National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hungary iceland ireland

  1. Sino Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sino-Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation Place: China Sector:...

  2. Carbon Bank Ireland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ireland Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Bank Ireland Place: Nevada Zip: 89411 Product: Investment bank focused on CDM projects. References: Carbon Bank Ireland1 This...

  3. Northern Ireland Electricity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ireland Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northern Ireland Electricity Place: Belfast, United Kingdom Zip: BT9 5HT Product: NIE is reponsible for the regulated...

  4. Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station - South Iceland | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - South Iceland Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station - South Iceland Published...

  5. Iceland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    infrastructure. The advantages of Icelandic biodiesel production and use are twofold: lower carbon emissions and domestic production, both of which result in increased energy...

  6. Iceland-NREL Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Europe References http:www.nrel.govinternationalbilateralpartnerships.html References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIceland-NRELCooperat...

  7. Iceland Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Iceland Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  8. Iceland America Energy IAE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    America Energy IAE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Iceland America Energy (IAE) Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90017 Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Geothermal project...

  9. Hungary: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Hungary Population 9,937,628 GDP 145,153,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.11 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code HU 3-letter ISO code HUN Numeric ISO...

  10. Renewable Energy Systems (RES UK and Ireland) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (RES UK and Ireland) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewable Energy Systems (RES UK and Ireland) Name: Renewable Energy Systems (RES UK and Ireland) Address: Beaufort Court Egg...

  11. Secretary Bodman Meets with Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary Secretary Bodman Meets with Regional Energy Ministers in Hungary March 17, 2006 - 3:44pm Addthis Emphasizes U.S. Support for Central European Energy Security BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today participated in a regional energy meeting with ministers from Hungary, Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Austria, Croatia and Romania. During the meeting, Secretary Bodman and the ministers discussed the importance of

  12. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the U.S. Iceland Geothermal Conference presentation on March 7, 2013 by Chief Engineer Jay Nathwani of the U.S. Department of Energys Geothermal Technologies Office. PDF icon...

  13. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.S. | Department of Energy Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal Conference presentation on March 7, 2013 by Chief Engineer Jay Nathwani of the U.S. Department of Energys Geothermal Technologies Office. PDF icon iceland_geothermal_conf2013_nathwani.pdf More Documents & Publications Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at

  14. H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd (aka Integral Energy) Place: Ipoly u 1A, Hungary Zip: H-6000 Sector: Solar...

  15. Ireland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Ireland Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.69 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code IE 3-letter ISO code IRL Numeric ISO...

  16. Australia, Iceland and the U.S. Launch International Partnership to Promote Advanced Geothermal Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    REYKJAVIK, ICELAND - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Acting Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs Katharine Fredriksen, Australia's Ambassador to Iceland Sharyn Minahan,...

  17. United States, Australia, and Iceland to Promote Geothermal Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    widespread deployment of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and deep drilling technologies. ... Office website, the Iceland Deep Drilling Project website, the Geoscience ...

  18. Australia, Iceland and the U.S. Launch International Partnership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Enhanced geothermal systems have the potential to be the world's only ever-present form ... DOE will work with Australia's Ministry of Resources, Energy and Tourism and Iceland's ...

  19. Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and Steamboat Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Helium...

  20. Research on human genetics in Iceland. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-31

    Records of the Icelandic Population are being used to investigate the possible inheritance of disabilities and diseases as well as other characters and the effect of environment on man. The progress report of research covers the period 1977 to 1980. The investigation was begun in 1965 by the Genetical Committee of the University of Iceland and the materials used are demographic records from the year 1840 to present and various medical information. The records are being computerized and linked together to make them effective for use in hereditary studies.

  1. Progress report on research on human genetics in Iceland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-31

    Records of the Icelandic population are being used to investigate the possible inheritance of disabilities and diseases as well as other characteristics and the effect of environment on man. The progress report of research covers the period from 1977 to 1980. The investigation was begun in 1965 by the Genetical Committee of the University of Iceland and the materials used are demographic records from the year 1840 to present and various medical information. The records are being computerized and linked together to make them effective for use in hereditary studies.

  2. United States, Australia, and Iceland to Promote Geothermal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States, Australia, and Iceland signed a charter on August 28 to launch the International Partnership for Geothermal Technology (IPGT), which will foster and promote cutting-edge geothermal technologies and help address energy security and address global climate change.

  3. U.S. and Iceland Sign Bilateral Agreement to Develop Clean Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy | Department of Energy U.S. and Iceland Sign Bilateral Agreement to Develop Clean Geothermal Energy U.S. and Iceland Sign Bilateral Agreement to Develop Clean Geothermal Energy October 6, 2010 - 10:33am Addthis Photo of two people signing an agreement. Today the United States and Iceland signed a bilateral agreement aimed at increasing the world's understanding of advanced geothermal technologies and accelerating their deployment. The agreement was signed by U.S. Ambassador to

  4. U.S. and Iceland Sign Bilateral Agreement to Develop Clean Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nations represented in this week's events include Australia, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Netherlands, ...

  5. Secretary Chu To Travel to Scotland and Ireland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To Travel to Scotland and Ireland Secretary Chu To Travel to Scotland and Ireland November 1, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - This week, Secretary Chu will travel to Scotland and Ireland where he will meet with government and academic leaders, as well as American and Irish business leaders who are engaged in clean energy industries. Both Scotland and Ireland share similar energy challenges and resources with the United States, including significant offshore wind energy potential. These

  6. Chu in Ireland: A Case Study in Wind Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ireland: A Case Study in Wind Power Chu in Ireland: A Case Study in Wind Power November 5, 2010 - 5:37pm Addthis Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs Secretary Chu is currently in Ireland, a country which shares many of the same energy challenges and opportunities as the United States. Like the U.S., Ireland has the potential to tap enormous renewable energy resources. In particular, Ireland has significant wind and wave power potential, and is moving quickly to

  7. Management of Disused Sealed Sources in Hungary - 13077

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapitany, Sandor

    2013-07-01

    Since 1976 the spent and disused radioactive sources arisen in Hungary are stored in a central storage facility called Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility operated by Public Limited Company for Radioactive Waste Management. The Facility is responsible for the record keeping, the waste acceptance procedure, the shipment and the storage or disposal (whether a certain source meets the waste acceptance criteria for disposal or not) of sources. Based on the more than 35 year old operation of the facility many experiences have been gathered regarding the technology for long-term storage of sources, the attitude of the users of sources, the evolution of the legislation and the national record keeping system. Recently a new legislation for the security of radioactive materials (including sources) was introduced, first in Central-Europe. It requires special security arrangements from the facility for transport and for storage. Due to the ongoing retrieval of radioactive waste formerly disposed of, partly containing sealed sources, there is a new challenge in the physical inventory control of historical waste. The paper would show the effect of the changes in the legislation system of record keeping or security on the users' attitude for discard of sources and on the management of the sources in the facility. The facility has a unique storage technology (shallow boreholes) in the narrow region. The sealed sources are placed into vertical pipes sunk into the surface. In the beginning, each of the sources were dropped into the pipe directly, recently they are placed in a metal tube first ensuring the retrieval. The lessons learned will be presented. There were several issues to introduce the new security arrangements (partly financially supported by US DOE) for storage and for transportation of sealed sources. These issues are addressed. In the past part of the sealed sources were disposed together with solid radioactive waste packaged in plastic bags. A waste retrieval campaign was fulfilled in 2008 to retrieve the sealed sources. The paper demonstrates the conditions of sealed sources after twenty-year disposal period. As a summary, the paper will share the main experiences of a 35-year old facility, managing radioactive sealed sources in Central Europe. (authors)

  8. SIMULATION OF THE ICELAND VOLCANIC ERUPTION OF APRIL 2010 USING THE ENSEMBLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R.

    2011-05-10

    The Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in Iceland in April 2010 disrupted transportation in Europe which ultimately affected travel plans for many on a global basis. The Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) is responsible for providing guidance to the aviation industry of the transport of volcanic ash clouds. There are nine such centers located globally, and the London branch (headed by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office, or UKMet) was responsible for modeling the Iceland volcano. The guidance provided by the VAAC created some controversy due to the burdensome travel restrictions and uncertainty involved in the prediction of ash transport. The Iceland volcanic eruption provides a useful exercise of the European ENSEMBLE program, coordinated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy. ENSEMBLE, a decision support system for emergency response, uses transport model results from a variety of countries in an effort to better understand the uncertainty involved with a given accident scenario. Model results in the form of airborne concentration and surface deposition are required from each member of the ensemble in a prescribed format that may then be uploaded to a website for manipulation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is the lone regular United States participant throughout the 10-year existence of ENSEMBLE. For the Iceland volcano, four separate source term estimates have been provided to ENSEMBLE participants. This paper focuses only on one of those source terms. The SRNL results in relation to other modeling agency results along with useful information obtained using an ensemble of transport results will be discussed.

  9. NNSA Agrees to Emergency Operations Cooperation with Morocco and Iceland at

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    IAEA General Conference | National Nuclear Security Administration Agrees to Emergency Operations Cooperation with Morocco and Iceland at IAEA General Conference | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our

  10. Secretary Chu To Travel to Scotland and Ireland | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington, D.C. - This week, Secretary Chu will travel to Scotland and Ireland where he will meet with government and academic leaders, as well as American and Irish business leaders who are engaged in clean energy industries. Both Scotland and Ireland share similar energy challenges and resources with the United States, including significant offshore wind energy potential. These countries have set rigorous renewable energy goals, including wind and water power, towards meeting the European

  11. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Jay Nathwani, Chief Engineer Enel Salt Wells - Courtesy of Enel Green Power - North America March 7, 2013 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Topics 1. Current Market 2. Budget Profile 3. Regulatory Roadmap 4. Different Policies 5. Impact of Policies 6. Path Forward 7. Conclusion Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Inaugural Address - January 21, 2013 "We

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 10_ROSE_MARTYN_UPDATED_NMMSS_2014_Foreign...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, The Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, ...

  13. Microsoft Word - Foreign Obligation Codes.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, ...

  14. 123 Agreements for Peaceful Cooperation | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, ...

  15. Environment and energy in Iceland: A comparative analysis of values and impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhallsdottir, Thora Ellen . E-mail: theth@hi.is

    2007-08-15

    Within an Icelandic framework plan for energy, environmental values and impacts were estimated in multicriteria analyses for 19 hydroelectric and 22 geothermal developments. Four natural environment classes were defined (geology + hydrology, species, ecosystems + soils, landscape + wilderness) with cultural heritage as the fifth class. Values and impacts were assessed through 6 agglomerated attributes: richness/diversity, rarity, size/continuity/pristineness, information/symbolic value, international responsibility and visual value. The project offers a unique opportunity for comparing environmental values and impacts within a large sample of sites and energy alternatives treated within a common methodological framework. Total values were higher in hydroelectric than in geothermal areas. Hydroelectric areas scored high for cultural heritage (particularly in rarity and information value), landscape and wilderness. Geothermal areas had high bedrock and hydrological diversity and information values, and a high landscape visual value but little cultural heritage. High values were correlated among some classes of the natural environment, all of which are likely to reflect functional relationships. In contrast, cultural heritage values were not related to natural environment values. Overall, landscape and wilderness had the highest mean value and were also most affected by energy development. Over 40% of the hydroelectric development had a predicted mean impact value of > 4 (out of a maximum of 10), compared with 10% of the geothermal projects. Excluding two outsized hydropower options, there was a significant correlation between plant capacity and impact on geology and hydrology but not with other environmental variables.

  16. Lessons learnt from post EIS evaluations of national road schemes in Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, E.A.; O'Malley, V.P.

