and then placed in lateral recumbency under general anesthesia. To determine the effect of pigment, black and white targets were examined with the instrument under various clinical conditions. In each horse, thermal gradient measurements were consistent along the extremities. Mean limb surface temperatures were less than rectal temperature and greater than ambient temperature. Limb surface temperatures measured in lateral recumbency under general anesthesia were uniformly higher than those obtained in the standing position in the stall. The average SD of absolute temperature measurements made under general anesthesia was +/- 0.1 C, whereas the average SD of those made in standing horses was +/- 0.2 C. For practical use, the latter deviation of +/- 0.2 C was considered more appropriate as the limit of significance for clinical measurements made with the instrument. When used indoors in the absence of direct sunlight, the influence of pigment on measurements made with the instrument was not significant. Optimal conditions for the clinical use of the portable infrared thermometer are defined and factors which affect limb surface temperature are discussed.

Palmer, S.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Development of age of dam and sex adjustment factors for preweaning traits of Brangus cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplied on Brangus cattle enrolled in the BHIR by the IBBA. The data consisted of 103, 620 preweaning records from 1962 through 1988. Variables pertinent to the analyses were sire, age of dam, sex of calf, month of birth, year of birth, age at weaning... calf records reduced the data set size to approximately 55, 000 records. Further editing included records with birth weights less than 18. 14 kg and greater than 63. 50 kg, because calves outside of this weight range would be very rare or would...

Cravey, Matthew David

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Distribution and Flux of Fish in the Forebay of The Dalles Dam in 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spring and summer 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led a team that conducted mobile and fixed hydroacoustic surveys in the forebay of The Dalles Dam for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District, for the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program. The surveys provided information on the distribution and movement of smolt-sized fish relative to ambient factors such as flow, bathymetry, or diel cycle in the forebay at The Dalles Dam. This information is intended to provide baseline data for the development of a surface bypass alternative for juvenile salmon at The Dalles Dam. We sampled the forebay of The Dallas Dam one day and night each week for six weeks in the spring and another six weeks in the summer. In general, during the day in the spring, the greatest densities of smolt-sized fish were observed in the thalweg of the main channel from the Washington bank, to the east side of the powerhouse, along the powerhouse, and concentrated in the areas next to the sluiceway. Fish density was lower on the Washington side of the river and west of mid-powerhouse (north spillway side). The spring night distribution was similar, with a few notable differences. The density of fish was high on the east side of the powerhouse and along the face of the powerhouse, and more fish were detected on the north spillway side. The distribution of sub-yearling sized fish in summer followed the same general patterns as spring, except that summer fish had a greater presence on the east side of the powerhouse and on the north spillway side. The vertical distribution of fish was also determined. In spring 80% of fish were above 5.6 m of depth during the day and above 4.7 m in the night. The summer fish were similarly distributed in the day and night with 80% of the fish in the upper 4.5 m and 4.7 m of the water column respectively. In general the smolt-sized fish were distributed deeper in the water column in the center of the channel than near the edges. The net movement of smolt-sized fish in the forebay from fixed-point samples appeared to be in a circular pattern, with fish moving with the flow and channel upstream of the powerhouse, and upstream at points near the powerhouse. The rate of fish movement (flux) was greatest at the east end of the powerhouse and on the upstream-north side of the channel.

Faber, Derrek M.; Hanks, Michael E.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Skalski, John R.; Dillingham, Peter W.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s/m), (3) make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simulation analysis of within-day flow fluctuation effects on trout below flaming Gorge Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to being renewable, hydropower has the advantage of allowing rapid load-following, in that the generation rate can easily be varied within a day to match the demand for power. However, the flow fluctuations that result from load-following can be controversial, in part because they may affect downstream fish populations. At Flaming Gorge Dam, located on the Green River in northeastern Utah, concern has been raised about whether flow fluctuations caused by the dam disrupt feeding at a tailwater trout fishery, as fish move in response to flow changes and as the flow changes alter the amount or timing of the invertebrate drift that trout feed on. Western Area Power Administration (Western), which controls power production on submonthly time scales, has made several operational changes to address concerns about flow fluctuation effects on fisheries. These changes include reducing the number of daily flow peaks from two to one and operating within a restricted range of flows. These changes significantly reduce the value of the power produced at Flaming Gorge Dam and put higher load-following pressure on other power plants. Consequently, Western has great interest in understanding what benefits these restrictions provide to the fishery and whether adjusting the restrictions could provide a better tradeoff between power and non-power concerns. Directly evaluating the effects of flow fluctuations on fish populations is unfortunately difficult. Effects are expected to be relatively small, so tightly controlled experiments with large sample sizes and long study durations would be needed to evaluate them. Such experiments would be extremely expensive and would be subject to the confounding effects of uncontrollable variations in factors such as runoff and weather. Computer simulation using individual-based models (IBMs) is an alternative study approach for ecological problems that are not amenable to analysis using field studies alone. An IBM simulates how a population responds to environmental changes by representing how the population's individuals interact with their environment and each other. IBMs represent key characteristics of both individual organisms (trout, in this case) and the environment, thus allowing controlled simulation experiments to analyze the effects of changes in the key variables. For the flow fluctuation problem at Flaming Gorge Dam, the key environmental variables are flow rates and invertebrate drift concentrations, and the most important processes involve how trout adapt to changes (over space and time) in growth potential and mortality risk. This report documents simulation analyses of flow fluctuation effects on trout populations. The analyses were conducted in a highly controlled fashion: an IBM was used to predict production (survival and growth) of trout populations under a variety of scenarios that differ only in the level or type of flow fluctuation.

Railsback, S. F.; Hayse, J. W.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division; EPRI

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Survival Rates of Juvenile Salmonids Passing Through the Bonneville Dam and Spillway in 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a 2008 acoustic telemetry survival study conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study estimated the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead passing Bonneville Dam (BON) and its spillway. Of particular interest was the relative survival of smolts detected passing through end spill bays 1-3 and 16-18, which had deep flow deflectors immediately downstream of spill gates, versus survival of smolts passing middle spill bays 4-15, which had shallow flow deflectors.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Johnson, Gary E.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.; McComas, Roy L.; Everett, Jason

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT NORTH FORK SKOKOMISH POWERHOUSE AT CUSHMAN NO. 2 DAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to add generating capacity on an in-stream flow release at Tacoma Power's Cushman hydroelectric project, Cushman No. 2 Dam, FERC Project P-460. The flow that is being used to generate additional electricity was being discharged from a valve at the base of the dam without recovery of the energy. A second objective to the project was to incorporate upstream fish passage by use of a fish collection structure attached to the draft tubes of the hydroelectric units. This will enable reintroduction of native anadromous fish above the dams which have blocked fish passage since the late 1920's. The project was funded in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Department of Energy, Office of Energy, Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and Water Power Program.

Fischer, Steve; Wilson, Matthew

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Prediction of Total Dissolved Gas (TDG) at Hydropower Dams throughout the Columbia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. The entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin cause elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) saturation. Physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been characterized throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and at real-time water quality monitoring stations. These data have been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange which are site specific and account for the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant transport and exchange in route to the downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the findings from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow for the formulation of optimal water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases.

Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL] [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL] [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation] [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

White Sturgeon Mitgation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2003 through March 2004 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rein, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2004 through March 2005 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rien, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Implications of Dam Deconstruction Methods on the Downstream Channel Bed Kristen M. Cannatelli (kmc7r@virginia.edu) and Joanna Crowe Curran (curran@virginia.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Implications of Dam Deconstruction Methods on the Downstream Channel Bed Kristen M. Cannatelli it downstream. At the same time, the lack of sediment supply downstream leads to channel and bank erosion of dam removal sequencing on sediment transport rates and downstream channel bathymetry. Vertical, Staged

Curran, Joanna C.

336

Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir. Prolonged wave overtopping or a combination of wave the actions of wind generated waves and wave overtopping. The uneven elevations of the dam crest

Bowles, David S.

337

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Detroit Dam, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Detroit Dam (DET) on the North Santiam River, Oregon for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at DET and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to regulatory requirements necessitated by the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The goal of the study was to provide information of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at DET from February 2011 through February 2012. The results of the hydroacoustic study provide new and, in some cases, first-ever data on passage estimates, run timing, distributions, and relationships between fish passage and environmental variables at the dam. This information will inform management decisions on the design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the North Santiam River watershed above DET. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 182,526 smolt-size fish (±4,660 fish, 95% CI) passed through turbine penstock intakes. Run timing peaked in winter and early spring months. Passage rates were highest during late fall, winter and early spring months and low during summer. Horizontal distribution for hours when both turbine units were operated simultaneously indicated Unit 2 passed almost twice as much fish as Unit 1. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish during the study period was fairly uniform, indicating fish were passing the turbines at all times of the day. A total of 5,083 smolt-size fish (± 312 fish, 95% CI) were estimated passed via the spillway when it was open between June 23 and September 27, 2011. Daily passage was low at the spillway during the June-August period, and increased somewhat in September 2011. When the spillway was operated simultaneously with the turbines, spillway efficiency (efficiency is estimated as spillway passage divided by total project passage) was 0.72 and effectiveness (fish:flow ratio—proportion fish passage at a route (e.g., spillway) divided by proportion water through that route out of the total project) was 2.69. That is, when the spillway was open, 72% of the fish passing the dam used the spillway and 28% passed into the turbine penstocks. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish at the spillway shows a distinct peak in passage between mid-morning and mid-afternoon and low passage at night. We estimated that 23,339 smolt-size fish (± 572 fish, 95% CI) passed via the Regulating Outlet (RO) when it was open from October 29 through November 12, 2011, January 2-6, and January 20 through February 3, 2012. During the October–November period, RO passage peaked at 1,086 fish on November 5, with a second peak on November 7 (1,075 fish). When the RO was operated simultaneously with the turbines, RO efficiency was 0.33 and effectiveness was 0.89. In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed fish passage data well. The best model included forebay temperature at depth, forebay elevation, total discharge, hours of daylight, and the operation period. The vertical distribution of fish in the forebay near the face of the dam where the transducers sampled showed fish were generally distributed throughout the water column during all four operational periods. During the refill and full pool periods, vertical distribution was bi-modal with surface-layer and mid-water modes. Patterns for day and night distributions were variable. Fish were distributed above and below the thermocline when it was present (full pool and drawdown periods).

