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1

mace-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar Data G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State...

2

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

3

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

4

Hungary: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hungary: Energy Resources Hungary: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47,"lon":20,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Secretary Bodman Meets with Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary Secretary Bodman Meets with Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary March 17, 2006 - 3:44pm Addthis Emphasizes U.S. Support for Central European Energy Security BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today participated in a regional energy meeting with ministers from Hungary, Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Austria, Croatia and Romania. During the meeting, Secretary Bodman and the ministers discussed the importance of advancing sufficient, affordable, clean and reliable energy supplies to sustain global economic growth, accommodate heightened demand, and promote regional energy security. Traveling to Budapest from Moscow where he participated in the G8 Energy Ministerial, Secretary Bodman reaffirmed the G8 priorities

6

Petroleum geochemistry of the Zala basin, Hungary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Zala basin is a subbasin within the Pannonian basis on Hungary. Oil and smaller amounts of gas are produced from Upper Triassic through Miocene reservoirs. Our geochemical study of oils and rocks in the basin indicate that two, and possibly three, genetic oil types are present in the basin. Miocene source rocks, previously believed by explorationists to be the predominant source rock, have expelled minor amounts of hydrocarbons. The main source rock is the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian) Koessen Marl Formation or its stratigraphic equivalent. Oils derived from the Triassic source rock are recognizable by their isotopic and biological marker composition, and high content of metals. In other areas of Europe, Upper Triassic source rocks have been correlated with large oil accumulations (e.g., Molassa and Villafortuna fields, Po basin, and other fields in Italy) or are postulated to be good potential source rocks (e.g., Bristol channel Trough). Knowledge of the geochemical characteristics of oils derived from these Upper Triassic source rocks and understanding of the source rock distribution and maturation history are important for recognizing Triassic oil-source bed relationships and for further exploration in other basins in Hungary and other parts of Europe where Triassic source rocks are present.

Clayton, J.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Koncz, I. (Hungarian Oil and Gas Corp., Nagykanizsa (Hungary))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy) Place Ipoly u 1/A, Hungary Zip H-6000 Sector Solar Product Owns an empty factory in Hungary, which it plans to use to make heat pumps and assemble solar panels. References H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy) is a company located in Ipoly u 1/A, Hungary . References ↑ "[ H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy)]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=H2_Hydrogen_Hungary_Ltd_aka_Integral_Energy&oldid=346329

8

Emobility (Smart Grid Project) (Budapest, Hungary) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Budapest, Hungary) Budapest, Hungary) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Emobility Country Hungary Headquarters Location Budapest, Hungary Coordinates 47.498405°, 19.040758° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.498405,"lon":19.040758,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary DOE removes all remaining HEU...

10

EUDEEP (Smart Grid Project) (Hungary) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EUDEEP (Smart Grid Project) (Hungary) EUDEEP (Smart Grid Project) (Hungary) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EUDEEP Country Hungary Coordinates 47.162495°, 19.503304° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.162495,"lon":19.503304,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Agency/Company /Organization European Climate Foundation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Building Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://3csep.ceu.hu/sites/defa Country Hungary UN Region Eastern Europe References Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme[1] Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Screenshot "The goal of the present research was to gauge the net employment impacts of a largescale deep building energy-efficiency renovation programme in

12

An Energy Overview of the Republic of Hungary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is maintaining a web site that is meant to provide useful business- and energy-related information about countries and regions of the world for exporters, project developers, and researchers. The site consists of more than 130 country pages (organized into seven different world regions), with each country page having its own set of links to information sources about that country. There are also more than 30 Country Energy Overviews at the web site -- each of these is a comprehensive review of a specific country's entire energy situation, including sections on Energy Policy, Oil, Natural Gas, Coal, Hydroelectric/Renewables, Nuclear Power, Energy Transmission Infrastructure, Electricity, Electric Industry Overview, Environmental Activities, Privatization, Trade, and Economic Situation. The specific country highlighted in this Country Energy Overview is Hungary. The site is designed to be dynamic. Updates to the overviews will be made as need and resources permit.

anon.

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Atmospheric CO2> Record from In Situ Measurements at K-Puszta, Hungary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K-Puszta, Hungary K-Puszta, Hungary Atmospheric CO2 Record from In Situ Measurements at K-Puszta, Hungary graphics Graphics data Data Investigator László Haszpra Hungarian Meteorological Service, Institute for Atmospheric Physics, Department for Analysis of Atmospheric Environment, H-1675, P.O. Box 39, Budapest, Hungary Period of Record 1981-1997 Location The K-puszta regional background air pollution monitoring station was established in a clearing in a mixed forest on the Hungarian Great Plain in the middle of the Carpathian Basin. K-puszta is as free from direct pollution as possible in the highly industrialized, densely populated central Europe. Because of the growing vegetation, the station was moved in September 1993 to a larger clearing, also at the same elevation,

14

Hungary-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hungary-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) Hungary-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Hungary-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Ministry of Energy, Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Industry Sector Climate, Energy, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Goods and Materials, Industry, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations

15

Trends in Educational Assortative Mating in Post-Socialist Central Europe: Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, and Hungary Between 1988 and 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unemployment in Hungary and Poland. Employment and Training.Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, and Hungary Between 1988L I C , S L O V A K I A , POLAND, AND H U N G A R Y B E T W

Katrnak, Tomas; Kreidl, M; Fonadova, Laura

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Study of the oxidation state of arsenic and uranium in individual particles from uranium mine tailings, Hungary  

SciTech Connect

Uranium ore mining and milling have been terminated in the Mecsek Mountains (southwest Hungary) in 1997. Mine tailings ponds are located between two important water bases, which are resources of the drinking water of the city of Pecs and the neighbouring villages. The average U concentration of the tailings material is 71.73 {mu}g/g, but it is inhomogeneous. Some microscopic particles contain orders of magnitude more U than the rest of the tailings material. Other potentially toxic elements are As and Pb of which chemical state is important to estimate mobility, because in mobile form they can risk the water basis and the public health. Individual U-rich particles were selected with solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) and after localisation the particles were investigated by synchrotron radiation based microanalytical techniques. The distribution of elements over the particles was studied by micro beam X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) and the oxidation state of uranium and arsenic was determined by micro X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) spectroscopy. Some of the measured U-rich particles were chosen for studying the heterogeneity with {mu}-XRF tomography. Arsenic was present mainly in As(V) and uranium in U(VI) form in the original uranium ore particles, but in the mine tailings samples uranium was present mainly in the less mobile U(IV) form. Correlation was found between the oxidation state of As and U in the same analyzed particles. These results suggest that dissolution of uranium is not expected in short term period. (authors)

Alsecz, A.; Osan, J.; Palfalvi, J.; Torok, Sz. [Hungarian Academy of Science, KFKI, Atomic Energy Research Institute, P. O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Sajo, I. [Chemical Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, H-1025 Budapest (Hungary); Mathe, Z. [Mecsek Ore Environment, H-7614 Pecs, P.O. Box 121 (Hungary); Simon, R. [Forschungsgruppe Synchrotronstrahlung, Research Centre, D-76021 Karlshruhe (Germany); Falkenberg, G. [Hamburger Synchrotronstralungslabor (HASYLAB) at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

between The Department of Energy of the United States of America and The Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary for Information Exchange Relating to Operation of Modular Vault Systems for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel 1. Participants The United States Department of Energy (DOE), a Participant to this Memorandum of Understanding (Memorandum), is the agency responsible for the management of radioactive wastes produced by or in the possession of tla U.S. Government (&mmercial reactor nuclear waste excluded) within the United Stztes, including spent nuclear fuel (SNF). DOE is the owner, operator, and licensee of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) MVDS and the Hanford Canister Storage Building (CSB). DOE's Idaho Operations Office (DOE-

18

Above- and below-ground Litter Manipulation: Effect on Retention and Release of DOC, DON and DIN in the Sikfokut Forest, Hungary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The above- and below-ground litter from fallen foliage and root exudates and their decomposition has an impact on forest soil. The objective of this research project was to determine the effect of above- and below-ground litter manipulation on the retention and release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), nitrate and ammonium in the soil profile at 0-5 and 5-15 cm depths. The soils were obtained from a Long Term Ecological Research site in the Sikfokut Forest in Hungary. The site is a mature oak forest and the soil has no organic layer; the leaf litter sits directly on the A horizon. There are six treatments applied to the soil: doubling of annual leaf litter (DL), doubling of annual wood litter (DW), removal of annual leaf litter (NL), removal of roots (NR), removal of leaf and roots (NI) and control (C). Each plot is 7 x 7 m, and each soil sample taken was 15 x 15 cm square. A stock solution of leaf litter was added in different concentrations to soils from each treatment in a 50 mL centrifuge tube. Because I was investigating retention or release of carbon and nitrogen, I inverted the tube gently over a period of 2 hours prior to centrifugation and removal of supernatant. The supernatant solution was analyzed for DOC, DON, ammonium and nitrate to determine retention and release values for each dependant upon the different treatments. The results of the study were interesting. Dissolved organic nitrogen was neither retained nor released in the 0-5 cm layer for any treatment yet nitrate, typically considered a mobile anion showed retention and release in this layer. In the 5-15 cm layer we had no retention or release of nitrate but dissolved organic nitrogen was retained and released between the solid and solution phases.

Evetts, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Jacqueline A.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hungary HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs...

20

The weight of an assassin's mace : vulnerabilities in the US military's satellite communications and China's information warfare threat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Believing that an information Revolution of Military Affairs has occurred, the US military is currently transforming to achieve dominance over the full spectrum of deployment scenarios with a lighter, more mobile, and more ...

Brooks, Benjamin M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nitrous oxide (N?O) isotopic composition in the troposphere : instrumentation, observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and regional modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide (N?O) is a significant greenhouse gas and main contributor to stratospheric ozone destruction. Surface measurements of N?O mole fractions have been used to attribute source and sink strengths, but large ...

Potter, Katherine Ellison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hungary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... , 31.0404 , 31.8950 , 31.8372 , 32.8834 , 33.9977 , 34.9232 , 35.3481 , 36.1492 , 37.1806 , 37.8558 , 37.9328 , 35.9958 , 36 ...

23

Timelapse of Hungary HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs...

24

Hungary HEU Removal Loading Ops | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs...

25

Hungary HEU Removal Airport Ops | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs...

26

Conditionality and Adjustment in Socialist Eonomies: Hungary and Yugoslavia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$517. & million one-year standby agreement $436 m i ll i o n one-year standby agreement Yugoslavia June, 1 1 Q E$141 m i l l i o n two-year standby agreement 31,960 m i l l

Tyson, Laura

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Suffer a Scratch to Avoid a Blow? Why Post-communist Parties in Eastern Europe Introduce Lustration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by XX in Hungary and Poland with the following politicians:inaction in Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, and in two Romanianmost important politicians in Poland, Hungary, and the Czech

Kaminski, Marek M.; Nalepa, Monika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Climate Foundation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Building Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource...

29

Industry sector analysis - energy industry news (Hungary) 1994. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article is derived from a telegraphic report dated 1 February 1994, prepared at the American Embassy-Budapest. It discusses recent developments from the Hungarian energy industry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Industry sector analysis - energy industry news (Hungary) 1994. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article is derived from a telegraphic report dated 18 April 1994, prepared at the American Embassy-Budapest. It discusses recent developments from the Hungarian energy industry.

Not Available

1994-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

31

The macroeconomic effect of the information and communication technology in Hungary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was not until the beginning of the 1990s that the effects of information and communication technology on economic growth as well as on the profitability of enterprises raised the interest of researchers. After giving a general description on the relationship between a more intense use of ICT devices and dynamic economic growth, the author identified and explained those four channels that had a robust influence on economic growth and productivity. When comparing the use of information technonology devices in developed as well as in developing countries, the author highlighted the importance of the available additional human capital and the elimination of organizational inflexibilities in the attempt of narrowing the productivity gap between the developed and developing nations. By processing a large quantitiy of information gained from Hungarian enterprises operating in several economic sectors, the author made an attempt to find a strong correlation between the development level of using ICT devices and pr...

Sasvari, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 COVERING ISRAEL, THE MIDDLE EAST & THE JEWISH WORLD Ethiopian kids `not at our school!' Hungary's martyred poet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of humankind, including the human genome project, the Manhattan project and even the moon landing. But Israeli of an international, multi-billion dollar project to map out the full circuitry of the human brain and its Neuroscience, dreams that the scope and intensity of the project will rival the greatest scientific endeavors

Segev, Idan

33

Budasolar Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Budapest, Hungary Zip H - 1121 Sector Solar Product BudaSolar is a developer of thin film technologies and manufacturing equipment headquartered in Budapest, Hungary....

34

NET FISCAL STIMULUS DURING THE GREAT RECESSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland* Ireland Italyfiscal stimuli. These were Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Poland,Spain Finland France U.K. Greece Hungary Ireland Iceland

Aizenman, Joshua; Pasricha, Gurnain Kaur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Immigration Control in the Age of Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finland France ix Germany Greece Hungary Ireland ItalyFinland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy,There Country U.S. UK Greece Spain Germany Italy France

Wong, Tak Kei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Risk Sharing, Financial integration, and "Mundell II" in the Enlarged European Union  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

those of Estonia, Hungary, Poland, and Slovenia. However,Hungary Latvia Lithuania Poland Slovakia Slovenia AustriaAlso, Slovenia and, in part, Poland show a relatively large

Boewer Bwer, Uwe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Education Delayed or Education Denied? Evidence on the Historically Variable Role of Delayed Educational Careers in Former Communist Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inequality in Post-War Poland. Pp. 303- 335 in: PersistentCzech republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia between 1948-Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Slovakia (see

Kreidl, M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Types of Cabinet Durability in Central Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

era (Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, Romania), while the othersinto these categories: In Poland, the first free electionHungary Latvia Lithuania Poland Romania Slovakia Slovenia

Mueller-Rommel, Ferdinand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements at the DOE ARM NSA Site Dong, X. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The Arctic plays...

40

Kato-S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampton University Hampton, Virginia G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbulence Properties Derived from MMCR Doppler Moments Mace, G. G., University of Utah Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting We are developing an...

42

dong(2)-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Center Hampton, Virginia G. G. Mace Meteorology Department University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State...

43

Evaluation of cirrus statistics produced by general circulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produced by general circulation models using ARM data Hartsock, Daniel University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Category: Modeling Our...

44

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors Vernon, E.N. and Mace, G.G., Department of Meteorology, Unviversity of Utah Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The extensive...

45

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Millimeter Radar and Microwave Radiometer Data Dong, X. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A new algorithm...

46

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Mask Products (MOD35) with MMCR Data Zhang, Q. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The...

47

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cases Sampled During the 2000 Cloud IOP Sonntag, K. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Quantities...

48

Tropical anvil cirrus evolution from observations and numerical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cirrus evolution from observations and numerical simulations Deng, Min University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Modeling The tropical anvil cirrus formation...

49

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cirrus Cloud Property Retrieval Algorithms Mace, G.G. and Zhang, Y., University of Utah Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The problem of...

50

Interactive Uses of the NSDL: .Atmospheric Visualization Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T. R. Gobble, H. M. Anthony, and D. Johnson Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois K. Andrew Eastern Illinois University Charleston, Illinois G. G. Mace University of...

51

Lessons Learned: Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boulder County Local Energy Alliance Program (LEAP) Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) New York State Energy Research & Development Authority...

52

2008 Technology Transfer Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conductivity than pure copper. Sensor Development and Advanced Concepts for Oil Shale Recovery Jonathan L. Mace (DE-6) Develop new methods that are based on combinations...

53

BioMed Central Research article DArT markers: diversity analyses and mapping in Sorghum bicolor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Mace et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Bmc Genomics; Emma S Mace; Ling Xia; David R Jordan; Kirsten Halloran; Dipal K Parh; Eric Huttner; Peter Wenzl; Andrzej Kilian; Peter Wenzl; Andrzej Kilian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Maureen Dunn | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cruises at sea and in research expeditions through rainforests of the Amazonas, Venezuela and Costa Rica Selected Publications Huang, D., Zhao, C., Dunn, M., Dong, X., Mace,...

55

Microsoft Word - H2_calibration_2013_v01.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry (MPI-BGC) in Jena, Germany (Jordan and Steinberg, 2011). * For Mace Head, a preliminary link to this MPI scale was...

56

Phylogeny and species delimitation in the genus Coprinellus with special emphasis on the haired species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 2009, L. Nagy and M. Jeppson, NL-0872 (HOLOTYPE, BP). Additional specimens examined. HUNGARY, Alfo

Hibbett, David S.