    2012-01-15

    The Irish National Roads Authority (NRA) recently completed over twenty post environmental impact assessment evaluations of noise chapters prepared as part of Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for new national road schemes in Ireland. The study focused on a range of issues including a review of noise monitoring procedures, noise prediction methodologies and an assessment of the effectiveness of noise mitigation measures currently in use on national road schemes. This review was carried out taking cognisance of best international practices for noise assessment and methodologies used to mitigate road traffic noise. The primary focus of the study was to assess the actual noise impacts of national road scheme developments and to revise, where necessary, methodologies recommended in the current NRA guidance document describing the treatment of noise on national road schemes. This paper presents a summary of the study and identifies a number of key areas that should be considered prior to the development of future guidance documents. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presents a post-EIS evaluation of noise assessments for national roads in Ireland. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effectiveness of some noise mitigation measures is critically evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Issues related to the current EIS noise assessment methodologies are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implications for alterations to the NRA noise guidelines.

  17. Microsoft Word - Final Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. ...

  18. Part 810-ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES Sec.

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... France Germany Greece Hungary Indonesia International Atomic Energy Agency Ireland Italy Japan Kazakhstan Korea, Republic of 23 1986 Version Final Rule (effective March 25, ...

  19. Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007 - 2012; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, Maureen

    2015-06-15

    This presentation provides a summary of IEA Wind Task 26 report on Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007-2012

  20. Targeted intervention strategies to optimise diversion of BMW in the Dublin, Ireland region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, M.; Magette, W.L.

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Previous research indicates that targeted strategies designed for specific areas should lead to improved diversion. > Survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting. > Then logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific management intervention strategies. > Waste management initiatives can be tailored to specific needs of areas rather than one size fits all means currently used. - Abstract: Urgent transformation is required in Ireland to divert biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill and prevent increases in overall waste generation. When BMW is optimally managed, it becomes a resource with value instead of an unwanted by-product requiring disposal. An analysis of survey responses from commercial and residential sectors for the Dublin region in previous research by the authors proved that attitudes towards and behaviour regarding municipal solid waste is spatially variable. This finding indicates that targeted intervention strategies designed for specific geographic areas should lead to improved diversion rates of BMW from landfill, a requirement of the Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC. In the research described in this paper, survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting, after which logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific waste management intervention strategies. The main strategies devised include (a) roll out of the Brown Bin (Organics) Collection and Community Workshops in Dun Laoghaire Rathdown, (b) initiation of a Community Composting Project in Dublin City (c) implementation of a Waste Promotion and Motivation Scheme in South Dublin (d) development and distribution of a Waste Booklet to promote waste reduction activities in Fingal (e) region wide distribution of a Waste Booklet to the commercial sector and (f) Greening Irish Pubs Initiative. Each of these strategies was devised after interviews with both the residential and commercial sectors to help make optimal waste management the norm for both sectors. Strategy (b), (e) and (f) are detailed in this paper. By integrating a human element into accepted waste management approaches, these strategies will make optimal waste behaviour easier to achieve. Ultimately this will help divert waste from landfill and improve waste management practice as a whole for the region. This method of devising targeted intervention strategies can be adapted for many other regions.

  1. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvsi, Norbert; Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprm ; Vigh, Tams; Manganese Mining Process Ltd., rkt ; Nmeth, Csaba; University of Pannonia, Veszprm ; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-02-15

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12C21C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 ms{sup ?1}) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (13060000 particles m{sup ?3}). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bqm{sup ?3} and 550(497) Bqm{sup ?3} in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bqm{sup ?3} and 1258(788) Bqm{sup ?3} in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bqm{sup ?3} and 3403(3075) Bqm{sup ?3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m{sup ?3} and 8512(1955) Bqm{sup ?3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bqm{sup ?3} and 161(148) Bqm{sup ?3} in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bqm{sup ?3} and 117(147) Bqm{sup ?3} in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bqm{sup ?3} and 371(789) Bqm{sup ?3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m{sup ?3} and 1462(3655) Bqm{sup ?3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves. Consequently, correction is required on previously obtained radon data acquired by CF monitors at subsurface workplaces to gain comparable data for SF monitors. In the case of thoron, the data were unreliable and no significant tendency was seen during the comparison therefore comparison of previously obtained thoron data acquired by either CF or SF is doubtful. There was probable influence by relative humidity on the detection response; however, the effects of the high wind speed and elevated aerosol concentration could not be excluded. The results of this study call attention to the importance of calibration under extreme environmental conditions and the need for using reliable radon-thoron monitors for subsurface workplaces.

  2. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitina, Aisma; Lüers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabø, Lief I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arántegui, Roberto; Hand, Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan H; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-01

    The International Energy Agency Implementing Agreement for cooperation in Research, Development, and Deployment of Wind Energy Systems (IEA Wind) Task 26—The Cost of Wind Energy represents an international collaboration dedicated to exploring past, present and future cost of wind energy. This report provides an overview of recent trends in wind plant technology, cost, and performance in those countries that are currently represented by participating organizations in IEA Wind Task 26: Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, and the United States as well as the European Union.

  3. OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts Workshop September 27th 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

    2010-12-02

    An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. Although the idea of cases representing the best practices was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as cases. There was also discomfort at the implication that best practices implied lesser practices; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

  4. Ireland Worksite Earns VPP RECOGNITION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WASHINGTON - Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Jonathan L. Snare today made an important announcements regarding OSHA's Voluntary Protection Program (VPP).

  5. European Partnerships and Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    European Partnerships and Projects European Partnerships and Projects The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) engages through regional partnerships, as well as bilaterally with individual countries in the European region. In addition to the regional partnerships described below, EERE Technology Offices engage in bilateral research partnerships with countries in Europe, including Denmark, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Spain,

  6. Emobility (Smart Grid Project) (Budapest, Hungary) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    behavior and load profiles. Analysis of requirements of charging infrastructure. Defining home charging infrastructure, and developing new tariffs. References "EU Smart Grid...

  7. EUDEEP (Smart Grid Project) (Hungary) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    technical and nontechnical barriers that prevent a massive deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) in Europe. In partnership with manufacturers, research organizations,...

  8. EV Network integration (Smart Grid Project) (Ireland) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview This project will take two typical LV (220V) circuits, one urban and one rural, and will examine in detail through modeling and through...

  9. EWIS European wind integration study (Smart Grid Project) (Ireland...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of wind generation developers. The study will use results from detailed network and market models of the European transmission system for scenarios representing immediate and...

  10. ESB Smart Meter Projects (Smart Grid Project) (Limerick, Ireland...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Customer Behavior; assessing the available technologies for AMI roll out in an Irish context. The above will input to the cost benefit analysis for the full roll out of AMI in...

  11. Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization European Climate Foundation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Building Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment,...

  12. Fissure Swarms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    iceland-overviewmapping-iceland Fissure swarms typically result from tensional forces in volcanic regions and are predominantly host to geothermal systems in Iceland....

  13. Fluid rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-12 and RN-19, Reykjanes, Iceland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-07-24

    Results for fluid rare earth elment analyses from Reykjanes wells RN-12 and RN-19. The data have not been corrected for flashing. Samples preconcetrated using chelating resin with IDA functional group (InertSep ME-1). Analyzed using and Element magnetic sctor ICP-MS.

  14. Secretary Chu Visits Dublin, Ireland 11/04/10-11/05/10 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    carbon free sources of energy. This is the same building where in June 1963, President Kennedy addressed a joint sitting of both Houses of the Irish Oireactas, and presented the...

  15. Reykjavk Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reykjavk PO Box 8920 128 Reykjavik, Iceland Place: Reykjavik, Iceland Zip: 8920 Sector: Geothermal energy Product: ConsultingProject development Year Founded: 2008 Phone Number:...

  16. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & MT data - Krafla volcano, Iceland * Producing Geothermal field * First Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) well * Use existing MEQ and MT datasets - Coso Hot Springs, USA *...

  17. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ireland) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration Country Ireland Coordinates...

  18. Distributed connected wind farms (Smart Grid Project) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributed connected wind farms (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Distributed connected wind farms Country Ireland Headquarters Location Kerry, Ireland...

  19. Linkage analysis of chromosome 17q markers and breast-ovarian cancer in Icelandic families, and possible relationship to prostatic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arason, A.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Egilsson, V. )

    1993-04-01

    Seven families, selected for breast cancer segregation, have been analyzed for chromosome 17q12-q23 linkage to breast and ovarian cancer. In two of them, linkage is seen with most markers tested, increasing toward the most proximal region, but without informative recombinations above NM23. In the remaining families, no linkage is observed. Families with 17q linkage are not easily distinguished by clinical characteristics such as early onset (mean age at diagnosis [le]45 years) or organs involved. In fact, the family with the highest lod scores ([ge]2.3) belongs to the [open quotes]later onset[close quotes] (>45 years) category of families. Interestingly, prostatic cancer is the most frequent malignancy, after breast cancer, in the families that were studied (13 cases total, all metastasizing) and is especially prevalent in males presumed to carry the trait. Of 16 paternal carriers, 7 (44%) had developed prostatic cancer. Haplotype analysis in families with 17q linkage reveals two further prostatic cases as potential carriers. The authors propose that breast cancer genes may predispose to prostatic cancer in male carriers. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. USAID Europe and Eurasia Climate Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Armenia, Republic of Macedonia, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Kazakhstan, Hungary, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan Western...

  1. UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Limitations1 Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia...

  2. Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary | Department of Energy US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary for information

  3. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005)...

  4. List of Geothermal Facilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calpine Birdsville Geothermal Power Station Birdsville, Queensland, Australia Ergon Energy Bjarnaflag Geothermal Power Plant Lake Myvatn, Iceland Reykjavk Energy Blumau...

  5. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More Documents & Publications Geothermal Technologies Program Annual Peer Review Presentation By Doug Hollett Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal...

  6. Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Thingvellir, Iceland Coordinates 64.108164743246,...

  7. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States. 2007 - 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitina, Aisma; Luers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabo, Leif I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arantegui, Roberto; Hand, M. Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-12

    This report builds from a similar previous analysis (Schwabe et al., 2011) exploring the differences in cost of wind energy in 2008 among countries participating in IEA Wind Task 26 at that time. The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) is a widely recognized metric for understanding how technology, capital investment, operations, and financing impact the life-cycle cost of building and operating a wind plant. Schwabe et al. (2011) apply a spreadsheet-based cash flow model developed by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) to estimate LCOE. This model is a detailed, discounted cash flow model used to represent the various cost structures in each of the participating countries from the perspective of a financial investor in a domestic wind energy project. This model is used for the present analysis as well, and comparisons are made for those countries who contributed to both reports, Denmark, Germany, and the United States.

  8. Budasolar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Budasolar Technologies Place: Budapest, Hungary Zip: H - 1121 Sector: Solar Product: BudaSolar is a developer of thin film technologies and...

  9. UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations1 Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country...

  10. LignoKem | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type MOU Partnering Center within NREL National Bioenergy Center Partnership Year 2004 LignoKem is a company located in Hungary. References...

  11. Genesis Energy Investment Public Limited Company Genesis Solar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investment Public Limited Company Genesis Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Genesis Energy Investment Public Limited Company (Genesis Solar) Place: Budapest, Hungary Zip:...

  12. Mega Nap Kft | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vrtesszls, Hungary Zip: 2837 Sector: Solar Product: Mega Nap designs solar cells and collectors for households and industrial users. References: Mega Nap Kft1 This...

  13. ALSNews Vol. 314

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time, and the audience was enthralled Graduate students from Switzerland, Hungary, Mexico, and China made up most of the group, along with five students from the University...