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ham, Kenneth D.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Rate of intramolecular reduction of oxyferryl iron in horse heart myoglobin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like heme peroxidases and other heme enzymes, myoglobin forms oxyferryl (Fe[sup IV][triple bond]O) on reaction with peroxides. We have recently observed slow intramolecular electron transfer (ET) to the oxyferryl heme of cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) from a[sub 5]Ru[sup II] (a[sub 5]Ru = pentaammineruthenium) bound at His60 and proposed a large reorganizational energy ([lambda]) for oxyferryl heme. An obvious test of this large postulated [lambda] is to directly compare intramolecular ET rates between oxyferryl and a[sub 5]Ru centers in myoglobin with the corresponding rates in zinc-substituted sperm whale (SWMb) and recombinant human myoglobins (RHMb). Since the oxyferryl heme of horse heart myoglobin (HHMb) is significantly more stable than that of SWMb, the former protein was chosen for this study. A a[sub 5]Ru group was attached to the surface His48 of HHMb, and rates of ET over the 12.7-angstrom distance between the a[sub 5]Ru center and the ferric and oxyferryl hemes were measured by pulse radiolysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory. HHMb (0.5-10 [mu]M) solutions were prepared in N[sub 2]O-saturated sodium phosphate buffer at pH 7.0 (40 mM) containing 12 mM HCOONa to generate CO[sub 2][sup .[minus

Fenwick, C.; Marmor, S.; Govindaraju, K.; English, A.M. (Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Wishart, J.F.; Sun, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1994-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Kore University, Enna, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Factors Affecting Route Selection and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at Snake River Dams in 2012 and 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a study that summarized the passage proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged-kelts. Kelts were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify individual, behavioral, environmental and dam operation variables that were related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts that passed through FCRPS dams. Bayesian model averaging of multivariable logistic regression models was used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the highest probability of influencing the route of passage and the route-specific survival probabilities for kelts that passed Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams in 2012 and 2013. The posterior probabilities of the best models for predicting route of passage ranged from 0.106 for traditional spill at LMN to 0.720 for turbine passage at LGS. Generally, the behavior (depth and near-dam searching activity) of kelts in the forebay appeared to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. Shallower-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the weir and deeper-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines than other routes. Kelts that displayed a higher level of near-dam searching activity had a higher probability of passing via the spillway weir and those that did less near-dam searching had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines. The side of the river in which kelts approached the dam and dam operations also affected route of passage. Dam operations and the size and condition of kelts were found to have the greatest effect on route-specific survival probabilities for fish that passed via the spillway at LGS. That is, longer kelts and those in fair condition had a lower probability of survival for fish that passed via the spillway weir. The survival of spillway weir- and deep-spill passed kelts was positively correlated with the percent of the total discharge that passed through turbine unit 4. Too few kelts passed through the traditional spill, JBS, and turbine units to evaluate survival through these routes. The information gathered in this study describes Snake River steelhead kelt passage behavior, rates, and distributions through the FCRPS as well as provide information to biologists and engineers about the dam operations and abiotic conditions that are related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Li, Xinya; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

343

Exploring the Potential Impact of Reforestation on the Hydrology of the Upper Tana River Catchment and the Masinga Dam, Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catchment and the Masinga Dam, Kenya Jennifer Jacobs, Jay Angerer, Jeff Vitale Raghavan Srinivasan, Robert of the most critical resource areas of Kenya. The Masinga Reservoir, at the outlet of the basin, provides, collaborating technical policy analysts working for key government institutions in Kenya identified the need

344

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Synthesis of Biological Reports on Juvenile Fish Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam through 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a review of available literature on juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam from 1939 through 2005. Studies of interest included project-wide fish-passage efficiency (FPE) studies by radio telemetry and fixed-aspect hydroacoustics, fish survival studies (direct and indirect), FGE studies, powerhouse and unit (by netting, hydroacoustics, and radio telemetry), predation studies in the forebay and tailrace, behavioral studies on forebay approach and egress, and surface-bypass studies. The FPE effort will include a review of available distribution data (horizontal, diel, and vertical) for juvenile salmon. This study does not repeat the results of previous review and synthesis studies but cites them. Where no previous review exists for a subject area, all reports were reviewed and synthesized. The report includes an annotated bibliography summarizing each of the documents reviewed and a DVD disk containing all of the original papers and reports along with an HTML index to the documents.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Giorgi, Albert E.; Johnson, Richard L.; Stevenson, John R.; Schilt, Carl R.; Johnson, Peter N.; Patterson, Deborah S.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival rates, reservoir rearing and predation, dam operations, and weather. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> {approx}90 mm and < 300 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. Passage peaks were also evident in early spring, early summer, and late fall. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish {+-} 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Of this total, 84% passed during December-January. Run timing for small-size fish ({approx}65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Relatively few fish passed into the Regulating Outlets (ROs) when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Overall, when the ROs were open, RO efficiency (RO passage divided by total project passage) was 0.004. In linear regression analyses, daily fish passage (turbines and ROs combined) for smolt-size fish was significantly related to project discharge (P<0.001). This relationship was positive, but there was no relationship between total project passage and forebay elevation (P=0.48) or forebay elevation delta, i.e., day-to-day change in forebay elevation (P=0.16). In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed data well. The multiple regression model indicates a positive trend between expected daily fish passage and each of the three variables in the model-Julian day, log(discharge), and log(abs(forebay delta)); i.e., as any of the environmental variables increase, expected daily fish passage increases. For vertical distribution of fish at the face of the dam, fish were surface-oriented with 62%-80% occurring above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30%-60%) was found between 5-10-m-deep. During spring and summer, mean target strengths for the analysis periods ranged from -44.2 to -42.1 dB. These values are indicative of yearling-sized juvenile salmon. In contrast, mean target strengths in fall and winter were about -49.0 dB, which are representative of subyearling-sized fish. The high-resolution spatial and temporal data reported herein provide detailed information about vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal fish passage rates and distributions at LOP from March 2010 through January 2011. This information will support management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above LOP.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Philadelphia Electric Company's East Fish Passage Facility at the Conowingo Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Conowingo East Fish Passage Facility employs the latest technology to attract, collect, and pass American Shad upstream of the dam as they make their annual spring spawning run u the Susquehanna River. The facility is designed to move up to 750,000 American Shad and 5 million River Herring per season, i.e., April 1 through June 15. The facility is designed so that if the numbers of American Shad warrant, the capacity of the flit may be doubled in the future. This paper will discuss the key elements in the design of a fishway, including planning, engineering, and hydraulic modelling. The paper will also address installation and operational experience at Philadelphia Electric's new East Side Fish Passage Facility.

Brunot, J.T. (Philadelphia Electric Co., Philadelphia, PA (US)); Frese, C.R. (RMC Environmental Services, Muddy Run Ecological Lab., Drumore, PA (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Use of an autonomous sensor to evaluate the biological performance of the advanced turbine at Wanapum Dam  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the United States and the world. However, hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydroturbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make those hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydroturbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the ten turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. As an additional measure to the primary metric of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device - the Sensor Fish - to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions and physical stresses experienced by the fish as well as the specific causes of fish biological response. We found that the new hydroturbine blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective in meeting the objectives of improving fish survival while enhancing operational efficiency of the dam. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by the balloon tag-recapture methodology. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of pressure change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydroturbine design improved passage of juvenile salmon at Wanapum Dam.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Crystal Structures of the Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Complexes of Horse Heart Myoglobin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrite is an important species in the global nitrogen cycle, and the nitrite reductase enzymes convert nitrite to nitric oxide (NO). Recently, it has been shown that hemoglobin and myoglobin catalyze the reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions. We have determined the 1.20 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of the nitrite adduct of ferric horse heart myoglobin (hh Mb). The ligand is bound to iron in the nitrito form, and the complex is formulated as Mb{sup III}(ONO{sup -}). The Fe-ONO bond length is 1.94 Angstroms, and the O-N-O angle is 113 degrees. In addition, the nitrite ligand is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with the distal His64 residue. We have also determined the 1.30 Angstroms resolution crystal structures of hh Mb{sup II}NO. When hh Mb{sup II}NO is prepared from the reaction of metMb{sup III} with nitrite/dithionite, the FeNO angle is 144 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 1.87 Angstroms. However, when prepared from the reaction of NO with reduced Mb{sup II}, the FeNO angle is 120 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 2.13 Angstroms. This difference in FeNO conformations as a function of preparative method is reproducible, and suggests a role of the distal pocket in hh Mb{sup II}NO in stabilizing local FeNO conformational minima.

Copeland,D.; Soares, A.; West, A.; Richter-Addo, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

%22Trojan Horse%22 strategy for deconstruction of biomass for biofuels production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of renewable biofuels to displace fossil fuels currently consumed in the transportation sector is a pressing multiagency national priority (DOE/USDA/EERE). Currently, nearly all fuel ethanol is produced from corn-derived starch. Dedicated 'energy crops' and agricultural waste are preferred long-term solutions for renewable, cheap, and globally available biofuels as they avoid some of the market pressures and secondary greenhouse gas emission challenges currently facing corn ethanol. These sources of lignocellulosic biomass are converted to fermentable sugars using a variety of chemical and thermochemical pretreatments, which disrupt cellulose and lignin cross-links, allowing exogenously added recombinant microbial enzymes to more efficiently hydrolyze the cellulose for 'deconstruction' into glucose. This process is plagued with inefficiencies, primarily due to the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, mass transfer issues during deconstruction, and low activity of recombinant deconstruction enzymes. Costs are also high due to the requirement for enzymes and reagents, and energy-intensive cumbersome pretreatment steps. One potential solution to these problems is found in synthetic biology-engineered plants that self-produce a suite of cellulase enzymes. Deconstruction can then be integrated into a one-step process, thereby increasing efficiency (cellulose-cellulase mass-transfer rates) and reducing costs. The unique aspects of our approach are the rationally engineered enzymes which become Trojan horses during pretreatment conditions. During this study we rationally engineered Cazy enzymes and then integrated them into plant cells by multiple transformation techniques. The regenerated plants were assayed for first expression of these messages and then for the resulting proteins. The plants were then subjected to consolidated bioprocessing and characterized in detail. Our results and possible implications of this work on developing dedicated energy crops and their advantage in a consolidated bioprocessing system.