57

The Washington State Model: e as go S ae ode Five Years of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Netherlands, Russia, Thailand, Portugal, Belgium, Poland, Italy, Indonesia, Singapore, Sweden, Mexico, New Zealand, Czech Republic, Hungary, ...

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

System description: IVY  

SciTech Connect

IVY is a verified theorem prover for first-order logic with equality. It is coded in ACL2, and it makes calls to the theorem prover Otter to search for proofs and to the program MACE to search for countermodels. Verifications of Otter and MACE are not practical because they are coded in C. Instead, Otter and MACE give detailed proofs and models that are checked by verified ACL2 programs. In addition, the initial conversion to clause form is done by verified ACL2 code. The verification is done with respect to finite interpretations.

McCune, W.; Shumsky, O.

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

59

International Energy Statistics - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices ; Heat Content; Country; Country: Tip: Hold 'Ctrl' to select ... Greece 676 747 328 719 595 Hungary ...

60

Major Sponsors International Motorcycle Exhibition Milan,Italy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands,...

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61

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Country -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hungary A Tool Applications Free Recently Updated AVReporter Energy management, energy monitoring, reducing CO2, increase energy efficency, ISO50001...

62

Project 2012: Increasing Female Representation in Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hungary Croatia Bosnia and Herzegovina Rep. of MoldovaBelize (Senate) Bosnia and Herzegovina (House of Peoples)

McLean, Lindsey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Table 3d. World Liquid Fuels Consumption (million barrels per day ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, ... Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2013

64

Contribution of Renewables to World Energy Supply (1971 - 2008...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland Portugal, Slovak...

65

Foreign Nationals - Clean Cities Transportation Workshop for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Ireland, Iceland, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg, Malaysia,...

66

Ukraine - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The remainder of the electric power is generated with conventional ... Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Moldova ... Installed Capacity ...

67

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the ...

68

KEYNOTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... POLAND Page 2. Page 3. ... Poland and Hungary - largest consumers among the CITs * the Russian Federation - the only producer. ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface and TOA Cloud Forcings Computed Using Several Cirrus Cloud Property Retrievals Surface and TOA Cloud Forcings Computed Using Several Cirrus Cloud Property Retrievals Chris Schwartz 1 , Jay Mace 1 , Roger Marchand 2 , Sally M c Farlane 2 , Matt Shupe 3 , Sergey Matrosov 3 , Min Deng 1 , Yuying Zhang 1 1. University of Utah, 2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3. University of Colorado Satellite-derived fluxes provided by Pat Minnis and Surface Radiation Analysis provided by Chuck Long Source Description Name Used in Plots G. Mace VZ, extinction constrained by Raman lidar Mace Bimodal Mace et al, 2006 Combination of retrieval algorithms, parameterizations, and empirical equations Ciret4 Yuying Zhang Retrieval based on reflectivity and radiance Zhang ZR Roger Marchand Retrievals base on reflectivity and Doppler velocity, parameterized for several different ice

70

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mining the ARM Data Set: A WWW-Staged Prototype Relational Database of ARM Data Mace, G.G. and Hudach, D.P., University of Utah Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)...

71

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Large-Scale Meteorology Benson, S., Mace, G.G., and Vernon, E.N., University of Utah Cirrus cloud properties are influenced by the large-scale meteorology in which they...

72

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Display Sassen, K., and Mace, G.G., Department of Meteorology, University of Utah; Arnott, W.P., and Hallett, J., Desert Research Institute; Liou, K.N., and Takano, Y.,...

73

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Layer Thickness and Temperature Vernon, E.N.(a) and Mace, G.G.(b), University of Utah (a), University of Utah (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science...

74

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MOD06 Cloud Products and the ARM SGP Zhang, Y.(a) and Mace, G.G.(b), University of Utah (a), University of Utah (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science...

75

A TWP-ICE High-Level Cloud Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A TWP-ICE High-Level Cloud Case Study Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Field Campaigns The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP ICE) was conducted near...

76

lazarus-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the ARM CART Site S. M. Lazarus, S. K. Krueger, and G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement (ARM) Pro-...

77

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Experiment (WB57 MidCiX) Mace, G.G.(a) and Heymsfield, A.J.(b), University of Utah (a), National Center for Atmospheric Research (b) Cloud property retrieval algorithms,...

78

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A WWW-Staged Prototype ARM Database Utility Mace, G.G. and Hudach, D., University of Utah Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Counting from when...

79

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing of Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds: Application to Climate Research Liou, K.N. (a), Ou, S.C. (a), Rolland, P. (a), Gu, Y. (a), Mace, G.G. (b), and...

80

Microsoft PowerPoint - McFarquhar_2007.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Ice Crystals during TWP-ICE Greg M. McFarquhar 1 , Junshik Um 1 , Matt Freer 1 , Darrel Baumgardner 2 , Gregory L. Kok 3 and Gerald G. Mace 4 1 Department of Atmospheric...

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81

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans to small and mid-sized businesses, non-profits, schools and municipalities to improve energy efficiency through its...

82

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- How$martKY On Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC, Fleming-Mason RECC, Grayson RECC, and Jackson Energy) work with MACED to provide energy retrofits as part of utility service...

83

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June, 2012 1. The original ADS GCMS instruments at Mace Head and Cape Grim were retired in December 2004, and replced by new generation of improved GC-MS system. The new GC-MS...

84

X:\\ARM_19~1\\P185-192.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Micropulse lidar cloud base frequency. A One-Year Cloud Climatology Using Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site Micropulse Lidar G. G. Mace and T. P. Ackerman Penn State...

85

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Parameters Using AVHRR and MODIS Data Coupled With Radar and Lidar Measurements Ou, S.C.(a), Liou, K.N.(a), Takano, Y.(a), Mace, G.G.(b), Sassen, K.(b),...

86

Original Paper Complementary analysis of historical glass by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For this purpose acetone of analytical grade (Sigma-Aldrich Chemie. GmbH, Hungary; www.sigmaladrich.com) was used. For LA ICP. MS measurements blocks...

87

International Energy Statistics - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices ; Heat Content; Country; Country: Tip: Hold 'Ctrl' to ... Greece 18.536 21.282 21.120 21.260 20.151 Hungary ...

88

Microsoft Word - DOE_PPPL_M119_Section I.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Liechtenstein,...

89

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

members, Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, China, France, Ghana, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russia, Slovenia and...

90

Secretary Bodman and Rosatom Director Kiriyenko Meet to Discuss...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to nuclear power, including: Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Ghana, Hungary, Italy, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Republic of Korea, Romania, Senegal, Slovenia, and...

91

Agenda item 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REPORT OF THE 16TH MEETING OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS WORKING IN THE FIELD OF METHODS OF ANALYSIS AND SAMPLING (INTER-AGENCY MEETING) Budapest, Hungary 5

92

Nobel Prize in Physics 1905  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 "for his work on cathode rays" Philipp Eduard Anton von Lenard Button Germany Button born 1862 (Pozsony (Pressburg), Hungary), died 1947 Button Kiel University, Kiel, Germany...

93

Energy Analysis and renovation proposal for a library in the University of Debrecen.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work assess an Energy Certificate for a library located in the University of Debrecen. The certification has been carried out in Hungary with national (more)

Pavarin, Lorenzo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

U.S. Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway...

95

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Inaugural Steering Group Meeting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ghana, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russia, Slovenia and Ukraine and three international organizations as...

96

Livermore scientist, engineers train to be inspectors for test...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Treaty Organization (CTBTO). Training has been held in Austria, Jordan, South Korea and Hungary. Of the five U.S. surrogate inspectors selected for the international...

97

IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Japan Korea (Republic of) Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak...

98

International Services, Human Resources, Brookhaven National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Japan Korea, Republic of Latvia Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Monaco Netherlands New...

99

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from six countries in addition to the United States: Germany, Hungary, Japan, South Korea, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Priorities given for the six countries are opinions of...

100

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greece 351.0 Hungary 143.2 Iceland 21.2 Ireland 143.2 Italy 1,493.8 Luxembourg 61.4 Macedonia 19 ...

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101

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Development - Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland,...

102

Globalization and taste convergence: The cases of wine and beer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazil, Chile, France, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, Mexico,France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg,Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland,

Aizenman, Joshua; Brooks, Eileen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greece 91.298 Hungary 49.563 Iceland 3.809 Ireland 36.568 Italy 400.939 Luxembourg 11.869 Macedonia ...

104

The power of the family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the exception of Greece) are among the countries withFrance, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Iceland,Poland Indonesia Philippines Greece England Ukraine Spain

Alesina, Alberto; Giuliano, Paola

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Press Pass - Press Release - LHC First Beam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden,...

106

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Belgium, Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands,...

107

Special Terms and Conditions for Use in most Grants and Cooperative...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Taipei (Taiwan), Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea (Republic of),...

108

arXiv.org - What was New on the arXiv.org (xxx) e-print archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.be (belgium), .dk (denmark), .fi (finland), .fr (france), .de (germany), .gr (greece), .hu (hungary), .ie (ireland), .it (italy), .nl (netherlands), .no (norway), .pl...

109

Addendum: Representations and Certifications  

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Bulgaria, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea (Republic of),...

110

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power 13/ Discrepancy 14/ ... year some of the PV units installed earlier will be ... Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland ...

111

Register as a New User  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Holland, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland Northern, Ireland Republic of, Israel, Italy...

112

Registration Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Holland, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland Northern, Ireland Republic of, Israel, Italy...

113

Export.gov - Trade Leads  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea...

114

Export.gov - Trade Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea...

115

Export.gov - World Wide Offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argentina Hong Kong Poland Australia Hungary Portugal Austria India Qatar Belgium Indonesia Romania Brazil Iraq Russia Bulgaria Ireland Saudi Arabia Canada Israel Serbia Chile...

116

Export.gov - exp_contact_specialist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hungary Budapest India Ahmedabad Bangalore Chennai Hyderabad Kolkata Mumbai New Delhi Indonesia Jakarta Iraq Baghdad Ireland Dublin Israel Jerusalem Tel Aviv Italy Milan Rome Japan...

117

Exchange Market Pressure and Absorption by International Reserves: Emerging Markets and Fear of Reserve Loss During the 2008-09 Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the exception of Venezuela, all the emerging marketsrespectively), followed by Venezuela, Morocco, India andThailand, Turkey and Venezuela. We exclude Hungary because

Aizenman, Joshua; Hutchison, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a number of countries (Bulgaria, Hungary, the Czech and Slovak republics, and Poland) of the new Europe. Read more Safety Tip West Nile Virus Update Mosquito trap Several...

119

The Collective Action Problems of Political Consolidation: Evidence from Poland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consolidation: Evidence from Poland 1 Marek M. Kaminskiproliferation of parties. In Poland, the effective number ofHungary (Lomax 1994), Poland (Kaminski 2001), Russia (

Kaminski, Marek

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Carbon Emissions in the EE/FSU: IEO99 vs. IEO98  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Bulgaria and Romania are using 1989 as a base year; Poland is using 1988; and Hungary is using the average emissions for the years 1985 to 1987.

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121

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, North Korea, South Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia...

122

Ask a Scientist!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, South Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon...

123

Annex B Countries List  

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Annex B Countries Australia Austria Belgium Bulgaria Canada Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France (including Monaco) Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy...

124

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Abstract- A Pliocene oil shale (Pula, Hungary), a C3 plant Triticum aestivum and a C4 plant Zea mays were-alkane, n-alkene, Pula oil shale, Botryococcus braunii, alga, plant, waxes, sediment. INTRODUCTION n-rich, Pliocene deposit from Pula (Hungary). The bulk carbon isotope ratio of this oil shale was also determined

Seamons, Kent E.

125

Carpathian Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, September 2011, Vol. 6, No. 2, p. 143 -149 STUDY OF A PASSIVE RADON MITIGATION PROCESS AND INDOOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thege út 29-33, 1121, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: The uranium mining was stopped in the Mecsek Mountains (S-Hungary) in 1997 and mine reclamation of the contaminated area began. For this purpose radiometric survey of houses in the towns of the former mining area, including settlement of Kvágószls

Horváth, Ákos

126

Revised version Organic Geochemistry 22, 1023-1027, 1994.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Abstract- A Pliocene oil shale (Pula, Hungary), a C3 plant Triticum aestivum and a C4 plant Zea mays were-alkane, n-alkene, Pula oil shale, Botryococcus braunii, alga, plant, waxes, sediment. INTRODUCTION n-rich, Pliocene deposit from Pula (Hungary). The bulk carbon isotope ratio of this oil shale was also determined

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

Export.gov - Welcome to Budapest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magyar oldalak Magyar oldalak Register | Manage Account Search Our Site Click to Search Our Site Export.gov Home Opportunities By Industry By Country Market Research Trade Events Trade Leads Free Trade Agreements Solutions International Sales & Marketing International Financing International Logistics Licenses & Regulations Trade Data & Analysis Trade Problems Locations Domestic Offices International Offices FAQ Blog Connect Home > Hungary Local Time: Print | E-mail Page Hungary Hungary Home Doing Business in Hungary Services for U.S. Companies Trade Events Trade Leads from Hungary Business Service Providers Links Contact Us Our Worldwide Network About Us Press Room Other European Markets Other Worldwide Markets   Welcome to the U.S. Commercial Service at Budapest!! The U.S. Commercial Service creates prosperity through global trade. Our

128

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

129

AGE-1 WALLEYE POLLOCK IN THE EASTERN BERING SEA: DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE, DIET, AND ENERGY DENSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGE-1 WALLEYE POLLOCK IN THE EASTERN BERING SEA: DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE, DIET, AND ENERGY DENSITY performed at sea · Energy density estimated using bomb calorimetry for samples from BASIS and MACE surveys · Confirm ages of age-0 and age-1 pollock using otoliths · Distribution of age-1's further north than age-0

130

Detection of Cloud-Base Height Using Jenoptik CHM15K and Vaisala CL31 Ceilometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twelve case studies of multilayer cloud-base height (CBH) retrievals from two collocated ceilometers (Vaisala CL31 and Jenoptik CHM15K) have been analyzed. The studies were performed during the period from September to December 2008 at the Mace ...

Giovanni Martucci; Conor Milroy; Colin D. ODowd

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary for information exchange relating to operation of modular vault systems for storage of spent nuclear fuel Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary More Documents & Publications

132

Long-Range Weather Forecasting Using an Analog Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analog selection method relying an the coincidence of main features (large ridge lines) in the Northern Hemisphere is presented and used for making 30-day weather forecasts for Hungary. Numerous analog model trials were tested, with the aid of ...

Zoltan Toth

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Astrophysical Journal, 522:L61L64, 1999 September 1 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nearby stars (Naka- jima et al. 1995), from proper-motion studies (Ruiz, Leggett, & Allard 1997), from´ta´ny 1/A, Budapest, H-1117, Hungary. 10 Institute for Cosmic-Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Midori

Golimowski, David A.

134

Agenda item 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agenda item 11 CRD 3 JOINT FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme Codex Committee on Methods of analysis and Sampling 22nd Session Budapest, Hungary, 23-27 November 1998 REPORT OF THE 13TH INTERAGENCY MEETING (IAM-

135

The Gains from Privatization in Transition Economies: Is "Change of Ownership" Enough?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia; 1991: Croatia, Macedonia, Slovenia; 1992: Armenia, Azerbaijan) Belarus, Moldova, Russia, Ukraine Caucasus (6) Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia Central Asia (7) Kazakhstan: Croatia, Macedonia, Slovenia. 1992: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz

136

UNAIDS RepoRt oN the globAl AIDS epIDemIc | 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australia Azerbaijan Bangladesh Belarus Belize Brazil Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Colombia Costa Indonesia Nicaragua Nigeria Pakistan 25­49% Azerbaijan Benin Bolivia Brazil Chile Democratic Republic Hungary Philippines Lebanon Republic of Korea Lithuania Tunisia Serbia Algeria Slovenia Azerbaijan Armenia

Lycan, Deborah E.

137

Statement of Limited Warranty Z125-4753-09 08/2006 Part 1 General Terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquired the Machine" is replaced by: 1) "the laws of Austria" in Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus this heading: In Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Hungary

138

The contribution of leading diseases and risk factors to excess losses of healthy life in eastern Europe: burden of disease study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Tajikistan, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Yugoslavia C Low child, high adult Belarus, Estonia, Hungary, Kazakhstan...

