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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

An NLG evaluation competition? Eight Reasons to be Cautious Donia Scott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An NLG evaluation competition? Eight Reasons to be Cautious Donia Scott Centre for Research in Computing The Open University, U.K. D.Scott@open.ac.uk Johanna Moore Human Communication Research Centre The University of Edinburgh, U.K. J.Moore@ed.ac.uk Most would agree that NLG has to date failed to make much

Belz, Anja

2

ARM - VAP Product - mergesonde1mace  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Merged Sounding profiles derived with first Mace algorithm Active Dates 1996.07.15 - 2014.12.30 Originating VAP Process Merged Sounding : MERGESONDE Measurements The...

3

Microsoft PowerPoint - Mace_Poster_ARM-ATrain_Comparison [Compatibilit...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p Jay Mace Sally Benson Jay Mace, Sally Benson y , y Contributions from: Roger Marchand (Cloudsat mask) Mark Vaughn (CALIPSO Mask) Eugene Clothiaux (MMCR mask) Contributions...

4

Jordan Loops Using Prover9/Mace4 to understand Jordan Loops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jordan Loops Using Prover9/Mace4 to understand Jordan Loops Kyle Pula June 22nd, 2007 Kyle Pula Using Prover9/Mace4 to understand Jordan Loops #12;Jordan Loops Jordan Loops A loop is a set with binary) and x · e = e · x = x A Jordan loop is a commutative loop satisfying x2 y · x = x2 · yx (1) Kyle Pula

Veroff, Robert

5

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

6

Hungary: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hungary: Energy Resources Hungary: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47,"lon":20,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Secretary Bodman Meets with Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary Secretary Bodman Meets with Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary March 17, 2006 - 3:44pm Addthis Emphasizes U.S. Support for Central European Energy Security BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today participated in a regional energy meeting with ministers from Hungary, Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Austria, Croatia and Romania. During the meeting, Secretary Bodman and the ministers discussed the importance of advancing sufficient, affordable, clean and reliable energy supplies to sustain global economic growth, accommodate heightened demand, and promote regional energy security. Traveling to Budapest from Moscow where he participated in the G8 Energy Ministerial, Secretary Bodman reaffirmed the G8 priorities

8

H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy) Place Ipoly u 1/A, Hungary Zip H-6000 Sector Solar Product Owns an empty factory in Hungary, which it plans to use to make heat pumps and assemble solar panels. References H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy) is a company located in Ipoly u 1/A, Hungary . References ↑ "[ H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy)]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=H2_Hydrogen_Hungary_Ltd_aka_Integral_Energy&oldid=346329

9

Emobility (Smart Grid Project) (Budapest, Hungary) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Budapest, Hungary) Budapest, Hungary) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Emobility Country Hungary Headquarters Location Budapest, Hungary Coordinates 47.498405°, 19.040758° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.498405,"lon":19.040758,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Research Support in Hungary Machine scheduling LED public lighting Microsimulation in public transportation Finally Optimization and Operation Research methods for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Support in Hungary Machine scheduling LED public lighting Microsimulation in public, 2011 Industrial Innovation Problems #12;Research Support in Hungary Machine scheduling LED public Innovation Problems #12;Research Support in Hungary Machine scheduling LED public lighting Microsimulation

Balázs, Bánhelyi

11

EUDEEP (Smart Grid Project) (Hungary) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EUDEEP (Smart Grid Project) (Hungary) EUDEEP (Smart Grid Project) (Hungary) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EUDEEP Country Hungary Coordinates 47.162495°, 19.503304° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.162495,"lon":19.503304,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Agency/Company /Organization European Climate Foundation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Building Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://3csep.ceu.hu/sites/defa Country Hungary UN Region Eastern Europe References Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme[1] Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Screenshot "The goal of the present research was to gauge the net employment impacts of a largescale deep building energy-efficiency renovation programme in

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly budapest hungary Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: @in.tum.de Software & Systems Engineering Technische Universitat Munchen Germany EDCC-5, Budapest, Hungary - p.1... . Case Study 7. Conclusions EDCC-5, Budapest,...

14

A Short Guide to The History of Hungary in The 20th Century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These prefatory remarks are designed to help the reader with the biographical sketches which follow. They contain some information about the history of Hungary in the twentieth century.

Jnos Horvth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An Energy Overview of the Republic of Hungary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is maintaining a web site that is meant to provide useful business- and energy-related information about countries and regions of the world for exporters, project developers, and researchers. The site consists of more than 130 country pages (organized into seven different world regions), with each country page having its own set of links to information sources about that country. There are also more than 30 Country Energy Overviews at the web site -- each of these is a comprehensive review of a specific country's entire energy situation, including sections on Energy Policy, Oil, Natural Gas, Coal, Hydroelectric/Renewables, Nuclear Power, Energy Transmission Infrastructure, Electricity, Electric Industry Overview, Environmental Activities, Privatization, Trade, and Economic Situation. The specific country highlighted in this Country Energy Overview is Hungary. The site is designed to be dynamic. Updates to the overviews will be made as need and resources permit.

anon.

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Atmospheric CO2> Record from In Situ Measurements at K-Puszta, Hungary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K-Puszta, Hungary K-Puszta, Hungary Atmospheric CO2 Record from In Situ Measurements at K-Puszta, Hungary graphics Graphics data Data Investigator László Haszpra Hungarian Meteorological Service, Institute for Atmospheric Physics, Department for Analysis of Atmospheric Environment, H-1675, P.O. Box 39, Budapest, Hungary Period of Record 1981-1997 Location The K-puszta regional background air pollution monitoring station was established in a clearing in a mixed forest on the Hungarian Great Plain in the middle of the Carpathian Basin. K-puszta is as free from direct pollution as possible in the highly industrialized, densely populated central Europe. Because of the growing vegetation, the station was moved in September 1993 to a larger clearing, also at the same elevation,

17

Hungary-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hungary-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) Hungary-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Hungary-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Ministry of Energy, Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Industry Sector Climate, Energy, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Goods and Materials, Industry, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations

18

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary for information exchange relating to operation of...

19

Structural variation in generated health reports Catalina Hallett and Donia Scott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Clinical E-Science Framework project (CLEF), which aims at providing tools to facilitate easy access are not at liberty to employ synonymy or lexical paraphrasing that may alter (however slightly) the meaning

20

The 17th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD-2011) June 20-24, 2011, Budapest, Hungary AUDITORY CUES FOR GESTURAL CONTROL OF MULTI-TRACK AUDIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hungary AUDITORY CUES FOR GESTURAL CONTROL OF MULTI-TRACK AUDIO Martin J. Morrell Queen Mary University to the participants via changes to the audio mixture over the stereo loud- speakers or feedback over a single ear auditory feedback of source selection in a multi-track audio environment. Several authors have also

Reiss, Josh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

between The Department of Energy of the United States of America and The Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary for Information Exchange Relating to Operation of Modular Vault Systems for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel 1. Participants The United States Department of Energy (DOE), a Participant to this Memorandum of Understanding (Memorandum), is the agency responsible for the management of radioactive wastes produced by or in the possession of tla U.S. Government (&mmercial reactor nuclear waste excluded) within the United Stztes, including spent nuclear fuel (SNF). DOE is the owner, operator, and licensee of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) MVDS and the Hanford Canister Storage Building (CSB). DOE's Idaho Operations Office (DOE-

22

The influence of N-dimethyl amino succinamic acid on the growth and development of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, Poellnitz cv. 'Mace'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The concentrations were applied at two different tinies, The first applica'ion of B-Nine ivas inade 1B ciavs a& ter the plants v ere exposed to short days, and the second was applied A5 days later. The data collected shoi(ed that B-Nine had no discernib)e effects... over treated and others requir' d frequent applica+ions of B-Nine. Fol!ar applications of B-Nine were relatively ineffective on coleus, gaillardia, go?phrena, french marigold and pansy. Jeffe and Isenberg (1)) used a B000 parts per mi 1 lion spray...

Warminski, Norman Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nitrous oxide (N?O) isotopic composition in the troposphere : instrumentation, observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and regional modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrous oxide (N?O) is a significant greenhouse gas and main contributor to stratospheric ozone destruction. Surface measurements of N?O mole fractions have been used to attribute source and sink strengths, but large ...

Potter, Katherine Ellison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of CBMIDA for removing uranium in rats after parenteral injections of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......chemical forms of the uranium in the body after intake...REFERENCES 1 Mould R. F. Depleted uranium and radiation-induced lung cancer and leukaemia. Br. J...Abou-Donia M. B. Depleted and natural uranium: chemistry and toxicological......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Nakamura; X. Yan; Y. Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Clinical diagnostic indicators of renal and bone damage in rats intramuscularly injected with depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Abou-Donia, M. Depleted and natural uranium: chemistry...Environ. Health B Crit...et al. Health effects of embedded depleted uranium. Mil. Med...determinations in depleted uranium exposed Gulf...veterans. Health Phys. 77......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Chiba; K. Kaneko

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep Building Retrofit Programme AgencyCompany Organization European Climate Foundation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Building Energy Efficiency...

27

Cesium-137 concentration of soils in Pest County, Hungary Katalin Zsuzsanna Szab a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Northern part of the Gödöll}o Hills. In contrast, low concentrations (0.0e10.0 Bq kg?1 ) characterized the southern part of the Gödöll}o Hills, the Pest Plane and the Börzsöny Mountains. Two highest values were 46.9 Bq kg?1 and 61.1 Bq kg?1 : one of these localities, a loamy brown forest soil was chosen to study

Horváth, Ákos

28

Abstracts of Talks and Posters Presented at the Iwrb/WSG Feeding Ecology Workshop, Hungary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal: Wader Study Group Bulletin Attachment Size p00027-p00041.pdf 3.16 MB Issue: 66 Year: 1992 Pages: 27-41

29

The inequity of informal payments for health care: The case of Hungary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As in most countries of Central and Eastern Europe, informal payments have been a characteristic feature of the Hungarian health care system both during and since the demise of Soviet type socialist rule. Although informal payments continue to be so characteristic in the region, little empirical evidence exists on their scope or working. As far as equity is concerned, it has sometimes been suggested that physicians play a Robin Hood role and subsidise the poor at the expense of the rich. With the aid of an interview survey of a representative sample of the Hungarian population, we examine the distribution of the burden of informal payments across income groups. Results indicate that informal payments are a highly regressive way of funding health care, with Kakwani progressivity indices of ?0.38, ?0.39, ?0.35 and ?0.36 for GP, outpatient specialist, hospital, and total care, respectively. The finding that people with lower income pay proportionally more for public health care through informal payments underlines the emptiness of the Robin Hood claims and the need for reform.

Agota Szende; Anthony Johr Culyer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Productivity, detritus formation and grazing of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum Banks in Caribbean meadows: a simulative numerical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and meadows formed by the sea- grasses Zostera marina L. (eelgrass), Posidonia australis Hooker and the turtlegrass T. testudinum. A~1 al mats A ;ge -e sliced mathematical odel for coastal e o- systems containing seaweeds was developed by Belyaev et al... community in relation to temperature and biotic interactions. A comparison between the predicted and observed temporal patterns of the seagrass biomass was presented. Posi donia meadows . ? Ki rkman 5 Reid ( 1979) studied the role of P. australis...

Victoria-Rueda, Carlos Humberto

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

In The AAMAS workshop on Agent Design Advancing from Pratice to Theory (ADAPT09), Budapest, Hungary, May 2009.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications. 2. Case Study: ARMOR ARMOR (Assistant for Randomized Monitoring Over Routes) is a software tool analysis, may be largely irrelevant. This paper introduces a general framework for evaluating deployed for these factors by modeling the problem as a Bayesian Stackelberg game, using the power of game theoretic analysis

Taylor, Matthew

32

In The AAMAS workshop on Agent Design Advancing from Pratice to Theory (ADAPT-09), Budapest, Hungary, May 2009.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications. 2. Case Study: ARMOR ARMOR (Assistant for Randomized Monitoring Over Routes) is a software tool analysis, may be largely irrelevant. This paper introduces a general framework for evaluating deployed for these factors by modeling the problem as a Bayesian Stackelberg game, using the power of game theoretic analysis

Taylor, Matthew

33

Exposure to 50 Hz magnetic field in apartment buildings with built-in transformer stations in Hungary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......between 8 and 13 h). Short-term spot measurements were taken in every room of the residence using ELF MF meter (EMDEX II, Enertech, Campbell, CA, USA). Broadband (Bb 40-800 Hz) component of MF was measured at selected measuring points. In each......

Gyrgy Thurczy; Gbor Jnossy; Nomi Nagy; Jzsef Bakos; Judit Szab; Gbor Mezei

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Quartz tube extensometer for observation of Earth tides and local tectonic deformations at the Sopronbanfalva Geodynamic Observatory, Hungary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1990, a quartz tube extensometer was installed in the Sopronbanfalva Geodynamic Observatory of the Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute (GGRI) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences for recording Earth tides and recent tectonic movements. The paper describes the construction of the extensometer and a portable calibrator used for the in situ calibration of the instrument. The extensometer is very sensitive. Its scale factor is 2.093{+-}0.032 nm/mV according to the highly precise calibration method developed at the GGRI. Since the stability of extensometers is strongly influenced by the geological structure and properties of the rocks in the vicinity of the recording site, the observatory instrument system was tested by coherence analysis between theoretical (as the input signal) and measured tidal data series (as the output signal). In the semidiurnal tidal frequency band the coherence is better than 0.95, while in the diurnal band it is about 0.8. Probably this is due to the fact that the noise is higher in the diurnal band (0.4-0.5 nstr) than in the semidiurnal band (0.19-0.22 nstr). Coherence analysis between theoretical and measured data corrected for barometric changes yielded a small improvement of coherence in both frequency bands, while using temperature data correction, no observable improvement was obtained. Results of the tidal analysis also show that the observatory instrument system is suitable for recording very small tectonic movements. The 18 years of continuous data series measured by the extensometer prove the high quality of the extensometer. On the basis of investigations, it was pointed out that further efforts should be done to improve the barometric correction method and that correction for ocean load, as well as considering topographic and cavity effects are necessary to increase the accuracy of determining tidal parameters.

Mentes, Gy. [Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Csatkai Endre u. 6-8, H-9400 Sopron (Hungary)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Budapest, Hungary, 17-19 September 2007 EDA Publishing/THERMINIC 2007 -1 -ISBN: 978-2-35500-002-7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies [4]. 2. The Principles of Thermoelectric Cooling A thermoelectric module is a solid-state heat-2-35500-002-7 A Novel VLSI Technology to Manufacture High-Density Thermoelectric Cooling Devices Howard Chen, Louis Hsu, a thermoelectric cooler operates quietly, allows cooling below ambient temperature, and may be used for temperature

Boyer, Edmond

36

ENER Forum 3. Successfully Promoting Renewable Energy Sources in Europe. Budapest, Hungary, 6-7 June 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

countries Large hydro Small Hydro "New" RES (Wi on the type of investor (Large companies vs small cooperatives vs individuals); · Future prospects

37

Copyright -World Automation Congress (WAC) 2006, July 24-26, Budapest, Hungary SIMULATION SOFTWARE FOR NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE TRAINING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency. Currently, it runs on regular personal computers #12;powered by the UNIX operating system. We surface warfare. To build this prototype, we have designed the modes of operation for the system, and details the system's interface and modes of operation. KEYWORDS: Simulation, Navy, Combat, Command

Dascalu, Sergiu

38

TEMPUS-INTCOM Symposium, September 9-14, 2000, Veszprm, Hungary. 1 PI, FOURIER TRANSFORM AND LUDOLPH VAN CEULEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The Netherlands, 2-7 july, 2000. see also the home-page: http //www.wiskgenoot.nl 2 It should be noted Enschede The Netherlands e-mail: m.vajta@math.utwente.nl ABSTRACT The paper describes an interesting (and ceremony1 took place in the St.Pieterskerk (St.Peter's Church) at Leiden, the Netherlands. A replica

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

39

Radionuclides as natural tracers for the characterization of fluids in regional discharge areas, Buda Thermal Karst, Hungary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Nico Goldscheider d , Anita ?. Csoma e,1 a Department of Physical and Applied Geology, Institute used uranium, radium and radon to identify mixing of fluids in the Buda Thermal Karst system for the waters. In this study we showed that uranium, radium and radon naturally occurring in groundwater can

Horváth, Ákos

40

MS_07_Number_14.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 , Eli Mlawer 3 , Gerald Mace 4 Author Affiliations 1: 2: 3: 4: Mergedsounding Primer What is Mergedsounding? Mergedsounding provides a continuous thermodynamic profile of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clothiaux, E. E., Thomas P. Ackerman, Gerald G. Mace, Kenneth P. Moran, Roger T. Marchand, Mark A. Miller, Brooks E. Martner, 2000: Objective Determination of Cloud Heights...

42

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Atmospheric Science, in press. Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, M Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination of cloud heights and radar...