  14. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | April 22, 2015: ICARUS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  15. Press Pass - Press Release - The CMS Tracking Detector's Midnight...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden,...

  16. Press Pass - Press Release - The CMS Tracking Detector's Midnight...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  17. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  18. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, India, Israel, Japan, Republic of Korea, the Netherlands, Norway,...

  19. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | July 19, 2013: Discovery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia,...

  20. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | June 3, 2015: U.S. joins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,...

  1. Press Pass - Press Releases - March 30, 2010 - Physics Begins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  2. Press Pass - Press Release - U.S. scientists join in "cosmic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  3. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    states are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak...

  4. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | April 5, 2015: U.S. scientists...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,...

  5. Press Pass - Press Release - LHC First Beam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  6. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia,...

  7. Press Pass - Press Release - CDF B_s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  8. Press Pass - Press Release - LHC Restart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  9. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | LHC experiments eliminate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia,...

  10. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 13, 2015: Two Large...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,...

  11. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | March 19, 2014: International...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    states are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,...

  12. Press Pass - Press Release - LHC First Beam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, India, Israel, Japan, Republic of Korea, the Netherlands, Norway,...

  13. Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public...

  14. Other Hydrothermal Alteration Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alteration Products Numerous types of colorful hydrothermal alterations compose the landscape at Kerlingarfjoll Geothermal area, Iceland. Photo by Darren Atkins User-specified...

  15. Other Hydrothermal Deposits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capping Other Hydrothermal Alteration Products Colorful hydrothermal deposits dot the landscape at the Hverir Geothermal Area, Iceland. Photo by Darren Atkins User-specified field...

  16. Fact #716: February 27, 2012 Diesels are more than Half of New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Note: Total includes Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Eire, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and ...

  17. Fact #643: October 4, 2010 Four Cylinder Engine Installations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    United Kingdom from 1999 to 2009. The total amount includes the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Eire, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, ...

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Republic of Korea Norway Russian Federation South Africa United Kingdom United States Australia Austria Brazil Canada China European Commission France Germany Iceland India Italy ...

  19. Geothermal Well Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Course on Geothermal Drilling, Resource Development and Power Plants; Santa Tecla, El Salvador; 20110116 Published Iceland GeoSurvey, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  20. Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Iceland. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the...

  1. Alterra Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    facilities in Iceland, a geothermal plant in Nevada, British Columbia's largest run of river hydro facilities and the province's largest wind farm. Their 297 MW share of...

  2. Magma Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    facilities in Iceland, a geothermal plant in Nevada, British Columbia's largest run of river hydro facilities and the province's largest wind farm. Their 297 MW share of...

  3. Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Geothermal Well Testing and Evaluation Author Jon Ragnarsson Published Iceland...

  4. Norden | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    headquartered in Copenhagen, Denmark, is a formal cooperation between Nordic amongst Nordic countries, which includes Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and the...

  5. Video: “Deep Heat” Explains Geothermal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ScienceNordic, a website that covers science news from Nordic countries in English, has a new short video featuring geothermal energy in Norway, Iceland, Tuscany and beyond.

  6. Development Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iceland.1 Best Practices Developmental drilling should only begin once a dependable reservoir model has been established and there is a good amount of certainty that the...

  7. Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Hengill, Iceland Coordinates 64.037222, -21.400833...

  8. Krafla Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Krafla Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Krafla Volcanoe, Iceland Coordinates 65.703861,...

  9. Reykjanes Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Reykjanes Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Reykjanes, Iceland Coordinates 63.826389, -22.681944...

  10. Svartsengi Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Svartsengi Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland Coordinates 63.878611,...

  11. Bjarnaflag Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plant General Information Name Bjarnaflag Geothermal Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Lake Myvatn, Iceland Coordinates 65.640833,...

  12. Jefferson Lab Hosts Series of Public Lectures in the Coming Months...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fire." Iceland is a land of great contrasts, especially in its physical geography and geology. Glaciers and volcanoes abound in this geologically dynamic land that sits astride...

  13. Mountainous | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Horst and Graben Shield Volcano Flat Lava Dome Stratovolcano Cinder Cone Caldera Depression Resurgent Dome Complex The interior of Iceland holds a vast expanse of mountainous...

  14. Geothermal Energy Featured on NBC's Today Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Iceland, there are five major geothermal power plants which produce about 26% (2006) of the country's electricity. In addition, geothermal heating meets the heating and hot water requirements for around 87% of the nation's buildings. As part of its "Ends of the Earth" series, NBC's Today Show presented a feature on the use of geothermal energy in Iceland.

  15. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Affiliations University of Graz JLAB Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay, India Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1183726...

  16. WorldWide Science.org

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estonia Ethiopia Finland France Germany Ghana Greece Honduras India Indonesia Ireland Italy Japan Kenya Latvia Lesotho Libya Lithuania Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Mauritius Mexico ...

  17. West Clare Renewable Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Sector: Wind energy Product: A wind project developer established to build the Mount Callan wind farm in County Clare Ireland. References: West Clare Renewable...

  18. Graphene nanoribbon molecular sensor based on inelastic transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene nanoribbon molecular sensor based on ... School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland) Instituto de Fsica, ...

  19. Airtricity Developments NI Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Airtricity Developments NI Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Airtricity Developments NI Ltd Place: Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Zip: BT2 7AF Sector: Wind energy...

  20. Joules Energy Efficiency Services Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joules Energy Efficiency Services Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Joules Energy Efficiency Services Ltd Address: 10 Edenderry Rd Place: Belfast Zip: BY8 8LD Region: Ireland...

  1. Clearpower Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clearpower Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clearpower Technology Place: Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Zip: BT3 9DT Sector: Wind energy Product: Clearpower...

  2. Organic Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Organic Power Place: Ireland Sector: Biomass, Hydro, Wind energy Product: Irish project developer active in wind energy, combined heat and...

  3. Mainstream Renewable Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Mainstream Renewable Power Place: Dublin, Ireland Zip: 18 Sector: Ocean, Solar, Wind energy Product: Developer of wind farms, solar, thermal and ocean stream projects....

  4. Surface Power Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Surface Power Technologies Place: Ireland Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: An Irish company supplying solar and micro-wind energy systems and...

  5. Kedco Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co. Cork, Ireland Product: Cork-based project developer of biogas and gasification plants; also active in the residential heating sector. References: Kedco Group1 This...

  6. Ellergreen Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    England, United Kingdom Zip: LA9 5SE Sector: Hydro Product: Develops, operates and finances small hydro sites in Great Britain and Ireland. References: Ellergreen Energy1 This...

  7. Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist for International Smart Grid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & ... Belgium, Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, ...

  8. Westwind Wind Turbines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ireland based small scale wind turbine manufacturer which originally started in Australia. References: Westwind Wind Turbines1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  9. SolarPrint | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: SolarPrint Place: Dublin, Ireland Sector: Solar Product: Irish solar cell manufacturer. The company developed DSSC technology. References: SolarPrint1 This...

  10. LotusWorks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LotusWorks Jump to: navigation, search Name: LotusWorks Place: Ireland Product: Engineering, technical and construction management service provider. References: LotusWorks1 This...

  11. Wavebob | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wavebob Address: H3 Maynooth Business Campus Place: Maynooth Region: Ireland Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: +353 (0)1 651 0177...

  12. LGC Skyrota | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Product: Northern Ireland-based producer of small wind turbines and maintenance company for large turbines. References: LGC Skyrota1 This article is a stub. You...

  13. Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ocean Energy Ltd Address: 3 Casement Square Place: Cobh Region: Ireland Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number:...

  14. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    less + Show Author Affiliations Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland) Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States) Univ. of...

  15. Korax Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Korax Solar Place: Sillingi t 30, Hungary Product: Hungarian module assembler. References: Korax Solar1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  16. NNSA Completes Conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor and Removal of

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    All Fresh HEU in Hungary | National Nuclear Security Administration Conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor and Removal of All Fresh HEU in Hungary | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations

  17. VPP EXPANDING THROUGHOUT EUROPEAN UNION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – Recently, the Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) made an important announcement regarding OSHA's Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). He announced that General Electric's (GE) Infrastructure-Security facility in Dublin, Ireland, was the first site accepted into Ireland's VPP Program.

  18. New York Event to Show Bi-Partisan, International Support for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merrill Lynch, GeothermEx, UTC Power, Terra-Gen Power, Western GeoPower, Raser Technologies, Iceland America Energy, Geysir Green Energy, Vulcan Power, and Enel North America. ...

  19. A Model For Syn-Eruptive Groundwater Flow During The Phreatoplinian...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Syn-Eruptive Groundwater Flow During The Phreatoplinian Phase Of The 28-29 March 1875 Askja Volcano Eruption, Iceland Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  20. Hunting for meteorites in Antarctica

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hunting for meteorites in Antarctica Hunting for meteorites in Antarctica Nina Lanza was selected as one of eight members for the 2015-2016 field campaign of the Antarctica Search for Meteorites (ANSMET) program. November 13, 2015 Lanza at the summit of Hvannadalsnukur, the highest mountain in Iceland, practicing glacier travel techniques similar to those needed for Antarctic fieldwork. Lanza at the summit of Hvannadalsnukur, the highest mountain in Iceland, practicing glacier travel techniques

  1. Pure Marine Gen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gen Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pure Marine Gen Place: Belfast, United Kingdom Zip: BT3 9DTN Product: Northern Ireland-based wave project developer. References: Pure Marine...

  2. Queen s University of Belfast | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    s University of Belfast Jump to: navigation, search Name: Queen(tm)s University of Belfast Place: Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Zip: BT7 1NN Product: Academic...

  3. Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries NREL Commercialization & Tech Transfer Webinar March 27, 2011 Gi-Heon Kim gi-heon.kim@nrel.gov John Ireland, Kyu-Jin Lee,...

  4. Rose Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Sector: Biomass Product: Backed by a consortium of three players in our agri-food industry, Rose Energy has proposed a 30MW biomass plant in Northern Ireland....

  5. Wind Prospect Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and advisor on renewable energy, especially wind projects in the UK, Ireland and Australia. Coordinates: 52.415065, -1.777849 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  6. B9 Energy Offshore Developments Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: BT40 2SF Sector: Wind energy Product: Established in 2002 to develop the offshore wind energy potential in Northern Ireland. Coordinates: 54.85114, -5.823019...

  7. MHK Projects/Ocean Energy Galway Bay IE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at the Irish Marine Institute-run test site in the waters off Galway, Ireland. Ocean Energy conducted a 2006-2007 winter sea trial on its 28 ton OEBuoy prototype at the Irish...

  8. Property:Project Country | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects + United Kingdom + MHK Projects40MW Lewis project + United Kingdom + MHK ProjectsADM 3 + Ireland + MHK ProjectsADM 4 + United...

  9. NREL: Energy Storage - NREL Battery Calorimeters Win R&D 100...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Battery Calorimeters Win R&D 100 Award The NREL Energy Storage team Dirk Long, John Ireland, Matthew Keyser, Ahmad Pesaran, and Mark Mihalic of NREL's Energy Storage Team. ...

  10. MHK Projects/WEC 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NULL Project Country Ireland Project Resource Click here Wave Project Nearest Body of Water Belmullet 100m site Coordinates 54.2744, -10.2757 Project Phase Phase 4 Project...