Powles, John W; Zatonski, Witold; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Ezzati, Majid

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

built in an abandoned uranium mine (granitic host rock) inin Southwestern Hungary. The uranium mine is located in aoverlying sandstone in the uranium mine, it is clear from a

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Global Rebalancing: US Protection versus Europe-led reflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Bulgaria, former Czechoslovakia (Czech Rep., Slovakia), Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and former Yugoslavian states (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegro, Kosovo, Slovenia). 12 allowing these countries a greater share...

Irvin, George; Izurieta, Alex

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hemp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the leading hemp producing regions in the world but, today, this has become a minor crop in the United States. It is produced largely in Russia, Poland, Hungary, Italy, India...

142

Geographic trends in research output and citations in veterinary medicine: insight into global research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Czech Rep 2. Hungary 3. Poland 4. Slovakia 5. Croatia 1.119 to 534 articles), Poland (157%, 233 to 599 articles),increases in Brazil, China, Poland, Taiwan, and Turkey. The

Christopher, Mary M; Marusic, Ana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Non-Standard Education Trajectories and Education Inequality: Do They Increase Equality? Evidence from Socialist Central and Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secondary education Total Poland None Vocational secondaryInequality in Post-War Poland. Pp. 303- 335 in: Persistentin Hungary from 35% to 12%, in Poland from 39% to 7%, and in

Kreidl, Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

"The Higher the Satellite, the Lower the Culture"? African American Studies in East-Central and Southeastern Europe: The Case of Poland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Studies,Pozna?,Poland,October1921,2003. Europe: TheCaseofPoland ANDRZEJANTOSZEK ThedramaticthatthecitizensofPoland,Hungary, andtheformerGDR

Antoszek, Andrzej

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Livermore scientist, engineers train to be inspectors for test...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). Training has been held in Austria, Jordan, South Korea and Hungary. Of the five U.S. surrogate inspectors selected for the...

146

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

147

Section 33  

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in in ' c n I o n exp (&T in / µ i ) T i,n ' µ i log (I o n / I i,n ) % µ i log (c n ) Session Papers 145 (1) (2) Multi-Spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction Analysis of Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements A.A. Lacis and B.E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Abstract MACE Analysis of MFRSR Multi-spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction (MACE) analysis of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements yield detailed time series information on the variations of the column amounts of atmospheric NO 2 and ozone and of aerosol optical depth, including the effective

148

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mace GG, S Houser, S Benson, SA Klein, and QL Min. 2011. "Critical evaluation of the ISCCP simulator using ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3517.1. Figure 1. Comparison of actual cloud top pressure from ARM remote sensors compared to ISCCP (top) and after the ICARUS algorithm has been used to convert the measured cloud top pressures to ISCCP-like quantities (bottom). Figure 2. Comparison of various measures of optical depth. Top left shows

149

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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Cirrus Cloud Statistics from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cirrus Cloud Statistics from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cloud Radar Observations Krueger, S.K. (a), Luo, Y. (a), Mace, G.G. (a), and Xu, K.-M. (b), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Mace, Clothiaux, and Ackerman (2000; MCA) determined the properties of cirrus clouds derived from one year (December 1996 to November 1997) of MMCR data collected at the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma. They also used additional measurements to retrieve the bulk microphysical properties of thin cirrus cloud layers. We sampled CRM results in a way that allows direct comparison to MCA's observations and retrievals of cirrus cloud properties. This allows evaluation, in a statistical sense, of the CRM's

150

Research Highlight  

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Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Download a printable PDF Submitter: Naud, C. M., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Del Genio, A. D., NASA Mace, G., Utah State University Benson, S., Utah State University Clothiaux, E. E., Pennsylvania State University Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Naud, C, A Del Genio, GG Mace, S Benson, EE Clothiaux, and P Kollias. "Impact of dynamics and atmospheric state on cloud vertical overlap." Journal of Climate 218: 1758-1770. Mean overlap parameter α as a function of separation: (a,b) at SGP for all winter months of 2002-2004 and for 4 subsets of increasing 500 mb ω such

151

ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property  

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govCampaignsColorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation govCampaignsColorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Campaign Links STORMVEX Website Related Campaigns Colorado: CFH/CMH Deployment to StormVEx 2011.02.01, Mace, AMF Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx 2010.11.15, Sedlacek, AMF Colorado : Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift 2010.11.15, Massoli, AMF Colorado: Infrared Thermometer (IRT) 2010.11.15, Mace, AMF Colorado: StormVEX Aerosol Size Distribution 2010.11.15, Hallar, AMF Colorado: Direct Measurements of Snowfall 2010.11.15, McCubbin, AMF Colorado: Thunderhead Radiative Flux Analysis Campaign 2010.11.15, Long, AMF Colorado: Ice Nuclei and Cloud Condensation Nuclei Characterization 2010.11.15, Cziczo, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA.

152

Research Highlight  

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Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhao Y, GG Mace, and JM Comstock. 2011. "The occurrence of particle size distribution bimodality in midlatitude cirrus as inferred from ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(6), doi:10.1175/2010JAS3354.1. Figure 1. Frequency distribution of ice water content (top), effective radius (middle), and crystal concentration (bottom) derived from 313 h of cloud property retrievals using the bimodal algorithm. The distributions are shown as a function of the layer-mean temperature shown in the legend.

153

Monte Carlo simulation of ion trajectories in the modified PDX thermal charge exchange analyzer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved design for the present PDX thermal charge exchange analyzer (MACE) has been proposed by one of the authors, in which the five cylindrical electrostatic plates for mass separation are replaced by a single flat, electrostatic deflection plate. An existihg Monte Carlo code that simulated the passage of ions through the MACE analyzer was modified to examine the feasibility of this change. The resulting calculations were used to optimize detector positions and collimation requirements. The first analyzer to be placed on PDX will be of the old design, similar to the present PLT analyzer. However, if the design reported here is successful on the test stand, the future PDX analyzers will all be of the new, single electrostatic plate variety. A further advantage will be the ability to install as many as ten detectors instead of the current five, thus providing twice as many energy channels for each shot. Also, both mass species (H, D) can be measured concurrently, if desired.

Kaita, R.; Davis, S.L.; Medley, S.S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Performance Analysis Integration in the Uintah Software Development Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], SPASS [32], Vampire [31], and E [22]. Despite these individual achievements, the extreme difficulty (expend more energy in directions that are successful). Second, for unaware observers, a lack of progress 0.6 SPASS 0.99T Vampire 0.24 Bliksem 1.01 SNARK 990218 OtterMACE 4.5 S-SETHEO 0.0 SCOTT 4.4.2 FDP 0

Utah, University of

155

? Capacity-based design [Preliminary for Part 2] 2. Energy Harvesting Networks Transmission Completion Time Minimization for single link  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Completion Time Minimization for single link w / finite battery Extension to fading channels Transmission policies with inefficient energy storage IEEE ICC 2013, Budapest, Hungary 6/9/2013 Goals ? Energy Efficiency (EE): What it meant last decade; what it means today ? From a communication network design perspective what should we care about for energy efficient design of cellular/conventional wireless networks? (greenish) rechargeable/energy harvesting networks? (green) ? Communication with energy harvesting nodes Green, self-sufficient nodes with extended network lifetime Relatively new field with increasing interest IEEE ICC 2013, Budapest, Hungary 6/9/2013 Prerequisites for the Tutorial

Aylin Yener; Short Term; Throughput Maximization

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

ARM - News from the Steamboat Springs Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ColoradoNews from the Steamboat Springs Deployment Steamboat Deployment AMF Home Steamboat Springs Home Storm Peak Lab Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Data Sets Experiment Planning STORMVEX Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan NWS Forecasting Plots STORMVEX Website Outreach STORMVEX Backgrounder (PDF, 1.6MB) News AMF2 STORMVEX Blog Images Contacts Gerald Mace News from the Steamboat Springs Deployment Releases WPSD (Paducah, KY) "STORMVEX Cloud Study" January 19, 2011 The Daily Sentinel, Grand Junction "Steamboat project gives scientists unique, grounded look at clouds" December 12, 2010 Steamboat Pilot & Today "Steamboat cloud study to help create better global climate models" Image Gallery December 12, 2010 Also picked up by:

157

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) State Kentucky Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount 100% of equipment and installation cost Provider Kentucky Solar Partnership The Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) and the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partner to offer low interest loans for the installation of solar water heaters. Loans cover the full equipment and installation cost. Flexible rate loans and terms are available. They

158

Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres (2005) 35: 383394 c Springer 2005 ON THE CHEMICAL NATURE AND ORIGIN OF TELEONOMY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering model reduction of bio-chemical kinetic models D´avid Csercsik, Katalin M. Hangos, Hungary Significance and Aim Bio-chemical kinetic models of enzyme kinetic processes, as well reaction kinetic scheme. Therefore it is of great importance to develop bio-chemically meaningful

Pross, Addy

159

Statement of Limited Warranty Part 1 General Terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Austria Hungary Poland Azerbaijan Iceland Portugal Bahamas India Qatar Bahrain Indonesia Romania of this analysis, Serbia has sovereignty of Kosovo (BBC, 2008, June 21). Nagorono- Karabakh Azerbaijan Ethnic and Central Asia (for Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina

160

CONSULTING ASSISTANCE ON ECONOMIC REFORM II DISCUSSION PAPERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Azerbaijan, BGR - Bulgaria, BLR ­ Belarus, CZE ­ Czech Republic, EST ­ Estonia, GEO ­ Georgia, HUN ­ Hungary, Russia 6. The Caucasus: Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia 7. Central Asia: Turkmenistan, Tajikistan 1992: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Lithuania, Latvia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Toxic element composition of multani mitti clay for nutritional safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan´, Budapest, Hungary 2012 Abstract Geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common in central Pakistan-012-1876-x #12;In Pakistan geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common especially amongst the women

Short, Daniel

162

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by circulating energetic ions", Phys. Plasmas 11 (2004) 1803. #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research of Sciences, Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

163

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I.R. Jones, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

164

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G. Grosso, Instituto di

165

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(1984) 1122. #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G. Grosso, Instituto di

166

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diego, CA, October 14- 17 (2003). #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

167

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. C., Nucl. Fus. 40 (2000) 1101. #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

168

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contract DE-AC02-76-CH03073. #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

169

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.csm.ornl.gov/evaluation/CHEETAH/index.html #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G. Grosso, Instituto di

170

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I.R. Jones, Flinders KFKI­ATKI, Hungary Kaw, Institute Plasma Research, India P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute Plasma, South Korea Dennis Bruggink, Fusion Library, University of Wisconsin, Institute Plasma Research

171

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Plasma Phys. 11 22 (1985). 8 #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

172

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, USA c Institute for Plasma Research, U. MD, College Park, MD 20742, USA Introduction Physics and at the ITB, compared to outside the ITB 0 0.5 1.0 #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India

173

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Professor Sami

174

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I.R. Jones, Flinders, Germany Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

175

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Professor Sami

176

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione Library, University of Wisconsin, USA Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, USA Librarian

177

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sciences, Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, USA Librarian, Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National

178

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.B. Forest, R.B. White, Nucl. Fusion 42 853 (2002). #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research of Sciences, Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

179

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the incident ion energy. Sample Temperature (C) #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

180

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at and outside ITB g(MHz) k r q s eff #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.8 #12;02/25/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Germany Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

182

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

holder7 ). D. Staack, Y. Raitses, and N.J. Fisch 10 #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research of Sciences, Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

183

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the dashed is Equilibrium 2 17 #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

184

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+6 +8 +1 +6 #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G. Grosso

185

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pletzer, Phys. Plasmas 6 (1999) 4693. #12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro

186

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discharges. #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G. Grosso, Instituto di Fisica del

187

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reports, 211, 1 (1992). #12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro

188

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;01/13/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Germany Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

189

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, private communication, 2002. #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

190

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unstable #12;#12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G. Grosso, Instituto di

191

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KFKI­ATKI, Hungary Kaw, Institute Plasma Research, India P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute Plasma, South Korea Dennis Bruggink, Fusion Library, University of Wisconsin, Institute Plasma Research. Parker, Phys. (2000). B. Cohen, Dimits, Nevins, Bull. Soc. (2000).01/09/01 External Distribution Plasma

192

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lewandowski #12;02/25/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Germany Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

193

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). 10 #12;01/13/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Germany Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

194

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the modular coil sub-assemblies. #12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro

195

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Plasma Research, U. MD, College Park, MD 20742, USA c Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT. 2. =0.4 k i s #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute

196

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 311, 529 (1984). #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G. Grosso, Instituto di

197

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. [11] P. Merkel. Nucl. Fus., 27:867, 1987. 4 #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

198

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G. Grosso, Instituto di Fisica del

199

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;02/25/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM

200

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1: 10 #12;Figure 2: 11 #12;Figure 3: 12 #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research of Sciences, Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Y. Raitses, and N. J. Fisch 11 Figure 4 #12;03/26/01 External Distribution Plasma Research Jolan Moldvai, Reports Library, MTA KFKI-ATKI, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

202

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Professor

203

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Professor Sami

204

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research of Sciences, Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA

205

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@adonis.osti.gov #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro

206

Remote sensing of the water quality of shallow lakes: A mixture modelling approach to quantifying phytoplankton in water characterized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote sensing of the water quality of shallow lakes: A mixture modelling approach to quantifying Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, POB 35, H-8237, Hungary Remote sensing has significantly over recent years, the application of satellite remote sensing to lake water is constrained

Tyler, Andrew N.

207

Nonlin. Processes Geophys., 15, 803813, 2008 www.nonlin-processes-geophys.net/15/803/2008/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are available to us for three Enercon E-40 (600 kW) wind turbines in Hungary. Two of them (M1 and M2 and timeline of the records. Heavy diamonds indicate the location of three Enercon E-40 wind turbines M1, M2

Jánosi, Imre M.

208

C:\\DOCUME~1\\DeCastro\\LOCALS~1\\Temp\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and doors and fiberboard to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and furniture and gallantry were the main products are Bosnia and Herzegovina, Hungary and Italy. Imports from these three countries represent 52.9% of the total imports, with the greatest import quantity coming from Bosnia and Herzegovina. The value

209

Farewell to the Ottoman Legacy? Islamic Reformism and Revivalism in Inter-War Bosnia-Herzegovina , in: Nathalie CLAYER / Eric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and doors and fiberboard to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and furniture and gallantry were the main products are Bosnia and Herzegovina, Hungary and Italy. Imports from these three countries represent 52.9% of the total imports, with the greatest import quantity coming from Bosnia and Herzegovina. The value

Peyré, Gabriel

210

Multipurpose Use of Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conference was organized to review the non-electric, multipurpose uses of geothermal energy in Hungary, Iceland, New Zealand, United States and the USSR. The international viewpoint was presented to provide an interchange of information from countries where non-electric use of geothermal energy has reached practical importance.

Lienau, Paul J.; Lund, John W. (eds.)

1974-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

211

DIAGNOSING VULNERABILITY, EMERGENT PHENOMENA, and VOLATILITY in MANMADE NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy as a % of total energy in EU 7-8% Wind field construction and maps of potential wind energy production over Europe #12;Wind field construction and maps of potential wind energy production over Europe tolerance of complex networks Composite electricity model for Hungary including wind energy Cascading

Arrowsmith, David

212

Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal, Science and Technology in Hungary, Safety of Nuclear Energy,Disposal of Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel Po vilas Poskas Lithuanian EnergyNuclear Energy. Article 48, entitled Storage or Disposal of Radioactive Wastes, states that the disposal

Witherspoon editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson editor, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICA SCRIPTA Phys. Scr. 74 (2006) 6270 doi:10.1088/0031-8949/74/1/009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, POB 49, Hungary 2 Department of Nuclear Engineering. The results are relevant in medium power subcritical nuclear systems where the zero power noise is still, 02.50.Ga, 05.40.-a, 05.40.Ca 1. Introduction Historically, the theory of neutron noise started

Pázsit, Imre

214

Progress in Nuclear Energy. 1982, Vol. 9, pp. 223-232 007%6530/82/03223-1055.00/0 Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved. Copyright 1982 Pergamon Press Ltd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BASED ON RESEARCH REACTORS: THEORY AND EXPERIMENT I. PAZSIT and I. Lux Central Research InstituteProgress in Nuclear Energy. 1982, Vol. 9, pp. 223-232 007%6530/82/03223-1055.00/0 Printed in Great for Physics, H-1525 Budapest 114, P. O. Box 49, Hungary ABSTRACT A concept for research reactor based noise

Pázsit, Imre

215

Some properties of zero power neutron noise in a time-varying medium with delayed neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there has been a gap between zero power noise and power reactor noise, i.e. in the theory of tem- poral Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49, Hungary c Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Nuclear Engineering of the present authors. Such a treatment gives account of both the so-called zero power reactor noise

Pázsit, Imre

216

Investigation of air supply conditions in the room of a B11type gas appliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Hungary, the prevalently used "B11" type gas appliances equipped with atmospheric burner and they have a draught hood beyond the outlet of the appliance. For the appropriate adjustment of the gas boiler to the conditions of the building, ... Keywords: CFD method, air supply, chimney, design requirements, gas appliances, numerical modelling

Lajos Barna; Rbert Goda

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

27 September 1999 Z .Physics Letters A 260 1999 489494  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN 46556 , USA f ´Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Swierk, Poland g ( )Institute for Nuclear Research, 4001 Debrecen, Hungary h Institute of Nuclear Physics, 31-342 Cracow, Poland i Institute of Physics of a two-photon emitting states which only test the transi- tion probability integrated over the photon

218

FSU/Eastern Europe: Russia spearheads small upturn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses the political and legal scene in Russia, domestic restructuring, exploration, drilling, development by Western companies and by Russian companies, and production. Exploration and development in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Serbia are also discussed.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Real-Time Data Acquisition and Feedback Control Using Linux Intel Computers (A25101)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. 5th IAEA Tech. Mtg On Control, Data Acquisition, And Remote Participation For Fusion Research, Budapest, Hungary, 2005; General Atomics Report GA-A25101 (2005)5th IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition and Remote Participation for Fusion Research Budapest, HU, 2005999610870

Penaflor, B.G.