43

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

System Strategy and Implementation: Custom Project Policies Matt Tidwell and Allie Mace March 25, 2014 Agenda Background and process for overhauling the custom project policies...

44

ARM - Field Campaign - SUbsonic Aircraft: Contrail & Cloud Effects...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Point of Contact Campaign Data Sets IOP Participant Data Source Description Final Data Beal ASD Spectrometer Order Data Halthore CIMEL Order Data Mace Polarization Lidar...

45

Natural Systems & Climate Change: Strategies for Our Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy #12;May 20, 2013 Amber Mace, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy Louis, 2013 AgendA 8 a.m. Registration 8:30 a.m. Welcome Amber Mace, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy

California at Davis, University of

46

Natural Systems & Climate Change: Strategies for Our Future May 20, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Afternoon kick off and MC: Amber Mace, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy of the day and closing (4:45 ­ 5:15) Amber Mace, Associate Director, UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy Davis Policy Institute for Energy, the Environment and the Economy Ron Gastelum, Member, Board

California at Davis, University of

47

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 84038418, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/8403/2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the routine station instrumentation, consisting of a gas chromatograph (GC) for CH4 and N2O as well Organization (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station at Mace Head, Ireland. The aim was to evaluate-laboratory compatibility target for all three greenhouse gases. At Mace Head, the median difference be- tween the station

Pierce, Jeffrey

48

Budapest, Hungary, 17-19 September 2007 EDA Publishing/THERMINIC 2007 -page-ISBN: 978-2-35500-002-7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall thermal budget, a reduction of their resistance extends the lifespan of cooling solutions and helps

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Budapest, Hungary, 17-19 September 2007 EDA Publishing/THERMINIC 2007 -page-ISBN: 978-2-35500-002-7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

automotive power electronics systems engineers to optimize electro-thermal coupling during the design systems in the expanding market of electronics for automotive applications. The figure 1 shows an example Toulouse, France. c. University of Aleppo, Faculty of Electronics Engineering. Aleppo - Syria. Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

50

Budapest, Hungary, 17-19 September 2007 EDA Publishing/THERMINIC 2007 -page-ISBN: 978-2-35500-002-7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2-35500-002-7 Thermal and Mechanical Analysis of High-Power Light-Emitting Diodes with Ceramic Packages Jianzheng Hu the thermal and mechanical analysis of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with ceramic packages and mechanical characteristics of ceramic packages. Thermal resistance from the junction to the ambient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

51

pre-acts -6th annual international conference of Territorial Intelligence -caENTI October 2008 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT METHODS IN HUNGARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for everyone. As a result of environmental damage, new technical achievements are introduced into waterENTI ­ October 2008 2 INTRODUCTION Surface and subsurface water contamination has been in the centre of public contamination. Beyond the widespread ecological effects of contaminants, the utilization of such waters

Boyer, Edmond

52

Geotermi i Ungern.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Hungarys share of renewable energy in 2010 was 7.9 %, and their renewable energy goal for 2020 is 14.65 %. Geothermal energy is one (more)

Hammar, Mikael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

U  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the...

54

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Development - Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary," "Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway,...

55

Microsoft Word - Final Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the...

56

Microsoft PowerPoint - 8_Martyn_NMMSS_2013_Foreign Obligations...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, The...

57

Microsoft PowerPoint - 10_ROSE_MARTYN_UPDATED_NMMSS_2014_Foreign...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, The...

58

U  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

states: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the...

59

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2A_Wednesday 5-22 830 NMMSS_2013_Presentation...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the...

60

Microsoft Word - Foreign Obligation Codes.docx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the...

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61

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Mitch Hembree_Monday 5-20 1115 NMMSS...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the...

62

Microsoft Word - April2005.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

states: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the...

63

T-Man: Gossip-Based Overlay Topology Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2002-001907). Also with MTA RGAI, SZTE, Szeged, Hungary. S.A. Brueckner et al. (Eds.): ESOA 2005, LNAI

64

Biography: Envy and power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... communism, right-wing terror and anti-Semitism. In 1920, Hungary enacted a law called numerus ...

Robert P. Crease

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface and TOA Cloud Forcings Computed Using Several Cirrus Cloud Property Retrievals Surface and TOA Cloud Forcings Computed Using Several Cirrus Cloud Property Retrievals Chris Schwartz 1 , Jay Mace 1 , Roger Marchand 2 , Sally M c Farlane 2 , Matt Shupe 3 , Sergey Matrosov 3 , Min Deng 1 , Yuying Zhang 1 1. University of Utah, 2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3. University of Colorado Satellite-derived fluxes provided by Pat Minnis and Surface Radiation Analysis provided by Chuck Long Source Description Name Used in Plots G. Mace VZ, extinction constrained by Raman lidar Mace Bimodal Mace et al, 2006 Combination of retrieval algorithms, parameterizations, and empirical equations Ciret4 Yuying Zhang Retrieval based on reflectivity and radiance Zhang ZR Roger Marchand Retrievals base on reflectivity and Doppler velocity, parameterized for several different ice

66

ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SP2 Deployment at StormVEx ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Colorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) 2010.11.15, Mace, AMF...

67

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- How$martKY On Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC, Fleming-Mason RECC, Grayson RECC, and Jackson Energy) work with MACED to provide energy retrofits as part of utility service...

68

December 22, 2014 January 2, 2015 With optional Zanzibar extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Ngorongoro Crater for two years after leaving Princeton, Mace Hack '86 S86 P15 will have many stories to tell work on grasslands in East Africa. Dr. Hack, who holds a doctorate in ecology, evolutionary biology

69

Constraining the magnitude of the global dust cycle by minimizing the difference between a model and observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heimaey Izana Mace Head Miami Midway Nauru Norfolk Is. OahuFanning French Alps Midway Nauru New Caledonia AVHRRCheju Izana Izana Miami Midway Miami Midway Norfolk Is.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Sites and the CRYSTAL Field Experiment Laribee-Dowd, K. (a), Mace, G. G. (a), and Marchand, R.T. (b), University of Utah (a) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (b)...

71

Pete Henderson & Robert Pincus. ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

109, D01104. 2 Clothiaux, E. E., T. P. Ackerman, G. G. Mace, K. P. Moran, R. T. Marchand, M. A. Miller, and B. E. Martner, Objective Determination of Cloud Heights and Radar...

72

On the Use of ARM Data in the Validation and Refinement of a...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

491-8480 References Clothiaux, E. E., T. P. Ackerman, G. G. Mace, K. P. Moran, R. T. Marchand, M. A. Miller, and B. E. Martner, 2000: Objective determination of cloud heights and...

73

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UTC on January 27, 1997. References Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination of cloud heights and radar...

74

The Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

brown-97.pdf Clothiaux, E. E., T. P. Ackerman, G. G. Mace, K. P. Moran, R. T. Marchand, M. Miller, and B. E. Martner, 2000: Objective determination of cloud heights and...

75

ARM - Value-Added Product (VAP) Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EE, MA Miller, RC Perez, DD Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ Rodriguez, T Uttal, JH Mather, CJ Flynn, KL Gaustad, and B Ermold...

76

The Impact of the Annual Cycle on Cloudiness at Manus and Nauru  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clim., 5, 371-389. Clothiaux, E. E., T. P. Ackerman, G. G. Mace, K. P. Moran, R. T. Marchand, M. A. Miller, and B. E. Martner, 2000: Objective determination of cloud heights and...

77

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

References Clothiaux, E. E., T. P. Ackerman, G. C. Mace, K. P. Moran, R. T. Marchand, M. A. Miller, and B. E. Martner, 2000: Objective determination of cloud heights and...

78

Microsoft Word - taylor.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NASA TT-F-790, 173-181. Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, M Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination of cloud heights and radar...

79

C. R. Yost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

clouds References Clothiaux, E. E., T. P. Ackerman, G. G. Mace, K. P. Moran, R. T. Marchand, M. A. Miller, and B. E. Martner (2000), Objective determination of cloud heights and...

80

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels. Citation: Marchand RT, JM Haynes, GG Mace, TP Ackerman, and GL Stephens.2009."A Comparison of Simulated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of MODIS Cloud Mask Products (MOD35) with MMCR Data Zhang, Q. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting...

82

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans to small and mid-sized businesses, non-profits, schools and municipalities to improve energy efficiency through its...

83

Antireflective silicon nanostructures with hydrophobicity by metal-assisted chemical etching for solar cell applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present broadband antireflective silicon (Si) nanostructures with hydrophobicity using a spin-coated Ag ink and by subsequent metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE). Improved understanding of ... reveals a des...

ChanIl Yeo; Joon Beom Kim; Young Min Song; Yong Tak Lee

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Status Report on The Microbase VAP Maureen Dunn 1 , Michael Jensen 1 , Karen Johnson 1 , Mark Miller 2 , Eugene Clothiaux 3 , Roger Marchand 4 , Gerard Mace 5 , James Mather 6...

85

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, North Korea, South Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia...

86

Secretary Bodman and Rosatom Director Kiriyenko Meet to Discuss...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to nuclear power, including: Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Ghana, Hungary, Italy, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Republic of Korea, Romania, Senegal, Slovenia, and...

87

U.S. Energy Secretary Highlights Need for Energy Diversity at...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

who are original GNEP partners, as well as Australia, Bulgaria, Ghana, Hungary, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, and Ukraine in efforts to address...

88

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

members, Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, China, France, Ghana, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russia, Slovenia and...

89

U.S. Department of Energy Welcomes the United Kingdom as 21st...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the GNEP Statement of Principles, along with Australia, Bulgaria, Ghana, Hungary, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, and the Ukraine. "The UK shares in...

90

Eia.gov BETA - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, North Korea, South Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia...

91

IEC documents | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Hungary IADB Iceland IEA IFC India Indonesia Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Lithuania Malaysia Mexico Moldova Mongolia...

92

Status of U.S. Nuclear Outages - U.S. Energy Information Administratio...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, North Korea, South Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia...

93

The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Belgium, Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the...

94

U.S. Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland...

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - austria telekanal hakkab Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turkey Czech Republic Romania Romania Riga Latvia Luxembourg Luxembourg... Potsdam Germany Austria Hungary Poland Russia Austria Czech ... Source: Applied Algebra Group at Linz...

96

3dtab.xlsx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the...

97

E-Print Network 3.0 - austria 25th june-7th Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turkey Czech Republic Romania Romania Riga Latvia Luxembourg Luxembourg... Potsdam Germany Austria Hungary Poland Russia Austria Czech ... Source: Applied Algebra Group at Linz...

98

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

accounted for 32%. The remaining 16% originated from Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Malawi, Namibia, Niger, Portugal, and South Africa. COOs purchased uranium...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - austria Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turkey Czech Republic Romania Romania Riga Latvia Luxembourg Luxembourg... Potsdam Germany Austria Hungary Poland Russia Austria Czech ... Source: Applied Algebra Group at Linz...

100

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a series of three secure air shipments during the past six weeks and transported to Russia. Previously, the four participants returned 190 kilograms of HEU from Hungary to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RICHARD H. GRANT, Professor of Agro-micrometeorology, Department of Agronomy, Purdue University B.S. 1977 Duke University (Distinction) 1974-1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Association International Solar Energy Society Gamma Sigma Delta honorary agriculture research, Hungary, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Mauritania, Mexico, Morroco, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Peoples Republic

Jackson, Scott A.

102

Alunite | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Alteration Products Alunite crystals from the Zempln Mtns, Hungary. Photo by Harold Moritz 2012. http:www.mindat.orgphoto-453442.html Alunite is a potassium...

103

A Novel Unified Approach to Invariance in Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 20, 2014 ... Category 3: Applications -- Science and Engineering (Control Applications ) ... Gy?r, Hungary Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering,...

Zoltn Horvth

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of Hungary for information exchange relating to operation of modular vault systems for storage of spent nuclear fuel Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and...

105

mat.univie.ac  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Group on Artificial Intelligence of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged,. H-6720 Szeged, Aradi vrtank tere 1., Hungary.

106

Carpathian Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, September 2011, Vol. 6, No. 2, p. 143 -149 STUDY OF A PASSIVE RADON MITIGATION PROCESS AND INDOOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thege út 29-33, 1121, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: The uranium mining was stopped in the Mecsek Mountains (S-Hungary) in 1997 and mine reclamation of the contaminated area began. For this purpose radiometric survey of houses in the towns of the former mining area, including settlement of Kvágószls

Horváth, Ákos

107

Revised version Organic Geochemistry 22, 1023-1027, 1994.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Abstract- A Pliocene oil shale (Pula, Hungary), a C3 plant Triticum aestivum and a C4 plant Zea mays were-alkane, n-alkene, Pula oil shale, Botryococcus braunii, alga, plant, waxes, sediment. INTRODUCTION n-rich, Pliocene deposit from Pula (Hungary). The bulk carbon isotope ratio of this oil shale was also determined

108

RENEXPO Central Europe International brokerage event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar energy Geothermal energy Biomass Others Target groups: Companies Universities, research - Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Exhibition on the 12- 13 March 2014 in Budapest, Hungary at the SYMA on East- Central Europe and Hungary's innovative-, high quality renewable energies and future energy

Hasýrcý, Vasýf

109

2011 Korean Government Scholarship Program Guideline for International Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Hungary, Iran, Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Fiji, Gabon, Greece, Guatemala, Kenya, Kuwait, Malaysia-Leste, Ecuador, El Salvador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, Gabon, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iran, Jamaica

Auckland, University of

110

Export.gov - Welcome to Budapest  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magyar oldalak Magyar oldalak Register | Manage Account Search Our Site Click to Search Our Site Export.gov Home Opportunities By Industry By Country Market Research Trade Events Trade Leads Free Trade Agreements Solutions International Sales & Marketing International Financing International Logistics Licenses & Regulations Trade Data & Analysis Trade Problems Locations Domestic Offices International Offices FAQ Blog Connect Home > Hungary Local Time: Print | E-mail Page Hungary Hungary Home Doing Business in Hungary Services for U.S. Companies Trade Events Trade Leads from Hungary Business Service Providers Links Contact Us Our Worldwide Network About Us Press Room Other European Markets Other Worldwide Markets   Welcome to the U.S. Commercial Service at Budapest!! The U.S. Commercial Service creates prosperity through global trade. Our

111

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

112

Robust computer vision is thought to be essential for creating intelligent robots that can operate in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, unmodeled environments has been the ambition of AI and robotics researchers for decades. In this challenging Energy Filters (MACE), correlation output is more dependent on the energy of the images than morphology (MMNN), and linear shared weight (LSNN) neural networks and the minimum average correlation energy

Skubic, Marjorie

113

Measuring marine fish biodiversity: temporal changes in abundance, life history and demography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and G. M. Mace Measuring marine fish biodiversity: temporal changes in abundance...B3H 4J1 Canada Patterns in marine fish biodiversity can be assessed by quantifying...marine fish recovery and biodiversity. marine conservation biology|biodiversity...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Science and the Public Sector: The User's Viewpoint. Guidepost for the Adventurous Technologist Exploring City Government Land  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...small urban riot complete with mace, while I was sitting here listening to their excellent presentation. In fact, I became so intrigued...mechanism. One of our Boeing technicians developed a simple device that cost less than $10.00, which if not shut off within...

William Donaldson

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A Lattice Boltzmann -Immersed Boundary method to simulate the fluid interaction with moving and slender flexible objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, France. bSchool of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering (MACE), University of Manchester, United Kingdom. cSchool of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, London, United Kingdom that are embedded in the computational domain. Differently from classical projection methods applied to advance

Boyer, Edmond

116

Parental investment and the optimization of human family size  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...theory of human life history evolution: diet...Mace, R. 2006 An energy-saving development...1996 Ache life history: the ecology and...B. 2002 Life-history theory, fertility...Natl Acad. Sci. USA 104, 553-558...Lauer, M. T., Price, M. E. 2001 Parental...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2000 ARM Cloud IOP Dong, X.(a), Minnis, P.(b), Mace, G.G.(c), Smith, W.L., Jr.(b), Marchand, R.T.(d), and Rapp, A.D.(e), University of North Dakota (a), NASA Langley Research...

118

Intercontinental Transport of Anthropogenic and Biomass Burning Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

feature for intercontinental transport. An important diagnostic site for transatlantic transport of North due to exported NOy is comparable to direct ozone export. I examined transatlantic transport of ozone to Mace Head ozone (10-20 ppb during transatlantic events). This North American influence is strongly

Li, Qinbin

119

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary for information exchange relating to operation of modular vault systems for storage of spent nuclear fuel Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary More Documents & Publications

120

Binding Energy Curves from Nonempirical Density Functionals II. van der Waals Bonds in Rare-Gas and Alkaline-Earth Diatomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry, Budapest UniVersity of Technology and Economics, H-1521 Budapest, Hungary ReceiVed: July 15, 2005 interactions of organic molecules too. For example, it is responsible for the heats of sublimation

Csonka, Gábor István

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Update on the European Weather Radar Network Iwan Holleman, Laurent Delobbe, and Anton Zgonc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meteorological Services". The second phase of OPERA, 2004-2006, has involved a significant renewal of the Program Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Latvia Luxembourg Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Slovak Republic

Stoffelen, Ad

122

Using luminosity data as a proxy for economic statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A fifteen year record of global natural gas flaring derived from satellite data...Cuba D Hong Kong C Azerbaijan C Cyprus D Hungary...A Fifteen Year Record of Global Natural Gas Flaring Derived from Satellite Data...