Simmons, Blake Alexander; Sinclair, Michael B.; Yu, Eizadora; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Hadi, Masood Z.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ex post power economic analysis of record of decision operational restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On October 9, 1996, Bruce Babbitt, then-Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed the Record of Decision (ROD) on operating criteria for the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). Criteria selected were based on the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) Alternative as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (Reclamation 1995). These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore its economic value. The EIS provided impact information to support the ROD, including an analysis of operating criteria alternatives on power system economics. This ex post study reevaluates ROD power economic impacts and compares these results to the economic analysis performed prior (ex ante) to the ROD for the MLFF Alternative. On the basis of the methodology used in the ex ante analysis, anticipated annual economic impacts of the ROD were estimated to range from approximately $15.1 million to $44.2 million in terms of 1991 dollars ($1991). This ex post analysis incorporates historical events that took place between 1997 and 2005, including the evolution of power markets in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council as reflected in market prices for capacity and energy. Prompted by ROD operational restrictions, this analysis also incorporates a decision made by the Western Area Power Administration to modify commitments that it made to its customers. Simulated operations of GCD were based on the premise that hourly production patterns would maximize the economic value of the hydropower resource. On the basis of this assumption, it was estimated that economic impacts were on average $26.3 million in $1991, or $39 million in $2009.

Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2004 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by above average water temperatures, below average flows and spill, low levels of debris. The number of smolts collected for all species groups (with the exception of clipped and unclipped sockeye/kokanee) exceeded all previous collection numbers. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook, steelhead and sockeye above LGR, we can not accurately distinguish wild chinook, wild steelhead and wild sockeye/kokanee from hatchery reared unclipped chinook and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Wild steelhead can be identified from hatchery steelhead by the eroded dorsal and pectoral fins exhibited on unclipped hatchery steelhead. The numbers in the wild columns beginning in 1998 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. This season a total of 11,787,539 juvenile salmonids was collected at LGR. Of these, 11,253,837 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 11,164,132 by barge and 89,705 by truck. An additional 501,395 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways and for research purposes. According to the PTAGIS database, 177,009 PIT-tagged fish were detected at LGR in 2004. Of these, 105,894 (59.8%) were bypassed through the PIT-tag diversion system, 69,130 (39.1%) were diverted to the raceways to be transported, 1,640 (0.9%) were diverted to the sample tank, sampled and then transported, 345 (0.2%) were undetected at any of the bypass, raceway or sample exit monitors.

Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Immunohistochemical localization of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) in the brain and infundibulum of the sheep, cow and horse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to hypophysial portal and systemic blood and the release of LH. Endocrinol. 95:18. Bugnon, C. , B. Bloch, . D. Lenys and D. Fellmann. 1977. Ultrastructural study of the LH-RH containing neurons in the human fetus. Brain Res. 137:175. Dreifuss, J. J. , J. T... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction IMMUNOHISTOCKEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF GONADOTROPIN RELEASING HORMONE (GnRH) IN THE BRAIN AND INFUNDIBULUM OF THE SHEEP, COW AND HORSE...

Dees, William Leslie

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Comparative feeding value of a cubed alfalfa:corn plant product as an exclusive diet for exercising horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in previous studies where a similar diet was utilized (Jones, 1992; Hower, 1993). Rate of Feed Intake Horses consumed the conventional diet significantly faster (P&. 05) than the cubed diet. The rate of intake for the conventional diet ranged from 65. 0... Conventional Cube Intake (kg/d) (% of BW) Digestibility (%) 9. 96 2. 23 68. 67 10. 21 2. 29 68. 64 . 125 . 098 1. 250 26 apparent DM digestibility for the conventional diet was within ranges reported by Hower (1993) for a conventional diet fed...

Younglove, Georgia Ann

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Application of a Hydrodynamic Model for Assessing the Hydraulic Capacity and Flow Field at Willamette Falls Dam, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Willamette Falls Hydroelectric Power Dam, operated by Portland General Electric (PGE), is located on the Willamette River, Oregon. The Project site consists of T.W. Sullivan Power Plant and a 2,950-ft-long spillway located on the top of the Willamette Falls Dam. As part of the effort of protection and enhancement of environmental resources, a flow control structure at the dam was proposed to improve the flow field and enhance the downstream juvenile fish passage in the region just upstream of the forebay (pre-forebay). The flow in the pre-forebay of Willamette Falls Dam is affected by the complex geometry and bathymetry, powerhouse flow, fish ladder flow and the spillway around the dam. The expectation was that the flow would be sensitive to the proposed flow control structures and could be modified to enhance downstream migration. In this study, a three-dimensional, free-surface hydrodynamic model (EFDC) was developed for the pre-forebay region of Willamette Falls to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed alternative and its effect on the flow field in two different flow regimes (low and high river flow), as well as to assess the hydraulic capacity of flow control structures. One of the key challenges in this modeling study was to properly specify the free open boundary conditions along the 2,950-feet-long spillway. In this study, a pressure boundary condition based on hydraulic head rating curves was applied to the free spillway boundary. The numerical model was calibrated with ADP velocity measurements at 17 stations for the existing low flow condition. Good agreements between model results and measured data were obtained, indicating the successful application of pressure boundary condition on the free spillway boundary. The calibrated model was applied to simulate the flow field and free surface elevation in the high flow region near the control flow structures under different alternative conditions. The model results were used to evaluate the effectiveness of flow control structure alternative for downstream fish passage. The model was also used to estimate the hydraulic capacity based on the water surface head drops upstream of the structures. This model application demonstrated that a free surface coastal model can be used successfully to examine free surface hydraulic problems near high velocity regions upstream of spillways at dams.

Lee, Cheegwan; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Divers, Arya-Behbehani

2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

359

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of measuring 1D water velocity magnitudes has been previously demonstrated by the authors, the feasibility of resolving 3D water velocity vectors given the heterogeneity of the flow field was unknown before this study’s data were collected. Both the 1D and 3D data were collected by deploying three ADCPs on dual-axis rotators directly above the draft tube exit of Turbine Unit 16. These instruments collected 1D data during both the mobile reconnaissance campaign and a later one-week period with zero spillway discharge. During the zero spillway discharge period, Turbine Unit 16 was operated over a range of discharges. Approximately 12 hours of 1D velocity data were collected at low (12 kcfs), middle (16.2 kcfs), and high (19.2 kcfs) turbine discharges. The 1D dataset indicates large differences in flow patterns and RMS velocity fluctuations among the various discharge levels. Results from this project show that it is technically feasible to measure 3D water velocities directly downstream of an operating turbine unit using a narrow beam swath (i.e., 6-degree) ADCP. Data products from these 3D velocity data include a measurement of the draft tube barrel flow distribution (a.k.a., the flow split), directional changes and the general decay of velocity as flow exits the draft tube and enters the tailrace, and a relative measure of the homogeneity of the flow field.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of seven streams and four lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2000. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in southern Pend Oreille County, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2001. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding or erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Counts of indicated pairs suggest there were 73-125 occupied nests in the study area; 44 were located in 1984. Twenty were island ground nests, 19 were tree nests, and 5 were on man-made structures. Hatching success was 76 percent. Sixty-one percent of all nests were in deciduous forest habitat; 87 percent were on riparian bench or island landforms. Seventy-four percent of all nests were within 5 m of the seasonal high water mark (HWM) and 85 percent of ground nests were 1 m or less above the HWM. Production, habitat use, and distribution of broods were documented through aerial, boat, ground, and observation tower surveys. 28 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Casey, Daniel

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The role of observer individual differences in personality assessments of the domesticated horse: A novel application of Kelly’s Repertory Grid Technique   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-as-a-scientist. As methodology is an important part of the project, the repertory grid technique (RGT) originally developed by Kelly (1955), was employed as a novel method to assess horse personality. This method gives observers the freedom to generate their own descriptors...

Grajfoner, Daša

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Astrophysical S(E) factor of the (15)N(p, alpha)(12)C reaction at sub-Coulomb energies via the Trojan horse method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The low-energy bare-nucleus cross section for (15)N(p, alpha)(12)C is extracted by means of the Trojan horse method applied to the (2)H((15)N,alpha(12)C)n reaction at E(beam) = 60 MeV. For the first time we applied the modified half...

La Cognata, M.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Fu, Changbo; Goldberg, V. Z.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Schmidt, D.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Irgaziev, B. F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

ASDSO/FEMA Specialty Workshop on Risk Assessment for Dams. Invited paper in the Proceedings of the 2001 ASDSO 21st Annual Conference, Snowbird, Utah. September 2001.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASDSO/FEMA Specialty Workshop on Risk Assessment for Dams. Invited paper in the Proceedings of the 2001 ASDSO 21st Annual Conference, Snowbird, Utah. September 2001. ASDSO/FEMA SPECIALTY WORKSHOP

Bowles, David S.

368

Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project began to address some of the identified data gaps, throughout the blocked area, with a variety of newly developed sampling projects, as well as, continuing with ongoing data collection of established projects.

Crossley, Brian (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA); Lockwood, Jr., Neil W. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Menski, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center)

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

373

Dworshak Dam Impact Assessment and Fishery Investigation and Trout, Bass and Forage Species: Combined Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) entered into separate intergovernmental agreements with the Bonneville Power Administration in a cooperative four-year effort to study impacts of Dworshak Dam operation on resident fisheries. The NPT Department of Fisheries Management focused on rainbow trout, smallmouth bass and forage fish. The IDFG's segment of the project was to document kokanee population dynamics, relate it to the changing nutrient status of the reservoir, evaluate kokanee losses through Dworshak Dam, and make kokanee management recommendations. This final report includes findings for 1990 and 1991 and relates these data to information previously presented in annual reports for 1987, 1988 and 1989.

Maiolie, Melo; Statler, David P.; Elam, Steve

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Placement of the dam for the no. 2 kambaratinskaya HPP by large-scale blasting: some observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of complex instrument observations of large-scale blasting during construction of the dam for the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP on the Naryn River in the Republic of Kirgizia are analyzed. The purpose of these observations was: to determine the actual parameters of the seismic process, evaluate the effect of air and acoustic shock waves, and investigate the kinematics of the surface formed by the blast in its core region within the mass of fractured rocks.