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electron 83 Rb / 83m Kr Source for the Energy Scale Monitoring in the KATRIN Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino) experiment investigates the endpoint region of the tritium ??spectrum aiming for the sensitivity on the neutrino mass of 0.2 eV (90% C.L.). A spectrometer of the MAC?E filter (Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic filter) type will be used for a total time of at least 5 years. An unrecognized shift of the filtering potential would directly influence the resulting neutrino mass. To continuously monitor the filtering potential the high voltage (HV) will be simultaneously applied to an additional MAC?E filter spectrometer. In this monitor spectrometer suitable electron sources based on atomic/nuclear standards will be utilized. As one of such monitoring tools the solid 83 Rb / 83m Kr source is intended. It provides conversion electrons from 83m Kr (t 1/2 ?=?1.83? h ) which is continuously generated by 83 Rb (t 1/2 ?86? d ). The Calibration and Monitoring task of the KATRIN project demands the long?term energy stability ?E/E of the K?32 conversion electron line (E?=?17.8? keV ???=?2.7? eV ) of 1.6? ppm / month .

Miroslav Zbo?il; The KATRIN collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

doi:10.1155/2012/372371 Clinical Study The Avantgarde Carbostent in Patients Scheduled for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2012 Carlo Briguori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Treatment of patients who need coronary revascularization before undelayable non-cardiac surgery is challenging. Methods. We assessed the safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) using the Avantgarde TM Carbostent (CID, Italy) in patients undergoing PCI before undelayable non-cardiac surgery. The Multiplate analyzer point-of-care was used to assess residual platelet reactivity. One major cardiac events (MACE, defined as death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis and major bleeding) were assessed. Results. 42 consecutive patients were analyzed. Total stent length ?25 mm was observed in 16 (37%) patients. Multivessel stenting was performed in 11 (31.5%) patients. Clopidogrel was interrupted 5 days before surgery in 35 patients, whereas it was stopped the day of the surgery in 7 patients. Surgery was performed after 27 9 (742) days from PCI. MACE occurred in one patient (2.4%; 95 % confidence interval: 0.0113%), who had fatal acute myocardial infarction 3 days after abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery and 12 days after stent implantation. No case of major bleeding in the postoperative phase was observed. Conclusions. The present pilot study suggests that, although at least 1014 days of dual antiplatelet therapy remain mandatory, the Avantgarde TM stent seems to have a role in patients requiring undelayable surgery. 1.

Undelayable Noncardiac Surgery; Carlo Briguori; Gabriella Visconti; Francesca De Micco; Amelia Focaccio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The second of these two planned tests, CCI-2, will be conducted with a nearly identical test facility and experiment boundary conditions, but with a Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete test section to investigate the effect of concrete type on the two-dimensional core-concrete interaction and debris cooling behavior. The objective of this report is to provide the overall test plan for CCI-2 to enable pretest calculations to be carried out. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus, followed by a description of the planned test operating procedure. Overall specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Visit the Nevada National Security Site Learn More NNSA DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Learn More DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Tiffany A. Blanchard-Case receives 2013 Linton Brooks Medal

228

Real-Time 3D Simulation of a Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel assemblies are very expensive parts of the nuclear reactor. Initially they were used in Hungary for 3 years, now for 4 years and soon they will stay in the core for 5 years. Each year only 1/3rd, 1/4th later 1/5th of them is replaced, therefore ... Keywords: NPP simulation, parallel processing, real-time simulation, coupled thermo-hydraulics and neutron kinetics simulation

Janos Sebestyen Janosy; Andras Kereszturi; Gabor Hazi; Jozsef Pales; Endre Vegh

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Review: 1991 industry developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is NUEXCO`s annual summary of the previous year`s (1991) events. There are reviews of major nuclear developments in each continent, as well as international developments. Specific topics include fuels, waste management, new facilities, and decommissioning. Nuclear activities in the following countries are noted: South Africa, Yemen, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Namibia, France, Japan, Taiwan, China, Korea, India, Pakistan, Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Italy, Czechoslovakia, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Canada, USA, Argentina, Brazil, and Uraguay.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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8 Science Team Meeting 8 Science Team Meeting 1998 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Eighth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-1998, March 1998 Tucson, Arizona For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). History and Status of the ARM Program - March 1998 Session Papers A Cloud Climatology of the ARM CART Site S.M. Lazarus, S.K. Krueger, and G.G. Mace A Combination of the Separation of Variable and the T-Matrix Method for Computing Optical Properties of Spheroidal Particles*

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Slide 1  

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Cloud Properties and Heating Cloud Properties and Heating Rates in Tropical Cloud Systems Jennifer Comstock and Sally McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Alain Protat Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research Motivation Cloud properties retrievals Cloud process understanding Cloud Radiative forcing and heating rates Model evaluation on many scales (LES, CRM, SCM...) Quantified uncertainties are needed... 2 Retrieval Algorithm Evaluation within CPWG Past intercomparisons CLOWD - Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (Turner et al. 2007) Ice Clouds - (Comstock et al. 2007) One retrieval does not fit all Present algorithm evaluation BBHRP Ice Cloud Retrievals at SGP - Microbase (Dunn, Jensen, Mace, Marchand) Arctic mixed phase clouds - BBHRP (Shupe, Turner) CLOWD - BBHRP Pt. Reyes AMF deployment

232

Research Highlight  

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ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing Method Submitter: Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, J., P. Minnis, B. Lin, Y. Yi, T.-F. Fan, S. Sun-Mack, and J. K. Ayers, 2006: Determination of ice water path in ice-over-water cloud systems using combined MODIS and AMSR-E measurements. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21801, 10.1029/2006GL027038. Minnis, P., J. Huang, B. Lin, Y. Yi, R. F. Arduini, T.-F. Fan, J. K. Ayers, and G. G. Mace, 2007: Ice cloud properties in ice-over-water cloud systems using TRMM VIRS and TMI data. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D06206, doi:10.1029/2006JD007626. Figure 1. Comparison of the VISST and MCRS retrievals with simultaneous

233

Section 9  

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Figure 1. Monthly mean values of clear-sky irradiance (solid), observed irradiance (long dash), and surface cloud forcing (short dash) at the ARM SGP site. A Two-Year Climatology of Radiation Budget and Cloud Properties for the ARM SGP Site T. P. Ackerman and S. G. Strum Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology, University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah C. N. Long NOAA/ERL/Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction One of primary reasons for the establishment of the ARM Southern Great Plains research site was to obtain long-term records of surface radiation data and the impact of clouds on these data (Stokes and Schwartz 1994). This research project focuses on the creation of a two-year climatology of the sur-

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Section 68  

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An Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations Using Southern An Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations Using Southern Great Plains Data D. A. Sovchik, G. C. Mace, and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Parameterization of cirrus in large-scale models is a challeng- considerably. A detailed analysis of the resulting distributions ing problem for a number of reasons. Among the most has not yet been carried out, but will be used to identify important of these has been the lack of quantifiable tests of systematic variations. parameterization results. However, the necessary testing can now be carried out using the data stream from the Atmos- The radiative parameterization developed by Ebert and Curry pheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern

235

Research Highlight  

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The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

236

AMF Deployment, Steamboat Springs, Colorado  

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Colorado Colorado Steamboat Deployment AMF Home Steamboat Springs Home Storm Peak Lab Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Data Sets Experiment Planning STORMVEX Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan NWS Forecasting Plots STORMVEX Website Outreach STORMVEX Backgrounder (PDF, 1.6MB) News AMF2 STORMVEX Blog Images Contacts Gerald Mace AMF Deployment, Steamboat Springs, Colorado This view shows the instrument locations for the STORMVEX campaign. At the westernmost site is the Valley Floor. Heading east up the mountain is Christy Peak, Thunderhead, and Storm Peak Laboratory at the far east. Valley Floor: 40° 39' 43.92" N, 106° 49' 0.84" W Thunderhead: 40° 39' 15.12" N, 106° 46' 23.16" W Storm Peak: 40° 27' 18.36" N, 106° 44' 40.20" W

237

Research Highlight  

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New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds Submitter: Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liou, K.N, S.C. Ou, Y. Takano, J. Roskovensky, G.G. Mace, K. Sassen, and M. Poellot, 2002: "Remote sensing of three-dimensional inhomogeneous cirrus clouds using satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data," Geophysical Research Letters 29(9): 1360. Figure 1 ARM Data Enables the Development and Verification of a New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds to Improve Climate Predictions Cirrus clouds cover about 30% of the Earth's surface. Because ice crystals both reflect sunlight and absorb thermal energy emitted from the earth

238

Microsoft Word - SPARTICUS_Science_Plan_DOE-SC-ARM-1001.doc  

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3 3 SPARTICUS: Small Particles in Cirrus Science and Operations Plan J Mace Principal Investigator E Jensen D Mitchell G McFarquhar X Liu J Comstock T Garrett T Ackerman October 2009 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

239

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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A Tale of Two Cirrus A Tale of Two Cirrus Poellot, M.R.(a), Mace, G.G.(b), and Arnott, W.P. (c), University of North Dakota (a), University of Utah (b), Desert Research Institute (c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting On May 8, 1998, an orographically-forced cirrus layer overspread the DOE ARM Program's Southern Great Plains site and subsequently became mixed with anvil outflow from thunderstorms. These clouds were sampled in situ by the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft and remotely by an array of ground-based radar, lidar and radiometric instrumentation. The first of two aircraft flights sampled the orographic cirrus through a series of step climbs and spirals. During that time, the cloud was relatively uniform in depth and structure. Shortly after the start of the second flight, the

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Cirrus Radiative Properties in the Tropical Western Pacific Cirrus Radiative Properties in the Tropical Western Pacific J. M. Comstock and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Cirrus clouds in tropical regions are often located high in the cold upper troposphere and have low optical depths. In addition, tropical cirrus often extend in large sheets up to 1000 km horizontally, which may have a large influence on the energy budget of the atmosphere. Characterizing the location and radiative properties of cirrus clouds is an important step in understanding the processes that generate and maintain these cold, thin cirrus clouds and their impact on upper tropospheric dynamics. In this paper, we present cirrus radiative properties derived using a combination of Micropulse Lidar

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241

X:\ARM_19~1\P185-192.WPD  

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Figure 1. Schematic diagram of an operational Figure 1. Schematic diagram of an operational methodology for cloud parameterization testing. The upper portion depicts the data analysis procedure, while the lower portion depicts parameterization forcing and evaluation. A Comparison of Radiometric Fluxes Influenced by Parameterized Cirrus Clouds with Observed Fluxes at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site G. G. Mace, T. P. Ackerman, and A. T. George Penn State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania As the data stream from the ARM Southern Great Plains on an hourly basis from the National Meteorological (SGP) site matures, the value of this resource is becoming Center. The MAPS profiles serve as input to a radiative more readily apparent. For the first time, research on the

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1  

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Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of In-Situ Cloud Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of In-Situ Cloud Properties Measured During Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment G. McFarquhar, M. Freer, and J. Um University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois G. Kok Droplet Measurement Technologies Boulder, Colorado R. McCoy and T. Tooman Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California J. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction In-situ measurements of ice particle sizes, shapes and numbers were made in fresh anvils, aging anvils and in generic cirrus during TWP-ICE. The vertical profiles and horizontal profiles performed by the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft were made on 7 different days as illustrated in Table 1. Table 1. Summary of flights conducted during TWP-ICE; *designates that spiral was conducted over Darwin,

243

X:\ARM_19~1\P283-315.WPD  

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Figure 1. Observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles by the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar on Figure 1. Observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles by the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar on 15 April during the 1994 ARM RCS IOP. Observations of a Cold Front With Strong Vertical Undulations During the ARM RCS-IOP D. O'C. Starr and D. N. Whiteman G. Mace National Aeronautics and Space Administration The Pennsylvania State University Goddard Space Flight Center University Park, Pennsylvania Greenbelt, Maryland S. H. Melfi University of Utah University of Maryland-Baltimore County Salt Lake City, Utah Baltimore, Maryland A. R. Lare Sandia National Laboratories Applied Research Livermore, California Landover, Maryland R. A. Ferrare, B. Demoz, and K. D. Evans Hughes STX Lanham, Maryland K. Sassen S. E. Bisson and J.E.M. Goldsmith Passage of a cold front was observed on the night of

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ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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The Association of the Cirrus Properties Over the Western Tropical Pacific The Association of the Cirrus Properties Over the Western Tropical Pacific with Tropical Deep Convection Deng, M.(a), Mace, G.G.(a), and Soden, B.J.(b), Univesity of Utah (a), Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (b) The microphysical and radiative properties of upper tropospheric clouds in the tropics are known to have a substantial influence on climate. Observations from long term cloud radar measurements in the tropics show that upper tropospheric clouds are observed above 10 km as much as 40% of the time depending on location. By combining satellite observations with observations from the tropical ARM site on Nauru and Manus Islands we examine the macro and microphysical properties of these clouds in terms of their association with deep convection. The fundamental questions we will

245

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

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govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior numerical studies of solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere in the presence of clouds have been limited by the necessity to use theoretical representations of clouds. Three-dimensional representations of actual clouds and their microphysical properties, such as the distribution of ice and water, had previously not been possible

246

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

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23, 2008 [Feature Stories and Releases] 23, 2008 [Feature Stories and Releases] Field Campaigns for 2010 Range from the Arctic to the Azores Bookmark and Share With the recent awards, the ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Graciosa Island in the Azores is extended from its original 9-month duration, beginning in May 2009 and now lasting through November 2010. With the recent awards, the ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Graciosa Island in the Azores is extended from its original 9-month duration, beginning in May 2009 and now lasting through November 2010. The Department of Energy recently announced the selection of major ARM field campaigns that will take place in 2010. Studies led by principal investigators Rob Wood, Hans Verlinde, and Jay Mace will examine marine, mixed-phase, and cirrus clouds in the Azores, Alaska, the Great Plains, and

247

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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3D Delta-Diffusion and IR Monte-Carlo Methods for Radiative Transfer 3D Delta-Diffusion and IR Monte-Carlo Methods for Radiative Transfer Applied to Inhomogeneous Cirrus over the ARM-SGP Site Chen, Y.(a), Liou, K.N.(a), Gu, Y.(a), Ou, S.C.(a), and Mace, G.G.(b), University of California, Los Angeles (a), University of Utah (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting An efficient method based on a full multigrid approach has been developed to solve the 3D delta-diffusion radiative transfer equation, which utilizes four-term spherical harmonics expansion for the phase function and intensity. This method first solves the inhomogeneous partial differential equation on a number of coarse grids and subsequently performs interpolation to predivided fine grids to speed up the convergence of the solution, particularly useful for cloud radiation parameterization in

248

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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Comparison of Boundary Layer Cloud Properties using Surface and GOES Comparison of Boundary Layer Cloud Properties using Surface and GOES Measurements at the ARM SGP Site Dong, X. (a), Minnis, P. (b), Smith, W.L., Jr. (b), and Mace, G.G. (a), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Boundary layer cloud microphysical and radiative properties derived from GOES data during March 2000 cloud IOP at ARM SGP site are compared with simultaneous surface-based observations. The cloud-droplet effective radius, optical depth, and top-of-atmoshpere (TOA) albedo are retrieved from a 2-stream radiative transfer model in conjunction with ground-based measurements of cloud radar, laser ceilometer, microwave and solar radiometers. The satellite results are retrieved from GOES visible and

249

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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The MERGED_SOUNDING VAP: A Status Report and Description The MERGED_SOUNDING VAP: A Status Report and Description Miller, M.A.(a), Troyan, D.T.(a), and Mace, G.G.(b), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), University of Utah (b) The Value-added Product (VAP) known as MERGED_SOUNDING has been deemed a very desirous component of ARMs suite of VAPs. To have a thermodynamics profile of the atmosphere at one-minute temporal intervals and uniform height levels available for ARM data users eliminates much redundancy and inconsistency as investigators will now have standard atmospheric profiles at their disposal. The values which constitute the thermodynamics profile include: Temperature, Relative Humidity, Vapor Pressure, Barometric Pressure, Wind Speed and Direction, and Dewpoint. The data integrated to form the MERGED_SOUNDING data stream comes from radiosonde launches, model

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Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and OLR Bias Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and OLR Bias Q. Fu and B. Carlin Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Clouds exhibit dramatic variabilities at spatial scales smaller than typical grid cells of large-scale models used to study climate and weather. These unresolved cloud fluctuations are potentially important for parameterizations of both cloud radiative effects and cloud microphysical processes (e.g., Harshvardhan and Randall 1985; Jacob and Kein 1999). It is now well accepted that neglect of cloud subscale variability can seriously bias model estimates of the disposition of solar radiation in the earth- atmosphere system (e.g., Cahalan et al. 1994a; Barker 1996).