  11. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Prendergast David Prendergast Director, Theory of Nanostructured Materials dgprendergast@lbl.gov 510.486.4948 personal website Biography Education 2002 Ph.D., Physics, University College Cork, Ireland 1999 B.Sc., Physics and Mathematics, University College Cork, Ireland Research Interests My research focuses on employing and developing first-principles electronic structure theory and molecular dynamics simulations on high-performance computing infrastructure to reveal energy relevant

  12. Microsoft Word - agreement_scanned.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IMPLEMENTING ARRANGEMENT BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND TO COOPERATE IN THE FIELD OF FOSSIL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY WHEREAS, The Department of Energy of the United States of America (DOE) and the Department of Trade and Industry of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (DTI), hereinafter referred to as the "Participants"; Entered into a

  13. A I K E N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Dewes Receives Hungary's Golden Cross of Merit AIKEN, S.C. (March 24, 2014) - The Director of Global Security at the Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory has been awarded the Golden Cross of Merit of the Republic of Hungary. The honor was bestowed on Director John Dewes and Igor Bolshinsky of Idaho National Laboratory by Hungarian President János Áder for their efforts to reduce the threat of terrorism by eliminating highly enriched uranium from the country of

  14. Microsoft Word - FY07AnnualReport.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (EZ) 1 18,000,000 FRANCE (FR) 5 8,093,198 GABON (GB) 1 441,600 GAMBIA (GA) 1 49,300 GERMANY FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF (GE) 3 1,698,498 HUNGARY (HU) 1 4,000,000 KAZAKHSTAN (KZ) 3...

  15. Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN), Partnering to Increase Island Energy Security Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the international partnership for Energy Development in Island nations, including mission, goals, and organization. It also includes background on EDIN's three pilot projects: U.S. Virgin Islands, Iceland-Dominica Collaboration, and New Zealand-Geothermal Potential in the Pacific.

  16. Geothermal energy as a source of electricity. A worldwide survey of the design and operation of geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPippo, R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of geothermal power generation is presented. A survey of geothermal power plants is given for the following countries: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Turkey, USSR, and USA. A survey of countries planning geothermal power plants is included. (MHR)

  17. F.O. Licht's 17th Annual World Ethanol & Biofuels Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The F.O. Licht's 17th Annual World Ethanol & Biofuels Conference will be held on November 3–6, 2014, in Budapest, Hungary. Valerie Reed, Deputy Director of the Bioenergy Technolgies Office will be serving on two panels: "Maintaining Next Generation Investments in the Years Ahead" on November 4 and "Putting Together a Constant Supply of Feedstocks for Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels, Biochemicals and Aviation Fuels" on November 5.

  18. Microscopic Description of Induced Nuclear Fission (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Microscopic Description of Induced Nuclear Fission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microscopic Description of Induced Nuclear Fission Authors: Schunck, N Publication Date: 2012-12-13 OSTI Identifier: 1059062 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-608273 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: 10th International Conference on Clustering Aspects of Nuclear Structure and Dynamics, Debrecen, Hungary, Sep 24 - Sep 28

  19. Janos Kirz

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janos Kirz Print Scientific Advisor, Advanced Light Source, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Stony Brook University. Advanced Light Source Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 15R0317 Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Tel. (510) 486-5423 Fax (510) 486-4960 Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Dr. Janos Kirz was born in Budapest, Hungary. He came to the University

  20. Janos Kirz

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janos Kirz Print Scientific Advisor, Advanced Light Source, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Stony Brook University. Advanced Light Source Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 15R0317 Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Tel. (510) 486-5423 Fax (510) 486-4960 Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Dr. Janos Kirz was born in Budapest, Hungary. He came to the University

  1. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09-March 31, 2010 2009 April 17 Professor Jian-Wei Qiu, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa and Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York QCD and High Energy Nuclear Collisions April 21 Dr. Peter Levai, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, Hungary Can We Find Quark-Gluon Plasma in pp Collision at LHC? April 28 Professor Wolfgang Mittig, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Nuclear Power and Global Energy

  2. From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge; Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Komomua, C.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the workshop entitled: From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge. The first workshop was held May 1-2, 2012 on NREL's campus in Golden, Colorado. The second was held June 6-7, 2012 at the University College Dublin, in Dublin, Ireland.

  3. Anaerobic digestion submarine in Abbey farmyard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    An anaerobic digestion system and fiber separation plant installed at Bethlehem Abbey (Northern Ireland) produces biogas for central heating and grain drying, and a compost which is bagged and sold. According to one report, it even keeps the monks warm at night. Designed by James Murcott of Farm Gas Ltd., the digester (shaped like a submarine) receives 10% solids slurry.

  4. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Ireland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Israel 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Italy 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Jamaica 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Korea, South 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lebanon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mexico 0 0 819 0 502...

  5. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Ireland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Israel 0 0 0 0 73 0 73 Italy 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Jamaica 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 5 0 2 3 5 Korea, South 0 0 119 0 0 13 14 Lebanon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mexico 1 0 7,778 0...

  6. From Fire to Ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fire to Ice For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight When tons of ash spewed into the atmosphere from a 2010 Icelandic volcano, it caused havoc for vacationers across Europe. But did it also dramatically change clouds? Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) found that volcanic ash is not as efficient as common dust in birthing clouds' ice particles. Using a novel laboratory testing chamber,

  7. EDIN Announces New Projects in the U.S. Virgin Islands, Dominica, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    across the Pacific - News Releases | NREL EDIN Announces New Projects in the U.S. Virgin Islands, Dominica, and across the Pacific April 9, 2009 HONOLULU, HI, - The International Partnership for Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) today announced three new pilot projects. The U.S. pilot project participant will be the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI); Iceland's pilot project will be working with Dominica; and New Zealand will work to assess geothermal potential for numerous Pacific Island

  8. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy - Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford Geothermal Workshop on February 11-13, 2013. PDF icon stanford_2013_hollett.pdf More Documents & Publications Geothermal Technologies Program Annual Peer Review Presentation By Doug Hollett Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Geothermal Technologies Program GRC

  9. Geothermal Technologies Program GRC Presentation, 10/1/2012 | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy GRC Presentation, 10/1/2012 Geothermal Technologies Program GRC Presentation, 10/1/2012 Doug Hollett's presentation at the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) Annual Meeting on October 1, 2012 in Reno, Nevada. PDF icon geothermal_grc_hollett_10-1-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.

  10. New York Event to Show Bi-Partisan, International Support for Geothermal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy in America | Department of Energy York Event to Show Bi-Partisan, International Support for Geothermal Energy in America New York Event to Show Bi-Partisan, International Support for Geothermal Energy in America June 29, 2008 - 4:15pm Addthis NEW YORK, -- Demonstrating the widespread support for renewable, geothermal energy, the President of Iceland as well as officials of the current Bush and former Clinton Administrations are scheduled to speak at a workshop in New York City, July

  11. SAGE Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Programs SAGE Past Programs A National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Contacts Institute Director Reinhard Friedel-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director W. Scott Baldridge-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director Larry Braile-Purdue University Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 665-0855 1999 From Portland, Maine, to San Diego, California, a group of 23 undergraduate and graduate students representing 20 institutions from the United States, Mexico, and Ireland

  12. COER Hydrodynamic Modeling Competition: Modeling the Dynamic Response of a Floating Body Using the WEC-Sim and FAST Simulation Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COER HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING COMPETITION: MODELING THE DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF A FLOATING BODY USING THE WEC-SIM AND FAST SIMULATION TOOLS Michael Lawson Braulio Barahona Garzon Fabian Wendt Yi-Hsiang Yu National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado, USA Carlos Michelen Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA ABSTRACT The Center for Ocean Energy Research (COER) at the University of Maynooth in Ireland organized a hydrodynamic modeling competition in conjunction with OMAE2015.

  13. Secretary Chu in Scotland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Scotland Secretary Chu in Scotland November 3, 2010 - 4:24pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Secretary Chu is in Europe this week participating in a series of meetings and events across Scotland and Ireland. Yesterday, he toured the research facilities at Strathclyde University in Glasgow, Scotland. Scotland has set aggressive targets for renewable energy -- 80 percent by 2020 -- which presents challenges in integrating the power into

  14. Jefferson Lab Signs Contract Wth SensL For Silicon Photomultiplier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology (Photonics Online) | Jefferson Lab articles/jefferson-lab-signs-contract-wth-sensl-silicon-photomultiplier-technology-photonics-o... Jefferson Lab Signs Contract Wth SensL For Silicon Photomultiplier Technology Photonics Online March 28,2008 Cork, Ireland and Mountain View, CA - SensL, a provider of innovative, low-light solutions that use the company's proprietary silicon detectors, recently announced that it has signed a contract with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator

  15. Wind Energy Integration: Slides

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    provide information about integrating wind energy into the electricity grid. Wind Energy Integration Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 25907 Wind energy currently contributes significant power to energy portfolios around the world. *U.S. Department of Energy. (August 2015). 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report. Wind Energy Integration In 2014, Denmark led the way with wind power supplying roughly 39% of the country's electricity demand. Ireland, Portugal, and Spain provided more than 20% of their

  16. Electric Vehicle Battery Testing: It's Hot Stuff! | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Vehicle Battery Testing: It's Hot Stuff! Electric Vehicle Battery Testing: It's Hot Stuff! May 26, 2011 - 2:45pm Addthis NREL's Large-Volume Battery Calorimeter has the highest-capacity chamber in the world for testing of this kind. From bottom clockwise:NREL researchers Matthew Keyser, Dirk Long & John Ireland | Photo Courtesy of Dennis Schroeder NREL's Large-Volume Battery Calorimeter has the highest-capacity chamber in the world for testing of this kind. From bottom

  17. Fermilab Cultural Events in Batavia, IL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 - 2016 Fermilab Arts & Lecture Series Tickets Available Now! Click here! - Purchase with no additional fees! SOLD OUT - Fermilab/WGN Tornado & Severe Storm Seminar April 2, 2016 @ noon Each year WGN weather superstar Tom Skilling hosts an extended peek into the methods meteorologists use to track tornados and severe weather, and the ways you can be prepared for serious storms. This event is sold out but will be simulcast on WGN's website. SATURDAY! Dervish from Ireland - Saturday,

  18. NREL: Wind Research - Grid Integration of Offshore Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Photograph of a wind turbine in the ocean. Located about 10 kilometers off the coast of Arklow, Ireland, the Arklow Bank offshore wind park consists of seven GE Wind 3.6-MW wind turbines. Much can be learned from the existing land-based integration research for handling the variability and uncertainty of the wind resource. Integration and Transmission One comprehensive grid integration study is the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), in

  19. Voluntary Protection Program - Business Case for Safety | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Business Case for Safety Voluntary Protection Program - Business Case for Safety Business Case for Safety - $ DOE is Benchmark for DoD: Department of Defense Benchmarks VPP in Visit to Hanford Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety Extreme VPP - Kandahar, Afghanistan VPP Expanding Throughout European Union Navy Follows DOE Lead in Using VPP to Enhance Safety Ireland Work Site Earns VPP Recognition U.S. Recordable Injury and Illness Rates and Lost

  20. Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Authority | Department of Energy Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland for exchange of information concerning management of radioactive waste. PDF icon Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

  1. The Tactical and Strategic Implementation of Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Manufacturing Office Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop Washington, DC Sean Ireland Verso Paper Corp. & Chairman, TAPPI Nanotechnology Division July 26, 2012 The Tactical and Strategic Implementation of Sustainable Nanomaterials Verso Paper Corp  Verso is one of North America's Leading Manufacturers of Coated Papers  Four paper mills with 1.8 Million tons of paper capacity  $1.72 billion in Net Sales for 2011  Market Leader in our two end-user segments (Magazines and

  2. INFCIRC/207 - Notification to the Agency of Exports and Imports of Nuclear Material

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    INF INFCIRC/207 26 July 1974 International Atomic Energy Agency INFORMATION CIRCULAR GENERAL Distr. Original: ENGLISH and RUSSIAN NOTIFICATION TO THE AGENCY OF EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL On 11 July 1974 the Director General received letters dated 10 July from the Resident Representatives to the Agency of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America informing him that in the interest of assisting

  3. Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Considerations of the Behavior of Plutonium in the Environment found in Health Physics Copyright Issue Author Hanson, Wayne C 101649 Document Date 1/1/75 Document Type Published Article (scientific or technical journals) Recipients Public ERC Index number 05.09.693 Box Number 1681-1 NTSEIS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORD i NTSEIS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORD ^jpith Ply"*- Sfe: j Pergamon Press 1975. Vol. 28 (May), pp. 529-537. Printed in Northern Ireland ECOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE BEHAVIOR OF

  4. Fermi-LAT Detection of a Break in the Gamma-Ray Spectrum of the Supernova

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Remnant Cassiopeia A (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Fermi-LAT Detection of a Break in the Gamma-Ray Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fermi-LAT Detection of a Break in the Gamma-Ray Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Authors: Yuan, Y. ; Funk, S. ; Johannesson, G. ; Lande, J. ; Tibaldo, L. ; Uchiyama, Y. ; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Iceland U. ; , Publication Date: 2013-11-07 OSTI Identifier: 1104713

  5. ARM News » Research Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1:48:10 +0000 http://www.arm.gov en From Fire to Ice Mon, 29 Feb 2016 01:48:10 +0000 Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RNjY0/view <img src="http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/images/thumbnails/thumb_R00664_1.jpg:100" style="float:left;margin-right:5px;margin-bottom:5px"/><p>When tons of ash spewed into the atmosphere from a 2010 Icelandic volcano, it caused havoc for vacationers across Europe. But did it also dramatically change clouds?