Xi Chen; William D. Nordhaus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

105(scaled land 215%)7-22-05  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Guatemala Honduras Hungary India Indonesia Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon C A N A D A U N I T E D S T A T...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - arabia senegal sudan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hungary 13 Sierra Leone 3 Belize 1 Iceland 10 Singapore 108... 548 Sudan 10 Cameroon 7 Jordan 6 Surinam 1 Canada 1307 Kenya 33 Sweden 46 Alberta 99 Khmer Republic 1 Source:...

125

Livermore scientist, engineers train to be inspectors for test...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). Training has been held in Austria, Jordan, South Korea and Hungary. Of the five U.S. surrogate inspectors selected for the...

126

Microsoft PowerPoint - GNEP PARTNERS CANDIDATE PARTNERS AND OBSERVERS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

16, 2007) 1. Australia 2. Bulgaria 3. China 4. France 5. Ghana 6. Hungary 7. Japan 8. Jordan 9. Kazakhstan 10. Lithuania 11. Poland 12. Romania 13. Russia 14. Slovenia 15. Ukraine...

127

July 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). Training has been held in Austria, Jordan, South Korea and Hungary. Of the five U.S. surrogate inspectors selected for the...

128

Mathematics physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In science, the countries of Austria and Hungary have probably made their nnost outstanding achievements in the areas of mathematics and logic. This includes the mathematical foundation of information technolo...

Gyula Staar; Pl Erd?s; Martin Neuwirther; Wilhelm Frank

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Anna J. Szkely Curriculum Vitae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Dunaferr, the major metallurgic company of Hungary (main researcher), (2) Optimization of biogas production wastewater". AXIOM Spring School, Leipzig, Germany. 2003 Best presentation award for "Comparison of ammonia

Meyers, Steven D.

130

Commissioning of Building HVAC Systems for Improved Energy Performance: A Summary of Annex 40 Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( Japan, France, Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, Sweden, USA, Germany, Norway, Finland) took part as full members, observers participated from 4 other countries (The Netherlands, Korea, China, Hungary). The Annex is organized in 5 tasks according...

Visier, J. C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Hybrid Isoprenoids from a Reeds Rhizosphere Soil Derived Actinomycete Streptomyces sp. CHQ-64  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

and www.hungary-romania-cbc.eu) and the National Information Infrastructure Development Institute (NIIFI 10038). ... The terpenoid secondary metabolites that have been discovered from actinomycetes are often in the form of biosynthetic hybrids called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs). ...

Qian Che; Tianjiao Zhu; Xin Qi; Attila Mndi; Tibor Kurtn; Xiaomei Mo; Jing Li; Qianqun Gu; Dehai Li

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hydrological SciencesJournaldes Sciences Hydrologiques, 49(4) August 2004 Open for discussion until 1 February 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; stream aquifer interactions; Gabcikovo scheme; River Danube; Hungary Analyses statistiques et Nord-Ouest de la Hongrie Résumé La construction de la centrale hydroélectrique de Gabcikovo et la

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

133

Colloquia Series, Department of Computer Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 1991-2009 1991 Presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Thursday, November 12. 7. Larry A. Coon and Edith A. Lawson, Department of Computer Science, RIT, GTO, Hungary, Scalabilityanalysis of low-level image processing algorithms implemented on a 2-dimensional array

Zanibbi, Richard

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - area sw finland Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BelgiumCzech Rep. Denm ark Finland France Germ any GreatBritain* Hungary ItalyNetherlands Norway Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council...

135

LARGE SCALE WIND CLIMATOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS OF WIND ENERGY UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this article is to describe the particular field of climatology which analyzes air movement characteristics regarding utilization of wind for energy generation. The article describes features of wind energy potential available in Hungary compared to wind conditions in other areas of the northern quarter sphere in order to assist the wind energy use development in Hungary. Information on wind climate gives a solid basis for financial and economic decisions of stakeholders in the field of wind energy utilization.

Andrea Kircsi

136

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

137

Section 33  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in in ' c n I o n exp (&T in / µ i ) T i,n ' µ i log (I o n / I i,n ) % µ i log (c n ) Session Papers 145 (1) (2) Multi-Spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction Analysis of Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements A.A. Lacis and B.E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Abstract MACE Analysis of MFRSR Multi-spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction (MACE) analysis of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements yield detailed time series information on the variations of the column amounts of atmospheric NO 2 and ozone and of aerosol optical depth, including the effective

138

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mace GG, S Houser, S Benson, SA Klein, and QL Min. 2011. "Critical evaluation of the ISCCP simulator using ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3517.1. Figure 1. Comparison of actual cloud top pressure from ARM remote sensors compared to ISCCP (top) and after the ICARUS algorithm has been used to convert the measured cloud top pressures to ISCCP-like quantities (bottom). Figure 2. Comparison of various measures of optical depth. Top left shows

139

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cirrus Cloud Statistics from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cirrus Cloud Statistics from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cloud Radar Observations Krueger, S.K. (a), Luo, Y. (a), Mace, G.G. (a), and Xu, K.-M. (b), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Mace, Clothiaux, and Ackerman (2000; MCA) determined the properties of cirrus clouds derived from one year (December 1996 to November 1997) of MMCR data collected at the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma. They also used additional measurements to retrieve the bulk microphysical properties of thin cirrus cloud layers. We sampled CRM results in a way that allows direct comparison to MCA's observations and retrievals of cirrus cloud properties. This allows evaluation, in a statistical sense, of the CRM's

140

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Download a printable PDF Submitter: Naud, C. M., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Del Genio, A. D., NASA Mace, G., Utah State University Benson, S., Utah State University Clothiaux, E. E., Pennsylvania State University Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Naud, C, A Del Genio, GG Mace, S Benson, EE Clothiaux, and P Kollias. "Impact of dynamics and atmospheric state on cloud vertical overlap." Journal of Climate 218: 1758-1770. Mean overlap parameter α as a function of separation: (a,b) at SGP for all winter months of 2002-2004 and for 4 subsets of increasing 500 mb ω such

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsColorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation govCampaignsColorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Campaign Links STORMVEX Website Related Campaigns Colorado: CFH/CMH Deployment to StormVEx 2011.02.01, Mace, AMF Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx 2010.11.15, Sedlacek, AMF Colorado : Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift 2010.11.15, Massoli, AMF Colorado: Infrared Thermometer (IRT) 2010.11.15, Mace, AMF Colorado: StormVEX Aerosol Size Distribution 2010.11.15, Hallar, AMF Colorado: Direct Measurements of Snowfall 2010.11.15, McCubbin, AMF Colorado: Thunderhead Radiative Flux Analysis Campaign 2010.11.15, Long, AMF Colorado: Ice Nuclei and Cloud Condensation Nuclei Characterization 2010.11.15, Cziczo, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA.

142

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhao Y, GG Mace, and JM Comstock. 2011. "The occurrence of particle size distribution bimodality in midlatitude cirrus as inferred from ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(6), doi:10.1175/2010JAS3354.1. Figure 1. Frequency distribution of ice water content (top), effective radius (middle), and crystal concentration (bottom) derived from 313 h of cloud property retrievals using the bimodal algorithm. The distributions are shown as a function of the layer-mean temperature shown in the legend.

143

An angular-selective electron source for the KATRIN experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The KATRIN experiment is going to search for the average mass of the electron antineutrino with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2. It uses a retardation spectrometer of MAC-E filter type to accurately measure the shape of the electron spectrum at the endpoint of tritium beta decay. In order to achieve the planned sensitivity the transmission properties of the spectrometer have to be understood with high precision for all initial conditions. For this purpose an electron source has been developed that emits single electrons at adjustable total energy and adjustable emission angle. The emission is pointlike and can be moved across the full flux tube that is imaged onto the detector. Here, we demonstrate that this novel type of electron source can be used to investigate the transmission properties of a MAC-E filter in detail.

Beck, M; Hein, H; Bauer, S; Baumeister, H; Bonn, J; Ortjohann, H -W; Ostrick, B; Rosendahl, S; Streubel, S; Valerius, K; Zboril, M; Weinheimer, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.010.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ?4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

THE HOMOSEXUALITY DEBATE IN THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: Religious Ethics, the Wesleyan Quadrilateral, and The United Methodist Moral Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE HOMOSEXUALITY DEBATE IN THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: Religious Ethics, the Wesleyan Quadrilateral, and The United Methodist Moral Landscape BY 2011 Benjamin A. Simpson B.A., Baylor University, 2002 M.A.C.E., Dallas Theological Seminary, 2005... for Benjamin A. Simpson certifies that this is the approved version of the following thesis: THE HOMOSEXUALITY DEBATE IN THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: Religious Ethics, the Wesleyan Quadrilateral, and The United Methodist Moral Landscape...

Simpson, Benjamin Arnold

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

txH20: Volume 7, Number 2 (Complete)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to come from,? Mace said. According to Dr. Michael Hightower of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM, desalination use is growing by #23;#24; percent a year and water reuse by #23;#20; percent in the United States. #31;at diversi#28...;cation is important, he said, because the country is ?stressing its surface water and groundwater sources.? Although cost is a hindrance to desalination, he said, that cost is decreasing while the cost of fresh water production is increasing. Robert...

Wythe, Kathy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

ARM - News from the Steamboat Springs Deployment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ColoradoNews from the Steamboat Springs Deployment Steamboat Deployment AMF Home Steamboat Springs Home Storm Peak Lab Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Data Sets Experiment Planning STORMVEX Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan NWS Forecasting Plots STORMVEX Website Outreach STORMVEX Backgrounder (PDF, 1.6MB) News AMF2 STORMVEX Blog Images Contacts Gerald Mace News from the Steamboat Springs Deployment Releases WPSD (Paducah, KY) "STORMVEX Cloud Study" January 19, 2011 The Daily Sentinel, Grand Junction "Steamboat project gives scientists unique, grounded look at clouds" December 12, 2010 Steamboat Pilot & Today "Steamboat cloud study to help create better global climate models" Image Gallery December 12, 2010 Also picked up by:

148

Creating win-wins from trade-offs? Ecosystem services for human well-being: A meta-analysis of ecosystem service trade-offs and synergies in the real world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sy m Global Environmental Change 28 (2014) 263275 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Global Environm jo ur n al h o mep ag e: www .e lseCaroline Howe a,*, Helen Suich b,1, Bhaskar Vira c, Georgina M. Mace a aCentre for Biodiversity... in international conservation and development organisations to describe the simultaneous achievement of the conservation and development A R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 13 February 2014 Received in revised form 7 July 2014 Accepted 15 July 2014...

Howe, Caroline; Suich, Helen; Vira, Bhaskar; Mace, Georgina M.

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

txH20: Volume 7, Number 1 (Complete)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

companies and other interests. #31;e bill also required the TWDB to publish a compre- hensive state water plan every #30;ve years and base its projections on a #21;#24;-year planning horizon. Mace said the drought in #23;#22;#22;#19; served as a wake...Texas AgriLife Research Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Fall 2011 Texas drought: Now and then Also in this issue . . . A timeline of drought in Texas, Re-water, Drought detective...

Wythe, Kathy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) State Kentucky Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount 100% of equipment and installation cost Provider Kentucky Solar Partnership The Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) and the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partner to offer low interest loans for the installation of solar water heaters. Loans cover the full equipment and installation cost. Flexible rate loans and terms are available. They

151

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Departement Elektrotechniek ESAT-SISTA/TR 02{71  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Departement Elektrotechniek ESAT-SISTA/TR 02{71 A conjecture Hungary/ Poland), IWT (Soft4s, STWW-Genprom, GBOU-McKnow, Eureka-Impact, Eureka-FLiTE, several PhD grants-McKnow, Eureka-Impact, Eureka-FLiTE, several PhD grants); Belgian Federal Government: DWTC (IUAP IV-02 (1996

152

Prediction of Protein Functional Domains from Sequences Using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Protein Functional Domains from Sequences Using Artificial Neural Networks János Ltd., Budapest 1121, Hungary An artificial neural network (ANN) solution is described, are forwarded to feed-forward artificial neural networks with six input and six hidden units with sigmoidal

Szepesvari, Csaba

153

arXiv:physics/0603142v117Mar2006 Brownian Motion after Einstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arXiv:physics/0603142v117Mar2006 Brownian Motion after Einstein: Some new applications and new-4000 Roskilde, Denmark 2 Department of Biological Physics, E¨otv¨os Lor´and University (ELTE), H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 3 Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, N¨othnitzer Strasse 38, D

154

Variations in Schumann resonances and their relation to atmospheric electric parameters at Nagycenk station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variations in Schumann resonances and their relation to atmospheric electric parameters at Nagycenk electric potential gradient (PG) and Schumann resonances at Nagycenk station (Hungary) from 1993 to 1996. Annual and semiannual variations detected previously in the relative amplitudes of Schumann resonances

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

155

Education Spending: Impacts on Human Capital Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

87% 12% 0% 19% 9 Estonia 98% 0% 2% N/A 10 Finland 93% 7% 0% 5% 11 France 79% 21% 1% 22% 12 Germany 93% 7% 0% 12% 13 Hungary 89% 11% 0% 0% 14 Iceland 96% 4% 0% 0% 15 Ireland 99% 0% 1% N/A 16 Israel 100% 0% 0% 18% 17 Italy 94% 0% 5% 0% 18...

Struminger, Rhonda

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

Subsidy schemes in EU t i M ti ti dcountries: Motivations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIT - Hungary FIT (feed-in premium) Investment subsidies Latvia FIT (combined with quota obligation support or taxes Bulgaria FIT - Czech FIT (fixed tariff or premium) Investment subsidies Republic Estonia competition for investments in renewables The level of support of FI tariffs and market prices together

157

agentTool III: From Process Definition to Code Generation Juan C. Garcia-Ojeda Scott A. DeLoach Robby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13931393 agentTool III: From Process Definition to Code Generation Juan C. Garcia-Ojeda Scott A. DeTool III: From Process Definition to Code Generation, Juan C. Garca-Ojeda, Scott A. DeLoach, and Robby, Sierra, and Castelfranchi (eds.), May, 10­15., 2009, Budapest, Hungary, pp. XXX-XXX. Copyright © 2009

Deloach, Scott A.

158

Solving Multiagent Assignment Markov Decision Scott Proper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

681 Solving Multiagent Assignment Markov Decision Processes Scott Proper Oregon State University]. On the Cite as: Solving Multiagent Assignment Markov Decision Processes, Scott Proper and Prasad Tadepalli, Sierra and Castelfranchi (eds.), May, 10­15, 2009, Bu- dapest, Hungary, pp. XXX-XXX. Copyright c 2009

159

Glycolate Oxidase Modulates Reactive Oxygen Species??Mediated Signal Transduction during Nonhost Resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulfonic acid hydrate (XTT) upon the generation of O2 by NADPH...1997). Activation of the ethylene gas response pathway in Arabidopsis by the...Z. Klement, K. Rudolph, and D.C. Sands, eds (Budapest, Hungary: Akademiai...

Clemencia M. Rojas; Muthappa Senthil-Kumar; Keri Wang; Choong-Min Ryu; Amita Kaundal; Kirankumar S. Mysore

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Constant Radiance Term Lszl Neumann 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is zero. The self- 1 Email: neumann@hungary.net #12; L. Neumann: The Constant Radiance Term - 2 information, nor the calculation of form factors. A constant radiance is extracted from the solution in every of the residuum problem is zero. The self-emitting term of the residuum problem can either be positive or negative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The patent literature of Nobel Laureate Dennis Gabor (1900-1979)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kitchin (Sadlers) Research Professor, City University...were recorded, and abstracts of the British and US...made of some of the abstracts. When an invention...cathode-ray tube, thermionic energy conversion and communications...covered in this review. RESEARCH IN GERMANY AND HUNGARY...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hungarian establishment now opposes hydroelectric project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... permission to publish its three reports on the probable environmental effect of the Gabcikovo-Nagymaros hydroelectric project. This is the latest in a sequence of events that, since the conference ... , north from its present channel, and the construction of two major 'peak-hour' hydroelectric plants at Gabcikovo in Slovakia and Nagymaros in Hungary, was originally intended as a ...

Vera Rich

1988-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

163

The new race to the Moon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for being there, the greater the number of activities, human brains and capital are invested and the greater the chance of making...Hungary is a small country but we have a big reservoir of brain cells, said Tibor Pacher, CEO of Team Puli. We want to show......

Sue Bowler

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A&G Volume 55 Issue 5, Full Issue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......being there, the greater the number of activi- ties, human brains and capital are invested and the greater the chance of making...Hungary is a small country but we have a big reservoir of brain cells," said Tibor Pacher, CEO of Team Puli. "We want to......