251

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: MICROBASE, A Continuous  

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MICROBASE, A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval: Status and Future MICROBASE, A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval: Status and Future Plans Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Johnson, Karen Brookhaven National Laboratory Michael, Paul Brookhaven National Laboratory Mace, Gerald University of Utah The MICROBASE_PI and MICROBASE_PA value-added products (VAPs) are integral components of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The goal of the BBHRP project is to determine atmospheric heating and cooling rate profiles in the column above the active sensors at each ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites and within a larger volume around each site, representative of a global climate model grid cell. To produce the heating rate profiles,

252

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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Cirrus Cloud Particle Mass and Terminal Velocity Derived from Airborne 2D-C Cirrus Cloud Particle Mass and Terminal Velocity Derived from Airborne 2D-C Probe and Counterflow Virtural Impactor Data for Selected Cases During the Spring 2000 Cloud IOP Benson-Troth, S.(a), Mace, G.G.(a), Twohy, C.(b), and Poellot, M.(c), University of Utah (a), Oregon State University (b), University of North Dakota (c) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting When cirrus cloud particles are sampled by an airborne 2D-C probe, the shadows of the particles on the diode array are preserved. Analysis of the raw 2D-C data provides a size distribution and number concentration of the cloud particles sampled. The airborne counterflow virtural impactor provides the ice water content of the sampled cloud particles. Using the size distribution and the ice water content, we derive the coefficient and

253

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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254

Research Highlight  

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Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ou, S., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of cirrus cloud vertical size profile using MODIS data." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D09205, doi:10.1029/2008JD011327. (a) MODIS true color composite images for March 6, 2001 at 1736UTC, (b) retrieved Τc; (c) retrieved Dt for selected domain; (d) retrieved Db for selected domain; (e) scatter plot for retrieved Τc versus MODIS Τc for selected domain; (f) scatter plot for retrieved De versus MODIS De for

255

X:\ARM_19~1\P155-184.WPD  

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Diffuse Diffuse ratio (diffuse)/(diffuse direct) Session Papers 173 (1) A Simple Formula for Determining Globally Clear Skies C. N. Long, A. T. George, G. G. Mace, and T. P. Ackerman Penn State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Surface measurements to serve as "ground truth" are of primary importance in the development of retrieval algorithms using satellite measurements to predict surface irradiance. The most basic algorithms of this type deal with clear sky (i.e., cloudless) top-to-surface shortwave (SW) transfer, serving as a necessary prerequisite towards treating both clear and cloudy conditions (Cess et al. 1991). Recently, Cess et al. (1995) have used a ratio of surface and top of atmosphere SW cloud forcing to infer

256

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

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govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

257

Observed and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties at the SGP CART Site  

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and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties at the SGP CART Site A. D. Del Genio and A. B. Wolf National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Despite their potential importance in a long-term climate change, less is known about cirrus clouds than most other cloud types, for a variety of reasons (Del Genio 2001) including: (1) the difficulty of remotely sensing ice water content (IWC), (2) uncertainty in the identities of ice nuclei and the relative importance of different nucleation processes, (3) significant variations in depth and optical thickness caused by formation and sedimentation of large particles, and (4) our relatively poor documentation of

258

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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On the Detection and Analysis of Multilayered Clouds: Comparison of MODIS On the Detection and Analysis of Multilayered Clouds: Comparison of MODIS Analyses with ARM CART Site Cloud Products Baum, B.A.(a), Nasiri, S.L.(b), and Mace, G.G.(c), NASA Langley Research Center (a), University of Wisconsin-Madison (b), University of Utah (c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting We will present new ideas regarding the detection and analysis of multilayered clouds in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery. Over the past year, the MODIS cloud property retrieval effort has matured considerably as algorithms have been improved and the instrument performance has been characterized more accurately. Errors caused by noise, striping, and out-of-band response have been reduced. We have developed and tested different approaches for daytime and nighttime

259

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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The March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observing Period; The Evolution of the The March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observing Period; The Evolution of the Synoptic-Scale Atmosphere and the Associated Cloud Radiative Forcing Mace, G.G.(a), Sonntag, K.L.(b), Kato, S.(c), Poellot, M.(d), Twohy, C.(e), Troth, S.(a), Zhang, Q.(a), and Minnis, P.(c), University of Utah (a), Unviersity of Oklahoma (b), NASA Langley Research Center (c), University of North Dakota (d), Oregon State University (e) During the first 3 weeks of March 2000, an intensive observing period (IOP) was held near the central facility of the Southern Great Plains ARM site. In conjunction with the ARESE II campaign, the objective of this IOP was to observe the 3-dimensional structure of the cloud field using multiple scanning and vertically pointing millimeter radars. In anticipation of

260

Section 120  

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Platt Platt r Platt r e r Platt r e r Platt Session Papers 543 Verification of Cirrus Cloud Parameterizations Using Southern Great Plains Data D. A. Sovchik and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction An evaluation of several diagnostic cirrus cloud parameteriza- tions is presented in this study using data from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We consider three parameterizations of ice water content (IWC) proposed by Heymsfield and Donner (HD 1990), Stephens et al. (ST 1990), and Slingo and Slingo (SL 1991), each coupled with parameterizations of the ice particle size characteristics by Heymsfield and Platt (HP 1984), Mitchell (MI 1994) and Platt

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261

ARM Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status  

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Value-Added Cloud Products: Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status M. A. Miller, K. L. Johnson, and D. T. Troyan Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania E. J. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a variety of state-of-the-art active and passive remote sensors at its sites. These sensors provide information about the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the structure of the clouds that are present above the site. Families of value- added products (VAPs) that contain geophysically relevant data are produced from the electronic

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Section 77  

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Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent potential temperature, and saturation equiva- lent potential temperature for a) the decou- pled boundary-layer observed over the ARM SGP site and b) the well-mixed boundary- layer observed over central Pennsylvania. Observational Studies of Continental Stratus-Implications for Modeling B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah H. Verlinde and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site have tremendous potential for providing statistical descriptions of cloud and boundary layer properties associated with continental stratus.

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Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations of Cloud-Radiative Interactions  

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Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations of Cloud-Radiative Interactions G. M. McFarquhar Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California G. G. Mace and Y. Zhang Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Accurate parameterizations of, and in terms of, ice cloud effective radius (r e ) are crucial for accurate model estimates of upwelling and downwelling radiative fluxes, and of cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Zhang et al. (1999), and Iacobellis and Somerville (2000) have all found that radiative fluxes are sensitive to the specification of r e and fallout, and that the most realistic vertical distribution of clouds is

264

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative Forcing  

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Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Kato, Seiji Hampton University/NASA Langley Research Center Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the surface and atmosphere represent a critical shortcoming in the set of observations that are needed to ascertain the validity of model simulations of the earth's climate. While clouds are known to cool the climate system from TOA radiation budget studies, the redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere and within the atmosphere by clouds has not been examined in detail. Using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP)

265

DOE/SC-ARM-TR-099 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set  

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099 099 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED) C Zhao MP Jensen S Xie GG Mace SA Klein SA McFarlane R McCoy EJ O'Connor JM Comstock A Protat J Delanoë MD Shupe M Deng D Turner M Dunn Z Wang RJ Hogan September 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

266

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

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Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

267

1  

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High Clouds Microphysical Retrievals Intercomparison High Clouds Microphysical Retrievals Intercomparison J. M. Comstock, S. A. McFarlane, and D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. d'Entremon Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts D. H. DeSlover University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin G. G. Mace Univerity of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah S. Y. Matrosov and M. D. Shupe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada K. Sassen University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Z. Wang University of Maryland, Baltimore County/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland 1 Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004

268

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval (MICROBASE): Status of SGP A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval (MICROBASE): Status of SGP Version 1.2 and Prototype TWP Version Miller, M.A.(a), Johnson, K.L.(a), Jensen, M.P.(b), Mace, G.G.(c), Dong, X.(d), and Vogelmann, A.M.(a), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), Columbia University (b), University of Utah (c), University of North Dakota (d) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The interaction of clouds with incoming and outgoing radiation streams produces discontinuous regions of heating and cooling within the atmospheric column. These regions can influence the atmospheric circulations at multiple scales, as well as modify the existing cloud structures. The Broadband Heating Rate Project (BBHRP) within ARM has the goal of producing instantaneous snapshots of the heating and cooling rate

269

sekelsky-98.pdf  

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1 1 Comparison of Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar Measurements for the Fall 1997 Cloud IOP S. M. Sekelsky, L. Li, J. Calloway, and R. E. McIntosh University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts M. A. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania S. Haimov University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming G. G. Mace and K. Sassen University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction One of the primary objectives of the fall 1997 intensive observation period (IOP) was to intercompare Ka-band (35 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) cloud radar observations and verify system calibrations. During September 1997, several cloud radars were deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site,

270

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Evaluation of GFDL SCM  

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Evaluation of GFDL SCM Cloud Fractions and Surface Radiation Fields with Evaluation of GFDL SCM Cloud Fractions and Surface Radiation Fields with Those from the Ground-based Remote Sensing at SGP Kim, Byung-Gon Princeton University Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah The various kinds of approaches to obtain cloud fraction in the model still have the limitations, which accordingly result in the consequent errors in the model radiative fluxes. Because of the different schemes to estimate the cloud fraction by the model and also observation artifacts, the prudent comparisons should be made in order to reach the right answer. This study demonstrates the more revised approaches of comparisons to improve the evaluation of cloud fraction. To do this, a relatively inexpensive and

271

Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus Cloud on MODIS Retrieved Water-Cloud Droplet Effective Radius  

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Detecting and Evaluating the Effect Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus Cloud on MODIS Retrieved Water-Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Cirrus clouds can largely modify the solar reflected and terrestrial emitted radiances. The ubiquitous presence of cirrus clouds has a global coverage of about 20% to30% and more than 70% in the tropics (Wylie et al. 1994). The probability of cirrus clouds overlaying a low-level boundary layer cloud system is greater than 50% (Hahn et al. 1982, 1984; Tian and Curry 1989; Mace et al. 1997). They are often optically thin and semitransparent and frequently reside in high altitude overlapping with a low-level

272

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cirrus properties and  

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Cirrus properties and air mean vertical motion retrieval using Cirrus properties and air mean vertical motion retrieval using mm-wavelength Doppler radar moments Deng, Min University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Vertically pointing millimeter wavelength Doppler radar provides valuable information on upper tropospheric cloud properties and dynamics. We are developing an innovative algorithm to simultaneously retrieve cirrus microphysical parameters and air mean vertical motion by using the three moments of the Doppler spectrum. The technique utilizes a statement that the observed Doppler spectrum is the convolution of a quiet air reflectivity spectrum with the turbulence PDF (probability density function). The set of equations describing the Doppler spectrum moments are inverted using optimal estimation theory to derive estimates of the

273

Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

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Program Program Accomplishments of the Cloud Properties Working Group (CPWG) August 2006 Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Using ARM Data to Establish Testable Metrics for GCM Predictions of Cloud Feedback Gerald Mace University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah The scientific underpinning of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is largely based on the premise that long term ground-based measurements of certain quantities provide information sufficient to test the skill of general circulation models (GCMs) to predict radiative heating and cloud feedbacks (Stokes and Schwartz, 1994; Ackerman and Stokes, 2003). This hypothesis is based on the assumption that some set of long-term ground-based measurements provide sufficient information to characterize the physical state of the atmospheric

274

X:\ARM_19~1\PGS1-8.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Data B. Albrecht, G. Mace, X. Dong, W. Syrett, and T. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus- are closely coupled to the water and energy budgets of land surfaces. This coupling involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds

275

dong-99.PDF  

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25-Month Data Base of Stratus Cloud Properties 25-Month Data Base of Stratus Cloud Properties Generated from Ground-Based Measurements at the ARM SGP Site X. Dong Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis Atmospheric Sciences Division National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. P. Ackerman, E. E. Clothiaux, and C. N. Long Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace Meteorology Department University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah J. C. Liljegren Ames Laboratory Ames, Iowa Introduction Boundary layer stratiform clouds are important in the regulation of the earth's radiation budget and play an important role in climate over both land and ocean (Ramanathan et al. 1989). Boundary layer stratus

276

OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Microsoft PowerPoint - Development of High Temperature_Chen_Chonglin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature/High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor PhD Students: Erik Enriquez, Shanyong Bao, & Brennan Mace PhD Awarded: Dr. Chunrui Ma (UK) & Dr. Gregory Collins (WVU) PIs: Patrick Nash (retired 2012) and Chonglin Chen (PI) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249-1644 Phone: 210-458-6427, Email: cl.chen@utsa.edu Grant Number: DE-FE0003780 Project Manager: Dr. Susan M. Maley Performance Period: 09/01/2010-8/31/2013 * Introduction * Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductive LnBaCo 2 O 5.5 Oxides * Full Scale Chemical Sensor Development * Summary OBJECTIVES & GOALS * The objective of this research is: - investigate and understand the mechanisms of mixed ionic electronic conductive LaBaCo 2 O 5+ highly epitaxial

278

kato-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Aerosol Thickness Derived from the Aerosol Thickness Derived from Ground-Based and Airborne Measurements S. Kato Hampton University Hampton, Virginia M. H. Bergin Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia T. P. Ackerman and E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Charlock and R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia N. S. Laulainen and D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah J. J. Michalsky State University of New York at Albany Albany, New York Introduction The extinction optical thickness of the atmosphere can be computed by measuring the attenuation of direct solar radiation (DSR). The aerosol extinction optical thickness in selected wavelength regions by

279

DOE/SC-ARM-10-021 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment  

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1 1 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan J Mace Principal Investigator S Matrosov B Orr M Shupe R Coulter P Lawson A Sedlacek G Hallar L Avallone I McCubbin C Long R Marchand September 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

280

1  

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Large-Scale Cloud Properties and Radiative Fluxes Large-Scale Cloud Properties and Radiative Fluxes over Darwin during Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment P. Minnis, L. Nguyen, and W.L. Smith, Jr. National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia R. Palikonka, J.K. Ayers, D.R. Doelling, M.L. Nordeen, D. Spangenberg, D.N. Phan, and M. Khaiyer Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia G.G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was conducted from 23 January - 13 February 2006 in Darwin, Australia, to characterize the properties of tropical cirrus and the convection that leads to their

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281

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of CERES/MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals Using Ground-Based Validation of CERES/MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals Using Ground-Based Measurements Obtained at the DOE ARM SGP Site Dong, X.(a), Minnis, P.(b), Sun-Mack, S.(b), and Mace, G.G.(a), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties derived from the NASA TERRA (EOS-AM) Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) as part of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project during November 2000-June 2001 are compared to simultaneous ground-based observations. The ground-based data taken by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are used as "ground truth" data set in the validation of the CERES cloud products and to improve the CERES daytime and