  6. Judging Edward Teller: A Closer Look at One of the Most Influential Scientists of the Twentieth Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, S B

    2010-12-29

    Much has been written about Edward TEller, but little of it is objective. Given, on the one hand, his position as one of the most inventive theoretical physicists of the 20th century, and on the other, his central role in the development and advocacy of thermonuclear weapons, one might imagine it impossible at this point in history to write a scholarly, impartial account of Teller's life and his impact. Now, however, Istvan Hargittai, a prominent Hungarian physical chemist and historian of science, has written a balanced, thoughtful, and beautifully research biography that comes closest. Hargittai is uniquely qualified for this difficult task. Coming a generation and a half later from a similar Hungarian-Jewish background, Hargittai understands well the influences and terrible events that shaped Teller. The advent of virulent, political anti-Semitism, first in Hungary and then in Germany, made Teller twice a refugee. Both Teller and Hargittai lost close family in the Holocaust; Hargittai was himself liberated from a Nazi concentration camp as a child. While Teller was in the US by then, his and Hargittai's surviving family members in Hungary suffered mistreatment at the hands of the postwar Hungarian Communist dictatorship. Hargittai's informed Eastern European perspective also provides a fresh viewpoint to the cold war context of the second half of Teller's career. Furthermore, Hargittai's own scientific work in molecular structure clearly makes him appreciate of Teller's breakthroughs in that field in the 1930s.

  7. World frontiers beckon oil finders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

  8. Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries NREL Commercialization & Tech Transfer Webinar March 27, 2011 Gi-Heon Kim gi-heon.kim@nrel.gov John Ireland, Kyu-Jin Lee, Ahmad Pesaran Kandler Smith kandler.smith@nrel.gov Source: A123 Source: GM NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Challenges for Large LIB Systems 2 * Li-ion batteries are flammable, require expensive manufacturing to reduce defects * Small-cell protection devices do not work for large systems * Difficult to detect

  9. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS User Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domain structures and mesoscopic phase transition in relaxor ferroelectrics A.L. Kholkin,1 A. N. Morozovska,2 D. A. Kiselev,1 I.K. Bdikin,1 B.J. Rodriguez,3 P. Wu,4 A.A. Bokov,5 Z.-G. Ye,5 B. Dkhil,6 L.-Q. Chen,4 M. Kosec,7 S. V. Kalinin8 1University of Aveiro, Portugal, 2National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 3University College Dublin, Ireland 4Pennsylvania State University, 5Simon Fraser University, Canada, 6Ecole Centrale Paris, 7Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia, 8Oak Ridge National

  10. Fbis report. Science and technology: Economic review, September 19, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-19

    ;Partial Contents: Germany: Braunschweig University Tests Organic Semiconductors; France: Ariane-5 Tests Suspended; First Tests in Euro-Russian RECORD Rocket Engine Program; France: Renault`s Multi-Model Assembly Line Presented; Germany: New High Speed Trains Under Development; France: Matra Test Drone, Missile Systems; France: Experimental Project for Automobile Recycling; Germany: Survey of Flexible Manufacturing Developments; Germany: Heinrich Hertz Institute Produces Polymer-Based Circuit; French Firms Introduce Computerized Control Room for Nuclear Plants; German Machine Tool Industry Calls for Information Technology Projects; Germany: R&D Achievements in Digital HDTV Reported; Hungary: Secondary Telecommunications Networks Described; EU: Mergers in Pharmaceutical Industry Reported; SGS-Thomson Business Performance Analyzed; Germany`s Siemens Invest Heavily in UK Semiconductor Plant.

  11. Bonneville Project Act, Federal Columbia River Transmission System Act and Other Related Legislation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Legislative texts are provided for: Bonneville Project Act which authorizes the completion, maintenance, and operation of Bonneville project for navigation, and for other purposes; Federal Columbia River Transmission system Act which enables the Secretary of the Interior to provide for operation, maintenance, and continued construction of the Federal transmission system in the Pacific Northwest by use of the revenues of the Federal Columbia River Power System and the proceeds of revenue bonds, and for other purposes; public law 88--552 which guarantees electric consumers of the Pacific Northwest first call on electric energy generated at Federal hydroelectric plants in that regions and reciprocal priority, and for other purposes; and public law 78--329 which provides for the partial construction of the Hungary Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River in the state of Montana, and for other purposes

  12. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  13. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilitiesInternational Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden)Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis VlachoudisWorkshop Assistant: Graldine Jean

  14. AIR SHIPMENT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL FROM THE BUDAPEST RESEARCH REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewes, J.

    2014-02-24

    The shipment of spent nuclear fuel is usually done by a combination of rail, road or sea, as the high activity of the SNF needs heavy shielding. Air shipment has advantages, e.g. it is much faster than any other shipment and therefore minimizes the transit time as well as attention of the public. Up to now only very few and very special SNF shipments were done by air, as the available container (TUK6) had a very limited capacity. Recently Sosny developed a Type C overpack, the TUK-145/C, compliant with IAEA Standard TS-R-1 for the VPVR/M type Skoda container. The TUK-145/C was first used in Vietnam in July 2013 for a single cask. In October and November 2013 a total of six casks were successfully shipped from Hungary in three air shipments using the TUK-145/C. The present paper describes the details of these shipments and formulates the lessons learned.

  15. Materials selection guidelines for geothermal energy utilization systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, P.F. II; Conover, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    This manual includes geothermal fluid chemistry, corrosion test data, and materials operating experience. Systems using geothermal energy in El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and the United States are described. The manual provides materials selection guidelines for surface equipment of future geothermal energy systems. The key chemical species that are significant in determining corrosiveness of geothermal fluids are identified. The utilization modes of geothermal energy are defined as well as the various physical fluid parameters that affect corrosiveness. Both detailed and summarized results of materials performance tests and applicable operating experiences from forty sites throughout the world are presented. The application of various non-metal materials in geothermal environments are discussed. Included in appendices are: corrosion behavior of specific alloy classes in geothermal fluids, corrosion in seawater desalination plants, worldwide geothermal power production, DOE-sponsored utilization projects, plant availability, relative costs of alloys, and composition of alloys. (MHR)

  16. Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

  17. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    Many countries--reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems--are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy (RE) on the grid. Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Colorado and Texas), for example, have effectively integrated variable RE utilizing diverse approaches. Analysis of the results from these case studies reveals a wide range of mechanisms that can be used to accommodate high penetrations of variable RE (e.g., from new market designs to centralized planning). Nevertheless, the myriad approaches collectively suggest that governments can best enable variable RE grid integration by implementing best practices in five areas of intervention: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations.

  18. Peat as an energy alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punwani, D.V.

    1980-07-01

    The importance of developing alternative energy sources to augment supplies of fossil fuels is growing all over the world. Coal, oil shale, tar sands, biomass, solar, geothermal, nuclear, and hydroelectric power have received considerable attention as alternative energy sources. One large energy resource, however, has received little attention until recently. That resource is peat. Although peat is used as an energy source in some countries such as Russia, Ireland, and Finland, it is virtually unexploited in many countries including the United States. This paper provides an understanding of peat: its varieties, abundance, and distribution; its value as an energy alternative; its current and future role as an energy alternative; and the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of large-scale peat utilization.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Saccharomonospora viridis type strain (P101T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pati, Amrita; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Kuske, Cheryl; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides1, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Saccharomonospora viridis (Schuurmans et al. 1956) Nonomurea and Ohara 1971 is the type species of the genus Saccharomonospora which belongs to the family Pseudonocardiaceae. S. viridis is of interest because it is a Gram-negative organism classified amongst the usually Gram-positive actinomycetes. Members of the species are frequently found in hot compost and hay, and its spores can cause farmer?s lung disease, bagassosis, and humidifier fever. Strains of the species S. viridis have been found to metabolize the xenobiotic pentachlorophenol (PCP). The strain described in this study has been isolated from peat-bog in Ireland. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Pseudonocardiaceae, and the 4,308,349 bp long single replicon genome with its 3906 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. North Sea development action brisk; plays expand elsewhere off Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, D.J.

    1996-08-19

    The North Sea may be a mature play, but operators are continually searching for new ways to develop small finds near existing infrastructure and to develop discoveries in new areas at low cost. As they fill in gaps in the North Sea oil and gas infrastructure, companies are also exploring and planning developments in new plays such as the U.K.`s West of Shetlands area, the Irish Sea, and the Atlantic Margin from off western Ireland to northern Norway. Floating production systems and subsea technology are vital parts of many of Northwest Europe`s recently sanctioned field developments, for both large and small reservoirs. The paper discusses the dominant role of floating production units, the niche for subsea developments, new production, the Harding field, the Schieballion and Clair fields (UK), Norway`s plans, the Elgin/Franklin field, small fields, frontier work, in-field projects, flexible floating platforms, deepwater technology, a gas monotower, and subsea control.

  1. Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

    2006-12-15

    In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of blind geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the Best Geophysics Paper at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the fault zones is constrained by geological, drilling, and geothermal production data. The objective is to determine interpretation techniques for evaluating structural controls of fluid circulation in hydrothermal systems. The conclusions are: directions of MT polarization and anisotropy and MEQ S-splitting correlate. Polarization and anisotropy are caused by fluid filled fractures at the base of the clay cap. Microearthquakes occur mainly on the boundary of low resistivity within the fracture zone and high resistivity in the host rock. Resistivity is lowest within the core of the fracture zone and increases towards the margins of the fracture zone. The heat source and the clay cap for the hydrothermal have very low resistivity of less than 5?m. Fracture porosity imaged by resistivity indicates that it varies between 45-5% with most between 10-20%, comparable to values from core samples in volcanic areas in Kenya and Iceland. For resistivity values above 60?m, the porosity reduces drastically and therefore this might be used as the upper limit for modeling fracture porosity from resistivity. When resistivity is lower than 5?m, the modeled fracture porosity increases drastically indicating that this is the low resistivity limit. This is because at very low resistivity in the heat source and the clay cap, the resistivity is dominated by ionic conduction rather than fracture porosity. Microearthquakes occur mainly above the heat source which is defined by low resistivity at a depth of 3-4.5 km at the Krafla hydrothermal system and 4-7 km in the Longonot hydrothermal system. Conversions of S to P waves occur for microearthquakes located above the heat source within the hydrothermal system. Shallow microearthquakes occur mainly in areas that show both MT and S-wave anisotropy. S-wave splitting and MT anisotropy occurs at the base of the clay cap and therefore reflects the variations in fracture porosity on top of the hydrothermal system. In the Krafla hydrothermal system in Iceland, both MT polarization and MEQ splitting directions align with

  2. Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J.