Shuifer, M. I.; Argal, E. S. [JSC 'SPII Gidroproekt' (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Use of an Autonomous Sensor to Evaluate the Biological Performance of the Advanced Turbine at Wanapum Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the world and the United States. However, Hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydro turbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make these hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon in the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Grant County Public Utility District (Grant PUD) requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that are designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided co-funding to Grant PUD for aspects of performance testing that supported the application. As an additional measure to the primary evaluation measure of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions or physical stresses that the fish experienced or the specific causes of the biological response. We found that the new blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by balloon tag-recapture tests. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydro turbine design met the desired fish passage goals for Wanapum Dam.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

376

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the twelfth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 19,621 hatchery steelhead, 8,128 wild steelhead, and 9,227 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2004 were to (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2004 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures; details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2004 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. Overall, the percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses were 68% hatchery-reared yearling Chinook salmon and 32% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 73% hatchery-reared and 27% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.923 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.860 for steelhead. Respective average survival estimates for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead were 0.875 and 0.820 from Little Goose Dam tailrace to Lower Monumental Dam tailrace; 0.818 and 0.519 from Lower Monumental Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace (including passage through Ice Harbor Dam); and 0.809 and 0.465 from McNary Dam tailrace to John Day Dam tailrace. Survival for yearling Chinook salmon from John Day Dam tailrace to Bonneville Dam tailrace (including passage through The Dalles Dam) was 0.735. We were unable to estimate survival through this reach for steelhead during 2004 because too few fish were detected at Bonneville Dam due to operation of the new corner collector at the second powerhouse. Combining average estimates from the Snake River smolt trap to Lower Granite Dam, from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam, and from McNary Dam to Bonneville Dam, estimated annual average survival through the entire hydropower system from the head of Lower Granite reservoir to the tailrace of Bonneville Dam (eight projects) was 0.353 (s.e. 0.045) for Snake River yearling Chinook salmon. We could not empirically estimate survival through the entire system for steelhead in 2004 because of low detection rates for this species at Bonneville Dam. For yearling spring Chinook salmon released in the Upper Columbia River, estimated survival from point of release to McNary Dam tailrace was 0.484 (s.e. 0.005) for fish released from Leavenworth Hatchery, 0.748 (s.e. 0.015) for fish released from Entiat Hatchery, 0.738 (s.e. 0.036) for fish released from Winthrop Hatchery, and 0.702 (s.e. 0.048) and 0.747 (s.e.0.047) for those from Methow Hatchery, Chewuch Pond and

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Route-Specific Passage and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at The Dalles and Bonneville Dams, 2012 - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was mainly focused on evaluating the route-specific passage and migration success of steelhead kelts passing downstream through The Dalles Dam (TDA) and Bonneville Dam (BON) at Columbia River (CR) river kilometers 309 and 234 respectively. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel collected, tagged and released out-migrating steelhead kelts in the tributaries of the Deschutes River, 15 Mile Creek and Hood River between April 14 and June 4, 2012. A PIT tag was injected into each kelt’s dorsal sinus whereas a Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic micro-transmitter was attached to an external FLoy T-bar tag and inserted into the dorsal back musculature using a Floy tagging gun. JSATS cabled arrays were deployed at TDA and BON and autonomous node arrays were deployed near Celilo, Oregon (CR325); the BON forebay (CR236); the BON tailrace (CR233); near Knapp, Washington (CR156); and near Kalama, Washington (CR113) to monitor the kelts movement while passing through the dams and above mentioned river cross-sections.

Rayamajhi, Bishes; Ploskey, Gene R.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derek M.; Kim, Jin A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Biological Evaluation of the Behavioral Guidance Structure at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington in 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998 a behavioral guidance structure (BGS; a steel wall 330m long and 17-24 m deep) was installed in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington. The purpose of the BGS was to change the horizontal distribution of downstream migrants approaching the south half of the powerhouse by guiding them toward the surface bypass and collector attached to the dam upstream of the north half of the powerhouses. The effectiveness of the BGS was evaluated with biotelemetry and hydroacoustics. The BGS was designed to be movable, thereby allowing a comparison between the horizontal distribution of the fish when the BGS was deployed as a diversion device and when the BGS was moved 800 m upstream of the dam and no longer influenced fish movements immediately upstream of the powerhouse. Radio telemetry and hydroacoustic techniques showed that about 80% of the fish migrating toward Turbines 1-3 were successfully diverted north. Radio telemetry data revealed that the mean residence times of chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead, and wild steelhead were 1.6, 1.7, and 2.4 times longer, respectively, when the BGS was out compared to when it was in. And overall fish passage efficiency was significantly higher when the BGS was in (93.7%) than out (91.2%).

Adams, Noah (U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Resource Division); Johnson, Gary E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rondorf, Dennis W. (VISITORS); Anglea, Steven M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wik, Timothy O. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Walla Walla District)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot study was conducted to estimate survival of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River. The goals of the study were to: (1) field test and evaluate the Single-Release, Modified-Single-Release, and Paired-Release Models for the estimation of survival probabilities through sections of a river and hydroelectric projects; (2) identify operational and logistical constraints to the execution of these models; and (3) determine the usefulness of the models in providing estimates of survival probabilities. Field testing indicated that the numbers of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon needed for accurate survival estimates could be collected at different areas with available gear and methods. For the primary evaluation, seven replicates of 830 to 1,442 hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon were purse-seined from Lower Granite Reservoir, PIT tagged, and released near Nisqually John boat landing (River Kilometer 726). Secondary releases of PIT-tagged smolts were made at Lower Granite Dam to estimate survival of fish passing through turbines and after detection in the bypass system. Similar secondary releases were made at Little Goose Dam, but with additional releases through the spillway. Based on the success of the 1993 pilot study, the authors believe that the Single-Release and Paired-Release Models will provide accurate estimates of juvenile salmonid passage survival for individual river sections, reservoirs, and hydroelectric projects in the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

Iwamoto, Robert N.; Sandford, Benjamin P.; McIntyre, Kenneth W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Survival and Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011 - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reported herein was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The PNNL and UW project managers were Drs. Thomas J. Carlson and John R. Skalski, respectively. The USACE technical lead was Mr. Brad Eppard. The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp) and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study is being documented in two types of reports: compliance and technical. A compliance report is delivered within 6 months of the completion of the field season and focuses on results of the performance metrics outlined in the 2008 BiOp and Fish Accords. A technical report is produced within the 18 months after field work, providing comprehensive documentation of a given study and results on route-specific survival estimates and fish passage distributions, which are not included in compliance reports. This technical report concerns the 2011 acoustic telemetry study at The Dalles Dam.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Batten, G.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Hughes, James S.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Royer, Ida M.; Townsend, Richard L.; Woodley, Christa M.; Kim, Jeongkwon; Etherington, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Fisher, Erik J.; Greiner, Michael J.; Khan, Fenton; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Characterizing the Fish Passage Environment at The Dalles Dam Spillway: 2001-2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spill environment at The Dalles Dam in 2001-2004 was characterized using a field-deployed autonomous sensor (the so-called Sensor Fish), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, and Lagrangian particle tracking. The sensor fish has a self-contained capability to digitally the record pressure and triaxial accelerations it was exposed to following its release into the spillway. After recovery downstream of the tailrace, the data stored in the memory of the sensor are downloaded and stored for analysis. The spillway, stilling basin, and tailrace hydrodynamics were simulated using an unsteady, free-surface, three-dimensional CFD code that solved the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. The results from the CFD simulations were then used in a Lagrangian particle tracking model that included the effects of mass, drag, and buoyancy in the particle equation of motion. A random walk method was used to simulate the effects of small-scale turbulence on the particle motion. Several operational and structural conditions were evaluated using the Sensor Fish, CFD, and particle tracking. Quantifying events such as strike and stilling basin retention time characterized exposure conditions in the spill environment.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Serkowski, John A.; Cook, Chris B.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Perkins, William A.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmon Behavior at Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Using a Multibeam Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, with increased effort to bypass and guide fragile stocks of juvenile salmon in the Columbia Basin past hydroelectric projects, it has been increasingly important to obtain fine-scale fish behavior data in a non-intrusive manner. The Dual-Head Multibeam Sonar is an emerging technology for fisheries applications that addresses that requirement. It has two principal advantages over traditional hydroacoustic techniques: (1) it allows for simultaneous large-volume coverage of a region of interest, and (2) it affords 3-D tracking capability. The use of Dual-Head Multibeam Sonar in this study resulted in unprecedented insight into fine-scale smolt behavior upstream of a prototype surface collector at Bonneville Dam first powerhouse in 1998. Our results indicated that outmigrant juvenile salmon had an increased likelihood of milling or holding. This discovery will lead to better design criteria for future bypass and collector systems. Future fisheries multibeam sonar systems will likely be fully integrated systems with built-in real time tracking capability. These systems may be used to track targets relative to physical guidance structures or other behavior modifying stimuli such as light, turbulent flow, electrical/magnetic fields, or low-frequency sound and vibration. The combination of fine-scale fish behavior data and environmental parameters will yield better design criteria for the safe passage of listed or endangered species of Pacific salmon.

Johnson, Robert L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Moursund, Russell A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Tradeoffs for Efficiently Passing Juvenile Salmonids through Bonneville Dam on the Lower Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed five years of route-specific fish-passage data acquired by fixed-aspect hydroacoustic sampling of juvenile salmonids passing downstream through Bonneville Dam. High passage effectiveness of surface-flow outlets relative to the spillway and turbines suggests that juvenile salmonids are preferentially selecting surface outlets over adjacent turbines. Seasonal estimates showed that median combined effectiveness of surface-flow outlets (7.8) was 7.1 times higher than that of the spillway (1.1) and 9.8 times higher than that of turbines (0.8). Islands prevent the spillway from attracting fish from either powerhouse, something that may occur at other projects. Regressions indicated that percent flow passing a specific route explained from 50 to 97% of fish-passage variation, and relations were useful for evaluating fish-passage alternatives. Fitted curves for surface-passage routes, including the sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1) and Powerhouse 2 (B2) were much steeper at low percent low (2-15%) than were curves for the spillway or turbines. Regressions indicate that increasing surface-flow percentages of B1 flow from 1% to 10% could increase B1 sluiceway-passage efficiency from 40% to 83%. Increasing B2 flow to the B2 sluiceway from 4% to 15% could increase fish passage from 31% to 62%. Without spill, about 50% of fish passed by non-turbine routes.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Kim, Jina

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase in hatchery Chinook catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery production and differences in flow between years. Changes in hatchery and wild steelhead catch are probably due to differences in flow between years. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2002 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 4.7-fold and a 3.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.8-fold and a 1.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2002 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. The analysis was unable to detect a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon. The lack of a detectable relation was probably a result of the migration rate data being spread over a very narrow range of discharge. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.2-fold for hatchery steelhead between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