A&G Volume 55 Issue 5; Full Issue

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Synthesis of Nickel-Zinc Ferrites in RF Thermal Plasma Reactor J. Szpvlgyi1,2*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

micelle synthesis [2], hydrothermal processing [3], precipitation [4] or intensive ball milling [5 of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Pannonia, H-8200 POB 158, Veszprém, Hungary 3 Research by ceramic technologies. In processing terms ferrite powders of well-defined com- position and narrow

Gubicza, Jenõ

166

13/05/20081 Timber Utilisation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-300 Standing tree Fibre-gen, New Zealand PH-330 Standing tree Fibre-gen, New Zealand TreeTap Standing in Greatsupply in Great BritainBritain LONG TERM TREND IN SOFTWOOD AVAILABILITY FOR GREAT BRITAIN BY TREE SPECIES tree University ofCanterbury, New Zealand Fakopp 2D Standing tree Fakopp Enterprises, Hungary IML

167

Office of Public Affairs Phone (609) 951-4458 Fax (609) 951-4451 www.ias.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences, 1973, 1976, 1980, 1982, 2005) The Netherlands 2004 David J. Gross (Member, School of Natural, 1950s) Hungary 1967 George Wald (Member, School of Mathematics, 1954s) United States #12;NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE 1948 T. S. Eliot (Member, School of Historical Studies, 1948f) United Kingdom 1963 George Seferis

168

UV-B-Responsive Association of the Arabidopsis bZIP Transcription Factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 with Target Genes, Including Its Own Promoter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Plant Biology, University of Geneva, Sciences III, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland...Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary c Department...Ghent, Belgium e School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, EH9 3JR Edinburgh...

Melanie Binkert; László Kozma-Bognár; Kata Terecskei; Lieven De Veylder; Ferenc Nagy; Roman Ulm

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

169

Metastability of Microtubules Induced by Competing Internal Forces Viktoria Hunyadi and Imre M. Janosi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- lizing free-energy is around Etot % ?10.5 kBT per dimer for 13 protofilament GDP MTs (8). Note that th, Hungary ABSTRACT Recent modeling efforts to estimate energies of tubulin-tubulin bonds shed light important refinements to the explanation of bond energetics. First, energy surface calculations

Jánosi, Imre M.

170

Supplement 18, Part 7, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Hosts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hungary Parastasiella ovorum Acanthocyclops gigas Fimbriaria fasciolaris Microsomacanthus para- compressa Microsomacanthus paramierosoma Dobrokhotova, 0. V., I965 a all from Southern Kazakhstan Acanthocyclops vernalis Michajlow, W., I965 k, 12... rectangulum 13 western oblasts, Ukraine Dobrokhotova, 0. V., 1965 a all from Southern Kazakhstan Acanthocyclops viridis ? ? ??? ? Dicranotaenia tenuirostris S. M., 1%5 (exper.) Parukhin, A. M.; and PalkLna, Acanthocyclops viridis "Krebstieren...

Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Margie D.; Crawley, Lila R.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Shaw, Judith H.; Walker, Martha L.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Crisis of Public Higher Education: A Comparative Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Japan than in other countries. US households contributehouseholds) contribute more than 30% on average to the tertiary institutions budgets, including the United States (37%), with only two ( Japan andhouseholds OECD countries Australia Austria Belgium Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Japan

Stephan Vincent-Lancrin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 4066  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damage and permanent indentation on laminate composite plate. In: ECCM14 - 14TH European Conference ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS 7-10 June 2010, Budapest, Hungary Paper ID: 672-ECCM14 1 MODELLING OF IMPACT DAMAGE damage and permanent indentation modelling. A model enabling the formation of damages developing during

Mailhes, Corinne

173

Nest shapes in paper wasps: can the variability of forms be deduced from the same  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nest shapes in paper wasps: can the variability of forms be deduced from the same construction 3, H-4010 Debrecen, Hungary We constructed a simple model to show that the variability of nest parameter. The interplay between the simple algorithm and the geometry of the nest structure resulted

Karsai, Istvan

174

CASSINI PLASMA SPECTROMETER INVESTIGATION D. T. YOUNG1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Establishment, Kjeller, Norway 13KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, Hungary 14 and aurora, and the solar wind. Our design approach meets these goals by emphasizing two complementary types and auroral particles. The IBS measures ion velocity distri- butions with very high angular and energy

Johnson, Robert E.

175

OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

National Nuclear Security Administration  

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National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Visit the Nevada National Security Site Learn More NNSA DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Learn More DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Tiffany A. Blanchard-Case receives 2013 Linton Brooks Medal

178

The effects of prevention and public health expenditure on measles immunization rates in Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Belgium* 40 40 0 Canada 185 184 1 Czech Republic 27 23 4 Denmark 15 13 2 Finland 87 41 47 France 90 68 22 Germany 100 86 15 Greece 65 35 30 Hungary** 54 29 24 Iceland 40 40 0 Ireland 78 59 19 Italy 15 15 0 Japan* 50 30 20 Korea 21 20 1....4 Austria 74.0 Belgium 82. Canada** 94.5 Czech Republic 96.9 Denmark 96.0 Finland 97. France 87.1 Germany 93.3 Greece 88.0 Hungary 99.9 Iceland* 99.0 Ireland 81. Italy 85.5 Japan*** 100.0 Korea**** 90.2 Luxembourg 91.0 Mexico 96.4 Netherlands...

Chen, Christina Melonie

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Case Study of the Emissions from a Heavy-Oil-Fueled Hungarian Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Case Study of the Emissions from a Heavy-Oil-Fueled Hungarian Power Plant ... More than 50% of the electric power in Hungary is produced by fossil-fuel-burning power plants. ... 15 The concentration of the pollutant at a location is described by an explicit function in Descartes coordinate system, where the origin is the source; the direction of the abscissa is the same as the wind direction. ...

Jnos Osn; Szabina Trk; Jen Fekete; Anders Rindby

2000-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

The United States and disarmament, 1921-1934  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the peacemakers at Versailles concentrated on the realities of the present, President Wilson clung to his ideals of a peaceful world of the future. Permanent peace and security, Wilson insisted, lay not in the dismemberment of Germany, but in a system... to attend the conference was extended on October. g, 1921, to the governments of Belgium, the Netherlands, and Portugal, all of which held economic interests or territorial possessions in the Orient. Although Russia, Germany, and Austria-Hungary had...

May, Roy

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Prisoners of War-Cold War Allies: The Anglo-American Relationship with Wehrmacht Generals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to becoming an active belligerent, however, the Americans had served as the protecting power for the war prisoners of Germany, Austria-Hungary, France, Great Britain and Russia. In this capacity, American officials inspected the camps of these respective.... 9 Consequently, the United States returned these men to British custody in 1946 rather than repatriating them directly to Germany, causing a great deal of resentment among the prisoners.16 Despite these postwar complications, the two Allies...

Mallett, Derek Ray

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Global energy in transition: environmental aspects of new and renewable sources for development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technical, development, and environmental aspects of the following alternative sources are assessed: solar energy, wind energy, energy from the oceans, hydropower, geothermal energy, biomass, fuelwood and charcoal, peat, oil shale and tar sands, and draft animal power. Policy issues for energy planning and development are presented for: rural energy, industry and transport, and financing new and renewable sources of energy. Summaries of the following national reports are included: China, Federal Republic of Germany, Hungary, Jamaica, Korea, Pakistan, Peru, Sudan, and United States. (MHR)

Bassan, E.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Availability of Phosphoric Acid in Rock Phosphate.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. MASSACHUSETTS. Gain or Loss Per Acre in Crop Values Compared with Cost of Phosphate. Natural Basic slag Dissolved 1 phosphates. mineral bone and meals. phosphates. ~fphosphates ............................. $3.67 $3.70 $3.24 average three crops 1899 1913... 61914. . average three crop;, 1894, 1912, 1914. ...... -4.79 ;- average three crops, 1899, 1913,'-1914. ..... Hay, av Hay, av Rowen, Tot Onions, Cabbagt Oat hay Hungari Tot Ensilagf al, average three crops, 1899, 1913. 1914 .'. .I .$ .16 1...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1917-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Science Team Meeting 8 Science Team Meeting 1998 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Eighth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-1998, March 1998 Tucson, Arizona For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). History and Status of the ARM Program - March 1998 Session Papers A Cloud Climatology of the ARM CART Site S.M. Lazarus, S.K. Krueger, and G.G. Mace A Combination of the Separation of Variable and the T-Matrix Method for Computing Optical Properties of Spheroidal Particles*

185

Slide 1  

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Cloud Properties and Heating Cloud Properties and Heating Rates in Tropical Cloud Systems Jennifer Comstock and Sally McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Alain Protat Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research Motivation Cloud properties retrievals Cloud process understanding Cloud Radiative forcing and heating rates Model evaluation on many scales (LES, CRM, SCM...) Quantified uncertainties are needed... 2 Retrieval Algorithm Evaluation within CPWG Past intercomparisons CLOWD - Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (Turner et al. 2007) Ice Clouds - (Comstock et al. 2007) One retrieval does not fit all Present algorithm evaluation BBHRP Ice Cloud Retrievals at SGP - Microbase (Dunn, Jensen, Mace, Marchand) Arctic mixed phase clouds - BBHRP (Shupe, Turner) CLOWD - BBHRP Pt. Reyes AMF deployment

186

Research Highlight  

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ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing Method Submitter: Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, J., P. Minnis, B. Lin, Y. Yi, T.-F. Fan, S. Sun-Mack, and J. K. Ayers, 2006: Determination of ice water path in ice-over-water cloud systems using combined MODIS and AMSR-E measurements. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21801, 10.1029/2006GL027038. Minnis, P., J. Huang, B. Lin, Y. Yi, R. F. Arduini, T.-F. Fan, J. K. Ayers, and G. G. Mace, 2007: Ice cloud properties in ice-over-water cloud systems using TRMM VIRS and TMI data. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D06206, doi:10.1029/2006JD007626. Figure 1. Comparison of the VISST and MCRS retrievals with simultaneous

187

Section 9  

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Figure 1. Monthly mean values of clear-sky irradiance (solid), observed irradiance (long dash), and surface cloud forcing (short dash) at the ARM SGP site. A Two-Year Climatology of Radiation Budget and Cloud Properties for the ARM SGP Site T. P. Ackerman and S. G. Strum Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology, University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah C. N. Long NOAA/ERL/Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction One of primary reasons for the establishment of the ARM Southern Great Plains research site was to obtain long-term records of surface radiation data and the impact of clouds on these data (Stokes and Schwartz 1994). This research project focuses on the creation of a two-year climatology of the sur-

188

Section 68  

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An Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations Using Southern An Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations Using Southern Great Plains Data D. A. Sovchik, G. C. Mace, and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Parameterization of cirrus in large-scale models is a challeng- considerably. A detailed analysis of the resulting distributions ing problem for a number of reasons. Among the most has not yet been carried out, but will be used to identify important of these has been the lack of quantifiable tests of systematic variations. parameterization results. However, the necessary testing can now be carried out using the data stream from the Atmos- The radiative parameterization developed by Ebert and Curry pheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern

189

Research Highlight  

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The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

190

AMF Deployment, Steamboat Springs, Colorado  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado Steamboat Deployment AMF Home Steamboat Springs Home Storm Peak Lab Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Data Sets Experiment Planning STORMVEX Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan NWS Forecasting Plots STORMVEX Website Outreach STORMVEX Backgrounder (PDF, 1.6MB) News AMF2 STORMVEX Blog Images Contacts Gerald Mace AMF Deployment, Steamboat Springs, Colorado This view shows the instrument locations for the STORMVEX campaign. At the westernmost site is the Valley Floor. Heading east up the mountain is Christy Peak, Thunderhead, and Storm Peak Laboratory at the far east. Valley Floor: 40° 39' 43.92" N, 106° 49' 0.84" W Thunderhead: 40° 39' 15.12" N, 106° 46' 23.16" W Storm Peak: 40° 27' 18.36" N, 106° 44' 40.20" W

191

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds Submitter: Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liou, K.N, S.C. Ou, Y. Takano, J. Roskovensky, G.G. Mace, K. Sassen, and M. Poellot, 2002: "Remote sensing of three-dimensional inhomogeneous cirrus clouds using satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data," Geophysical Research Letters 29(9): 1360. Figure 1 ARM Data Enables the Development and Verification of a New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds to Improve Climate Predictions Cirrus clouds cover about 30% of the Earth's surface. Because ice crystals both reflect sunlight and absorb thermal energy emitted from the earth

192

Microsoft Word - SPARTICUS_Science_Plan_DOE-SC-ARM-1001.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 SPARTICUS: Small Particles in Cirrus Science and Operations Plan J Mace Principal Investigator E Jensen D Mitchell G McFarquhar X Liu J Comstock T Garrett T Ackerman October 2009 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

193

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Tale of Two Cirrus A Tale of Two Cirrus Poellot, M.R.(a), Mace, G.G.(b), and Arnott, W.P. (c), University of North Dakota (a), University of Utah (b), Desert Research Institute (c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting On May 8, 1998, an orographically-forced cirrus layer overspread the DOE ARM Program's Southern Great Plains site and subsequently became mixed with anvil outflow from thunderstorms. These clouds were sampled in situ by the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft and remotely by an array of ground-based radar, lidar and radiometric instrumentation. The first of two aircraft flights sampled the orographic cirrus through a series of step climbs and spirals. During that time, the cloud was relatively uniform in depth and structure. Shortly after the start of the second flight, the

194

1  

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Cirrus Radiative Properties in the Tropical Western Pacific Cirrus Radiative Properties in the Tropical Western Pacific J. M. Comstock and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Cirrus clouds in tropical regions are often located high in the cold upper troposphere and have low optical depths. In addition, tropical cirrus often extend in large sheets up to 1000 km horizontally, which may have a large influence on the energy budget of the atmosphere. Characterizing the location and radiative properties of cirrus clouds is an important step in understanding the processes that generate and maintain these cold, thin cirrus clouds and their impact on upper tropospheric dynamics. In this paper, we present cirrus radiative properties derived using a combination of Micropulse Lidar

195

X:\ARM_19~1\P185-192.WPD  

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Figure 1. Schematic diagram of an operational Figure 1. Schematic diagram of an operational methodology for cloud parameterization testing. The upper portion depicts the data analysis procedure, while the lower portion depicts parameterization forcing and evaluation. A Comparison of Radiometric Fluxes Influenced by Parameterized Cirrus Clouds with Observed Fluxes at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site G. G. Mace, T. P. Ackerman, and A. T. George Penn State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania As the data stream from the ARM Southern Great Plains on an hourly basis from the National Meteorological (SGP) site matures, the value of this resource is becoming Center. The MAPS profiles serve as input to a radiative more readily apparent. For the first time, research on the

196

1  

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Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of In-Situ Cloud Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of In-Situ Cloud Properties Measured During Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment G. McFarquhar, M. Freer, and J. Um University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois G. Kok Droplet Measurement Technologies Boulder, Colorado R. McCoy and T. Tooman Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California J. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction In-situ measurements of ice particle sizes, shapes and numbers were made in fresh anvils, aging anvils and in generic cirrus during TWP-ICE. The vertical profiles and horizontal profiles performed by the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft were made on 7 different days as illustrated in Table 1. Table 1. Summary of flights conducted during TWP-ICE; *designates that spiral was conducted over Darwin,

197

X:\ARM_19~1\P283-315.WPD  

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Figure 1. Observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles by the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar on Figure 1. Observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles by the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar on 15 April during the 1994 ARM RCS IOP. Observations of a Cold Front With Strong Vertical Undulations During the ARM RCS-IOP D. O'C. Starr and D. N. Whiteman G. Mace National Aeronautics and Space Administration The Pennsylvania State University Goddard Space Flight Center University Park, Pennsylvania Greenbelt, Maryland S. H. Melfi University of Utah University of Maryland-Baltimore County Salt Lake City, Utah Baltimore, Maryland A. R. Lare Sandia National Laboratories Applied Research Livermore, California Landover, Maryland R. A. Ferrare, B. Demoz, and K. D. Evans Hughes STX Lanham, Maryland K. Sassen S. E. Bisson and J.E.M. Goldsmith Passage of a cold front was observed on the night of

198

Microsoft PowerPoint - Development of High Temperature_Chen_Chonglin  

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Temperature/High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor PhD Students: Erik Enriquez, Shanyong Bao, & Brennan Mace PhD Awarded: Dr. Chunrui Ma (UK) & Dr. Gregory Collins (WVU) PIs: Patrick Nash (retired 2012) and Chonglin Chen (PI) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249-1644 Phone: 210-458-6427, Email: cl.chen@utsa.edu Grant Number: DE-FE0003780 Project Manager: Dr. Susan M. Maley Performance Period: 09/01/2010-8/31/2013 * Introduction * Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductive LnBaCo 2 O 5.5 Oxides * Full Scale Chemical Sensor Development * Summary OBJECTIVES & GOALS * The objective of this research is: - investigate and understand the mechanisms of mixed ionic electronic conductive LaBaCo 2 O 5+ highly epitaxial