282

Section 7  

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A One-Year Cloud Climatology Derived from the Micro Pulse Lidar G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology, University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania J. D. Spinhirne and V. S. Scott NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Abstract A cloud detection algorithm that attempts to identify all of the significant power returns from the vertical column above the micro pulse lidar at all times was applied to one year of micro pulse lidar data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The results of this analysis are presented, and the

283

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave and Longwave Flux and Cooling Rate Profiles for the ARM Central Shortwave and Longwave Flux and Cooling Rate Profiles for the ARM Central Facility Clough, S.A. (a), Delamere, J.S. (a), Mlawer, E.J. (a), Cederwall, R.T. (b), Revercomb, H. (c), Tobin, D. (c), Turner, D.D. (c), Knuteson, R.O. (c), Michalsky, J.J. (d), Kiedron, P.W. (d), Ellingson, R.G. (e), Krueger, S.K. (f), Mace, G.G. (f), Shippert, T. (g), and Zhang, M.H.(h), Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (a), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (b), University of Wisconsin-Madison (c), State University of New York, Albany (d), University of Maryland (e), University of Utah (f), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (g), State University of New York, Stony Brook (h) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Accurate representations of the cooling rate profile, the surface flux and

284

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of TERRA MODIS Cloud Properties Using Ground-Based Measurements Validation of TERRA MODIS Cloud Properties Using Ground-Based Measurements at the DOE ARM SGP Site Dong, X.(a), Xi, B.(a), Minnis, P.(b), Wielicki, B.(b), Sun-Mack, S.(c), Chen,Y.(c), and Mace, G.G.(d), University of North Dakota (a), NASA/Langley Research Center (b), SAIC, Inc. (c), University of Utah (d) Cloud macrophysical and microphysical/optical properties derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra as part of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project during February 2000-December 2001 are compared to simultaneous ground-based observations. The ground-based data taken over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are used as cloud truth data set in the validation of the CERES Science Team derived

285

Section 44  

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An Automated Cloud Mask Algorithm for the An Automated Cloud Mask Algorithm for the Micropulse Lidar G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania To perform cloud base analysis, an automated technique for sky signal using the standard lidar equation (Spinhirne determination of cloud base height from the raw lidar returns 1993) and midlatitude standard atmospheres. After is needed. Previously, a straightforward signal thresholding normalization, the observations form a swarm of points about algorithm was used to determine cloud base height. The unity with the scatter due to electronic noise, solar background difficulty with this approach is illustrated in Figure 1a. The and cloud and aerosol return. micropulse lidar operates at a wavelength of 523 nm, which is

286

USAID Europe and Eurasia Climate Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Eurasia Climate Program and Eurasia Climate Program Jump to: navigation, search Name USAID Europe and Eurasia Climate Program Agency/Company /Organization U.S. Agency for International Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/ Country Armenia, Republic of Macedonia, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Kazakhstan, Hungary, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan Western Asia, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Central Asia, Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Central Asia, Central Asia, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Asia, Central Asia References USAID Regional Climate Programs[1]

287

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

288

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AVReporter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AVReporter AVReporter tool_avreporter.jpg Energy management systems can measure data via installed hardware and turn it into valuable information. The AVReporter Energy Management software then will turn this information into reports and analytical information aiding energy efficiency, helping to realize where and when to change user platform in order to reduce consumption. Screen Shots Keywords Energy management, energy monitoring, reducing CO2, increase energy efficency, ISO50001 Validation/Testing Compatible with ISO50001 Standards and LEED Certifications. Expertise Required For users: none. For system integrators: electrical engineer and IT specialist. Users Users over 100 in Hungary and international Audience Production companies, building complexes, logistic centers and shopping

289

GNEP Ministerial Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Senior Delegation Officials From All GNEP Participants Senior Delegation Officials From All GNEP Participants GNEP PARTNERS Australia John Carlson, Director General, Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office Bulgaria Chavdar Zhechev, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Bulgaria to the United Nations China Chen Deming, Vice Chairman, National Development and Reform Commission France Alain Bugat, Chairman, French Atomic Energy Commission Ghana Joseph Adda, Minister for Energy Hungary József Rónaky, Director General, Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority Japan Yukiya Amano, Ambassador, Permanent Mission of Japan to the International Organizations in Vienna Jordan Khaled Toukan, Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research Kazakhstan Kayrat Abdrakhmanov, Ambassador Extraordinary

290

Fission: theory and beyond (a study of collective dynamics)  

SciTech Connect

From correlation on nuclei conference; Lake Balaton, Hungary (3 Sep 1973). The topic of the dynamics of the fission process has two subdivisions, the determination of the inertial mass parameters and the study of deviations from adiabaticity, excitation of singleparticle levels, viscosity, etc. The problems of dynamics are studied, with attention directed to the role of nuclear correlations. Two alternate forms for the mass parameter are presented. The first is variational, but it requires the evaluation of matrix elements involving the Hamiltonian. The other does not involve the Hamiltonian, but rather it utilizes the physical content of the wave function. (1 figures) (RWR)

Wilets, L.; Haff, P.K.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis of unknown materials with prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assay the degradation of high explosives (HE) by a material-loss mechanism, prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA), using a miniature neutron accelerator developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is proposed. Whereas the PGAA signatures from carbon and nitrogen in the chemical matrices are relatively low, fast neutrons may be used due to the higher cross sections for interaction. By using the upgraded PGAA database developed by the Isotope Projects Group at LBNL in collaboration with new PGAA data obtained at the Institute of Isotope and Surface Chemistry in Budapest, Hungary, it should be possible to observe and potentially to quantify a macroscopic loss of mass in HE.

English, Gerald; Firestone, Richard

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

292

Proceedings: 2003 EPRI International Low Level Waste Conference  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and minimize cost. EPRI's Twelfth Annual International Low Level Waste (LLW) Conference--coupled with the 24th Annual ASME/EPRI Radwaste Workshop--offered valuable insights into this effort by presenting papers covering new or improved technology developed worldwide for LLW management, processing, shipment, disposal, and regulation. EPRI accomplished the conference planning in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In addition to the United States, international representatives from the IAEA, Korea, Hungary, Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan, and Germany presented papers.

None

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Auctioning of EU ETS Phase II allowances: how and why?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

practice,ofcourse,thesefactorsvary considerablybetweensectors,andindeed,companiesandfacilitieswithinsectors.Non? participating sectorswith high electricity consumption (such as aluminium)will face substantiallyhighercostsduetohigherelectricity... auctioned 5% and used the revenue to purchase JI/CDM credits, Hungary auctioned 2.4%, Lithuania auctioned 1.5%, and Ireland auctioned 0.75%, with European?wide eligibility, to cover the administrativecostsofthescheme. 3Intheyear...

Hepburn, Cameron; Grubb, Michael; Neuhoff, Karsten; Matthes, Felix; Tse, Maximilien

294

Industry turns its attention south  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Significant foreign investment continues to elude Russia`s oil and gas industry, so the Caspian nations of Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan are picking up the slack, welcoming the flow of foreign capital to their energy projects. Separate evaluations are given for Russia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Moldova, Tajikstan, Uzbekistan, Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Serbia.

Marhefka, D. [Russian Petroleum Investor, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) Country Hungary Headquarters Location Budapest, Hungary Coordinates 47.498405°, 19.040758° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.498405,"lon":19.040758,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

296

Finite-Time Singularity Signature of Hyperinflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a novel analysis extending the recent work of Mizuno et al. [2002] on the hyperinflations of Germany (1920/1/1-1923/11/1), Hungary (1945/4/30-1946/7/15), Brazil (1969-1994), Israel (1969-1985), Nicaragua (1969-1991), Peru (1969-1990) and Bolivia (1969-1985). On the basis of a generalization of Cagan's model of inflation based on the mechanism of ``inflationary expectation'' or positive feedbacks between realized growth rate and people's expected growth rate, we find that hyperinflations can be characterized by a power law singularity culminating at a critical time $t_c$. Mizuno et al.'s double-exponential function can be seen as a discrete time-step approximation of our more general nonlinear ODE formulation of the price dynamics which exhibits a finite-time singular behavior. This extension of Cagan's model, which makes natural the appearance of a critical time $t_c$, has the advantage of providing a well-defined end of the clearly unsustainable hyperinflation regime. We find an excellent and reliable agreement between theory and data for Germany, Hungary, Peru and Bolivia. For Brazil, Israel and Nicaragua, the super-exponential growth seems to be already contaminated significantly by the existence of a cross-over to a stationary regime.

D. Sornette; H. Takayasu; W. -X. Zhou

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

Judging Edward Teller: A Closer Look at One of the Most Influential Scientists of the Twentieth Century  

SciTech Connect

Much has been written about Edward TEller, but little of it is objective. Given, on the one hand, his position as one of the most inventive theoretical physicists of the 20th century, and on the other, his central role in the development and advocacy of thermonuclear weapons, one might imagine it impossible at this point in history to write a scholarly, impartial account of Teller's life and his impact. Now, however, Istvan Hargittai, a prominent Hungarian physical chemist and historian of science, has written a balanced, thoughtful, and beautifully research biography that comes closest. Hargittai is uniquely qualified for this difficult task. Coming a generation and a half later from a similar Hungarian-Jewish background, Hargittai understands well the influences and terrible events that shaped Teller. The advent of virulent, political anti-Semitism, first in Hungary and then in Germany, made Teller twice a refugee. Both Teller and Hargittai lost close family in the Holocaust; Hargittai was himself liberated from a Nazi concentration camp as a child. While Teller was in the US by then, his and Hargittai's surviving family members in Hungary suffered mistreatment at the hands of the postwar Hungarian Communist dictatorship. Hargittai's informed Eastern European perspective also provides a fresh viewpoint to the cold war context of the second half of Teller's career. Furthermore, Hargittai's own scientific work in molecular structure clearly makes him appreciate of Teller's breakthroughs in that field in the 1930s.

Libby, S B

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

Ultra-stable implanted 83Rb/83mKr electron sources for the energy scale monitoring in the KATRIN experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The KATRIN experiment aims at the direct model-independent determination of the average electron neutrino mass via the measurement of the endpoint region of the tritium beta decay spectrum. The electron spectrometer of the MAC-E filter type is used, requiring very high stability of the electric filtering potential. This work proves the feasibility of implanted 83Rb/83mKr calibration electron sources which will be utilised in the additional monitor spectrometer sharing the high voltage with the main spectrometer of KATRIN. The source employs conversion electrons of 83mKr which is continuously generated by 83Rb. The K-32 conversion line (kinetic energy of 17.8 keV, natural line width of 2.7 eV) is shown to fulfill the KATRIN requirement of the relative energy stability of +/-1.6 ppm/month. The sources will serve as a standard tool for continuous monitoring of KATRIN's energy scale stability with sub-ppm precision. They may also be used in other applications where the precise conversion lines can be separated from the low energy spectrum caused by the electron inelastic scattering in the substrate.

M. Zbo?il; S. Bauer; M. Beck; J. Bonn; O. Dragoun; J. Jak\\rubek; K. Johnston; A. Kovalk; E. W. Otten; K. Schlsser; M. Slezk; A. palek; T. Thmmler; D. Vnos; J. emli?ka; C. Weinheimer

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

299

A comparison of cloud microphysical quantities with forecasts from cloud prediction models  

SciTech Connect

Numerical weather prediction models (ECMWF, NCEP) are evaluated using ARM observational data collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical quantities, retrieved using a variety of parameterizations. Information gained from this comparison will be utilized during the FASTER project, as models are evaluated for their ability to reproduce fast physical processes detected in the observations. Here the model performance is quantified against the observations through a statistical analysis. Observations from remote sensing instruments (radar, lidar, radiometer and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content, ice effective radius and liquid effective radius. Unfortunately, discrepancies in the derived quantities arise when different retrieval schemes are applied to the observations. The uncertainty inherent in retrieving the microphysical quantities using various retrievals is estimated from the range of output microphysical values. ARM microphysical retrieval schemes (Microbase, Mace) are examined along with the CloudNet retrieval processing of data from the ARM sites for this purpose. Through the interfacing of CloudNet and ARM processing schemes an ARMNET product is produced and employed as accepted observations in the assessment of cloud model predictions.

Dunn, M.; Jensen, M.; Hogan, R.; OConnor, E.; Huang, D.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Expedition to the 30-km Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and the Utilization of its Experience in Education and Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between May 28 - June 4, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (HYGN) - which operates within the framework of the HNS - a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the surrounding exclusion zone. The participants were young Hungarian nuclear professionals supervised by more experienced experts. The main scientific goals of the expedition were the followings: Get personal experiences in a direct way about the current status of the Chernobyl Power Plant and its surroundings, the contamination of the environment and about the doses. Gather information about the state of the shut down power plant and the shelter built above the damaged 4. unit. Training of young nuclear experts by performing on site measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives by performing wide-range of environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. Within the 30-km exclusion zone the influence of the accident occurred 20 years ago still could be measured clearly; however the level of the radioactivity is manageable in most places. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure occurred among the members of the expedition. The analysis of samples has been started at the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. During the expedition not only environmental sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out but it was also well documented with photos and video recordings for educational, training and PR purposes. A documentary TV film was recorded during the expedition. The first-hand knowledge acquired during the expedition helps the authentic communication of the accident and its present-day consequences, which is especially important in 2006, 20 years after the Chernobyl accident. Since Ukraine and Hungary are neighbor countries the media constantly discuss the accident, the consequences and the risks of using nuclear energy. In addition in November 2005 Hungary's parliament approved plans to extend the lifetime of the country's four-unit nuclear power plant. In order to have the crucial public support for nuclear energy it is very important to dispel unrealistic dismay and misbelieves regarding these questions. Thus it is extremely beneficial to have a film on this topic created by nuclear professionals especially for the public audience. In 2005 a book on the Chernobyl accident was published in Hungary that covers this expedition in a full chapter [2]. We plan to present the film to the audience of the conference. (authors)

Aszodi, Attila; Yamaji, Bogdan [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Silye, Judit [Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety Directorate, H-1539 Budapest, P.O. Box 676 (Hungary); Pazmandi, Tamas [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY 2 IEA MEMBER COUNTRIES Australia Austria Belgium Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Japan Korea (Republic of) Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom United States These countries are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as the IEA is an autonomous agency linked with the OECD. The European Commission also participates in the work of the IEA. The International Energy Agency (IEA) is the energy forum for 28 industrialised countries. IEA member country governments are committed to taking joint measures to meet oil supply emergencies. They also have agreed to share energy information,

302

Acrux Bt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acrux Bt Acrux Bt Jump to: navigation, search Name Acrux Bt Place Kecskemét, Hungary Zip 6000 Sector Solar Product Acrux designs solar systems for households. Coordinates -27.030609°, -65.320297° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-27.030609,"lon":-65.320297,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

303

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Appendix K. Regional Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K. Regional Definitions K. Regional Definitions International Energy Outlook 2008 Appendix K. Regional Definitions Figure K1. Map of the Six Basic Country Groupings. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2008 world population): North America—United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe—Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia—Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2008 world population):

304

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Appendix J  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J J International Energy Outlook 2006 Appendix J: Regional Definitions Figure J1. Map of the Six Basic Country Groupings. Need help, contact the National Information Center at 202-586-8800. The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure J1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2006 world population): North America—United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe—Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia—Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2006 world population): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2006 world

305

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

918 Federal Register 918 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 146 / Tuesday, July 30, 2013 / Notices The countries which are scheduled to be discussed are Antigua and Barbuda, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Granada, Hungary, Philippines, and Sint Maarten. The meeting agenda, as well as the staff analyses pertaining to the meeting will be posted on the Department of Education's Web site prior to the meeting at http://www2.ed.gov/about/ bdscomm/list/ncfmea.html. Reasonable Accommodations: The meeting site is accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you will need an auxiliary aid or service to participate in the meeting (e.g., interpreting service, assistive listening device, or materials in an alternate format), notify the contact person listed in this notice by October 18, 2013, although we will attempt to

306

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ecofys Country Fact Sheets Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.ecofys.com/files/files/ecofys_2011_country_factsheets_update.pdf Country: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Korea, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela

307

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Appendix K  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K - Regional Definitions K - Regional Definitions International Energy Outlook 2007 Appendix K - Regional Definitions Figure K1. Map of the Six Basic Country Groupings. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2007 world population): North America—United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe—Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia—Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2007 world population):

308

Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Jump to: navigation, search Name Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Agency/Company /Organization European Union Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://eur-lex.europa.eu/smart Country Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Hungary, Malta, Netherlands, Austria, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Finland, Sweden, United Kingdom Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Southern Europe, Western Asia, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe

309

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Definitions Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure J1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2006 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2006 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2006 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azer- baijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovenia,

310

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html Country: United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Luxembourg, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Egypt, South Africa, Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand

311

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Triples in Size to 16 Members September 16, 2007 - 2:33pm Addthis Nations Sign On to International Cooperation for Safe Expansion of Nuclear Energy Worldwide VIENNA, AUSTRIA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and senior international officials from 16 nations today agreed to increase international nuclear energy cooperation through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). China, France, Japan, Russia and the United States, who are original GNEP partners, as well as Australia, Bulgaria, Ghana, Hungary, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, and Ukraine signed a "Statement of Principles", which addresses the prospects of expanding the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, including enhanced

312

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Agency/Company /Organization: European Environment Agency Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Maps Website: www.eea.europa.eu/publications/eea_report_2009_9 Country: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Ireland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

313

IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY 2 IEA MEMBER COUNTRIES Australia Austria Belgium Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Japan Korea (Republic of) Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom United States These countries are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as the IEA is an autonomous agency linked with the OECD. The European Commission also participates in the work of the IEA. The International Energy Agency (IEA) is the energy forum for 28 industrialised countries. IEA member country governments are committed to taking joint measures to meet oil supply emergencies. They also have agreed to share energy information,

314

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets (Redirected from Ecofys Country Fact Sheets) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ecofys Country Fact Sheets Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.ecofys.com/files/files/ecofys_2011_country_factsheets_update.pdf Country: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Korea, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela

315

Appendix K: Regional Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K K Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2008 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2008 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2008 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia,

316

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Notes and Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

sources.gif (4045 bytes) sources.gif (4045 bytes) [1] Turkey and Belarus are Annex I nations that have not ratified the Framework Convention on Climate Change and did not commit to quantifiable emissions targets under the Kyoto Protocol. [2] The Annex I countries under the Framework Convention on Climate Change are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Turkey and Belarus are also considered Annex I countries, but neither has agreed to any limits on greenhouse gas emissions.