    1987-01-22

    Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

  3. ISHHC XIII International Symposium on the Relations betweenHomogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai , G.A.

    2007-06-11

    The International Symposium on Relations between Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis (ISHHC) has a long and distinguished history. Since 1974, in Brussels, this event has been held in Lyon, France (1977), Groeningen, The Netherlands (1981); Asilomar, California (1983); Novosibirsk, Russia (1986); Pisa, Italy (1989); Tokyo, Japan (1992); Balatonfuered, Hungary (1995); Southampton, United Kingdom (1999); Lyon, France (2001); Evanston, Illinois (2001) and Florence, Italy (2005). The aim of this international conference in Berkeley is to bring together practitioners in the three fields of catalysis, heterogeneous, homogeneous and enzyme, which utilize mostly nanosize particles. Recent advances in instrumentation, synthesis and reaction studies permit the nanoscale characterization of the catalyst systems, often for the same reaction, under similar experimental conditions. It is hoped that this circumstance will permit the development of correlations of these three different fields of catalysis on the molecular level. To further this goal we aim to uncover and focus on common concepts that emerge from nanoscale studies of structures and dynamics of the three types of catalysts. Another area of focus that will be addressed is the impact on and correlation of nanosciences with catalysis. There is information on the electronic and atomic structures of nanoparticles and their dynamics that should have importance in catalyst design and catalytic activity and selectivity.

  4. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY IDENTIFICATION, DEVELOPMENT, DEMONSTRATION, DEPLOYMENT AND EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy C. Herndon

    2001-02-28

    Cooperative Agreement (DE-FC21-95EW55101) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Florida State University's Institute for International Cooperative Environmental Research (IICER) was designed to facilitate a number of joint programmatic goals of both the DOE and the IICER related to international technology identification, development, demonstration and deployment using a variety of mechanisms to accomplish these goals. These mechanisms included: laboratory and field research; technology demonstrations; international training and technical exchanges; data collection, synthesis and evaluation; the conduct of conferences, symposia and high-level meetings; and other appropriate and effective approaches. The DOE utilized the expertise and facilities of the IICER at Florida State University to accomplish its goals related to this cooperative agreement. The IICER has unique and demonstrated capabilities that have been utilized to conduct the tasks for this cooperative agreement. The IICER conducted activities related to technology identification, development, evaluation, demonstration and deployment through its joint centers which link the capabilities at Florida State University with collaborating academic and leading research institutions in the major countries of Central and Eastern Europe (e.g., Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland) and Russia. The activities and accomplishments for this five-year cooperative agreement are summarized in this Final Technical Report.

  5. Comparison of personal radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure in different urban areas across Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Wout; University of Basel ; Thuroczy, Gyoergy; French National Institute for Industrial Environment and Risks , Verneuil en Halatte ; Gajsek, Peter; Trcek, Tomaz; Bolte, John; Vermeeren, Guenter; University of Basel ; Juhasz, Peter; Finta, Viktoria

    2010-10-15

    Background: Only limited data are available on personal radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure in everyday life. Several European countries performed measurement studies in this area of research. However, a comparison between countries regarding typical exposure levels is lacking. Objectives: To compare for the first time mean exposure levels and contributions of different sources in specific environments between different European countries. Methods: In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), measurement studies were performed using the same personal exposure meters. The pooled data were analyzed using the robust regression on order statistics (ROS) method in order to allow for data below the detection limit. Mean exposure levels were compared between different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoor. Results: Exposure levels were of the same order of magnitude in all countries and well below the international exposure limits. In all countries except for the Netherlands, the highest total exposure was measured in transport vehicles (trains, car, and busses), mainly due to radiation from mobile phone handsets (up to 97%). Exposure levels were in general lower in private houses or flats than in offices and outdoors. At home, contributions from various sources were quite different between countries. Conclusions: Highest total personal RF-EMF exposure was measured inside transport vehicles and was well below international exposure limits. This is mainly due to mobile phone handsets. Mobile telecommunication can be considered to be the main contribution to total RF-EMF exposure in all microenvironments.

  6. IPIRG-2 task 1 - pipe system experiments with circumferential cracks in straight-pipe locations. Final report, September 1991--November 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, P.; Olson, R.; Marschall, C.; Rudland, D.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents the results from Task 1 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The IPIRG-2 program is an international group program managed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) and funded by a consortium of organizations from 15 nations including: Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Lithuania, Republic of China, Slovak Republic, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The objective of the program was to build on the results of the IPIRG-1 and other related programs by extending the state-of-the-art in pipe fracture technology through the development of data needed to verify engineering methods for assessing the integrity of nuclear power plant piping systems that contain defects. The IPIRG-2 program included five main tasks: Task 1 - Pipe System Experiments with Flaws in Straight Pipe and Welds Task 2 - Fracture of Flawed Fittings Task 3 - Cyclic and Dynamic Load Effects on Fracture Toughness Task 4 - Resolution of Issues From IPIRG-1 and Related Programs Task 5 - Information Exchange Seminars and Workshops, and Program Management. The scope of this report is to present the results from the experiments and analyses associated with Task 1 (Pipe System Experiments with Flaws in Straight Pipe and Welds). The rationale and objectives of this task are discussed after a brief review of experimental data which existed after the IPIRG-1 program.

  7. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Thomas L.; Bersell, Bridget M.; Booker, Paul M.; Anderson, Gerald E.; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Meagher, John B.; Siefken, Rob R.; Spracklen, James L.

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  8. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  9. PEAT: an energy alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schora, F.C.; Punwani, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    Even though peat is a low-heating value and low-bulk density fossil fuel which in its natural state contains over 80 percent moisture, it can be an economical alternative to coal, and fuel oil, as is the case in Iceland and Finland for direct combustion applications. This is because of the relative ease with which peat can be harvested, and the generally low sulfur and ash content of peat. Recent studies show that peat also has very favorable characteristics for conversion to synthetic fuels. Tests show that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is a better raw material than coal for production of synthetic fuels. Recent estimates also show that conversion of peat to high-Btu gas (>950 Btu/scf) is competitive with other alternatives of synthetic high-Btu gas. Therefore, peat can be an economical energy alternative depending upon location of peat deposits, region of energy need, scale of operation and cost of other energy alternatives.

  10. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Rial; J. Lees

    2009-03-31

    As proposed, the main effort in this project is the development of software capable of performing real-time monitoring of micro-seismic activity recorded by an array of sensors deployed around an EGS. The main milestones are defined by the development of software to perform the following tasks: • Real-time micro-earthquake detection and location • Real-time detection of shear-wave splitting • Delayed-time inversion of shear-wave splitting These algorithms, which are discussed in detail in this report, make possible the automatic and real-time monitoring of subsurface fracture systems in geothermal fields from data collected by an array of seismic sensors. Shear wave splitting (SWS) is parameterized in terms of the polarization of the fast shear wave and the time delay between the fast and slow shear waves, which are automatically measured and stored. The measured parameters are then combined with previously measured SWS parameters at the same station and used to invert for the orientation (strike and dip) and intensity of cracks under that station. In addition, this grant allowed the collection of seismic data from several geothermal regions in the US (Coso) and Iceland (Hengill) to use in the development and testing of the software.

  11. Real-time fracture monitoring in Engineered Geothermal Systems with seismic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jose A. Rial; Jonathan Lees

    2009-03-31

    As proposed, the main effort in this project is the development of software capable of performing real-time monitoring of micro-seismic activity recorded by an array of sensors deployed around an EGS. The main milestones are defined by the development of software to perform the following tasks: • Real-time micro-earthquake detection and location • Real-time detection of shear-wave splitting • Delayed-time inversion of shear-wave splitting These algorithms, which are discussed in detail in this report, make possible the automatic and real-time monitoring of subsurface fracture systems in geothermal fields from data collected by an array of seismic sensors. Shear wave splitting (SWS) is parameterized in terms of the polarization of the fast shear wave and the time delay between the fast and slow shear waves, which are automatically measured and stored. The measured parameters are then combined with previously measured SWS parameters at the same station and used to invert for the orientation (strike and dip) and intensity of cracks under that station. In addition, this grant allowed the collection of seismic data from several geothermal regions in the US (Coso) and Iceland (Hengill) to use in the development and testing of the software.

  12. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-26

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  13. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990--94 growing season (June--August) to determine the local and regional patterns of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar Arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993--94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993--94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990--91 growing seasons.

  14. Willow firing in retrofitted Irish peat plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broek, R. van den; Faaij, A.; Kent, T.

    1995-11-01

    Interest in biomass electricity in Ireland is being re-awakened by environmental concerns about CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation and the potential of biomass production to provide an alternative agricultural enterprise. The technical and economical feasibility of wood-fuelled power production using willow from energy farming in existing peat-fired plants in Ireland is being studied within the framework of the EU JOULE II+ programme. These options are compared with new combustion plants and a biomass integrated gasifier with combined cycle (BIG/CC). Background studies supplied data for yields of willow farming, establishment of willow plantations, harvesting methods, logistics and costs and efficiencies for different retrofit options at Irish peat plants. All technologies considered are currently available or are expected to be available in the near future. Neither agricultural subsidies nor possible CO{sub 2} taxes have been included. In the least cost supply scenario storage and chipping of wood is done at the power station. In this case wood is only stored in the form of sticks and wood harvested by a chips harvester is supplied to the plant directly during the harvesting season. Fuel costs at the plant gate were estimated between 3.3 and 11 EGU/GJ{sub LHV}. This wide range resulted in a wide range of kWh costs. For the lowest cost option they ranged between 5.4 and 15 ECUcents/kWh. The cheapest proven retrofit option is the conversion of the existing milled peat Lanesborough unit 3 into a bubbling fluidized bed with kWh costs ranging from 5.6 up to 16 ECUcents/kWh. For this plant, costs per tonne of avoided CO{sub 2} emissions varied between 1 and 70 ECU. It is noteworthy that the kWh costs for all options considered were very close. Especially in the high costs scenario a BIG/CC appeared to have lower kWh cost than all biomass combustion plants. Mainly for the retrofitted plants the fuel costs were by far the largest kWh cost component.

  15. Strategic planning -- task 7.1. Topical report, February 1994--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The nations of East Central Europe regained their political and economic freedom in 1989, ending nearly a half century of centrally planned economies under the hegemony of the former Soviet Union (FSU). These nations are now emerging from economic conditions marked by price distortions and a focus on heavy industry, isolation from world markets, and a lack of occupational health and environmental safeguards. Economic recovery, environmental restoration, and political stability, as well as eventual entrance into the European Community (EC), require a reordering of policies and priorities, including those bearing on energy and the environment. This report, prepared as a background document for the Second International Conference on Energy and Environment to be held in Prague in November 1994, is composed of a summary table and supporting text and is intended to provide a concise review of issues related to energy and the environment for the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, Poland, and Bulgaria. Organized by subject and country, Table 1 contains country profiles (Row A), information on the economy (Row B), primary energy consumption, environmental priorities, energy resources, production, and utilization (Rows C, D, F, G, H, and 1), electrical generation and transmission (Rows J and K), district heating (Row L), briquettes (Row M), and environmental regulations (Row N). Pertinent policy goals, issues, and trends are noted. The reports is based largely on a review of documents published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as selected sources obtained from the countries of the region. Reference citations are keyed to information presented in Table 1.