199

kato-99.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Aerosol Thickness Derived from the Aerosol Thickness Derived from Ground-Based and Airborne Measurements S. Kato Hampton University Hampton, Virginia M. H. Bergin Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia T. P. Ackerman and E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Charlock and R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia N. S. Laulainen and D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah J. J. Michalsky State University of New York at Albany Albany, New York Introduction The extinction optical thickness of the atmosphere can be computed by measuring the attenuation of direct solar radiation (DSR). The aerosol extinction optical thickness in selected wavelength regions by

200

DOE/SC-ARM-10-021 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment  

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1 1 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan J Mace Principal Investigator S Matrosov B Orr M Shupe R Coulter P Lawson A Sedlacek G Hallar L Avallone I McCubbin C Long R Marchand September 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large-Scale Cloud Properties and Radiative Fluxes Large-Scale Cloud Properties and Radiative Fluxes over Darwin during Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment P. Minnis, L. Nguyen, and W.L. Smith, Jr. National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia R. Palikonka, J.K. Ayers, D.R. Doelling, M.L. Nordeen, D. Spangenberg, D.N. Phan, and M. Khaiyer Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia G.G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was conducted from 23 January - 13 February 2006 in Darwin, Australia, to characterize the properties of tropical cirrus and the convection that leads to their

202

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Validation of CERES/MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals Using Ground-Based Validation of CERES/MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals Using Ground-Based Measurements Obtained at the DOE ARM SGP Site Dong, X.(a), Minnis, P.(b), Sun-Mack, S.(b), and Mace, G.G.(a), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties derived from the NASA TERRA (EOS-AM) Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) as part of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project during November 2000-June 2001 are compared to simultaneous ground-based observations. The ground-based data taken by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are used as "ground truth" data set in the validation of the CERES cloud products and to improve the CERES daytime and

203

Section 7  

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A One-Year Cloud Climatology Derived from the Micro Pulse Lidar G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology, University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania J. D. Spinhirne and V. S. Scott NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Abstract A cloud detection algorithm that attempts to identify all of the significant power returns from the vertical column above the micro pulse lidar at all times was applied to one year of micro pulse lidar data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The results of this analysis are presented, and the

204

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Association of the Cirrus Properties Over the Western Tropical Pacific The Association of the Cirrus Properties Over the Western Tropical Pacific with Tropical Deep Convection Deng, M.(a), Mace, G.G.(a), and Soden, B.J.(b), Univesity of Utah (a), Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (b) The microphysical and radiative properties of upper tropospheric clouds in the tropics are known to have a substantial influence on climate. Observations from long term cloud radar measurements in the tropics show that upper tropospheric clouds are observed above 10 km as much as 40% of the time depending on location. By combining satellite observations with observations from the tropical ARM site on Nauru and Manus Islands we examine the macro and microphysical properties of these clouds in terms of their association with deep convection. The fundamental questions we will

205

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

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govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior numerical studies of solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere in the presence of clouds have been limited by the necessity to use theoretical representations of clouds. Three-dimensional representations of actual clouds and their microphysical properties, such as the distribution of ice and water, had previously not been possible

206

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23, 2008 [Feature Stories and Releases] 23, 2008 [Feature Stories and Releases] Field Campaigns for 2010 Range from the Arctic to the Azores Bookmark and Share With the recent awards, the ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Graciosa Island in the Azores is extended from its original 9-month duration, beginning in May 2009 and now lasting through November 2010. With the recent awards, the ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Graciosa Island in the Azores is extended from its original 9-month duration, beginning in May 2009 and now lasting through November 2010. The Department of Energy recently announced the selection of major ARM field campaigns that will take place in 2010. Studies led by principal investigators Rob Wood, Hans Verlinde, and Jay Mace will examine marine, mixed-phase, and cirrus clouds in the Azores, Alaska, the Great Plains, and

207

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3D Delta-Diffusion and IR Monte-Carlo Methods for Radiative Transfer 3D Delta-Diffusion and IR Monte-Carlo Methods for Radiative Transfer Applied to Inhomogeneous Cirrus over the ARM-SGP Site Chen, Y.(a), Liou, K.N.(a), Gu, Y.(a), Ou, S.C.(a), and Mace, G.G.(b), University of California, Los Angeles (a), University of Utah (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting An efficient method based on a full multigrid approach has been developed to solve the 3D delta-diffusion radiative transfer equation, which utilizes four-term spherical harmonics expansion for the phase function and intensity. This method first solves the inhomogeneous partial differential equation on a number of coarse grids and subsequently performs interpolation to predivided fine grids to speed up the convergence of the solution, particularly useful for cloud radiation parameterization in

208

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of Boundary Layer Cloud Properties using Surface and GOES Comparison of Boundary Layer Cloud Properties using Surface and GOES Measurements at the ARM SGP Site Dong, X. (a), Minnis, P. (b), Smith, W.L., Jr. (b), and Mace, G.G. (a), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Boundary layer cloud microphysical and radiative properties derived from GOES data during March 2000 cloud IOP at ARM SGP site are compared with simultaneous surface-based observations. The cloud-droplet effective radius, optical depth, and top-of-atmoshpere (TOA) albedo are retrieved from a 2-stream radiative transfer model in conjunction with ground-based measurements of cloud radar, laser ceilometer, microwave and solar radiometers. The satellite results are retrieved from GOES visible and

209

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The MERGED_SOUNDING VAP: A Status Report and Description The MERGED_SOUNDING VAP: A Status Report and Description Miller, M.A.(a), Troyan, D.T.(a), and Mace, G.G.(b), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), University of Utah (b) The Value-added Product (VAP) known as MERGED_SOUNDING has been deemed a very desirous component of ARMs suite of VAPs. To have a thermodynamics profile of the atmosphere at one-minute temporal intervals and uniform height levels available for ARM data users eliminates much redundancy and inconsistency as investigators will now have standard atmospheric profiles at their disposal. The values which constitute the thermodynamics profile include: Temperature, Relative Humidity, Vapor Pressure, Barometric Pressure, Wind Speed and Direction, and Dewpoint. The data integrated to form the MERGED_SOUNDING data stream comes from radiosonde launches, model

210

1  

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Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and OLR Bias Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and OLR Bias Q. Fu and B. Carlin Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Clouds exhibit dramatic variabilities at spatial scales smaller than typical grid cells of large-scale models used to study climate and weather. These unresolved cloud fluctuations are potentially important for parameterizations of both cloud radiative effects and cloud microphysical processes (e.g., Harshvardhan and Randall 1985; Jacob and Kein 1999). It is now well accepted that neglect of cloud subscale variability can seriously bias model estimates of the disposition of solar radiation in the earth- atmosphere system (e.g., Cahalan et al. 1994a; Barker 1996).

211

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: MICROBASE, A Continuous  

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MICROBASE, A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval: Status and Future MICROBASE, A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval: Status and Future Plans Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Johnson, Karen Brookhaven National Laboratory Michael, Paul Brookhaven National Laboratory Mace, Gerald University of Utah The MICROBASE_PI and MICROBASE_PA value-added products (VAPs) are integral components of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The goal of the BBHRP project is to determine atmospheric heating and cooling rate profiles in the column above the active sensors at each ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites and within a larger volume around each site, representative of a global climate model grid cell. To produce the heating rate profiles,

212

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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Cirrus Cloud Particle Mass and Terminal Velocity Derived from Airborne 2D-C Cirrus Cloud Particle Mass and Terminal Velocity Derived from Airborne 2D-C Probe and Counterflow Virtural Impactor Data for Selected Cases During the Spring 2000 Cloud IOP Benson-Troth, S.(a), Mace, G.G.(a), Twohy, C.(b), and Poellot, M.(c), University of Utah (a), Oregon State University (b), University of North Dakota (c) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting When cirrus cloud particles are sampled by an airborne 2D-C probe, the shadows of the particles on the diode array are preserved. Analysis of the raw 2D-C data provides a size distribution and number concentration of the cloud particles sampled. The airborne counterflow virtural impactor provides the ice water content of the sampled cloud particles. Using the size distribution and the ice water content, we derive the coefficient and

213

Fihl  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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214

Research Highlight  

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Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ou, S., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of cirrus cloud vertical size profile using MODIS data." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D09205, doi:10.1029/2008JD011327. (a) MODIS true color composite images for March 6, 2001 at 1736UTC, (b) retrieved Τc; (c) retrieved Dt for selected domain; (d) retrieved Db for selected domain; (e) scatter plot for retrieved Τc versus MODIS Τc for selected domain; (f) scatter plot for retrieved De versus MODIS De for

215

X:\ARM_19~1\P155-184.WPD  

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Diffuse Diffuse ratio (diffuse)/(diffuse direct) Session Papers 173 (1) A Simple Formula for Determining Globally Clear Skies C. N. Long, A. T. George, G. G. Mace, and T. P. Ackerman Penn State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Surface measurements to serve as "ground truth" are of primary importance in the development of retrieval algorithms using satellite measurements to predict surface irradiance. The most basic algorithms of this type deal with clear sky (i.e., cloudless) top-to-surface shortwave (SW) transfer, serving as a necessary prerequisite towards treating both clear and cloudy conditions (Cess et al. 1991). Recently, Cess et al. (1995) have used a ratio of surface and top of atmosphere SW cloud forcing to infer

216

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

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govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

217

Observed and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties at the SGP CART Site  

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and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties at the SGP CART Site A. D. Del Genio and A. B. Wolf National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Despite their potential importance in a long-term climate change, less is known about cirrus clouds than most other cloud types, for a variety of reasons (Del Genio 2001) including: (1) the difficulty of remotely sensing ice water content (IWC), (2) uncertainty in the identities of ice nuclei and the relative importance of different nucleation processes, (3) significant variations in depth and optical thickness caused by formation and sedimentation of large particles, and (4) our relatively poor documentation of

218

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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On the Detection and Analysis of Multilayered Clouds: Comparison of MODIS On the Detection and Analysis of Multilayered Clouds: Comparison of MODIS Analyses with ARM CART Site Cloud Products Baum, B.A.(a), Nasiri, S.L.(b), and Mace, G.G.(c), NASA Langley Research Center (a), University of Wisconsin-Madison (b), University of Utah (c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting We will present new ideas regarding the detection and analysis of multilayered clouds in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery. Over the past year, the MODIS cloud property retrieval effort has matured considerably as algorithms have been improved and the instrument performance has been characterized more accurately. Errors caused by noise, striping, and out-of-band response have been reduced. We have developed and tested different approaches for daytime and nighttime

219

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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The March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observing Period; The Evolution of the The March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observing Period; The Evolution of the Synoptic-Scale Atmosphere and the Associated Cloud Radiative Forcing Mace, G.G.(a), Sonntag, K.L.(b), Kato, S.(c), Poellot, M.(d), Twohy, C.(e), Troth, S.(a), Zhang, Q.(a), and Minnis, P.(c), University of Utah (a), Unviersity of Oklahoma (b), NASA Langley Research Center (c), University of North Dakota (d), Oregon State University (e) During the first 3 weeks of March 2000, an intensive observing period (IOP) was held near the central facility of the Southern Great Plains ARM site. In conjunction with the ARESE II campaign, the objective of this IOP was to observe the 3-dimensional structure of the cloud field using multiple scanning and vertically pointing millimeter radars. In anticipation of

220

Section 120  

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Platt Platt r Platt r e r Platt r e r Platt Session Papers 543 Verification of Cirrus Cloud Parameterizations Using Southern Great Plains Data D. A. Sovchik and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction An evaluation of several diagnostic cirrus cloud parameteriza- tions is presented in this study using data from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We consider three parameterizations of ice water content (IWC) proposed by Heymsfield and Donner (HD 1990), Stephens et al. (ST 1990), and Slingo and Slingo (SL 1991), each coupled with parameterizations of the ice particle size characteristics by Heymsfield and Platt (HP 1984), Mitchell (MI 1994) and Platt

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221

ARM Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status  

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Value-Added Cloud Products: Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status M. A. Miller, K. L. Johnson, and D. T. Troyan Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania E. J. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a variety of state-of-the-art active and passive remote sensors at its sites. These sensors provide information about the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the structure of the clouds that are present above the site. Families of value- added products (VAPs) that contain geophysically relevant data are produced from the electronic

222

Section 77  

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Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent potential temperature, and saturation equiva- lent potential temperature for a) the decou- pled boundary-layer observed over the ARM SGP site and b) the well-mixed boundary- layer observed over central Pennsylvania. Observational Studies of Continental Stratus-Implications for Modeling B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah H. Verlinde and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site have tremendous potential for providing statistical descriptions of cloud and boundary layer properties associated with continental stratus.

223

Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations of Cloud-Radiative Interactions  

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Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations of Cloud-Radiative Interactions G. M. McFarquhar Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California G. G. Mace and Y. Zhang Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Accurate parameterizations of, and in terms of, ice cloud effective radius (r e ) are crucial for accurate model estimates of upwelling and downwelling radiative fluxes, and of cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Zhang et al. (1999), and Iacobellis and Somerville (2000) have all found that radiative fluxes are sensitive to the specification of r e and fallout, and that the most realistic vertical distribution of clouds is

224

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative Forcing  

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Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Kato, Seiji Hampton University/NASA Langley Research Center Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the surface and atmosphere represent a critical shortcoming in the set of observations that are needed to ascertain the validity of model simulations of the earth's climate. While clouds are known to cool the climate system from TOA radiation budget studies, the redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere and within the atmosphere by clouds has not been examined in detail. Using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP)

225

DOE/SC-ARM-TR-099 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set  

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099 099 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED) C Zhao MP Jensen S Xie GG Mace SA Klein SA McFarlane R McCoy EJ O'Connor JM Comstock A Protat J Delanoë MD Shupe M Deng D Turner M Dunn Z Wang RJ Hogan September 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

226

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

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Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

227

1  

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High Clouds Microphysical Retrievals Intercomparison High Clouds Microphysical Retrievals Intercomparison J. M. Comstock, S. A. McFarlane, and D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. d'Entremon Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts D. H. DeSlover University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin G. G. Mace Univerity of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah S. Y. Matrosov and M. D. Shupe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada K. Sassen University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Z. Wang University of Maryland, Baltimore County/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland 1 Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004

228

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval (MICROBASE): Status of SGP A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval (MICROBASE): Status of SGP Version 1.2 and Prototype TWP Version Miller, M.A.(a), Johnson, K.L.(a), Jensen, M.P.(b), Mace, G.G.(c), Dong, X.(d), and Vogelmann, A.M.(a), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), Columbia University (b), University of Utah (c), University of North Dakota (d) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The interaction of clouds with incoming and outgoing radiation streams produces discontinuous regions of heating and cooling within the atmospheric column. These regions can influence the atmospheric circulations at multiple scales, as well as modify the existing cloud structures. The Broadband Heating Rate Project (BBHRP) within ARM has the goal of producing instantaneous snapshots of the heating and cooling rate

229

sekelsky-98.pdf  

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1 1 Comparison of Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar Measurements for the Fall 1997 Cloud IOP S. M. Sekelsky, L. Li, J. Calloway, and R. E. McIntosh University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts M. A. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania S. Haimov University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming G. G. Mace and K. Sassen University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction One of the primary objectives of the fall 1997 intensive observation period (IOP) was to intercompare Ka-band (35 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) cloud radar observations and verify system calibrations. During September 1997, several cloud radars were deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site,

230

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Evaluation of GFDL SCM  

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Evaluation of GFDL SCM Cloud Fractions and Surface Radiation Fields with Evaluation of GFDL SCM Cloud Fractions and Surface Radiation Fields with Those from the Ground-based Remote Sensing at SGP Kim, Byung-Gon Princeton University Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah The various kinds of approaches to obtain cloud fraction in the model still have the limitations, which accordingly result in the consequent errors in the model radiative fluxes. Because of the different schemes to estimate the cloud fraction by the model and also observation artifacts, the prudent comparisons should be made in order to reach the right answer. This study demonstrates the more revised approaches of comparisons to improve the evaluation of cloud fraction. To do this, a relatively inexpensive and

231

Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus Cloud on MODIS Retrieved Water-Cloud Droplet Effective Radius  

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Detecting and Evaluating the Effect Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus Cloud on MODIS Retrieved Water-Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Cirrus clouds can largely modify the solar reflected and terrestrial emitted radiances. The ubiquitous presence of cirrus clouds has a global coverage of about 20% to30% and more than 70% in the tropics (Wylie et al. 1994). The probability of cirrus clouds overlaying a low-level boundary layer cloud system is greater than 50% (Hahn et al. 1982, 1984; Tian and Curry 1989; Mace et al. 1997). They are often optically thin and semitransparent and frequently reside in high altitude overlapping with a low-level