317

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K K Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2007 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2007 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2007 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia,

318

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional definitions Regional definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure M1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2011 world population): OECD Americas-United States, Canada, Chile, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom; OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2011 world population): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2011 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan,

319

Wind and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind and Power Wind and Power Place Warszawa, Poland Zip 04-320 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product The firm offers small-scale PV panels, inverters, accumulators, solar collectors and wind turbines, and has distributors in Germany, Hungary and Rumania. Coordinates 52.23537°, 21.009485° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.23537,"lon":21.009485,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Kraft Rt (Kraft Electronics Inc) Place Budapest, Hungary Zip H-112 Sector Solar Product Equipment manufacturer for the clean energy industry, currently focused on thin-film solar cell production equipment. Coordinates 47.506225°, 19.06482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.506225,"lon":19.06482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

322

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Map-Annex 1 Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Climate Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.unfccc.int/di/map/ Country: Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States

323

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study (Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series) Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

324

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Notes & Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To International Forecasting Home Page To International Forecasting Home Page To Annual Energy Outlook 2000 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage [1] Turkey and Belarus are Annex I nations that have not ratified the Framework Convention on Climate Change and did not commit to quantifiable emissions targets under the Kyoto Protocol. [2] The Annex I countries under the Framework Convention on Climate Change are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Turkey and Belarus are also considered Annex I countries, but neither has agreed to any limits on greenhouse gas emissions.

325

Technologies development for environmental restoration and waste management: International university and research institution and industry partnerships  

SciTech Connect

The Institute for Central and Eastern European Cooperative Environmental Research (ICEECER) at Florida State University was formed in 1990 soon after the end of the Cold War. ICEECER consists of a number of joint centers which link FSU, and US as well as international funding agencies, to academic and research institutions in Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Russia, and the other countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States. Areas of interest include risk assessment, toxicology, contaminated site remediation/characterization, waste management, emergency response, environmental technology development/demonstration/transfer, and some specialized areas of research (e.g., advanced chemical separations). Through ICEECER, numerous international conferences, symposia, training courses, and workshops have also been conducted on a variety of environmental topics. This paper summarizes the mission, structure, and administration of ICEECER and provides information on the projects conducted through this program at FSU.

Herndon, R.C.; Moerlins, J.E.; Kuperberg, J.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Burn-up Credit Criticality Benchmark - Phase IV-B: Results and Analysis of MOX Fuel Depletion Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

takes part in the work of the OECD (Article 13 of the OECD Convention). NUCLEAR ENERGYAGENCY The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was established on 1st February 1958 under the name of the OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency. It received its present designation on 20th April 1972, when Japan became its first non-European full Member. NEA membership today consists of 28 OECD Member countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Commission of the European Communities also takes part in the work of the Agency. The mission of the NEA is: - to assist its Member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for a safe, environme

Gregory J. O' Connor; Gregory J. Oconnor; Peng Hong Liem

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Activities of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)  

SciTech Connect

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Spain, and Israel are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. The 2001 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark specifications for 2642 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for use in validation efforts and for testing basic nuclear data.

Briggs, Joseph Blair

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Budapest research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor (BRR) from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute in Hungary. Comparisons were made of the reactor performance with the current HEU (36%) fuel and with a proposed LEU (19.75%) fuel. Cycle lengths, thermal neutron fluxes, and rod worths were calculated in equilibrium-type cores for each type of fuel. Relative to the HEU fuel, the LEU fuel has up to a 50% longer fuel cycle length, but a 7-10% smaller thermal neutron flux in the experiment locations. The rod worths are smaller with the LEU fuel, but are still large enough to easily satisfy the BRR shutdown margin criteria. Irradiation testing of four VVR-M2 LEU fuel assemblies that are nearly the same as the proposed BRR LEU fuel assemblies is currently in progress at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute.

Pond, R. B.

1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Uranium production in Eastern Europe and its environmental impact: A literature survey  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the unclassified literature was made to determine the location, technology, throughput, and environmental status of the uranium mines and mills that have historically made up uranium production capability in Eastern Europe. Included in that survey were the following countries: the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), now part of a reunited Germany, Czechoslovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Poland. Until recently, uranium was being produced in five of these six countries (Poland stopped production 20 years ago). The production began directly after World War II in support of weapons production in the Soviet Union. Eastern Europe has produced about two-thirds of the total Soviet uranium inventory historically, or about 330,000 metric tonnes of uranium (NM) [730 million pounds of uranium (MlbU)l out of a total of about 490,000 MTU (1090 NlbU).

Norman, R.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Bonneville Project Act, Federal Columbia River Transmission System Act and Other Related Legislation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Legislative texts are provided for: Bonneville Project Act which authorizes the completion, maintenance, and operation of Bonneville project for navigation, and for other purposes; Federal Columbia River Transmission system Act which enables the Secretary of the Interior to provide for operation, maintenance, and continued construction of the Federal transmission system in the Pacific Northwest by use of the revenues of the Federal Columbia River Power System and the proceeds of revenue bonds, and for other purposes; public law 88--552 which guarantees electric consumers of the Pacific Northwest first call on electric energy generated at Federal hydroelectric plants in that regions and reciprocal priority, and for other purposes; and public law 78--329 which provides for the partial construction of the Hungary Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River in the state of Montana, and for other purposes

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway Islands Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Zealand Nicaragua Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

332

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chapter footnotes Chapter footnotes Preface 1 OECD includes all members of the organization as of September 1, 2010, throughout all time series included in this report. Israel became a member on September 7, 2010, and Estonia became a member on December 9, 2010, but neither country's membership is reflected in IEO2011. Highlights 2 Current OECD member countries (as of September 1, 2010) are the United States, Canada, Mexico, Austria, Belgium, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Israel became a member on September 7, 2010, and Estonia became a member on December 9, 2010, but neither country's

333

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J: Regional Definitions J: Regional Definitions Figure J1. Map of the Six Basic Country Groupings. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure J1) are defined as follows: Mature Market Economies (15 percent of the 2005 world population): North America—United States, Canada, and Mexico; Western Europe—Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom; Mature Market Asia—Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. Transitional Economies (6 percent of the 2005 world population): Eastern Europe (EE)—Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro,

334

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional definitions Regional definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure M1) are defined as follows: OECD (18 percent of the 2011 world population): OECD Americas-United States, Canada, Chile, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. Israel is reported in OECD Europe for statistical purposes. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2013 world population): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2013 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and

335

OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

Historical (1850-2000) gridded anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of reactive gases and aerosols:methodology and application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present and discuss a new dataset of gridded emissions covering the historical period (1850-2000) in decadal increments at a horizontal resolution of 0.5 in latitude and longitude. The primary purpose of this inventory is to provide consistent gridded emissions of reactive gases and aerosols for use in chemistry model simulations needed by climate models for the Climate Model Intercomparison Program #5 (CMIP5) in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment report. Our best estimate for the year 2000 inventory represents a combination of existing regional and global inventories to capture the best information available at this point; 40 regions and 12 sectors were used to combine the various sources. The historical reconstruction of each emitted compound, for each region and sector, was then forced to agree with our 2000 estimate, ensuring continuity between past and 2000 emissions. Application of these emissions into two chemistry-climate models is used to test their ability to capture long-term changes in atmospheric ozone, carbon monoxide and aerosols distributions. The simulated long-term change in the Northern mid-latitudes surface and mid-troposphere ozone is not quite as rapid as observed. However, stations outside this latitude band show much better agreement in both present-day and long-term trend. The model simulations consistently underestimate the carbon monoxide trend, while capturing the long-term trend at the Mace Head station. The simulated sulfate and black carbon deposition over Greenland is in very good agreement with the ice-core observations spanning the simulation period. Finally, aerosol optical depth and additional aerosol diagnostics are shown to be in good agreement with previously published estimates.

Lamarque, J. F.; Bond, Tami C.; Eyring, Veronika; Granier, Claire; Heil, Angelika; Klimont, Z.; Lee, David S.; Liousse, Catherine; Mieville, Aude; Owen, Bethan; Schultz, Martin; Shindell, Drew; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; van Aardenne, John; Cooper, Owen; Kainuma, M.; Mahowald, Natalie; McConnell, J.R.; Naik, Vaishali; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

337

OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. The fractured crust will provide a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed and contribute to terminating the core-concrete interaction. Thus, one of the key aims of the current program was to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit, the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in previous

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

338

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbulence Turbulence in Alcator C-Mod and Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions N.P.Basse, E.M.Edlund, C.L.Fiore, M.J.Greenwald, A.E.Hubbard, J.W.Hughes, J.H.Irby, G.J.Kramer 1 , L.Lin, Y.Lin, A.G.Lynn 2 , E.S.Marmar, D.R.Mikkelsen 1 , D.Mossessian, P.E.Phillips 2 , M.Porkolab, J.E.Rice, W.L.Rowan 2 , J.A.Snipes, J.L.Terry, S.M.Wolfe, S.J.Wukitch, K.Zhurovich, S.Zoletnik 3 and the C-Mod and W7-AS 4 Teams MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, USA 1 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, USA 2 University of Texas at Austin, Austin, USA 3 KFKI-RMKI, EURATOM Association, Budapest, Hungary 4 Max-Planck-Institut f¨ ur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald, Germany At certain values of the edge rotational transform, ι a = 1/q a , the confinement time of plasmas in the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator was found to

340

East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore South Africa Spain Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hungary mace donia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Localization of shallow gas deposits and uncontrolled gas flows in young and unconsolidated sediments by geophysical methods  

SciTech Connect

The great mass of Neogene sediments in the Hungarian basin, where several hydrocarbon accumulations are known, is affected by Pliocene strike-slip movements, resulting in many [open quotes]flower structures.[close quotes] The gas may migrate from the reservoirs upward to the surface along the faults. Thus, shallow gas deposits can be located in the young, unconsolidated sands. There are also several shallow gas deposits derived from uncontrolled gas flows. In Hungary, the shallow gas reservoirs, which are small but increasingly important, have not yet been explored properly. However, the depleting gas may pollute the water in the soil as well as cause explosions. Our purpose is to develop inexpensive, complete, and highly sophisticated field- and data-processing techniques and an integrated complex of geophysical methods in order to define the limits of shallow gas deposits. To avoid anomalous behavior on seismic sections of the depleting gas, we started from uncontrolled gas flows which require special velocity and amplitude vs. offset analyses. In addition, natural and controlled source electromagnetic/electric surveys with various parameters were applied. An industrial-scale seismic section over an uncontrolled gas flow, special sections over flower structures and geoelectric sections, and a magnetic map are presented. The integrated complex of geophysical methods outlined above is being developed in order to establish the conditions for the exploration of gas reservoirs which have been used close to their locality and which could be recovered inexpensively.

Csoergei, J.; Kummer, I.; Papa, A.; Sipos, J.; Solyom, I.; Takacs, E.; Timar, Z. (Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary, Budapest (Hungary)); Keresztes, T. (MOL RT, Budapest (Hungary))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Memory of Quark Matter Card Game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientists at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC, BNL) recently discovered, that the hottest known form of matter is not a gas, but acts like a fluid. Furthermore, this fluid of quarks expands and flows much more perfectly than water or any other well known fluid. This aspect of the RHIC discovery can be introduced even to primary levels of physics education, noting that the usual solid to liquid to gas sequence of phase transitions now are known to be followed by a transition to a nearly perfect fluid, a liquid of quarks, at the largest temperatures made by humans. The educational games described herein were invented by middle school students, members of a Science Club in Hungary. The games were invented for their entertainment, the educational applications in teaching high energy particle and nuclear physics to laypersons are quite unexpected but most welcomed. This manuscript describes games with a deck of cards called Quark Matter cards, where each card represents an elementary particle. The games include an important contribution by Angela Melocoton, an administrator of the Guests, Users and Visitors (GUV) Center at BNL. It describes in simple terms, how to play the Memory of Quark Matter style card games.

J. Csrg?; Cs. Trk; T. Csrg?

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Ion Beam Modification of Materials  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier-Science Publishers as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil, and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists, and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English. IBMM 2004 was held on September 5-10, 2004. The focus was on materials science involving both basic ion-solid interaction processes and property changes occurring either during or subsequent to ion bombardment and ion beam processing in relation to materials and device applications. Areas of research included Nanostructures, Multiscale Modeling, Patterning of Surfaces, Focused Ion Beams, Defects in Semiconductors, Insulators and Metals, Cluster Beams, Radiation Effects in Materials, Photonic Devices, Ion Implantation, Ion Beams in Biology and Medicine including New Materials, Imaging, and Treatment.

Averback, B; de la Rubia, T D; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Rehn, L E

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

PS2007 Satellite Meeting on Photosynthetic Antennas, 19-22 July 2007, Drymen, Scotland  

SciTech Connect

A Satellite Workshop of the 14th International Congress on Photosynthesis on the topic of photosynthetic light-harvesting systems was held on 18-21 July 2007, at the Buchanan Arms Hotel in Drymen, Scotland, near Glasgow. This meeting continued the tradition of satellite light-harvesting conferences occurring prior to the last five international photosynthesis congresses in Japan, France, Hungary, Australia and Canada, dating from 1992. With an attendance of 124 participants, this Workshop represents an intimate gathering of scientists interested in a thorough coverage of the light-harvesting aspects of photosynthesis. A significant amount of time was set aside for discussion and poster sessions. The organizers were: Richard J. Cogdell, UK (Chairperson), Alastair T. Gardiner, UK, Conrad W. Mullineaux, UK, Robert A. Niederman, USA, Robert E. Blankenship, USA, Harry Frank, USA, Bruno Robert, France. Sessions were focused on new concepts relating to the function, regulation, assembly, photoprotection and evolution of a wide variety of antenna systems. Cutting-edge scientific methods used to study these systems that were covered included time-resolved and single-molecule spectroscopy, structure determination by X-ray diffraction, NMR and electron and atomic force microscopy, molecular genetics, protein chemistry, model systems and theory. A central theme was how emerging high-resolution structural information on antenna proteins continues to provide an enhanced understanding of areas ranging from the kinetics of energy transfer processes to the assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus.