386

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Characterization of The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 Vortex Using Surface Entrained Sensor Fish Device: Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the pilot study to characterize The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 vortex using a surface entrained Sensor Fish device. It was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on April 13 and 14, 2006. The total spill was controlled at approximately 110 kcfs, the forebay elevation was 157.89 ft, and the discharge of Bay 6 at the tested gate opening of 14 ft was approximately 18 kcfs. The objectives of the full study are to (1) develop baseline conditions for the detailed analysis of Sensor Fish measurements by deploying Sensor Fish in different surface locations in the vortex periphery; (2) observe the entrainment pattern and extract hydraulic data of interest such as acceleration, rotation, pressure, and estimated velocity of Sensor Fish or drogues; (3) integrate the experimental results with companion computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and inertial particle tracking studies. A total of 12 Sensor Fish were released in the surface at upstream edge, left edge, downstream edge, and the core of the vortex at Bay 6. Because of the high discharge, the vortex patterns at the test condition were less consistent than the patterns observed at lower discharges. Compared with the Sensor Fish released at mid-bay at Bay 6, Sensor Fish released from the surface at the vortex experienced higher pressure fluctuations, a larger percentage of severe events, and much more rapid angular velocities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic water level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Changes in chronology of seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding and erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Our 1985 pair count data indicated that 95 to 143 nests may have been present. Hatching success for 1985 nests (55%) was low compared to long-term averages for the region. Predation was the predominant cause of ground nest failure (25 nests); we documented 2 nest failures due to flooding. The maximum gosling count in the study area for 1985 was 197. Six key brood-rearing areas were identified. Most (80%) sites were located in the herbaceous or pasture cover type and the riparian bench landform. Analysis of aerial photographs taken prior to construction of Kerr Dam documented the loss of 1859 acres of habitat along the north shore of Flathead Lake. Losses were attributed to inundation and to continuing erosion due to operation of Kerr Dam. Lake and river water level regimes were compared with the chronology of important periods in the nesting cycle. Low lake levels in May and early June coincide with the breed-rearing period. Mudflats are heavily used by broods, but their effect on survival must still be documented. Preliminary recommendations to protect and enhance Canada goose habitat and production are being developed.

Casey, Daniel

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage decoded for JSATS transmitters from: turbine operations; spillway operations; DIDSON/ADCP acoustic energy; and PAS hydroacoustic systems at transmit level of -12 dB, although there was a significant impact at all higher transmit levels (-11 to -6 dB). The main conclusion from this optimization study is that valid JSATS telemetry data can be collected simultaneously with a DIDSON/ADCP and a PAS hydroacoustic system at transmit level -12 dB. Multiple evaluation tools should be considered to increase the robustness and thoroughness of future fish passage evaluations at John Day and other dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam 2008-2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam (TDA) sluiceway and turbines during fall/winter 2008 and early spring 2009, respectively. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). Operating the sluiceway reduces the potential for hydropower production. However, this surface flow outlet may be the optimal non-turbine route for fallbacks in late fall after the sluiceway is typically closed for juvenile fish passage and for overwintering summer steelhead and kelt passage in the early spring before the start of the voluntary spill season. The goal of this study was to characterize adult steelhead spatial and temporal distributions and passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines, and their movements in front of the sluiceway at TDA to inform fisheries managers’ and engineers’ decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. The study periods were from November 1 to December 15, 2008 (45 days) and from March 1 to April 9, 2009 (40 days). The study objectives were to 1) estimate the number and distribution of overwintering summer steelhead fallbacks and kelt-sized acoustic targets passing into the sluiceway and turbines at TDA during the two study periods, respectively, and 2) assess the behavior of these fish in front of sluice entrances. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics and fish behavior data using acoustic imaging. For the overwintering summer steelhead, fallback occurred throughout the 45-day study period. We estimated that a total of 1790 ± 250 (95% confidence interval) summer steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices during November 1 to December 15, 2008. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, without the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of steelhead may have fallen back through turbines. Run timing peaked in late November, but fish continued to pass the dam until the end of the study. Horizontal distribution data indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these fish during fallback through the dam. Diel distribution for overwintering steelhead fallbacks was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. Therefore, sluiceway operations should not be based on diel distribution. For the early spring study, overwintering summer steelhead and early out-migrating steelhead kelt downstream passage occurred throughout the 40-day study period. A total of 1766 ± 277 (95% confidence interval) kelt-size targets were estimated to have passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, as with steelhead fallback, not having the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of overwintering steelhead and kelts may use the turbines for downstream passage before the start of the spill season. Run timing peaked in late March; however, relatively large numbers of kelt-sized targets passed the dam on March 2 and March 6 (162 and 188 fish, respectively). Horizontal distribution indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these adult salmonids as they migrate downstream through the dam. Again, no clear pattern was seen for diel distribution of overwintering steelhead and early out-migrating kelt passage.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka, during the 1998 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake and Salmon rivers. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam 19 1998 were marked with a fin-clip. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 226% of the 1997 number and 110% of the 1996 catch. The wild chinook catch was 120% of the 1997 catch but was only 93% of 1996. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 501% of 1997 numbers but only 90% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 569% of 1997 and 125% of the 1996 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 106 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998, for the first time, the Snake River trap captured a significant number of hatchery sockeye salmon (1,552) and hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch (166). Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 8 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 12. The trap was out of operation for 34 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 476% and wild chinook salmon catch was 137% of 1997 numbers and 175% and 82% of 1996 catch, respectively. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 96% of the 1997 catch and 13% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 170% of the 1997 catch and 37% of the 1996 numbers. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 1998 detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon there was a 2.0- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 thousands of cubic feet per second (kcfs). For hatchery steelhead trout there was a 2.6-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 1998 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon hatchery and found a 3.3- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. A significant relation between migration rate and discharge was not detected for hatchery steelhead trout. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT-tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Reduced Spill at Hydropower Dams: Opportunities for More Generation and Increased Fish Population  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report indicates that reduction of managed spill at hydropower dams can speed implementation of technologies for fish protection and achieve economic goals. Spill of water over spillways is managed in the Columbia River basin to assist downstream-migrating juvenile salmon, and is generally believed to be the most similar to natural migration, benign and effective passage route; other routes include turbines, intake screens with bypasses, and surface bypasses. However, this belief may be misguided, because spill is becoming recognized as less than natural, with deep intakes below normal migration depths, and likely causing physical damages from severe shear on spillways, high turbulence in tail waters, and collisions with baffle blocks that lead to disorientation and predation. Some spillways induce mortalities comparable to turbines. Spill is expensive in lost generation, and controversial. Fish-passage research is leading to more fish-friendly turbines, screens and bypasses that are more effective and less damaging, and surface bypasses that offer passage of more fish per unit water volume than does spill (leaving more water for generation). Analyses by independent economists demonstrated that goals of increased fish survival over the long term and net gain to the economy can be obtained by selectively reducing spill and diverting some of the income from added power generation to research, development, and installation of fish-passage technologies. Such a plan would selectively reduce spill when and where least damaging to fish, increase electricity generation using the water not spilled and use innovative financing to direct monetary gains to improving fish passage.

Coutant, Charles C [ORNL; Mann, Roger [RMecon, Davis, California; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Development of nondestructive evaluation techniques for DAM inspection. Progress report, January 1995 through August 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concluded a two and a half year study on the development of an ultrasonic inspection system to inspect post stressed steel tendons on dams and flood gates. The inspection systems were part of a program for the California Department of Water Resources. The effort included the identification of the location and amount of corrosion damage to the tendons, identification of the cause of corrosion, and the technology for inhibiting corrosion. Several NDE methods for inspecting and quantifying damage to steel reinforced concrete water pipes were investigated and presented to the DWR for their consideration. The additional methods included Ground Penetrating RADAR, Electro- Potential Measurements, Infrared Technology, Pipe Inspection Crawlers (designed to travel inside pipelines and simultaneously report on the pipe condition as viewed by ultrasonic methods and video cameras from within the pipeline.) Reference to consultants hired by LLNL for similar on-site corrosion inspections were given to the DWR. The LLNL research into industries that have products to prevent corrosion resulted in the identification of an Innsbruck, Austria, company. This company claims to have products to permanently protect post- or pre-stressed tendons. The caveat is that the tendon protection system must be installed when the tendons are installed because no retrofit is available. Corrosion mitigation on the steel reinforcements surrounding the concrete was addressed through active and passive cathodic protection schemes. The combination of corrosion and erosion were addressed during consideration for the inspection of water-pump impeller-blades that are used in the three stage, million horsepower, pumping stations at Edmunston.

Brown, A. E.; Thomas, G.H.

1997-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Behavior Guidance System Siting Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were developed to support the siting and design of a behavioral guidance system (BGS) structure in The Dalles Dam (TDA) forebay on the Columbia River. The work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP). The CFD results were an invaluable tool for the analysis, both from a Regional and Agency perspective (for the fish passage evaluation) and a CENWP perspective (supporting the BGS design and location). The new CFD model (TDA forebay model) included the latest bathymetry (surveyed in 1999) and a detailed representation of the engineered structures (spillway, powerhouse main, fish, and service units). The TDA forebay model was designed and developed in a way that future studies could easily modify or, to a large extent, reuse large portions of the existing mesh. This study resulted in these key findings: (1) The TDA forebay model matched well with field-measured velocity data. (2) The TDA forebay model matched observations made at the 1:80 general physical model of the TDA forebay. (3) During the course of this study, the methodology typically used by CENWP to contour topographic data was shown to be inaccurate when applied to widely-spaced transect data. Contouring methodologies need to be revisited--especially before such things as modifying the bathymetry in the 1:80 general physical model are undertaken. Future alignments can be evaluated with the model staying largely intact. The next round of analysis will need to address fish passage demands and navigation concerns. CFD models can be used to identify the most promising locations and to provide quantified metrics for biological, hydraulic, and navigation criteria. The most promising locations should then be further evaluated in the 1:80 general physical model.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Johnson, Gary E.