232

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cirrus properties and  

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Cirrus properties and air mean vertical motion retrieval using Cirrus properties and air mean vertical motion retrieval using mm-wavelength Doppler radar moments Deng, Min University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Vertically pointing millimeter wavelength Doppler radar provides valuable information on upper tropospheric cloud properties and dynamics. We are developing an innovative algorithm to simultaneously retrieve cirrus microphysical parameters and air mean vertical motion by using the three moments of the Doppler spectrum. The technique utilizes a statement that the observed Doppler spectrum is the convolution of a quiet air reflectivity spectrum with the turbulence PDF (probability density function). The set of equations describing the Doppler spectrum moments are inverted using optimal estimation theory to derive estimates of the

233

Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

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Program Program Accomplishments of the Cloud Properties Working Group (CPWG) August 2006 Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Using ARM Data to Establish Testable Metrics for GCM Predictions of Cloud Feedback Gerald Mace University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah The scientific underpinning of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is largely based on the premise that long term ground-based measurements of certain quantities provide information sufficient to test the skill of general circulation models (GCMs) to predict radiative heating and cloud feedbacks (Stokes and Schwartz, 1994; Ackerman and Stokes, 2003). This hypothesis is based on the assumption that some set of long-term ground-based measurements provide sufficient information to characterize the physical state of the atmospheric

234

OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

X:\ARM_19~1\PGS1-8.WPD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Data B. Albrecht, G. Mace, X. Dong, W. Syrett, and T. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus- are closely coupled to the water and energy budgets of land surfaces. This coupling involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds

236

dong-99.PDF  

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25-Month Data Base of Stratus Cloud Properties 25-Month Data Base of Stratus Cloud Properties Generated from Ground-Based Measurements at the ARM SGP Site X. Dong Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis Atmospheric Sciences Division National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. P. Ackerman, E. E. Clothiaux, and C. N. Long Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace Meteorology Department University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah J. C. Liljegren Ames Laboratory Ames, Iowa Introduction Boundary layer stratiform clouds are important in the regulation of the earth's radiation budget and play an important role in climate over both land and ocean (Ramanathan et al. 1989). Boundary layer stratus

237

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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Shortwave and Longwave Flux and Cooling Rate Profiles for the ARM Central Shortwave and Longwave Flux and Cooling Rate Profiles for the ARM Central Facility Clough, S.A. (a), Delamere, J.S. (a), Mlawer, E.J. (a), Cederwall, R.T. (b), Revercomb, H. (c), Tobin, D. (c), Turner, D.D. (c), Knuteson, R.O. (c), Michalsky, J.J. (d), Kiedron, P.W. (d), Ellingson, R.G. (e), Krueger, S.K. (f), Mace, G.G. (f), Shippert, T. (g), and Zhang, M.H.(h), Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (a), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (b), University of Wisconsin-Madison (c), State University of New York, Albany (d), University of Maryland (e), University of Utah (f), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (g), State University of New York, Stony Brook (h) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Accurate representations of the cooling rate profile, the surface flux and

238

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Validation of TERRA MODIS Cloud Properties Using Ground-Based Measurements Validation of TERRA MODIS Cloud Properties Using Ground-Based Measurements at the DOE ARM SGP Site Dong, X.(a), Xi, B.(a), Minnis, P.(b), Wielicki, B.(b), Sun-Mack, S.(c), Chen,Y.(c), and Mace, G.G.(d), University of North Dakota (a), NASA/Langley Research Center (b), SAIC, Inc. (c), University of Utah (d) Cloud macrophysical and microphysical/optical properties derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra as part of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project during February 2000-December 2001 are compared to simultaneous ground-based observations. The ground-based data taken over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are used as cloud truth data set in the validation of the CERES Science Team derived

239

Section 44  

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An Automated Cloud Mask Algorithm for the An Automated Cloud Mask Algorithm for the Micropulse Lidar G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania To perform cloud base analysis, an automated technique for sky signal using the standard lidar equation (Spinhirne determination of cloud base height from the raw lidar returns 1993) and midlatitude standard atmospheres. After is needed. Previously, a straightforward signal thresholding normalization, the observations form a swarm of points about algorithm was used to determine cloud base height. The unity with the scatter due to electronic noise, solar background difficulty with this approach is illustrated in Figure 1a. The and cloud and aerosol return. micropulse lidar operates at a wavelength of 523 nm, which is

240

USAID Europe and Eurasia Climate Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Eurasia Climate Program and Eurasia Climate Program Jump to: navigation, search Name USAID Europe and Eurasia Climate Program Agency/Company /Organization U.S. Agency for International Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/ Country Armenia, Republic of Macedonia, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Kazakhstan, Hungary, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan Western Asia, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Central Asia, Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Central Asia, Central Asia, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Asia, Central Asia References USAID Regional Climate Programs[1]

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241

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

242

The Foreign Policy of the Polish Government-in-Exile, 19391945: Political and Military Realities versus Polish Psychological Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and William C. Bullitt (Boston, 1972), pp. 576-599, and... p. 133, Note 43, at end add: The generals remains were reburied in Wawel Castle Cathedral, Krakw, in 1993. Due to renewed controversy over the cause of death, an examination of the remains in 2008... and to make their way to Romania or Hungary, or because they were misled by the friendly declarations of the incoming Soviet troops. Thus, the Red Army took three to four hundred thousand prisoners, including about 10,000 officers. Most of the rank and file...

Cienciala, Anna M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Industry turns its attention south  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Significant foreign investment continues to elude Russia`s oil and gas industry, so the Caspian nations of Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan are picking up the slack, welcoming the flow of foreign capital to their energy projects. Separate evaluations are given for Russia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Moldova, Tajikstan, Uzbekistan, Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Serbia.

Marhefka, D. [Russian Petroleum Investor, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Customer satisfaction and price acceptance in the case of electricity supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper reports empirical research exploring the relationship between satisfaction and price acceptance in the case of a basic utility. The research is based on a face-to-face questionnaire survey of a representative sample of randomly selected 1384 residential consumers in Hungary. The respondents were asked about their satisfaction with electricity supply and at the same time they were requested to evaluate the prices compared to the perceived value of the service they received. The statistical model developed for the analysis of this relationship proved to be reliable and significant. It proved the existence of the basic hypothesis that satisfied customers have higher price acceptance.

Gabor Rekettye; Jozsef Pinter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Global energy in transition. Environmental aspects of new and renewable sources for development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sierra Club's compendium summarizes many of the documents presented at the United Nations Conference on New and Renewable Sources of Energy, Nairobi, Kenya, August 1981. The summaries give special attention to the environmental benefits of many energy sources - solar, wind, ocean thermal, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass, wood, peat, oil shale, tar sands, and draft animal. The Sierra Club also discusses the policy issues involved in energy planning and development and includes summaries of selected national reports on energy in China, Hungary, Jamaica, Korea, Pakistan, Peru, Sudan, the US and West Germany.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Supplement 16, Part 7, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Hosts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bogdanova, ?. ?., 19?1 ? Volga River Kosareva, ?. ?., 196l d Volga-Don canal reservoir Ekimova, I. V., 1962 a Petchora River Kolesnikova, ?. ?., I965 a Syr-Darya river Lom, J?, 196I e Czechoslovakia Abramis brama Sphaerostomum bramae (in- testine...?fner, G.; Graubmann, H. D. and Betke, P., 1965 a German lakes Kolesnikova, ?. N., I963 a all from Syr-Darya river Kczicka, J., 1963 a, II8 Lakes of W?gorzewo Establishment, Poland Moln?r, ?. , 1964 b all from Hungary Ekimova, I. V., 1962...

Segal, Dorothy B.; Humphrey, Judith M.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Margie D.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effects of Genotype and Environment on the Contents of Betaine, Choline, and Trigonelline in Cereal Grains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined the environmental and genetic variation in methyl donor contents and compositions of 200 cereal genotypes. ... (25) This study provides an unrivaled database of the detailed composition of grain of wheat and other cereals. ... Agronomic treatments were standard for the individual sites, with 110 kg of N/ha being applied in Poland, 204 kg of N/ha in the United Kingdom, 200 kg of N/ha in France, and 140 kg of N/ha in Hungary and appropriate use of agrochemicals. ...

Delia-Irina Corol; Catherine Ravel; Mariann Raksegi; Zoltan Bedo; Gilles Charmet; Michael H. Beale; Peter R. Shewry; Jane L. Ward

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AVReporter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AVReporter AVReporter tool_avreporter.jpg Energy management systems can measure data via installed hardware and turn it into valuable information. The AVReporter Energy Management software then will turn this information into reports and analytical information aiding energy efficiency, helping to realize where and when to change user platform in order to reduce consumption. Screen Shots Keywords Energy management, energy monitoring, reducing CO2, increase energy efficency, ISO50001 Validation/Testing Compatible with ISO50001 Standards and LEED Certifications. Expertise Required For users: none. For system integrators: electrical engineer and IT specialist. Users Users over 100 in Hungary and international Audience Production companies, building complexes, logistic centers and shopping

249

GNEP Ministerial Attendees  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Senior Delegation Officials From All GNEP Participants Senior Delegation Officials From All GNEP Participants GNEP PARTNERS Australia John Carlson, Director General, Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office Bulgaria Chavdar Zhechev, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Bulgaria to the United Nations China Chen Deming, Vice Chairman, National Development and Reform Commission France Alain Bugat, Chairman, French Atomic Energy Commission Ghana Joseph Adda, Minister for Energy Hungary József Rónaky, Director General, Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority Japan Yukiya Amano, Ambassador, Permanent Mission of Japan to the International Organizations in Vienna Jordan Khaled Toukan, Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research Kazakhstan Kayrat Abdrakhmanov, Ambassador Extraordinary

250

ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) Country Hungary Headquarters Location Budapest, Hungary Coordinates 47.498405°, 19.040758° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.498405,"lon":19.040758,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

Judging Edward Teller: A Closer Look at One of the Most Influential Scientists of the Twentieth Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much has been written about Edward TEller, but little of it is objective. Given, on the one hand, his position as one of the most inventive theoretical physicists of the 20th century, and on the other, his central role in the development and advocacy of thermonuclear weapons, one might imagine it impossible at this point in history to write a scholarly, impartial account of Teller's life and his impact. Now, however, Istvan Hargittai, a prominent Hungarian physical chemist and historian of science, has written a balanced, thoughtful, and beautifully research biography that comes closest. Hargittai is uniquely qualified for this difficult task. Coming a generation and a half later from a similar Hungarian-Jewish background, Hargittai understands well the influences and terrible events that shaped Teller. The advent of virulent, political anti-Semitism, first in Hungary and then in Germany, made Teller twice a refugee. Both Teller and Hargittai lost close family in the Holocaust; Hargittai was himself liberated from a Nazi concentration camp as a child. While Teller was in the US by then, his and Hargittai's surviving family members in Hungary suffered mistreatment at the hands of the postwar Hungarian Communist dictatorship. Hargittai's informed Eastern European perspective also provides a fresh viewpoint to the cold war context of the second half of Teller's career. Furthermore, Hargittai's own scientific work in molecular structure clearly makes him appreciate of Teller's breakthroughs in that field in the 1930s.

Libby, S B

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

Expedition to the 30-km Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and the Utilization of its Experience in Education and Communication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between May 28 - June 4, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (HYGN) - which operates within the framework of the HNS - a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the surrounding exclusion zone. The participants were young Hungarian nuclear professionals supervised by more experienced experts. The main scientific goals of the expedition were the followings: Get personal experiences in a direct way about the current status of the Chernobyl Power Plant and its surroundings, the contamination of the environment and about the doses. Gather information about the state of the shut down power plant and the shelter built above the damaged 4. unit. Training of young nuclear experts by performing on site measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives by performing wide-range of environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. Within the 30-km exclusion zone the influence of the accident occurred 20 years ago still could be measured clearly; however the level of the radioactivity is manageable in most places. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure occurred among the members of the expedition. The analysis of samples has been started at the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. During the expedition not only environmental sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out but it was also well documented with photos and video recordings for educational, training and PR purposes. A documentary TV film was recorded during the expedition. The first-hand knowledge acquired during the expedition helps the authentic communication of the accident and its present-day consequences, which is especially important in 2006, 20 years after the Chernobyl accident. Since Ukraine and Hungary are neighbor countries the media constantly discuss the accident, the consequences and the risks of using nuclear energy. In addition in November 2005 Hungary's parliament approved plans to extend the lifetime of the country's four-unit nuclear power plant. In order to have the crucial public support for nuclear energy it is very important to dispel unrealistic dismay and misbelieves regarding these questions. Thus it is extremely beneficial to have a film on this topic created by nuclear professionals especially for the public audience. In 2005 a book on the Chernobyl accident was published in Hungary that covers this expedition in a full chapter [2]. We plan to present the film to the audience of the conference. (authors)

Aszodi, Attila; Yamaji, Bogdan [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Silye, Judit [Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety Directorate, H-1539 Budapest, P.O. Box 676 (Hungary); Pazmandi, Tamas [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY 2 IEA MEMBER COUNTRIES Australia Austria Belgium Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Japan Korea (Republic of) Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom United States These countries are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as the IEA is an autonomous agency linked with the OECD. The European Commission also participates in the work of the IEA. The International Energy Agency (IEA) is the energy forum for 28 industrialised countries. IEA member country governments are committed to taking joint measures to meet oil supply emergencies. They also have agreed to share energy information,

254

Acrux Bt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acrux Bt Acrux Bt Jump to: navigation, search Name Acrux Bt Place Kecskemét, Hungary Zip 6000 Sector Solar Product Acrux designs solar systems for households. Coordinates -27.030609°, -65.320297° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-27.030609,"lon":-65.320297,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Appendix K. Regional Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K. Regional Definitions K. Regional Definitions International Energy Outlook 2008 Appendix K. Regional Definitions Figure K1. Map of the Six Basic Country Groupings. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2008 world population): North America—United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe—Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia—Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2008 world population):

256

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Appendix J  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J J International Energy Outlook 2006 Appendix J: Regional Definitions Figure J1. Map of the Six Basic Country Groupings. Need help, contact the National Information Center at 202-586-8800. The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure J1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2006 world population): North America—United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe—Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia—Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2006 world population): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2006 world

257

Notices  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

918 Federal Register 918 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 146 / Tuesday, July 30, 2013 / Notices The countries which are scheduled to be discussed are Antigua and Barbuda, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Granada, Hungary, Philippines, and Sint Maarten. The meeting agenda, as well as the staff analyses pertaining to the meeting will be posted on the Department of Education's Web site prior to the meeting at http://www2.ed.gov/about/ bdscomm/list/ncfmea.html. Reasonable Accommodations: The meeting site is accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you will need an auxiliary aid or service to participate in the meeting (e.g., interpreting service, assistive listening device, or materials in an alternate format), notify the contact person listed in this notice by October 18, 2013, although we will attempt to

258

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway Islands Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Zealand Nicaragua Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

259

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chapter footnotes Chapter footnotes Preface 1 OECD includes all members of the organization as of September 1, 2010, throughout all time series included in this report. Israel became a member on September 7, 2010, and Estonia became a member on December 9, 2010, but neither country's membership is reflected in IEO2011. Highlights 2 Current OECD member countries (as of September 1, 2010) are the United States, Canada, Mexico, Austria, Belgium, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Israel became a member on September 7, 2010, and Estonia became a member on December 9, 2010, but neither country's

260

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J: Regional Definitions J: Regional Definitions Figure J1. Map of the Six Basic Country Groupings. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure J1) are defined as follows: Mature Market Economies (15 percent of the 2005 world population): North America—United States, Canada, and Mexico; Western Europe—Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom; Mature Market Asia—Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. Transitional Economies (6 percent of the 2005 world population): Eastern Europe (EE)—Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro,

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261

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional definitions Regional definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure M1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2011 world population): OECD Americas-United States, Canada, Chile, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. Israel is reported in OECD Europe for statistical purposes. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2013 world population): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2013 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and

262

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ecofys Country Fact Sheets Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.ecofys.com/files/files/ecofys_2011_country_factsheets_update.pdf Country: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Korea, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela

263

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Appendix K  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K - Regional Definitions K - Regional Definitions International Energy Outlook 2007 Appendix K - Regional Definitions Figure K1. Map of the Six Basic Country Groupings. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2007 world population): North America—United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe—Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia—Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2007 world population):

264

Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Jump to: navigation, search Name Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Agency/Company /Organization European Union Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://eur-lex.europa.eu/smart Country Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Hungary, Malta, Netherlands, Austria, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Finland, Sweden, United Kingdom Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Southern Europe, Western Asia, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe

265

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Definitions Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure J1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2006 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2006 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2006 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azer- baijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovenia,

266

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html Country: United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Luxembourg, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Egypt, South Africa, Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand

267

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members September 16, 2007 - 2:33pm Addthis Nations Sign On to International Cooperation for Safe Expansion of Nuclear Energy Worldwide VIENNA, AUSTRIA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and senior international officials from 16 nations today agreed to increase international nuclear energy cooperation through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). China, France, Japan, Russia and the United States, who are original GNEP partners, as well as Australia, Bulgaria, Ghana, Hungary, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, and Ukraine signed a "Statement of Principles", which addresses the prospects of expanding the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, including enhanced

268

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Agency/Company /Organization: European Environment Agency Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Maps Website: www.eea.europa.eu/publications/eea_report_2009_9 Country: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Ireland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

269

IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY 2 IEA MEMBER COUNTRIES Australia Austria Belgium Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Japan Korea (Republic of) Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom United States These countries are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as the IEA is an autonomous agency linked with the OECD. The European Commission also participates in the work of the IEA. The International Energy Agency (IEA) is the energy forum for 28 industrialised countries. IEA member country governments are committed to taking joint measures to meet oil supply emergencies. They also have agreed to share energy information,

270

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets (Redirected from Ecofys Country Fact Sheets) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ecofys Country Fact Sheets Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.ecofys.com/files/files/ecofys_2011_country_factsheets_update.pdf Country: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Korea, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela

271

Appendix K: Regional Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K K Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2008 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2008 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2008 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia,

272

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Notes and Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

sources.gif (4045 bytes) sources.gif (4045 bytes) [1] Turkey and Belarus are Annex I nations that have not ratified the Framework Convention on Climate Change and did not commit to quantifiable emissions targets under the Kyoto Protocol. [2] The Annex I countries under the Framework Convention on Climate Change are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Turkey and Belarus are also considered Annex I countries, but neither has agreed to any limits on greenhouse gas emissions.