  16. [Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal]: Task 7.1, Strategic planning. Topical report, February 1, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The nations of East Central Europe regained their political and economic freedom in 1989, ending nearly a half century of centrally planned economies under the hegemony of the former Soviet Union (FSU). These nations are now emerging from economic conditions marked by price distortions and a focus on heavy industry, isolation from world markets, and a lack of occupational health and environmental safeguards. Economic recovery, environmental restoration, and political stability, as well as eventual entrance into the European Community (EC), require a reordering of policies and priorities, including those bearing on energy and the environment. This report, prepared as a background document for the Second International Conference on Energy and Environment to be held in Prague in November 1994, is composed of a summary table (Table 1) and supporting text and is intended to provide a concise review of issues related to energy and the environment for the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, Poland, and Bulgaria. Organized by subject and country, Table 1 contains country profiles (Row A), information on the economy (Row B), primary energy consumption, environmental priorities, energy resources, production, and utilization (Rows C, D, F, G, H, and I), electrical generation and transmission (Rows J and K), district heating (Row L), briquettes (Row M), and environmental regulations (Row N). Pertinent policy goals, issues, and trends are noted. The reports is based largely on a review of documents published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as selected sources obtained from the countries of the region. Reference citations are keyed to information presented in Table 1.

  17. Markets to Facilitate Wind and Solar Energy Integration in the Bulk Power Supply: An IEA Task 25 Collaboration; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Soder, L.; Clark, C.; Pineda, I.

    2012-09-01

    Wind and solar power will give rise to challenges in electricity markets regarding flexibility, capacity adequacy, and the participation of wind and solar generators to markets. Large amounts of wind power will have impacts on bulk power system markets and electricity prices. If the markets respond to increased wind power by increasing investments in low-capital, high-cost or marginal-cost power, the average price may remain in the same range. However, experiences so far from Denmark, Germany, Spain, and Ireland are such that the average market prices have decreased because of wind power. This reduction may result in additional revenue insufficiency, which may be corrected with a capacity market, yet capacity markets are difficult to design. However, the flexibility attributes of the capacity also need to be considered. Markets facilitating wind and solar integration will include possibilities for trading close to delivery (either by shorter gate closure times or intraday markets). Time steps chosen for markets can enable more flexibility to be assessed. Experience from 5- and 10-minute markets has been encouraging.

  18. 1982 worldwide pipeline construction will top 21,900 miles, $9. 5 billion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.

    1982-07-01

    Reports that pipeline construction slowed slightly in 1982 because of lowered economic activity worldwide, with an upturn forecast for 1983. Explains that need for new pipelines to transport increasing amounts of oil and gas energy now being discovered, plus use of pipelines to transport other commodities in increasing amounts, has created a backlog of demand for facilities. Indicates that commodities suited for pipeline transport and getting consideration include crude oil; refined products; natural gas liquids; LPG; coal slurries; carbon dioxide (used for enhanced oil recovery); chemicals such as ammonia, ethane, ethylene, and similar petrochemical feedstocks; industrial gases such as oxygen, nitrogen; and solids slurries such as ores, wood chips, and other non-soluble minerals, even items such as wood chips and wood pulp for paper-making. Reveals that there are 10,396 miles of coal slurry pipeline planned for the US and 500 miles in Canada. Major US projects underway in the gas pipeline field include the 797-mile, 36-in. Trailblazer system in Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. Products/ LPG/NGL pipelines underway include 105 miles of dual 4 and 6-in. line in Kansas. Crude pipeline activity includes 100 miles of 12-in. in California and 80 miles of 4 thru 40-in. in Alaska on the North Slope. Updates plans in Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Ireland, France, the Middle East, Australia, Southeast Asia, Mexico, South America and the USSR.

  19. Chernobyl bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, F. Jr.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database project is to create and maintain an information system to provide usable information for research studies related to the nuclear accident. The system is the official United States repository for information about the Chernobyl accident and its consequences, and currently includes an extensive bibliography and diverse radiological measurements with supporting information. PNL has established two resources: original (not summarized) measurement data, currently about 80,000 measurements, with ancillary information; and about 2,200 bibliographic citations, some including abstracts. Major organizations that have contributed radiological measurement data include the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services; United States Environmental Protection Agency (domestic and foreign data); United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Stone Webster; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Commissariat A L'energie Atomique in France; Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food in the United Kingdom; Japan National Institute of Radiological Sciences; and the Finnish Centre For Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Scientists in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, England, Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Romania, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, Wales, and Yugoslavia have made contributions. Bibliographic materials have been obtained from scientists in the above countries that have replied to requests. In addition, literature searches have been conducted, including a search of the DOE Energy Database. The last search was conducted in January, 1989. This document lists the bibliographic information in the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database at the current time.

  20. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This study documents the diverse approaches to effective integration of variable renewable energy among six countries -- Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Western region-Colorado and Texas)-- and summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. Each country has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. The ability to maintain a broad ecosystem perspective, to organize and make available the wealth of experiences, and to ensure a clear path from analysis to enactment should be the primary focus going forward.

  1. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Singla, P.; Bursik, M.; Dehn, J.; Jones, M.; Patra, A.; Pavolonis, M.; Pitman, E.B.; Singh, T.; Webley, P.

    2014-08-15

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajkull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 1416 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  2. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-26

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  3. Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

    2014-06-30

    In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

  4. Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1993-01-28

    PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  5. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2007-06-01

    Industrial motor-driven systems use more than 2194 billionkWh annually on a global basis and offer one of the largest opportunitiesfor energy savings.1 The International Energy Agency estimates thatoptimization of motor driven systems could reduce global electricitydemand by 7 percent through the application of commercially availabletechnologies and using well-tested engineering practices. Yet manyindustrial firms remain either unaware of or unable to achieve theseenergy savings. The same factors that make it so challenging to achieveand sustain energy efficiency in motor-driven systems (complexity,frequent changes) apply to the production processes that they support.Yet production processes typically operate within a narrow band ofacceptable performance. These processes are frequently incorporated intoISO 9000/14000 quality and environmental management systems, whichrequire regular, independent audits to maintain ISO certification, anattractive value for international trade. It is our contention that acritical step in achieving and sustaining energy efficiency ofmotor-driven systems specifically, and industrial energy efficiencygenerally, is the adoption of a corporate energy management standard thatis consistent with current industrial quality and environmentalmanagement systems such as ISO. Several energy management standardscurrently exist (US, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden) and specifications(Germany, Netherlands) others are planned (China, Spain, Brazil, Korea).This paper presents the current status of energy management standardsdevelopment internationally, including an analysis of their sharedfeatures and differences, in terms of content, promulgation, andimplementation. The purpose of the analysis is to describe the currentstate of "best practices" for this emerging area of energy efficiencypolicymaking and tosuggest next steps toward the creation of a trulyinternational energy management standard that is consistent with the ISOprinciples of measurement, documentation, and continuousimprovement.

  6. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  7. Carbon footprints of heating oil and LPG heating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric P.

    2012-07-15

    For European homes without access to the natural gas grid, the main fuels-of-choice for heating are heating oil and LPG. How do the carbon footprints of these compare? Existing literature does not clearly answer this, so the current study was undertaken to fill this gap. Footprints were estimated in seven countries that are representative of the EU and constitute two-thirds of the EU-27 population: Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Poland and the UK. Novelties of the assessment were: systems were defined using the EcoBoiler model; well-to-tank data were updated according to most-recent research; and combustion emission factors were used that were derived from a survey conducted for this study. The key finding is that new residential heating systems fuelled by LPG are 20% lower carbon and 15% lower overall-environmental-impact than those fuelled by heating oil. An unexpected finding was that an LPG system's environmental impact is about the same as that of a bio heating oil system fuelled by 100% rapeseed methyl ester, Europe's predominant biofuel. Moreover, a 20/80 blend (by energy content) with conventional heating oil, a bio-heating-oil system generates a footprint about 15% higher than an LPG system's. The final finding is that fuel switching can pay off in carbon terms. If a new LPG heating system replaces an ageing oil-fired one for the final five years of its service life, the carbon footprint of the system's final five years is reduced by more than 50%.

  8. Romania: Brand-New Engineering Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Allen; Lucian Biro; Nicolae Zamfir; Madalina Budu

    2011-01-01

    The HEU spent nuclear fuel transport from Romania was a pilot project in the framework of the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), being the first fully certified spent nuclear fuel shipment by air. The successful implementation of the Romanian shipment also brought various new technology in the program, further used by other participating countries. Until 2009, the RRRFR program repatriated to the Russian Federation HEU spent nuclear fuel of Russian origin from many countries, like Uzbekistan, Czech Republic, Latvia, Hungary, Kazakhstan and Bulgaria. The means of transport used were various; from specialized TK-5 train for the carriage of Russian TUK-19 transport casks, to platform trains for 20 ft freight ISO containers carrying Czech Skoda VPVR/M casks; from river barge on the Danube, to vessel on the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean. Initially, in 2005, the transport plan of the HEU spent nuclear fuel from the National Institute for R&D in Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' in Magurele, Romania considered a similar scheme, using the specialized TK-5 train transiting Ukraine to the destination point in the Russian Federation, or, as an alternative, using the means and route of the spent nuclear fuel periodically shipped from the Bulgarian nuclear power plant Kosloduy (by barge on the Danube, and by train through Ukraine to the Russian Federation). Due to impossibility to reach an agreement in due time with the transit country, in February 2007 the US, Russian and Romanian project partners decided to adopt the air shipment of the spent nuclear fuel as prime option, eliminating the need for agreements with any transit countries. By this time the spent nuclear fuel inspections were completed, proving the compliance of the burn-up parameters with the international requirements for air shipments of radioactive materials. The short air route avoiding overflying of any other countries except the country of origin and the country of destination also contributed to the decision making in this issue. The efficient project management and cooperation between the three countries (Russia, Romania and USA) made possible, after two and a half years of preparation work, for the first fully certified spent nuclear fuel air shipment to take place on 29th of June 2009, from Romanian airport 'Henri Coanda' to the Russian airport 'Koltsovo' near Yekaterinburg. One day before that, after a record period of 3 weeks of preparation, another HEU cargo was shipped by air from Romanian Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti to Russia, containing fresh pellets and therefore making Romania the third HEU-free country in the RRRFR program.

  9. Radiocarbon as a Reactive Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Schlosser, Peter; Broecker, Wallace

    2015-09-30

    In view of concerns about the long-term integrity and containment of CO2 storage in geologic reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification and accounting methods for geologically stored CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate that carbon-14 (14C) could be used as a reactive tracer to monitor geochemical reactions and evaluate the extent of mineral trapping of CO2 in basaltic rocks. The capacity of a storage reservoir for mineral trapping of CO2 is largely a function of host rock composition. Mineral carbonation involves combining CO2 with divalent cations including Ca2+, Mg2+ and Fe2+. The most abundant geological sources for these cations are basaltic rocks. Based on initial storage capacity estimates, we know that basalts have the necessary capacity to store million to billion tons of CO2 via in situ mineral carbonation. However, little is known about CO2-fluid-rock reactions occurring in a basaltic storage reservoir during and post-CO2 injection. None of the common monitoring and verification techniques have been able to provide a surveying tool for mineral trapping. The most direct method for quantitative monitoring and accounting involves the tagging of the injected CO2 with 14C because 14C is not present in deep geologic reservoirs prior to injection. Accordingly, we conducted two CO2 injection tests at the CarbFix pilot injection site in Iceland to study the feasibility of 14C as a reactive tracer for monitoring CO2-fluid-rock reactions and CO2 mineralization. Our newly developed monitoring techniques, using 14C as a reactive tracer, have been successfully demonstrated. For the first time, permanent and safe disposal of CO2 as environmentally benign carbonate minerals in basaltic rocks could be shown. Over 95% of the injected CO2 at the CarbFix pilot injection site was mineralized to carbonate minerals in less than two years after injection. Our monitoring results confirm that CO2 mineralization in basaltic rocks is far faster than previously postulated.