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Spillway, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine detailed vertical, horizontal, intensive, and diel distributions of juvenile salmonid passage at the spillway at The Dalles Dam from April 12 to July16, 2006. These data are being applied in the Spillway Improvements Program to position release pipes for direct injury and mortality studies and to provide baseline data for assessment of the vortex suppression devices scheduled for deployment in 2007. We estimated fish distributions from hydroacoustic data collected with split-beam transducers arrayed across Bays 1 through 9 and 14. Spill at ~20 kcfs per bay was bulked at Bays 1-6, although the other bays were opened at times during the study to maintain a 40% spill percentage out of total project discharge. The vertical distribution of fish was skewed toward the surface during spring, but during summer, passage peaked at 2-3 m above the spillway ogee. Fish passage rates (number per hour) and fish densities (number per kcfs) were highest at Bay 6, followed by passage at Bay 5. This result comports with spillway horizontal distribution data from radio telemetry and hydroacoustic studies in 2004. The vertical and horizontal distribution of fish passage at bays 5 and 6 was much more variable during spring than summer and more variable at bay 5 than bay 6. Diel distribution data revealed that fish passage was highest during 0600-0700 h in spring; otherwise passage was reasonably uniform on a diel basis. This study substantiates the purpose of the spillway vortex suppression device to re-distribute downstream migrants away from Bay 6 toward Bays 1-5.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, John R.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

397

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases conducted in water year 2011 resulted only in financial costs; the total cost of all experimental releases was about $622,000.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration)

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

398

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Appendix 61 USGS Gaging Station Hydrologic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horse Dam 100 1000 10000 100000 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 percent of time discharge was equaled

403

Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Coutant, Charles C [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Pond B Dam Repair Project at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1285) for the proposed repair of the Pond B dam at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

N /A

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Empowerment Through Education Sick Plants and a Hungry World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the late blight fungus resulted in the death of more than a million Irish and the immigration of many://plantpath.osu.edu/extension. Department of Plant Pathology College of FOOD, AGRICULTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES plantpath.osu.edu Non student can thrive. Department of Plant Pathology College of FOOD, AGRICULTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL

406

Fruits and Veggies Healthy Snacks for Hungry Kids  

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and veggies are within reach! Kids love to dip! u Dip fresh veggies in low-fat ranch dressing, peanut butter

Liskiewicz, Maciej

407

Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

408

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at Pittsburg Landing to 1.23 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.8% (82.1-93.4%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 94.1% (90.1-98.1%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 58.7% (49.3-68.1%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 71.3% (60.1-82.5%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 9.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 18.7 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 9.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 7-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 21-23 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, were all from April 23-25. The median arrival date for Big Canyon Surplus was May 4. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 7-8. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam were May 17 for Big Canyon Surplus and April 26 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery.

Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 37.9% (36.0-40.0%) for Pittsburg Landing to 57.9% (53.0-62.8%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 6.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Big Canyon to 10.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 5.2 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 10.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-17 days to Lower Granite Dam and 31-37 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 26-27. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 14-18. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was May 13 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 65.8% (58.5-73.1%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 84.0% (76.2-91.8%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 10.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 19.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 6.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-25 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 21-22. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 5-6. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was April 24 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluation of a Prototype Surface Flow Bypass for Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead at the Powerhouse of Lower Granite Dam, Snake River, Washington, 1996-2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A surface flow bypass provides a route in the upper water column for naturally, surface-oriented juvenile salmonids to safely migrate through a hydroelectric dam. Surface flow bypasses were recommended in several regional salmon recovery plans as a means to increase passage survival of juvenile salmonids at Columbia and Snake River dams. A prototype surface flow bypass, called the SBC, was retrofit on Lower Granite Dam and evaluated from 1996 to 2000 using biotelemetry and hydroacoustic techniques. In terms of passage efficiency, the best SBC configurations were a surface skimmer (99 m3/s [3,500 cfs], three entrances 5 m wide, 5 m deep and one entrance 5 m wide, 15 m deep) and a single chute (99 m3/s, one entrance 5 m wide, 8.5 m deep). They each passed 62 ? 3% (95% confidence interval) of the total juvenile fish population that entered the section of the dam with the SBC entrances (Turbine Units 4-5). Smooth entrance shape and concentrated surface flow characteristics of these configurations are worth pursuing in designs for future surface flow bypasses. In addition, a guidance wall in the Lower Granite Dam forebay diverted the following percentages of juvenile salmonids away from Turbine Units 1-3 toward other passage routes, including the SBC: run-at-large 79 ? 18%; hatchery steelhead 86%; wild steelhead 65%; and yearling chinook salmon 66%. When used in combination with spill or turbine intake screens, a surface flow bypass with a guidance wall can produce a high level (> 90% of total project passage) of non-turbine passage and provide operational flexibility to fisheries managers and dam operators responsible for enhancing juvenile salmonid survival.

Johnson, Gary E.; Anglea, Steven M.; Adams, Noah S.; Wik, Timothy O.

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on their progress from April 1998 through March 1999 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report D), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report E), and the University of Idaho (UI; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 1998 through March 1999 are given.

Ward, David L.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

activity of the GSH-Px of all treated kids of untreated and treated dams was 177, 245, 240, 150 and 143 U/g respectively for Hemoglobin (Hb). The comparable values of the untreated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activity of the GSH-Px of all treated kids of untreated and treated dams was 177, 245, 240, 150 and treated dams were 39, 55, 91, 68 and 78 U/g respectively for Hb. The observed difference was significant and 26 p. 100 crude protein and Speen-Foc made up from 10 p. 100 alcohol treated soya protein with whey

Boyer, Edmond

415

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam, 2009-2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam (TDA) sluiceway and turbines during fall/winter 2009 through early spring 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of this study was to characterize adult steelhead spatial and temporal distributions and passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines for fisheries managers and engineers to use in decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. The study was from November 1, 2009 to April 10, 2010. The study was divided into three study periods: Period 1, November 1 - December 15, 2009 for a fall/winter sluiceway and turbine study; Period 2, December 16, 2009 - February 28, 2010 for a turbine only study; Period 3, March 1 - April 10, 2010 for a spring sluiceway and turbine study. Sluiceway operations were scheduled to begin on March 1 for this study; however, because of an oil spill cleanup near the sluice outfall, sluiceway operations were delayed until March 8, 2010, therefore the spring study period did not commence until March 8. The study objectives were to (1) estimate the number and distribution of overwintering summer steelhead fallbacks and kelt-sized acoustic targets passing into the sluiceway and turbines at TDA between November 1 and December 15, 2009 and March 1 and April 10, 2010, and (2) estimate the numbers and distribution of adult steelhead and kelt-sized targets passing into turbine units between December 16, 2009 and February 28, 2010. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics. For Period 1, overwintering summer steelhead fallback occurred throughout the 45-day study period. A total of 879 {+-} 165 (95% CI) steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse and sluiceway during November 1 to December 15, 2009. Ninety two percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Run timing peaked in early December, but fish continued to pass the dam until the end of the study. Horizontal distribution data indicated that Sluice 1 is the preferred route for these fish during fallback through the dam. Diel distribution for steelhead was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. For Period 2, adult steelhead passage occurred on January 14 and 31 and February 2, 22, and 24. A total of 62 {+-} 40 (95% CI) steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse intakes during December 16, 2009 to March 7, 2010. Horizontal distribution data indicated turbine unit 18 passed the majority of fish. Fish passage occurred during morning periods. Passage did not occur during afternoon or nighttime. For Period 3, the early spring study period, overwintering summer steelhead and early out-migrating steelhead kelt downstream passage occurred throughout the 34-day study period. A total of 1,985 {+-} 234 (95% CI) kelt-size targets were estimated to have passed through the powerhouse sluiceway. Ninety-nine percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Run timing peaked in late March and again in early April. Horizontal distribution indicated that Sluice 1 is the preferred route for these adult salmonids as they migrate downstream through the dam. Diel distribution for steelhead was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. The results of this study strongly suggest that operating the TDA sluiceway for steelhead passage (fallbacks and kelts) during the late fall, winter, and early spring months will provide an optimal, non-turbine route for these fishes to pass the dam.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 16.2 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 11.7 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 8-15 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-27 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 23-25. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 4-10.

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 14.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Big Canyon to 15.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-12 days to Lower Granite Dam and 25-30 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 20-28. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for the FCAP groups were all May 11. The objectives of this project are to quantify and evaluate pre-release fish health, condition and mark retention as well as post-release survival, migration timing, migration rates, travel times and movement patterns of fall Chinook salmon from supplementation releases at the FCAP facilities, then provide feedback to co-managers for project specific and basin wide management decision-making.

Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-16 days to Lower Granite Dam and 23-29 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, ranged from April 18-29. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 1-8.

Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Determination of iron-ligand bond lengths in horse heart met- and deoxymyoglobin using multiple-scattering XAFS analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

XAFS data in the range 0 {le} k {le} 14.5 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} have been obtained from frozen aqueous solutions (10 K) of horse heart myoglobin (Mb) in the Fe(III) (aqua-met) and Fe(II) (deoxy) forms. The structures of the Fe sites have been refined using both single-scattering (SS) and multiple-scattering (MS) analyses. The XAFS MS analyses yield more precise Fe-ligand bond lengths (estimated error 0.02--0.03 {angstrom}) than those determined crystallographically (estimated errors {ge} 0.1 {angstrom}). For met-Mb, the MS analysis results in an average Fe-N(pyrrole) distance of 2.05 {angstrom}, an Fe-N(imidazole) distance of 2.17 {angstrom}, and an Fe-O(aqua) distance of 2.08 {angstrom}. For deoxy-Mb, the MS analysis results in Fe-N(pyrrole) and Fe-N(imidazole) distances of 2.06 and 2.16 {angstrom}, respectively. The final XAFS R values are 18.8% and 17.8% for met- and deoxy-Mb, respectively. The robustness of the refinements was tested by varying the starting models, constraints, restraints, and k ranges.

Rich, A.M.; Armstrong, R.S.; Ellis, P.J.; Freeman, H.C.; Lay, P.A. [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). School of Chemistry] [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). School of Chemistry

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam Turbines, Early Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam turbines during early spring 2011. The study was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) to investigate whether adult steelhead are passing through turbines during early spring before annual sluiceway operations typically begin. The sluiceway surface flow outlet is the optimal non-turbine route for adult steelhead, although operating the sluiceway reduces hydropower production. This is a follow-up study to similar studies of adult steelhead passage at the sluiceway and turbines we conducted in the fall/winter 2008, early spring 2009, fall/winter 2009, and early spring 2010. The goal of the 2011 study was to characterize adult steelhead passage rates at the turbines while the sluiceway was closed so fisheries managers would have additional information to use in decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. Sluiceway operations were not scheduled to begin until April 10, 2011. However, based on a management decision in late February, sluiceway operations commenced on March 1, 2011. Therefore, this study provided estimates of fish passage rates through the turbines, and not the sluiceway, while the sluiceway was open. The study period was March 1 through April 10, 2011 (41 days total). The study objective was to estimate the number and distribution of adult steelhead and kelt-sized targets passing into turbine units. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics with transducers deployed at all 22 main turbine units at The Dalles Dam. Adult steelhead passage through the turbines occurred on 9 days during the study (March 9, 12, 30, and 31 and April 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9). We estimated a total of 215 {+-} 98 (95% confidence interval) adult steelhead targets passed through the turbines between March 1 and April 10, 2011. Horizontal distribution data indicated Main Unit 18 passed the majority of fish. Fish passage occurred throughout the day. We conclude that adult steelhead passed through turbines during early spring 2011 at The Dalles Dam.