273

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K K Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2007 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2007 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2007 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia,

274

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional definitions Regional definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure M1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2011 world population): OECD Americas-United States, Canada, Chile, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom; OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2011 world population): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2011 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan,

275

Wind and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind and Power Wind and Power Place Warszawa, Poland Zip 04-320 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product The firm offers small-scale PV panels, inverters, accumulators, solar collectors and wind turbines, and has distributors in Germany, Hungary and Rumania. Coordinates 52.23537°, 21.009485° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.23537,"lon":21.009485,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Kraft Rt (Kraft Electronics Inc) Place Budapest, Hungary Zip H-112 Sector Solar Product Equipment manufacturer for the clean energy industry, currently focused on thin-film solar cell production equipment. Coordinates 47.506225°, 19.06482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.506225,"lon":19.06482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

278

Investigation of natural gas theft by magnetic remanence mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Natural gas theft causes major losses in the energy industry in Hungary. Among the non-technical losses occurring in natural gas networks, fraudulent residential consumption is one of the main factors. Up to 2014, gas meters that are most widely used in residential monitoring are manufactured with ferromagnetic moving components, which makes it possible to alter or disrupt the operation of the meters non-intrusively by placing permanent magnets on the casing of the meters. Magnetic remanence mapping was used to investigate a sample of 80 recalled residential meters and detect potentially fraudulent activity. 10% of the meters were found suspect by magnetic remanence measurement, of which 50% were confirmed to be potentially hijacked by further mechanical investigation. The details of the technique are described in this paper, along with experimental results and the discussion of the analysis of the real-world samples.

Zsolt Dob; Helga Kovcs; Pl Tth; rpd B. Palots

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Activities of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Spain, and Israel are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. The 2001 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark specifications for 2642 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for use in validation efforts and for testing basic nuclear data.

Briggs, Joseph Blair

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilitiesInternational Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden)Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis VlachoudisWorkshop Assistant: Graldine Jean

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Map-Annex 1 Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Climate Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.unfccc.int/di/map/ Country: Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States

282

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study (Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series) Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

283

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Notes & Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To International Forecasting Home Page To International Forecasting Home Page To Annual Energy Outlook 2000 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage [1] Turkey and Belarus are Annex I nations that have not ratified the Framework Convention on Climate Change and did not commit to quantifiable emissions targets under the Kyoto Protocol. [2] The Annex I countries under the Framework Convention on Climate Change are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Turkey and Belarus are also considered Annex I countries, but neither has agreed to any limits on greenhouse gas emissions.

284

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Spain, and Israel are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled "International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments" (ICSBEP Handbook). The 2002 edition of the ICSBEP Handbook contains benchmark model specifications for 2881 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for validating computer codes that calculate effective neutron multiplication and for testing basic nuclear data.

J. Blair Briggs

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A SEARCH FOR L/T TRANSITION DWARFS WITH Pan-STARRS1 AND WISE: DISCOVERY OF SEVEN NEARBY OBJECTS INCLUDING TWO CANDIDATE SPECTROSCOPIC VARIABLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present initial results from a wide-field (30,000 deg{sup 2}) search for L/T transition brown dwarfs within 25 pc using the Pan-STARRS1 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) surveys. Previous large-area searches have been incomplete for L/T transition dwarfs, because these objects are faint in optical bands and have near-infrared (near-IR) colors that are difficult to distinguish from background stars. To overcome these obstacles, we have cross-matched the Pan-STARRS1 (optical) and WISE (mid-IR) catalogs to produce a unique multi-wavelength database for finding ultracool dwarfs. As part of our initial discoveries, we have identified seven brown dwarfs in the L/T transition within 9-15 pc of the Sun. The L9.5 dwarf PSO J140.2308+45.6487 and the T1.5 dwarf PSO J307.6784+07.8263 (both independently discovered by Mace et al.) show possible spectroscopic variability at the Y and J bands. Two more objects in our sample show evidence of photometric J-band variability, and two others are candidate unresolved binaries based on their spectra. We expect our full search to yield a well-defined, volume-limited sample of L/T transition dwarfs that will include many new targets for study of this complex regime. PSO J307.6784+07.8263 in particular may be an excellent candidate for in-depth study of variability, given its brightness (J = 14.2 mag) and proximity (11 pc)

Best, William M. J.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Deacon, Niall R. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dupuy, Trent J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Redstone, Joshua [Facebook, 335 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10017-4677 (United States); Price, P. A., E-mail: wbest@ifa.hawaii.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

Dudhia, Jimy

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report : thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-3 test data report : thermal Hydraulic results, Rev. 0 February 19, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the third water ingression test, designated SSWICS-3. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% limestone/common sand concrete at a system pressure of 4 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 final data report, Rev. 1 February 10, 2003.; Report, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure; and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The test investigated the quench behavior of a 15 cm deep, fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% limestone/common sand concrete decomposition products. The melt was quenched at nominally atmospheric pressure. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and data reduction to obtain an estimate of the corrected heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool. A section of the report is devoted to calculations of the conduction-limited heat flux that accounts for heat losses to the crucible holding the corium. The remainder of the report describes post test examinations of the crust, which includes permeability and mechanical strength measurements, and chemical analysis.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

291

OECM MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 final data report, Rev. 0 February 12, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The test investigated the quench behavior of a 15 cm deep, fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% siliceous concrete decomposition products. The melt was quenched at nominally atmospheric pressure. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and data reduction to obtain an estimate of the corrected heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool. A section of the report is devoted to calculations of the conduction-limited heat flux that accounts for heat losses to the crucible holding the corium. The remainder of the report describes post test examinations of the crust, which includes permeability and mechanical strength measurements, and chemical analysis.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turbulence Turbulence in Alcator C-Mod and Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions N.P.Basse, E.M.Edlund, C.L.Fiore, M.J.Greenwald, A.E.Hubbard, J.W.Hughes, J.H.Irby, G.J.Kramer 1 , L.Lin, Y.Lin, A.G.Lynn 2 , E.S.Marmar, D.R.Mikkelsen 1 , D.Mossessian, P.E.Phillips 2 , M.Porkolab, J.E.Rice, W.L.Rowan 2 , J.A.Snipes, J.L.Terry, S.M.Wolfe, S.J.Wukitch, K.Zhurovich, S.Zoletnik 3 and the C-Mod and W7-AS 4 Teams MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, USA 1 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, USA 2 University of Texas at Austin, Austin, USA 3 KFKI-RMKI, EURATOM Association, Budapest, Hungary 4 Max-Planck-Institut f¨ ur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald, Germany At certain values of the edge rotational transform, ι a = 1/q a , the confinement time of plasmas in the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator was found to

294

NPO Turboatom steam turbine design features and modifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since its foundation in 1934, the Kharkov Turbine Works, parent of Turboatom has developed, manufactured, adjusted and operated steam turbine plants for thermal and nuclear power stations. More than 300 steam turbines for thermal power stations with a total capacity over 100,000 MW have been manufactured. Steam turbines rated 25 to 500 MW for pressures of 2.9 to 23.5 MPa for stations operating on fossil fuel and turbines rated 30 to 1100 MW for nuclear power stations (NPS) have been produced. unique experience was gained during building and operation of the SKR-100 turbine rated 100 MW for initial steam conditions of 29.4 MPa, 650{sup o}C with steam cooling and minimum use of high-temperature materials. In addition to the turbine plants made for the power stations of the former USSR, Turboatom has manufactured 95 steam turbines for export. These are installed at 7 nuclear and 16 thermal power stations throughout the world, including Bulgaria, China, Cuba, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Korea and Rumania. Turboatom produces turbines operating at 25; 50 or 60 l/s speed of rotation.

Levchenko, E.V. [NPO Turboatom, Kharkov (Ukraine)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Acoustics of the hammered dulcimer, its history, and recent developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hammered dulcimers (e.g. santir psanterim psalterion) have been known in the Near East for about 5000 years. From the Near East the instrument traveled west to Europe and east to China and Korea. The most elaborate of dulcimers is the cimbalom developed in Hungary in the 19th century and used by Hungarian gypsies as a concert instrument. Brought from England to the New World in colonial times the hammered dulcimer became popular in New England the Appalachians the lumber camps of Maine and Michigan and the southern states. The hammered dulcimer an ancestor of the piano has changed significantly in the last 15 years. Since the instrument does not have mechanical dampers builders have attempted to reduce decay times by changing bridge caps slotting bridges reducing weight and stiffness and reducing soundboard impedance. Changes in string arrangements and soundboard bracing have resulted in stronger sound in the bass. Unlike a piano in which the hammers consistently strike the same position on the strings the hammered dulcimer player strikes the strings at varying distances from the bridge. During the brief contact time this creates a short string segment that drives the bridge at frequencies considerably higher than the string fundamental. Thus the attack characteristics and spectral frequencies are greatly influenced by the hardness of the hammer and the strike position.

David R. Peterson; Thomas D. Rossing; Gregory H. Canfield

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

(Environmental impact assessment as applied to policies, plans and programs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposal to study the application of the principles of environmental impact assessment (EIA) to policy, plans, and programs was submitted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Senior Advisors on Environmental and Water Problems of the United Nations Economic Commission. On approval, EPA asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support its efforts as lead participant on an international task force. ORNL is responsible for overall project management, including development of the report. At the first meeting in Geneva on June 18--19, there were representatives from Austria, Canada, Finland, Norway, Poland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The administrative/legal setting for EIA in each country was reviewed. The objectives of the task force were defined, and issues related to the application of EIA at the policy level were discussed. At the second meeting, in addition to those countries represented at the first meeting the Commission of Economic Communities, Czech and Slovak Federal Republic, Remark, Federal Republic of Germany, Hungary, and The Netherlands were represented. A brief review was given by the new participants of legal/administrative requirements for EIA in their countries. Case studies were presented by Canada, Finland, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United States.

Sigal, L.L.

1990-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

297

Surveillance data bases, analysis, and standardization program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traveler presented a paper at the Seventh ASTM-EURATOM Symposium on Reactor Dosimetry and co-chaired an oral session on Computer Codes and Methods. Papers of considerable interest to the NRC Surveillance Dosimetry Program involved statistically based adjustment procedures and uncertainties. The information exchange meetings with Czechoslovakia and Hungary were very enlightening. Lack of large computers have hindered their surveillance program. They depended very highly on information from their measurement programs which were somewhat limited because of the lack of sophisticated electronics. The Nuclear Research Institute at Rez had to rely on expensive mockups of power reactor configurations to test their fluence exposures. Computers, computer codes, and updated nuclear data would advance their technology rapidly, and they were not hesitant to admit this fact. Both eastern-bloc countries said that IBM is providing an IBM 3090 for educational purposes but research and development studies would have very limited access. They were very apologetic that their currencies were not convertible, and any exchange means that they could provide services or pay for US scientists in their respective countries, but funding for their scientists in the United States, or expenses that involved payment in dollars, must come from us.

Kam, F.B.K.

1990-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

ICSBEP Benchmarks For Nuclear Data Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) -- Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Serbia and Montenegro (formerly Yugoslavia), Kazakhstan, Spain, Israel, Brazil, Poland, and the Czech Republic are now participating. South Africa, India, China, and Germany are considering participation. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled ''International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.'' The 2004 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark specifications for 3331 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for use in validation efforts and for testing basic nuclear data. New to the 2004 Edition of the Handbook is a draft criticality alarm / shielding type benchmark that should be finalized in 2005 along with two other similar benchmarks. The Handbook is being used extensively for nuclear data testing and is expected to be a valuable resource for code and data validation and improvement efforts for decades to come. Specific benchmarks that are useful for testing structural materials such as iron, chromium, nickel, and manganese; beryllium; lead; thorium; and 238U are highlighted.

Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

299

Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses.One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions (i.e., radial directions) that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six side electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable,...

Drentje, A G; Uchida, T; Rcz, R; Biri, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Chapter 3 Strife and hope in the lives of a scientist couple  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter outlines strife and hope in the lives of a scientist coupleKate Brny and Michael Brny. Michael's professional career started with a considerable delay. He matriculated from high school in 1939 at the age of 18 with a summa cum laude degree but was not accepted by any Hungarian University as the Numerus Clausus law restricted the admittance of Jews. By the end of 1943, the course of World War II took a visible turn: the Soviet troops recaptured their own country and were chasing the Germans out of Poland. The situation for Jews changed immediately. Kate was born in a small Hungarian town, which had good schools, theaters, a museum, and a concert hall. Kate was 15 years old in the spring of 1944, when the Germans occupied Hungary. Despite the suffering, Kate and Michael sustained their hope and achieved much of what they pursued. They contributed to science through their efforts in the laboratory, the classroom, and the encouragement of Hungarian children.

Michael Brny; Kate Brny

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

IPIRG-2 task 1 - pipe system experiments with circumferential cracks in straight-pipe locations. Final report, September 1991--November 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from Task 1 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The IPIRG-2 program is an international group program managed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) and funded by a consortium of organizations from 15 nations including: Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Lithuania, Republic of China, Slovak Republic, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The objective of the program was to build on the results of the IPIRG-1 and other related programs by extending the state-of-the-art in pipe fracture technology through the development of data needed to verify engineering methods for assessing the integrity of nuclear power plant piping systems that contain defects. The IPIRG-2 program included five main tasks: Task 1 - Pipe System Experiments with Flaws in Straight Pipe and Welds Task 2 - Fracture of Flawed Fittings Task 3 - Cyclic and Dynamic Load Effects on Fracture Toughness Task 4 - Resolution of Issues From IPIRG-1 and Related Programs Task 5 - Information Exchange Seminars and Workshops, and Program Management. The scope of this report is to present the results from the experiments and analyses associated with Task 1 (Pipe System Experiments with Flaws in Straight Pipe and Welds). The rationale and objectives of this task are discussed after a brief review of experimental data which existed after the IPIRG-1 program.

Scott, P.; Olson, R.; Marschall, C.; Rudland, D. [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore South Africa Spain Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

303

Chapter 6 - Eastern Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the library and information systems of four Eastern European countries. In a survey described in the chapter, four libraries in Eastern Europe returned the questionnaires on the role of national libraries in national and international information systems: (1) Bulgaria, (2) the Czech Socialist Republic, (3) Hungary, and (4) Poland. The USSR was regularly present at the meetings of the Conference and made contributions to the discussions but did not return replies to the questionnaires. As in the case of the British Library, answers were given to the questions from personal experience. A study of the Soviet Library system appeared in 1972 under the title Libraries, Documentation and Bibliography in the USSR, which, despite its inadequacies, is the only survey in English of the Russian library and information system as a whole. The influence of the Lenin Library as a library planning center is very strong throughout Eastern Europe, while the Council of Mutual Economic Assistance has strongly influenced the structure and services in the field of scientific and technical information.