Robert E. Blankenship

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

Simulation of the SPE-4 small-break loss-of-coolant accident using RELAP5/MOD 3.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A small-break loss-of-coolant accident experiment conducted at the PMK-2 integral test facility in Hungary is analyzed using the RELAP5/MOD3.1 thermal-hydrauhc code. The experiment simulated a 7.4% break in the cold leg of a VVER-440/213-type nuclear power plant as part of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Fourth Standard Problem Exercise (SPE-4). One distinguishing characteristic of this type of power plant 'LS the horizontal steam generator. Nineteen countries participated in the exercise, with Texas A&M representing the U. S. Blind calculations of the exercise are presented, and the timing of various events throughout the transient is discussed. A post-test analysis is performed in which the sensitivity of the calculated results is investigated. RELAP5 predicts most of the transient events well, although the predicted time of occurrence of several events during the accident scenario is adversely affected by an underprediction of system pressure. A few problems are noted, particularly the failure of RELAP5 to predict dryout in the core even though collapsed liquid level fell below the top of the heated portion. A discrepancy between the predicted primary mass inventory distribution and the experimental data is identified. Finally, the primary and secondary pressures calculated by RELAP5 fell too rapidly during the latter part of the transient, resulting in rather large errors in the predicted timing of some pressure-actuated events.

Cebull, Peter Patrick

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

ISHHC XIII International Symposium on the Relations betweenHomogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis  

SciTech Connect

The International Symposium on Relations between Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis (ISHHC) has a long and distinguished history. Since 1974, in Brussels, this event has been held in Lyon, France (1977), Groeningen, The Netherlands (1981); Asilomar, California (1983); Novosibirsk, Russia (1986); Pisa, Italy (1989); Tokyo, Japan (1992); Balatonfuered, Hungary (1995); Southampton, United Kingdom (1999); Lyon, France (2001); Evanston, Illinois (2001) and Florence, Italy (2005). The aim of this international conference in Berkeley is to bring together practitioners in the three fields of catalysis, heterogeneous, homogeneous and enzyme, which utilize mostly nanosize particles. Recent advances in instrumentation, synthesis and reaction studies permit the nanoscale characterization of the catalyst systems, often for the same reaction, under similar experimental conditions. It is hoped that this circumstance will permit the development of correlations of these three different fields of catalysis on the molecular level. To further this goal we aim to uncover and focus on common concepts that emerge from nanoscale studies of structures and dynamics of the three types of catalysts. Another area of focus that will be addressed is the impact on and correlation of nanosciences with catalysis. There is information on the electronic and atomic structures of nanoparticles and their dynamics that should have importance in catalyst design and catalytic activity and selectivity.

Somorjai (Ed.), G.A.

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

348

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

349

ECONOMIC REFORM AND COMMUNIST REGIME SURVIVABILTY: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the collapse of communist rule and process of transitioning to democracy in the former-Soviet Union and its numerous satellite states certainly warrants the wealth of attention received, by no means does this signal that the history of communist state rule is ended. Contrary to popular beliefand even belief in academe it sometimes seemsCommunism still survives. In fact, a number of Asian states still claim to follow the path to a promised societal utopia under the guidance of their respective Politburos and may be described as not only surviving but thriving, experiencing economic stability and enjoying high rates of growth. This study examines the ramifications of economic and political reform policies implemented by four collapsed communist regimes which have transitioned to democratic governancethe former-Soviet Union, Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakiaas well as two surviving Asian communist regimesVietnam and Chinain identifying characteristic patterns of reform that are conducive to regime survival and/or collapse. The end objective herein is to provide projections for the future of the Castro regime in Cuba, which faces a critical juncture in the future with the impending death of its charismatic leader. I hypothesize that economic reform, through consistent implementation, generates credibility for both Communist Party elites and their future reform endeavors. Additionally, reform packages that manage to successfully stabilize the economy bestow an increased measure of legitimacy to the political elite, allowing the Communist Party to maintain political control, thereby avoiding collapse and the transition to democracy. The third and final section contains general discussion and what conclusions can be drawn from the results, as well as analysis of the history of reform efforts to present in the Caribbean island state of Cuba.

Nelson, John

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

350

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Report Uranium Marketing Annual Report Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Australia 12,758 41.59 11,164 52.25 7,112 51.35 6,001 57.47 6,724 51.17 Brazil W W W W W W W W W W Canada 9,791 48.72 8,975 42.25 10,238 50.35 10,832 56.08 13,584 56.75 China 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- W W W W Czech Republic W W W W W W 0 -- 0 -- Germany 0 -- 0 -- W W 0 -- 0 -- Hungary 0 -- 0 -- W W 0 -- 0 -- Kazakhstan 3,818 60.61 4,985 43.41 6,830 47.81 9,728 53.71 6,234 51.69 Malawi 0 -- 0 -- W W 780 65.44 W W Namibia 3,880 54.79 5,732 47.30 4,913 47.90 6,199 56.74 5,986 54.56 Niger W W 2,001 47.55 587 49.00 1,744 54.38 2,133 50.45 Russia 12,080 27.64 7,938 37.98 10,544 50.28 10,199 56.57 7,643 54.40 South Africa 783 27.50 W W W W 1,524 53.62 1,243 56.45 Ukraine 0 -- 0 -- W W W W W W United Kingdom W W 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- Uzbekistan

351

The U.S. Geological Survey World Energy Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey has conducted four assessments of world oil and gas resources over the past 15 years. Recently, a new five year plan for the World Energy Program was completed. Eight regional coordinators were appointed and planning activities for a new world assessment which will include oil, natural gas and coal resources is planned within four years. Currently the program is undertaking U.S. AID sponsored collaborative work with research organizations in Russia including VINIGNI and VNIGRI. Some of the products planned for this collaborative effort include a petroleum basin map of the former Soviet Union and eventually a basin map of the world at a scale of 1:5,000,000 and databases characterizing past exploration activities in Russia. Centers are being established in Moscow and Tyumen to where state of the art seismic processing, organic geochemistry and geographic information systems will be operational. Additionally, collaborative research particularly organic geochemical studies and unconventional natural gas studies in the Timon-Pechora basin are underway. Training of Russian scientists both at the USGS and in Russia on equipment purchased for the Russian institutes has been underway for the past year. An analogous program, but at a smaller scale, focusing primarily on seismic processing and compilation of databases is underway with Ukranian geologists. Similar collaborative activities in coal research are underway in Armenian and Kyrgyzstan, and recently completed in India and Pakistan. Collaborative organic geochemical research, natural gas research with particular emphasis on basin centered gas accumulations or unconventional natural gas accumulations such as coal bed methane have been undertaken or are anticipated in several countries including Hungary, Poland, China, several Middle East countries, South America and Indonesia.

Ahlbrandt, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Strategic planning -- task 7.1. Topical report, February 1994--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The nations of East Central Europe regained their political and economic freedom in 1989, ending nearly a half century of centrally planned economies under the hegemony of the former Soviet Union (FSU). These nations are now emerging from economic conditions marked by price distortions and a focus on heavy industry, isolation from world markets, and a lack of occupational health and environmental safeguards. Economic recovery, environmental restoration, and political stability, as well as eventual entrance into the European Community (EC), require a reordering of policies and priorities, including those bearing on energy and the environment. This report, prepared as a background document for the Second International Conference on Energy and Environment to be held in Prague in November 1994, is composed of a summary table and supporting text and is intended to provide a concise review of issues related to energy and the environment for the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, Poland, and Bulgaria. Organized by subject and country, Table 1 contains country profiles (Row A), information on the economy (Row B), primary energy consumption, environmental priorities, energy resources, production, and utilization (Rows C, D, F, G, H, and 1), electrical generation and transmission (Rows J and K), district heating (Row L), briquettes (Row M), and environmental regulations (Row N). Pertinent policy goals, issues, and trends are noted. The reports is based largely on a review of documents published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as selected sources obtained from the countries of the region. Reference citations are keyed to information presented in Table 1.

Daly, D.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

[Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal]: Task 7.1, Strategic planning. Topical report, February 1, 1994--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The nations of East Central Europe regained their political and economic freedom in 1989, ending nearly a half century of centrally planned economies under the hegemony of the former Soviet Union (FSU). These nations are now emerging from economic conditions marked by price distortions and a focus on heavy industry, isolation from world markets, and a lack of occupational health and environmental safeguards. Economic recovery, environmental restoration, and political stability, as well as eventual entrance into the European Community (EC), require a reordering of policies and priorities, including those bearing on energy and the environment. This report, prepared as a background document for the Second International Conference on Energy and Environment to be held in Prague in November 1994, is composed of a summary table (Table 1) and supporting text and is intended to provide a concise review of issues related to energy and the environment for the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, Poland, and Bulgaria. Organized by subject and country, Table 1 contains country profiles (Row A), information on the economy (Row B), primary energy consumption, environmental priorities, energy resources, production, and utilization (Rows C, D, F, G, H, and I), electrical generation and transmission (Rows J and K), district heating (Row L), briquettes (Row M), and environmental regulations (Row N). Pertinent policy goals, issues, and trends are noted. The reports is based largely on a review of documents published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as selected sources obtained from the countries of the region. Reference citations are keyed to information presented in Table 1.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements  

SciTech Connect

This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities: (1) the demilitarization of the Sinai region between Israel and Egypt in the 1970s; (2) the 1991 quadripartite agreement for monitoring nuclear facilities among Brazil, Argentina, The Argentine-Brazilian Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency; and (3) a bilateral Open Skies agreement between Hungary and Romania in 1991. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations.Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Newsletter Signup Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

356

Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1989-1990 1989-1990 Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov » Communities » Research » Data Digest of United States Practice in International Law 1989-1990 Dataset Summary Description The Office of the Legal Adviser publishes the annual Digest of United States Practice in International Law to provide the public with a historical record of the views and practice of the Government of the United States in public and private international law. In his April 2003 introduction to the 1989-1990 Digest, then Legal Adviser William H. Taft IV stated in part: "The year 1989-90 was a transitional period in international relations, as the world community continued to deal with implications of the end of the Cold War and the unsteady emergence of a new era. Many of the tensions and ambiguities of the time are reflected in the documents excerpted in this volume. For example, the Immigration Act of 1990 was adopted against the background of domestic U.S. concerns about terrorism, admission of refugees and exclusion of aliens-issues that continue to be important today. Other significant domestic law issues involved reservations to treaties (in this case, the 1948 Genocide Convention), the application of doctrines of foreign sovereign immunity (the Wallenberg Case), the interplay between sanctions and foreign assistance (e.g., Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the German Democratic Republic), and the allocation of foreign affairs authority in our federal system. "At the same time, the volume records U.S. efforts to deal effectively with the legal dimensions of very diverse issues on the international plane, including the Iraqi attack on the U.S.S. Stark, the downing of Iran Air Flight 655, the deployment of U.S. armed forces in Panama, maritime interdiction incidents, irregular rendition of criminal suspects, and the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe. Concerns about human rights, terrorism, and the war on drugs are indicated by the adoption of domestic legislation implementing, or relating to the implementation of, the UN Convention on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, the UN Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, the Montreal Protocol on Suppression of Unlawful Acts of Violence at Airports, and the IMO Convention on the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (negotiated in the aftermath of the Achille Lauro incident) and its related Protocol on Fixed Platforms. . . ."

357

The RERTR Program : a status report.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress achieved by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program in collaboration with its many international partners since its inception in 1978. A brief summary of the results that the program had attained by the end of 1997 is followed by a detailed review of the major events, findings, and activities that took place in 1998. The past year was characterized by exceptionally important accomplishments and events for the RERTR program. Four additional shipments of spent fuel from foreign research reactors were accepted by the U.S. Altogether, 2,231 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors have been received by the U.S. under the acceptance policy. Fuel development activities began to yield solid results. Irradiations of the first two batches of microplates were completed. Preliminary postirradiation examinations of these microplates indicate excellent irradiation behavior of some of the fuel materials that were tested. These materials hold the promise of achieving the pro am goal of developing LEU research reactor fuels with uranium density in the 8-9 g /cm{sup 3} range. Progress was made in the Russian RERTR program, which aims to develop and demonstrate the technical means needed to convert Russian-supplied research reactors to LEU fuels. Feasibility studies for converting to LEU fuel four Russian-designed research reactors (IR-8 in Russia, Budapest research reactor in Hungary, MARIA in Poland, and WWR-SM in Uzbekistan) were completed. A new program activity began to study the feasibility of converting three Russian plutonium production reactors to the use of low-enriched U0{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel, so that they can continue to produce heat and electricity without producing significant amounts of plutonium. The study of an alternative LEU core for the FRM-II design has been extended to address, with favorable results, the transient performance of the core under hypothetical accident conditions. A major milestone was accomplished in the development of a process to produce molybdenum-99 from fission targets utilizing LEU instead of HEU. Targets containing LEU metal foils were irradiated in the RAS-GAS reactor at BATAN, Indonesia, and molybdenum-99 was successfully extracted through the ensuing process. These are exciting times for the program and for all those involved in it, and last year's successes augur well for the future. However, as in the past, the success of the RERTR program will depend on the international friendship and cooperation that have always been its trademark.

Travelli, A.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Romania: Brand-New Engineering Solutions  

SciTech Connect

The HEU spent nuclear fuel transport from Romania was a pilot project in the framework of the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), being the first fully certified spent nuclear fuel shipment by air. The successful implementation of the Romanian shipment also brought various new technology in the program, further used by other participating countries. Until 2009, the RRRFR program repatriated to the Russian Federation HEU spent nuclear fuel of Russian origin from many countries, like Uzbekistan, Czech Republic, Latvia, Hungary, Kazakhstan and Bulgaria. The means of transport used were various; from specialized TK-5 train for the carriage of Russian TUK-19 transport casks, to platform trains for 20 ft freight ISO containers carrying Czech Skoda VPVR/M casks; from river barge on the Danube, to vessel on the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean. Initially, in 2005, the transport plan of the HEU spent nuclear fuel from the National Institute for R&D in Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' in Magurele, Romania considered a similar scheme, using the specialized TK-5 train transiting Ukraine to the destination point in the Russian Federation, or, as an alternative, using the means and route of the spent nuclear fuel periodically shipped from the Bulgarian nuclear power plant Kosloduy (by barge on the Danube, and by train through Ukraine to the Russian Federation). Due to impossibility to reach an agreement in due time with the transit country, in February 2007 the US, Russian and Romanian project partners decided to adopt the air shipment of the spent nuclear fuel as prime option, eliminating the need for agreements with any transit countries. By this time the spent nuclear fuel inspections were completed, proving the compliance of the burn-up parameters with the international requirements for air shipments of radioactive materials. The short air route avoiding overflying of any other countries except the country of origin and the country of destination also contributed to the decision making in this issue. The efficient project management and cooperation between the three countries (Russia, Romania and USA) made possible, after two and a half years of preparation work, for the first fully certified spent nuclear fuel air shipment to take place on 29th of June 2009, from Romanian airport 'Henri Coanda' to the Russian airport 'Koltsovo' near Yekaterinburg. One day before that, after a record period of 3 weeks of preparation, another HEU cargo was shipped by air from Romanian Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti to Russia, containing fresh pellets and therefore making Romania the third HEU-free country in the RRRFR program.

Ken Allen; Lucian Biro; Nicolae Zamfir; Madalina Budu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

105(scaled land 215%)7-22-05  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

G G U Y A N A S U R I N A M F R E N C H G U I A N A E S T O N IA L A T V I A L I T H . S L O V E N I A C R O A T I A S E R B - M O N T A L B A N I A T O G O B E N I N B O S N I A - H E R Z E G O V I N A G H A N A A U S T R I A B E L G I U M A F G H A N I S T A N U Z B E K I S T A N T U R K M E N I S T A N N E P A L L U X S W I T Z I T A L Y A N D O R R A MACEDON INTERNATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND COOPERATION National Nuclear Security Administration G R E E N L A N D I C E L A N D S W E D E N F I N L A N D R U S S I A N O R W A Y D E N M A R K U N I T E D C A N A D A K I N G D O M N E T H B E L A R U S P O L A N D G E R M A N Y I R E L A N D C Z E C H U K R A I N E SLOVAKIA K A Z A K H S T A N M F R A N C E HUNGARY M O L D O V A O N G O L I A R O M A N I A B U L G A R I A G E O R G I A KYRGYZSTAN IA A Z E R B A I J A N A R M E N I A P O R T U G A L N O R T H S P A I N U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A K O R E A T U R K E Y T A J I K I S T A N G R E E C E J A P A N S Y R I A S O U T H K O R E A T U N I S I A C Y P R U S C H I N A M O R O C C O L E B A N O N I R A Q I R A N I S R A E L J O R D A