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungry horse dam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Implications of Horizontal and Complete Dam Removals on the Downstream Channel Bed Joanna Crowe Curran (curran@virginia.edu) and Kristen Cannatelli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Implications of Horizontal and Complete Dam Removals on the Downstream Channel Bed Joanna Crowe on the downstream channel morphology can be predicted. With a defined deconstruction sequence, non-contaminated impounded sediment can be released and transported downstream in a way that benefits, rather than harms

Curran, Joanna C.

422

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

423

Re-Analysis of Hydroacoustic Fish-Passage Data from Bonneville Dam after Spill-Discharge Corrections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to re-analyze four years of fixed-aspect hydroacoustic data after the District made adjustments to spill discharge estimates. In this report, we present new estimates of all major fish-passage metrics for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004, as well as estimates for 2005. This study supports the Portland District and its effort to maximize survival of juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes through Bonneville Dam include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines at Powerhouse 2 (B2) and a sluiceway including the B2 Corner Collector. The original reports and all associated results, discussion, and conclusions for non flow-related metrics remain valid and useful, but effectiveness measures for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004 as reported in previous reports by Ploskey et al. should be superseded with the new estimates reported here. The fish-passage metrics that changed the most were related to effectiveness. Re-analysis produced spill effectiveness estimates that ranged from 12% to 21% higher than previous estimates in spring and 16.7% to 27.5% higher in summer, but the mean spill effectiveness over all years was only slightly above 1:1 (1.17 for spring and 1.29 for summer). Conversely surface-passage effectiveness decreased in the years this metric was measured (by 10.1% in spring and 10.7% in summer of 2002 and 9.5% in spring and 10.2% in summer of 2004). The smallest changes in the re-analysis were in project fish passage efficiency (0%-1%) and spill efficiency (0.9%-3.0%).

Ploskey, Gene R.; Kim, Jina; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Appendix 50 Creston National Fish Hatchery: Hatchery and Genetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to take individuals from wild stocks. 1.9) List of program "Performance Standards." 1. Provide predictable VERSION (HGMP-RF) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed and Region: Date Submitted: Date Last Updated: Hatchery Program: Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Mitigation

425

FY 2007-09 Project Selection, Section 10 1 Project ID: 1991-019-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FY 2007-09 Project Selection, Section 10 1 Project ID: 1991-019-01 Title: Hungry Horse Mitigation/Flathead Lake Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes A. Abstract This project was initiated in 1992 after NPCC annual funding since that time. This project specifically addresses the losses on the Flathead Indian

426

Survival of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs in 2003 and from McNary Dam Tailrace to John Day Dam Tailrace in the Columbia River from 1999 to 2002, 1999-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report results from an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River during 2003 and in the Columbia River during 1999-2002. Earlier years of the study included serial releases of PIT-tagged hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon upstream from Lower Granite Dam, but these were discontinued in 2003. Instead, we estimated survival from a large number of PIT-tagged fish released upstream from Lower Granite Dam to evaluate transportation from Snake River Dams. During late May and early June 2003, 68,572 hatchery-reared subyearling fall Chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released at Couse Creek and Pittsburg Landing in the free-flowing Snake River. We estimated survival for these fish from release to Lower Granite Dam tailrace. In comparison to wild subyearling fall Chinook salmon PIT tagged and released in the free-flowing Snake River, the hatchery fish we released traveled faster and had higher survival to Lower Granite Dam, likely because of their larger size at release. For fish left in the river to migrate we estimated survival from Lower Granite Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace. Each year, a small proportion of fish released are not detected until the following spring. However, the number of fish released in 2003 that overwintered in the river and were detected as they migrated seaward as yearlings in 2004 was small (<1.0%) and had minimal effect on survival estimates. We evaluated a prototype floating PIT-tag detector deployed upstream from Lower Granite reservoir to collect data for use in partitioning travel time and survival between free-flowing and reservoir habitats. The floating detector performed poorly, detecting only 27 PIT tags in 340 h of operation from a targeted release of 68,572; far too few to partition travel time and survival between habitats. We collected river-run subyearling Chinook salmon (mostly wild fish from the Hanford Reach) at McNary Dam, PIT tagged them, and released them to the tailrace as part of an evaluation of transportation from McNary Dam in 2002. Estimated survival in 2002 from the tailrace of McNary Dam to the tailrace of John Day Dam was 0.746 (s.e. 0.036). For migration years 1999-2002, we found that in the reach from McNary to John Day Dam reach, travel time was shorter (migration rate was greater) and survival probabilities were greater when flow volume was greater. Survival was also correlated with water temperature: warmer water was associated with decreased survival, and there was an apparent survival threshold at about 19.3 C (above this temperature survival decreased substantially).

Muir, William D.; Axel, Gordon A.; Smith, Steven G. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Preliminary Three-Dimensional Simulation of Sediment and Cesium Transport in the Ogi Dam Reservoir using FLESCOT – Task 6, Subtask 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated a collaborative project on environmental restoration. In October 2013, the collaborative team started a task of three-dimensional modeling of sediment and cesium transport in the Fukushima environment using the FLESCOT (Flow, Energy, Salinity, Sediment Contaminant Transport) code. As the first trial, we applied it to the Ogi Dam Reservoir that is one of the reservoirs in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency’s (JAEA’s) investigation project. Three simulation cases under the following different temperature conditions were studied: • incoming rivers and the Ogi Dam Reservoir have the same water temperature • incoming rivers have lower water temperature than that of the reservoir • incoming rivers have higher water temperature than that of the reservoir. The preliminary simulations suggest that seasonal temperature changes influence the sediment and cesium transport. The preliminary results showed the following: • Suspended sand, and cesium adsorbed by sand, coming into the reservoirs from upstream rivers is deposited near the reservoir entrance. • Suspended silt, and cesium adsorbed by silt, is deposited farther in the reservoir. • Suspended clay, and cesium adsorbed by clay, travels the farthest into the reservoir. With sufficient time, the dissolved cesium reaches the downstream end of the reservoir. This preliminary modeling also suggests the possibility of a suitable dam operation to control the cesium migration farther downstream from the dam. JAEA has been sampling in the Ogi Dam Reservoir, but these data were not yet available for the current model calibration and validation for this reservoir. Nonetheless these preliminary FLESCOT modeling results were qualitatively valid and confirmed the applicability of the FLESCOT code to the Ogi Dam Reservoir, and in general to other reservoirs in the Fukushima environment. The issues to be addressed in future are the following: • Validate the simulation results by comparison with the investigation data. • Confirm the applicability of the FLESCOT code to Fukushima coastal areas. • Increase computation speed by parallelizing the FLESCOT code.

Onishi, Yasuo; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Revised financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western whileothers resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $23 million.

Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Quantifying the Behavioral Response of Spawning Chum Salmon to Elevated Discharges from Bonneville Dam, Columbia River : Annual Report 2005-2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In unimpounded rivers, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) typically spawn under relatively stable stream flows, with exceptions occurring during periodic precipitation events. In contrast, hydroelectric development has often resulted in an artificial hydrograph characterized by rapid changes in discharge and tailwater elevation that occur on a daily, or even an hourly basis, due to power generation (Cushman 1985; Moog 1993). Consequently, populations of Pacific salmon that are known to spawn in main-stem habitats below hydroelectric dams face the risks of changing habitat suitability, potential redd dewatering, and uncertain spawning success (Hamilton and Buell 1976; Chapman et al. 1986; Dauble et al. 1999; Garland et al. 2003; Connor and Pflug 2004; McMichael et al. 2005). Although the direct effects of a variable hydrograph, such as redd dewatering are apparent, specific effects on spawning behavior remain largely unexplored. Chum salmon (O. keta) that spawn below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are particularly vulnerable to the effects of water level fluctuations. Although chum salmon generally spawn in smaller tributaries (Johnson et al. 1997), many fish spawn in main-stem habitats below Bonneville Dam near Ives Island (Tomaro et al. 2007; Figure 1). The primary spawning area near Ives Island is shallow and sensitive to changes in water level caused by hydroelectric power generation at Bonneville Dam. In the past, fluctuating water levels have dewatered redds and changed the amount of available spawning habitat (Garland et al. 2003). To minimize these effects, fishery managers attempt to maintain a stable tailwater elevation at Bonneville Dam of 3.5 m (above mean sea level) during spawning, which ensures adequate water is provided to the primary chum salmon spawning area below the mouth of Hamilton Creek (Figure 1). Given the uncertainty of winter precipitation and water supply, this strategy has been effective at restricting spawning to a specific riverbed elevation and providing minimum spawning flows that have the greatest chance of being maintained through egg incubation and fry emergence. However, managing the lower Columbia River for a stable tailwater elevation does not provide much operational flexibility at Bonneville Dam, which has little storage capacity. When river discharges increase due to rain events, the traditional approach has been to pass excess water at night to maintain stable tailwater elevations during the daytime. The underlying assumption of this strategy, referred to as reverse load following, is that fish do not spawn at night. However, Tiffan et al. (2005) showed that this assumption is false by documenting nighttime spawning by chum salmon in the Ives Island area. Similarly, McMichael et al. (2005) reported nighttime spawning by Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the Columbia River, indicating that diel spawning may be a common occurrence in Pacific salmon. During the latter portion of the chum spawning period in December 2003 and 2004, discharges from Bonneville Dam increased from an average of 3,398 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 3.5 m above mean sea level) during the day to over 5,664 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 5.1 m) at night, with peak discharges of 7,080 m{sup 3}/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 6.1 m). This caused concern among fishery managers regarding the potential effects of these high discharges on this population of spawning chum salmon, which is listed under the Endangered Species Act (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 1999). We hypothesized that increased water velocities associated with elevated tailwaters might alter chum salmon spawning behavior if water velocities at redd locations increased beyond the range of suitability (>0.8 m/s; Salo 1991). In 2005, we investigated the movement and behavioral responses of spawning chum salmon at Ives Island to increased tailwater elevations at Bonneville Dam. We used acoustic telemetry to determine if the higher velocities associated with increased tailwater elevations caused fish to leave their re

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A.; Kock, Tobias J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of Steelhead Kelt Passage into the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse Corner Collector Prior to the Juvenile Migration Seasons, 2007 and 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a steelhead kelt passage study conducted by the PNNL for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Bonneville Dam in early spring 2007 and 2008. At the Second Powerhouse, a surface flow outlet called the corner collector (B2CC) may be an effective non-turbine passage route for steelhead kelt moving downstream in early spring before the main juvenile emigration season. The goal of this project was to inform management decisions regarding B2CC operations by estimating the number of kelt using the B2CC for downstream passage at Bonneville Dam prior to the juvenile spring migration season. We performed a hydroacoustic study from March 2 to April 10, 2007 and from March 13 to April 15, 2008.