GEORGE CHANDLER

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

305

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Report Uranium Marketing Annual Report Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Australia 12,758 41.59 11,164 52.25 7,112 51.35 6,001 57.47 6,724 51.17 Brazil W W W W W W W W W W Canada 9,791 48.72 8,975 42.25 10,238 50.35 10,832 56.08 13,584 56.75 China 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- W W W W Czech Republic W W W W W W 0 -- 0 -- Germany 0 -- 0 -- W W 0 -- 0 -- Hungary 0 -- 0 -- W W 0 -- 0 -- Kazakhstan 3,818 60.61 4,985 43.41 6,830 47.81 9,728 53.71 6,234 51.69 Malawi 0 -- 0 -- W W 780 65.44 W W Namibia 3,880 54.79 5,732 47.30 4,913 47.90 6,199 56.74 5,986 54.56 Niger W W 2,001 47.55 587 49.00 1,744 54.38 2,133 50.45 Russia 12,080 27.64 7,938 37.98 10,544 50.28 10,199 56.57 7,643 54.40 South Africa 783 27.50 W W W W 1,524 53.62 1,243 56.45 Ukraine 0 -- 0 -- W W W W W W United Kingdom W W 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- Uzbekistan

306

Summary of the contractor information exchange meeting for improving the safety of Soviet-Designed Nuclear Power Plants, February 19, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a meeting held on February 19, 1997, in Washington, D.C. The meeting was held primarily to exchange information among the contractors involved in the U.S. Department of Energy`s efforts to improve the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Previous meetings have been held on December 5-6, 1995, and May 22, 1996. The meetings are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and coordinated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The U.S. Department of Energy works with countries to increase the level of safety at 63 Soviet-designed nuclear reactors operating in Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. The work is implemented largely by commercial companies and individuals who provide technologies and services to the countries with Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Attending the meeting were 71 representatives of commercial contractors, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, national laboratories, and other federal agencies. The presentations and discussions that occurred during the exchange are summarized in this report. While this report captures the general presentation and discussion points covered at the meeting, it is not a verbatim, inclusive record. To make the report useful, information presented at the meeting has been expanded to clarify issues, respond to attendees` requests, or place discussion points in a broader programmatic context. Appendixes A through F contain the meeting agenda, list of attendees, copies of presentation visuals and handouts, the Strategy Document discussed at the meeting, and a summary of attendees` post-meeting evaluation comments. As with past information exchanges, the participants found this meeting valuable and useful. In response to the participant`s requests, a fourth information exchange will be held later in 1997.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The marriage of car sharing and hydrogen economy: A possible solution to the main problems of urban living  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen economy is seeking its killer application, which can break down the chicken and egg problem, i.e., no hydrogen powered car can be sold if it cannot be refueled, and nobody will invest to a hydrogen refueling station if no one has a hydrogen powered vehicle. The applications like material handling, backup-power, and small stationary combined heat and power (CHP) engines are the most promising candidates, which may show financial return in 35 years. The replacement of fossil fuel with hydrogen in the automotive industry offers a substantial reduction of the harmful environmental effects, however, it is still the most challenging because of the absence of the hydrogen infrastructure, the price and the lifetime of the fuel cell (FC) engine and the unsuitable regulations, as well. In this work a new possible market was identified and analyzed in different points of view. This market segment is a car-sharing system operating with small urban vehicles, which not only can solve some environmental problems (e.g., air pollution and CO2 emission), but also helps to reduce congestion, secure energy supply and ease its distribution. First, a sensitivity analysis was done and the key performance indicators of the system were determined. The financial return of a hydrogen-based car-sharing system was examined carefully as a function of the rated power of the fuel cell power train, the way of hydrogen supply, the cost of the hydrogen and the size of the car fleet. Finally, a possible hydrogen-based car-sharing service was designed and optimized to the downtown of Budapest, Hungary. A sustainable system was proposed, which can satisfy the needs of the business (i.e., profitability) and the environment.

Akos Kriston; Tams Szab; Gyrgy Inzelt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

[Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal]: Task 7.1, Strategic planning. Topical report, February 1, 1994--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nations of East Central Europe regained their political and economic freedom in 1989, ending nearly a half century of centrally planned economies under the hegemony of the former Soviet Union (FSU). These nations are now emerging from economic conditions marked by price distortions and a focus on heavy industry, isolation from world markets, and a lack of occupational health and environmental safeguards. Economic recovery, environmental restoration, and political stability, as well as eventual entrance into the European Community (EC), require a reordering of policies and priorities, including those bearing on energy and the environment. This report, prepared as a background document for the Second International Conference on Energy and Environment to be held in Prague in November 1994, is composed of a summary table (Table 1) and supporting text and is intended to provide a concise review of issues related to energy and the environment for the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, Poland, and Bulgaria. Organized by subject and country, Table 1 contains country profiles (Row A), information on the economy (Row B), primary energy consumption, environmental priorities, energy resources, production, and utilization (Rows C, D, F, G, H, and I), electrical generation and transmission (Rows J and K), district heating (Row L), briquettes (Row M), and environmental regulations (Row N). Pertinent policy goals, issues, and trends are noted. The reports is based largely on a review of documents published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as selected sources obtained from the countries of the region. Reference citations are keyed to information presented in Table 1.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

310

Newsletter Signup Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

311

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1989-1990 1989-1990 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. In his April 2003 introduction to the 1989-1990 Digest, then Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV stated in part: "The year 1989-90 was a transitional period in international relations, as the world community continued to deal with implications of the end of the Cold War and the unsteady emergence of a new era. Many of the tensions and ambiguities of the time are reflected in the documents excerpted in this volume. For example, the Immigration Act of 1990 was adopted against the background of domestic U.S. concerns about terrorism, admission of refugees and exclusion of aliens-issues that continue to be important today. Other significant domestic law issues involved reservations to treaties (in this case, the 1948 Genocide Convention), the application of doctrines of foreign sovereign immunity (the Wallenberg Case), the interplay between sanctions and foreign assistance (e.g., Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the German Democratic Republic), and the allocation of foreign affairs authority in our federal system. "At the same time, the volume records U.S. efforts to deal effectively with the legal dimensions of very diverse issues on the international plane, including the Iraqi attack on the U.S.S. Stark, the downing of Iran Air Flight 655, the deployment of U.S. armed forces in Panama, maritime interdiction incidents, irregular rendition of criminal suspects, and the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe. Concerns about human rights, terrorism, and the war on drugs are indicated by the adoption of domestic legislation implementing, or relating to the implementation of, the UN Convention on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, the UN Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, the Montreal Protocol on Suppression of Unlawful Acts of Violence at Airports, and the IMO Convention on the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (negotiated in the aftermath of the Achille Lauro incident) and its related Protocol on Fixed Platforms. . . ."

312

The RERTR Program : a status report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress achieved by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program in collaboration with its many international partners since its inception in 1978. A brief summary of the results that the program had attained by the end of 1997 is followed by a detailed review of the major events, findings, and activities that took place in 1998. The past year was characterized by exceptionally important accomplishments and events for the RERTR program. Four additional shipments of spent fuel from foreign research reactors were accepted by the U.S. Altogether, 2,231 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors have been received by the U.S. under the acceptance policy. Fuel development activities began to yield solid results. Irradiations of the first two batches of microplates were completed. Preliminary postirradiation examinations of these microplates indicate excellent irradiation behavior of some of the fuel materials that were tested. These materials hold the promise of achieving the pro am goal of developing LEU research reactor fuels with uranium density in the 8-9 g /cm{sup 3} range. Progress was made in the Russian RERTR program, which aims to develop and demonstrate the technical means needed to convert Russian-supplied research reactors to LEU fuels. Feasibility studies for converting to LEU fuel four Russian-designed research reactors (IR-8 in Russia, Budapest research reactor in Hungary, MARIA in Poland, and WWR-SM in Uzbekistan) were completed. A new program activity began to study the feasibility of converting three Russian plutonium production reactors to the use of low-enriched U0{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel, so that they can continue to produce heat and electricity without producing significant amounts of plutonium. The study of an alternative LEU core for the FRM-II design has been extended to address, with favorable results, the transient performance of the core under hypothetical accident conditions. A major milestone was accomplished in the development of a process to produce molybdenum-99 from fission targets utilizing LEU instead of HEU. Targets containing LEU metal foils were irradiated in the RAS-GAS reactor at BATAN, Indonesia, and molybdenum-99 was successfully extracted through the ensuing process. These are exciting times for the program and for all those involved in it, and last year's successes augur well for the future. However, as in the past, the success of the RERTR program will depend on the international friendship and cooperation that have always been its trademark.

Travelli, A.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Spent Fuel Storage Operational Experience With Increased Crud Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant part of the electricity production in Hungary is provided by 4 units of VVER 440 nuclear reactors at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. Interim dry storage of the spent fuel assemblies that are generated during the operation of the reactors is provided in a Modular Vault Dry Storage (MVDS) facility that is located in the immediate vicinity of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. The storage capacity of the MVDS is being continuously extended in accordance with spent the fuel production rate from the four reactors. An accident occurred at unit 2 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant in 2003, when thirty irradiated fuel assemblies were damaged during a cleaning process. The fuel assemblies were not inside the reactor at the time of the accident, but in a separate tank within the adjacent fuel decay pool. As a result of this accident, contamination from the badly damaged fuel assemblies spread to the decay pool water and also became deposited onto the surface of (hermetic) spent fuel assemblies within the decay pool. Therefore, it was necessary to review the design basis of the MVDS and assess the effects of taking the surface contaminated spent fuel assemblies into dry storage. The contaminated hermetic assemblies were transferred from the unit 2 pool to the interim storage facility in the period between 2005 and 2007. Continuous inspection and measurement was carried out during the transfer of these fuel assemblies. On the basis of the design assessments and measurement of the results during the fuel transfer, it was shown that radiological activity values increased due to the consequences of the accident but that these levels did not compromise the release and radiation dose limits for the storage facility. The aim of this paper is to show the effect on the operation of the MVDS interim storage facility as a result of the increased activity values due to the accident that occurred in 2003, as well as to describe the measurements that were taken, and their results and experience gained. In summary: On the basis of the design assessments and measurement of the results during the fuel transfer operations, it was shown that radiological activity values increased due to the consequences of the 2003 accident but that these levels did not compromise the release and dose limits for the fuel storage facility. In the environment there was no measurable radioactivity as a result of the operation of the Paks ISFSI. The exposure of the surrounding population was calculated on measured releases and meteorological data. The calculations show negligible doses until 2004. Due to the increased surface contamination on the spent fuel assemblies the dose rate increased almost 5 times compared to the least annual value, but still less then 0.01 percent of the allowed dose restriction. (authors)

Barnabas, I. [Public Agency for Radioactive Waste, Management (PURAM) (Hungary); Eigner, T. [Paks NPP (Hungary); Gresits, I. [Technical University of Budapest (Hungary); Ordagh, M. [SOM System Llc, (Hungary)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Evolutionary history of Ichthyosaura alpestris (Caudata, Salamandridae) inferred from the combined analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial markers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Widespread species with morphologically and ecologically differentiated populations are key to understand speciation because they allow investigating the different stages of the continuous process of population divergence. The alpine newt, Ichthyosaura alpestris, with a range that covers a large part of Central Europe as well as isolated regions in all three European Mediterranean peninsulas, and with strong ecological and life-history differences among populations, is an excellent system for such studies. We sampled individuals across most of the range of the species, and analyzed mitochondrial (1442bp) and nuclear (two nuclear genes -1554bp- and 35 allozyme loci) markers to produce a time-calibrated phylogeny and reconstruct the historical biogeography of the species. Phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA data produced a fully resolved topology, with an endemic, Balkan clade (Vlasina) which is sister to a clade comprising an eastern and a western group. Within the former, one clade (subspecies I. a. veluchiensis) is sister to a clade containing subspecies I. a. montenegrina and I. a. serdara as well as samples from southern Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia and Bulgaria (subspecies I. a. reiseri and part of I. a. alpestris). Within the western group, populations from the Italian peninsula (subspecies I. a. apuana and I. a. inexpectata) are sister to a clade containing samples from the Iberian Peninsula (subspecies I. a. cyreni) and the remainder of the samples from subspecies I. a. alpestris (populations from Hungary, Austria, Poland, France, Germany and the larger part of Romania). Results of ?BEAST analyses on a combined mtDNA and nDNA dataset consistently recovered with high statistical support four lineages with unresolved inter-relationships: (1) subspecies I. a. veluchiensis; (2) subspecies I. a. apuana+I. a. inexpectata; (3) subspecies I. a. cyreni+part of subspecies I. a. alpestris (the westernmost populations, plus most Romanian populations); and (4) the remaining populations, including subspecies I. a. serdara, I. a. reiseri and I. a. montenegrina and part of subspecies I. a. alpestris, plus samples from Vlasina. Our time estimates are consistent with ages based on the fossil record and suggest a widespread distribution for the I. alpestris ancestor, with the split of the major eastern and western lineages during the Miocene, in the Tortonian. Our study provides a solid, comprehensive background on the evolutionary history of the species based on the most complete combined (mtDNA+nDNA+allozymes) dataset to date. The combination of the historical perspective provided by coalescent-based analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA variation with individual-based multilocus assignment methods based on multiple nuclear markers (allozymes) also allowed identification of instances of discordance across markers that highlight the complexity and dynamism of past and ongoing evolutionary processes in the species.

Ernesto Recuero; David Buckley; Mario Garca-Pars; Jan W. Arntzen; Dan Cog?lniceanu; Iigo Martnez-Solano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Critical Review of the System of Radiation Protection. First  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Nuclear Energy Agency's (NEA's) Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has a wide remit to consider, offer informed expert views, and develop ideas on topical issues in radiation protection. In 1999 the CRPPH set up a working group to examine Roger Clarke's initiative on `controllable dose', and on the use of collective dose. Some CRPPH members had expressed concern over the use of collective doses when integrated over long time periods and very large populations. Antonio Susanna of ANPA chaired the group; Tony Bandle and I attended from the UK and there were other members from Ireland, France, USA, Canada, Hungary, Finland, Germany Switzerland, Japan and the OECD. This report sets out the outcome of the deliberations of the group and the CRPPH on how the current system of radiation protection could be improved. Ted Lazo of the CRPPH secretariat presented its main findings at the IRPA meeting in May 2000. Eight areas for improvement were identified, i.e. coherence and clarity, justification, optimisation, collective dose, dose limits, triviality, public protection and protection of the environment. The report discusses each of these areas, and points out difficulties in practical application of the topics and deficiencies which need to be addressed. Some of the major points in the document are as follows. The complexity of radiation protection terminology and lack of simple definitions has contributed to poor communication of key messages and a decline in decision-maker confidence. An internationally agreed glossary of terms would help to address this problem. The concept of dose constraint is not used consistently, and (although a good report by NEA and the EC was published in 1996) it is not widely understood. The scope of a `practice' has caused confusion, particularly when considered with the principle of Justification. The report comments that this broad-based principle of Justification is of little practical use in operational radiation protection. The CRPPH refers to justification with a small `j', meaning the choice of actions on a case by case basis, in relation to medical diagnosis or treatments or in deciding whether a particular activity should be allowed. These decisions on questions of (small `j') justification are much more useful and increasingly important to practitioners and stakeholders. The document recognises that optimisation of protection in some situations is difficult and practical guidance would help, for example in dealing with remediation of contaminated sites, and where risks are transferred from one population to another (e.g. workers to the public, or vice versa). Collective dose is the subject of much debate; the concept has been misused, particularly for public exposures, where there can be considerable uncertainties in the assessments. Using the approach of LNT (linear-no-threshold), large collective doses (sometimes aggregated from very small individual doses to large populations and perhaps summed over many years) can be translated into a number of predicted excess fatalities, without any qualification about the associated uncertainties. On the other hand, collective dose is a useful tool in the comparative sense, particularly when selecting options for controlling occupational exposures. It can inhibit the unreasonable use of dose sharing and aids in following trends in operations such as steam generator replacement. Clear operational guidance for the valid application of collective dose is important. On dose limits, the report comments that ICRP's selection of limits is based on scientific considerations, when the choice of the boundary between the acceptable and unacceptable is a societal judgement. Greater transparency is needed on the selection of limits and on for example the rationale for the different worker and public dose limits. Presentation of the concept of triviality, and similarly ` de minimis' and `below regulatory concern' has been, at best, of limited success and more often has met with significant opposition. Where experts and regulators may

Joe McHugh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

105(scaled land 215%)7-22-05  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

G G U Y A N A S U R I N A M F R E N C H G U I A N A E S T O N IA L A T V I A L I T H . S L O V E N I A C R O A T I A S E R B - M O N T A L B A N I A T O G O B E N I N B O S N I A - H E R Z E G O V I N A G H A N A A U S T R I A B E L G I U M A F G H A N I S T A N U Z B E K I S T A N T U R K M E N I S T A N N E P A L L U X S W I T Z I T A L Y A N D O R R A MACEDON INTERNATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND COOPERATION National Nuclear Security Administration G R E E N L A N D I C E L A N D S W E D E N F I N L A N D R U S S I A N O R W A Y D E N M A R K U N I T E D C A N A D A K I N G D O M N E T H B E L A R U S P O L A N D G E R M A N Y I R E L A N D C Z E C H U K R A I N E SLOVAKIA K A Z A K H S T A N M F R A N C E HUNGARY M O L D O V A O N G O L I A R O M A N I A B U L G A R I A G E O R G I A KYRGYZSTAN IA A Z E R B A I J A N A R M E N I A P O R T U G A L N O R T H S P A I N U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A K O R E A T U R K E Y T A J I K I S T A N G R E E C E J A P A N S Y R I A S O U T H K O R E A T U N I S I A C Y P R U S C H I N A M O R O C C O L E B A N O N I R A Q I R A N I S R A E L J O R D A