Weiland, Mark A.; Kim, Jina; Nagy, William T.; Johnson, Gary E.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Mallette, Christine [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

Overview of the Performance of PIT-Tag Interrogation Systems for Adult Salmonids at Bonneville and McNary Dams, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During winter 2001, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) installed a prototype orifice-based PIT-tag interrogation system into the Washington Shore Ladder at Bonneville Dam (BWSL). Detectors were installed into 12 weirs: 4 downstream (Weirs 334-337) and 8 upstream (Weirs 352-359) from the fish release point (i.e., the exit ladder for the Adult Fish Facility). NOAA Fisheries (National Marine Fisheries Service--NMFS) tagged and released salmonids during 2001 to determine tag-reading efficiencies for different salmonid populations. Data analyses focused on the upper eight weirs. The 2001 tagging results for spring chinook salmon indicated that having detectors in four consecutive weirs would have been sufficient to yield a reading efficiency of 95%. The BWSL orifice-based system performed well until the coho and fall chinook salmon migrations began. Coho and fall chinook salmon appeared to use the weir overflows, and thus avoid detection, at much higher rates than biologists expected. During 2001, technology advances led to the development of significantly larger antennas than had been available earlier, and thus it was possible to build antennas of approximately 2 x 6 ft. Consequently, it became feasible to design interrogation systems for ladder locations where all fish would have to go through the antennas and thus could not avoid detection by using the weir overflows (Fig. 1). Destron Technologies by Digital Angel designed a prototype interrogation system with two antennas that was installed into the counting-window area in the Oregon Ladder at McNary Dam, where its performance could then be directly compared to that of the orifice-based system in the same ladder. Although the orifice-based systems appeared less effective than the fisheries community wanted for fall chinook and coho salmon, the decision was made to proceed with installations planned for Bonneville and McNary Dams because valuable data would still be collected. During the winter of 2002, the Corps and BPA installed PIT-tag interrogation systems into the Bradford Island and Cascades Island Fish Ladders at Bonneville Dam and into the Washington and Oregon Ladders at McNary Dam. Like BWSL in 2001, these ladders had eight weirs (16 orifices) outfitted with fiberglass antennas. Douglas County Public Utility District also installed an orifice-based system into its ladders at Wells Dam, but they were able to use weirs with no overflow sections wherein all fish had to swim through the orifice antennas. Thus, 2002 was the first year that the fisheries community had PIT-tag detection of adult salmonids at Bonneville, McNary, Wells, and Lower Granite Dams (Fig. 2). This overview will provide information on how well the systems at Bonneville and McNary Dams performed.

Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Creation of the dam for the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP by large-scale blasting: analysis of planning experience and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of complex instrument observations and video taping during large-scale blasts detonated for creation of the dam at the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP on the Naryn River in the Kyrgyz Republic are analyzed. Tests of the energy effectiveness of the explosives are evaluated, characteristics of LSB manifestations in seismic and air waves are revealed, and the shaping and movement of the rock mass are examined. A methodological analysis of the planning and production of the LSB is given.

Shuifer, M. I.; Argal, E. S. [JSC 'Gidrospetsproekt' (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Evaluation of laboratory test method for determining the potential alkali contribution from aggregate and the ASR safety of the Three-Gorges dam concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The releasable alkali from granite, which was used in the Three-Gorges concrete dam project in China, and from gneiss and feldspar was estimated by extraction in distilled water and super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. Results show that: i) the finer the particles and the higher the temperature, the greater and faster the release of alkali; ii) compared with extraction by distilled water, super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution had a stronger activation on feldspar than on granite and gneiss; iii) for the three rocks tested, thermal activation had the largest effect on gneiss and a lower and similar effect on granite and feldspar. For very fine particles, temperature had a similar effect on the release of alkali by all three rocks. Because the aggregate used in the Three-Gorges dam concrete is non-reactive and a low calcium fly ash was used in the concrete, ASR would not be an issue for the dam, despite the release of alkali from the aggregate into the concrete.

Lu Duyou [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China)]. E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Zhou, Xiaoling [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Xu Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Lan Xianghui [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Tang Mingshu [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mafan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Fournier, Benoit [ICON/CANMET, Natural Resources Canada, 405 Rocherster Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0G1 (Canada)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

Comment on "Long-period astronomical forcing of mammal turnover" by van Dam et al., Nature 443:687-691  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Van Dam et al. (2006) claimed 2.4 to 2.5 and 1.0 Myr turnover cycles in a Spanish rodent lineages record. However, the record variance spectrum, which is missing in ibid., shows that the varying reliability and multiple alterations of raw (gapped and unaltered) data by ibid. unnaturally boosted the 2.5 and 1.0 Myr noise cycles to the 99% confidence level, while failing to recognize a third such so called 99% significant noise period, of 0.55 Myr at 5.3 var%. Thus at least one claimed period (of 1.0 Myr) is a simple modulation of a relatively stronger noise cycle (of 0.55 Myr) overlooked by ibid. All so called 99% significant periods reach mere 5 to 6% var levels which can be hardly distinguished from noise: those periods fidelity is at staggering 1 to 2 orders of magnitude below the usual signal to noise separation marker at 12.0. Remarkably, at least ten noise periods got boosted to 95% confidence level, and some five noise periods to near 95% confidence level, as well. Even the zero padding of just 4% of da...

Omerbashich, M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Simulation of Sediment and Cesium Transport in the Ukedo River and the Ogi Dam Reservoir during a Rainfall Event using the TODAM Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011 caused widespread environmental contamination. Although decontamination activities have been performed in residential areas of the Fukushima area, decontamination of forests, rivers, and reservoirs is still controversial because of the economical, ecological, and technical difficulties. Thus, an evaluation of contaminant transport in such an environment is important for safety assessment and for implementation of possible countermeasures to reduce radiation exposure to the public. The investigation revealed that heavy rainfall events play a significant role in transporting radioactive cesium deposited on the land surface, via soil erosion and sediment transport in rivers. Therefore, we simulated the sediment and cesium transport in the Ukedo River and its tributaries in Fukushima Prefecture, including the Ogaki Dam Reservoir, and the Ogi Dam Reservoir of the Oginosawa River in Fukushima Prefecture during and after a heavy rainfall event by using the TODAM (Time-dependent, One-dimensional Degradation And Migration) code. The main outcomes are the following: • Suspended sand is mostly deposited on the river bottom. Suspended silt and clay, on the other hand, are hardly deposited in the Ukedo River and its tributaries except in the Ogaki Dam Reservoir in the Ukedo River even in low river discharge conditions. • Cesium migrates mainly during high river discharge periods during heavy rainfall events. Silt and clay play more important roles in cesium transport to the sea than sand does. • The simulation results explain variations in the field data on cesium distributions in the river. Additional field data currently being collected and further modeling with these data may shed more light on the cesium distribution variations. • Effects of 40-hour heavy rainfall events on clay and cesium transport continue for more than a month. This is because these reservoirs slow down the storm-induced high flow moving through these reservoirs. • The reservoirs play a major role as a sink of sediment and cesium in the river systems. Some amounts of sediment pass through them along with cesium in dissolved and clay-sorbed cesium forms. • Effects of countermeasures such as overland decontamination, dam control and sorbent injection were tentatively estimated. The simulation suggested that overland decontamination and sorbent injection would be effective for decreasing the contamination of water in the reservoir and in the river below the dam.

Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Kurikami, Hiroshi

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

The effects of overwinter flowson the spring condition of rainbow and brown trout size classes in the Green River downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam, Utah.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flaming Gorge Dam, a hydroelectric facility operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is located on the Green River in Daggett County, northeastern Utah. Until recently, and since the early 1990s, single daily peak releases or steady flows have been the operational pattern of the dam during the winter period. However, releases from Flaming Gorge Reservoir followed a double-peak pattern (two daily flow peaks) during the winters of 2006-2007 and 2008-2009. Because there is little recent long-term history of double-peaking at Flaming Gorge Dam, the potential effects of double-peaking operations on trout body condition in the dam's tailwater are not known. A study plan was developed that identified research activities to evaluate potential effects from winter double-peaking operations (Hayse et al. 2009). Along with other tasks, the study plan identified the need to conduct a statistical analysis of historical trout condition and macroinvertebrate abundance to evaluate the potential effects of hydropower operations. The results from analyses based on the combined size classes of trout (85-630 mm) were presented in Magnusson et al. (2008). The results of this earlier analysis suggested possible relationships between trout condition and flow, but concern that some of the relationships resulted from size-based effects (e.g., apparent changes in condition may have been related to concomitant changes in size distribution, because small trout may have responded differently to flow than large trout) prompted additional analysis of within-size class relationships. This report presents the results of analyses of three different size classes of trout (small: 200-299 mm, medium: 300-399 mm, and large: {ge}400 mm body length). We analyzed historical data to (1) describe temporal patterns and relationships among flows, benthic macroinvertebrate abundance, and condition of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the tailwaters of Flaming Gorge Dam, and to (2) evaluate the relative importance of the effects of flow (i.e., flow volumes and flow variability), trout abundance (catch per unit effort [CPUE]), and benthic macroinvertebrate abundance on trout condition for different size classes of trout.

Magnusson, A. K.; LaGory, K. E.; Hayse, J. W.; Environmental Science Division

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

440

Acoustic Camera Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Approach and Fate at Surface Flow Outlets of Two Hydropower Dams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to estimate and compare fate probabilities for juvenile salmon approaching two surface flow outlets (SFOs) to identify effective design characteristics. The SFOs differed principally in forebay location, depth, discharge, and water velocity over a sharp-crested weir. Both outlets were about 20 ft wide. The 22-ft deep Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Corner Collector (B2CC) was located in the southwest corner of the forebay and passed 5,000 ft3/s of water at normal-pool elevation. In contrast, The Dalles Dam ice and trash sluiceway outlet above Main Unit 1-3 (TDITC) was not located in a forebay corner, was only 7-ft deep, and discharged about 933 ft3/s at normal-pool elevation. The linear velocity of water over the weir was about 15 ft/s at the B2CC and 5 ft/s at the TDITC. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to record movements of fish within about 65 ft of the B2CC and within 35 ft of the TDITC. We actively tracked fish by manually adjusting pan and tilt rotator angles to keep targets in view. Contrary to expectations, active tracking did not provide a predominance of long tracks that clearly indicated fish fate because most tracks were incomplete. Activ