  10. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1983-12-15

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  11. Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1994-01-20

    PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  12. Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W.

    1988-01-21

    PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

  13. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1991-01-25

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  14. Response of a tundra ecosytem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990-94 growing season (June-August) to determine the local and regional patterns, of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993-94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993-94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990-91 growing seasons. Measurements were made on small (e.g. 0.5 m{sup 2}) plots using a portable gas-exchange system and cuvette. The sample design allowed frequent measurements of net CO{sub 2} exchange and respiration over diurnal and seasonal cycles, and a large spatial extent that incorporated both locally and regionally diverse tundra surface types. Measurements both within and between ecosystem types typically extended over soil water table depth and temperature gradients, allowing for the indirect analysis of the effects of anticipated climate change scenarios on net CO{sub 2} exchange. In situ experiments provided a direct means for testing hypotheses.

  15. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara ); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt )

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines; 2) the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals; and 3) the effects of energy removal on physical systems. Each case study contains a description of environmental monitoring efforts and research studies, lessons learned, and analysis of remaining information gaps. The information collected through the Annex IV effort and referenced in this report, can be accessed on the Tethys database at http://mhk.pnnl.gov/wiki/index.php/Tethys_ Home.

  16. Climate data, analysis and models for the study of natural variability and anthropogenic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Philip D.

    2014-07-31

    Gridded Temperature Under prior/current support, we completed and published (Jones et al., 2012) the fourth major update to our global land dataset of near-surface air temperatures, CRUTEM4. This is one of the most widely used records of the climate system, having been updated, maintained and further developed with DoE support since the 1980s. We have continued to update the CRUTEM4 (Jones et al., 2012) database that is combined with marine data to produce HadCRUT4 (Morice et al., 2012). The emphasis in our use of station temperature data is to access as many land series that have been homogenized by National Meteorological Services (NMSs, including NCDC/NOAA, Asheville, NC). Unlike the three US groups monitoring surface temperatures in a similar way, we do not infill areas that have no or missing data. We can only infill such regions in CRUTEM4 by accessing more station temperature series. During early 2014, we have begun the extensive task of updating as many of these series as possible using data provided by some NMSs and also through a number of research projects and programs around the world. All the station data used in CRUTEM4 have been available since 2009, but in Osborn and Jones (2014) we have made this more usable using a Google Earth interface (http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/crutem/ge/ ). We have recently completed the update of our infilled land multi-variable dataset (CRU TS 3.10, Harris et al., 2014). This additionally produces complete land fields (except for the Antarctic) for temperature, precipitation, diurnal temperature range, vapour pressure and sunshine/cloud. Using this dataset we have calculated sc-PDSI (self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index) data and compared with other PDSI datasets (Trenberth et al., 2014). Also using CRU TS 3.10 and Reanalysis datasets, we showed no overall increase in global temperature variability despite changing regional patterns (Huntingford et al., 2013). Harris et al. (2014) is an update of an earlier dataset (Mitchell and Jones, 2005) which also had earlier DoE support. The earlier dataset has been cited over 1700 times according to ResearcherID on 31/July/2014 and the recent paper has already been cited 22 times. Analyses of Temperature Data Using the ERA-Interim estimate of the absolute surface air temperature of the Earth (instead of in the more normal form of anomalies) we compared the result against estimates we produced in 1999 with earlier DoE support. The two estimates are surprisingly close (differing by a couple of tenths of a degree Celsius), with the average temperature of the world (for 1981-2010) being very close to 14C (Jones and Harpham, 2013). We have assessed ERA-Interim against station temperatures from manned and automatic weather station measurements across the Antarctic (Jones and Lister, 2014). Agreement is generally excellent across the Antarctic Peninsula and the sparsely sampled western parts of Antarctica. Differences tend to occur over eastern Antarctica where ERA-Interim is biased warm (up to 6C) in the interior of the continent and biased cool (up to 6C) for some of the coastal locations. Opportunities presented themselves during 2012 for collaborative work with a couple of Chinese groups. Three papers develop new temperature series for China as a whole and also for the eastern third of China (Wang et al., 2014, Cao et al., 2013 and Zhao et al., 2014). A dataset of ~400 daily Chinese temperature stations has been added to the CRU datasets. The latter paper finds that urban effects are generally about 10% of the long-term warming trend across eastern China. A fourth paper (Wang et al., 2013) illustrates issues with comparisons between reanalyses and surface temperatures across China, a method that has been widely used by some to suggest urban heating effects are much larger in the region. ERA-Interim can be used but NCEP/NCAR comparisons are very dependent on the period analysed. Earlier a new temperature dataset of homogenized records was developed for China (Li et al., 2009). Urbanization has also been addressed for London (Jones and Lister, 2009) where two rural sites have not warmed more than a city centre site since 1900. Additionally, in Ethymiadis and Jones (2010) we show that land air temperatures agree with marine data around coastal areas, further illustrating that urbanization is not a major component of large-scale surface air temperature change. Early instrumental data (before the development of modern thermometer screens) have always been suspected of being biased warm in summer, due to possible direct exposure to the sun. Two studies (Bhm et al., 2010 and Brunet et al., 2010) show this for the Greater Alpine Region (GAR) and for mainland Spain respectively. The issue is important before about 1870 in the GAR and before about 1900 in Spain. After correction for the problems, summer temperature estimates before these dates are cooler by about 0.4C. In Jones and Wigley (2010), we discussed the importance of the biases in global temperature estimation. Exposure and to a lesser extent urbanization are the most important biases for the land areas, but both are dwarfed by the necessary adjustments for bucket SST measurements before about 1950. Individual station homogeneity is only important at the local scale. This was additionally illustrated by Hawkins and Jones (2013) where we replicated the temperature record developed by Guy Stewart Callendar in papers in 1938 and 1961. Analyses of Daily Climate Data Work here indicates that ERA-Interim (at least in Europe, Cornes and Jones, 2013, discussed in more detail in this proposal) can be used to monitor extremes (using the ETCCDI software see Zhang et al., 2011). Additionally, also as a result of Chinese collaboration, a new method of daily temperature homogenization has been developed (Li et al., 2014). In Cornes and Jones (2011) we assessed storm activity in the northeast Atlantic region using daily gridded data. Even though the grid resolution is coarse (5 by 5 lat/long) the changes in storm activity are similar to those developed from the pressure triangle approach with station data. Analyses of humidity and pressure data In Simmons et al. (2010) we showed a reduction in relative humidity over low-latitude and mid-latitude land areas for the 10 years to 2008, based on monthly anomalies of surface air temperature and humidity from ECMWF reanalyses (ERA-40 and ERA-Interim) and our earlier land-only dataset (CRUTEM3) and synoptic humidity observations (HadCRUH). Updates of this station-based humidity dataset (now called HadISDH) extend the record, showing continued reductions (Willett et al., 2013). Analyses of Proxy Temperature Data In Vinther et al. (2010), relationships between the seasonal stable isotope data from Greenland Ice Cores and Greenland and Icelandic instrumental temperatures were investigated for the past 150-200 years. The winter season stable isotope data are found to be influenced by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and very closely related to SW Greenland temperatures. The summer season stable isotope data display higher correlations with Icelandic summer temperatures and North Atlantic SST conditions than with local SW Greenland temperatures. In Jones et al. (2014) we use these winter isotope reconstructions to show the expected inverse correlation (due to the NAO) with winter-season documentary reconstructions from the Netherlands and Sweden over the last 800 years. Finally, in this section Jones et al. (2013) shows the agreement between tree-ring width measurements from Northern Sweden and Finland and an assessment of the link to explosive volcanic eruptions. An instrumental record for the region in the early 19th century indicates that the summer of 1816 was only slightly below normal, explaining why this year has normal growth for both ring width and density. GCM/RCM/Reanalysis Evaluation In this section we have intercompared daily temperature extremes across Europe in Cornes and Jones (2013) using station data, E-OBS and ERA-Interim. We have additionally considered the impact of the urban issue on the global scale using the results of the Compo et al. (2011) Reanalyses, 20CR. These only make use of SST and station pressure data. Across the worlds land areas, they indicate similar warming since 1900 to that which has occurred (Compo et al., 2013), again illustrating that urbanization is not the cause of the long-term warming. Changes in HadCRUH global land surface specific humidity and CRUTEM3 surface temperatures from 1973 to 1999 were compared to the CMIP3 archive of climate model simulations with 20th Century forcings (Willett et al., 2010). The models reproduce the magnitude of observed interannual variance over all large regions. Observed and modelled trends and temperature-humidity relationships are comparable with the exception of the extra-tropical Southern Hemisphere where observations exhibit no trend but models exhibit moistening.

  17. Cost Effective Surfactant Formulations for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes work during the 30 month time period of this project. This was planned originally for 3-years duration, but due to its financial limitations, DOE halted funding after 2 years. The California Institute of Technology continued working on this project for an additional 6 months based on a no-cost extension granted by DOE. The objective of this project is to improve the performance of aqueous phase formulations that are designed to increase oil recovery from fractured, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. This process works by increasing the rate and extent of aqueous phase imbibition into the matrix blocks in the reservoir and thereby displacing crude oil normally not recovered in a conventional waterflood operation. The project had three major components: (1) developing methods for the rapid screening of surfactant formulations towards identifying candidates suitable for more detailed evaluation, (2) more fundamental studies to relate the chemical structure of acid components of an oil and surfactants in aqueous solution as relates to their tendency to wet a carbonate surface by oil or water, and (3) a more applied study where aqueous solutions of different commercial surfactants are examined for their ability to recover a West Texas crude oil from a limestone core via an imbibition process. The first item, regarding rapid screening methods for suitable surfactants has been summarized as a Topical Report. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the surface of these chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant oil recovery performance reported in the literature. The second effort is a more fundamental study. It considers the effect of chemical structures of different naphthenic acids (NA) dissolved in decane as model oils that render calcite surfaces oil-wet to a different degree. NAs are common to crude oil and are at least partially responsible for the frequent observation that carbonate reservoirs are oil-wet. Because pure NA compounds are used, trends in wetting behavior can be related to NA molecular structure as measured by solid adsorption, contact angle and our novel, simple flotation test with calcite. Experiments with different surfactants and NA-treated calcite powder provide information about mechanisms responsible for sought after reversal to a water-wet state. Key findings include: (1) more hydrophobic NA's are more prone to induce oil-wetting, and (2) recovery of the model oil from limestone core was better with cationic surfactants, but one nonionic surfactant, Igepal CO-530, also had favorable results. This portion of the project included theoretical calculations to investigate key basic properties of several NAs such as their acidic strength and their relative water/oil solubility, and relate this to their chemical structure. The third category of this project focused on the recovery of a light crude oil from West Texas (McElroy Field) from a carbonate rock (limestone outcrop). For this effort, the first item was to establish a suite of surfactants that would be compatible with the McElroy Field brine. Those were examined further for their ability to recover oil by imbibition. Results demonstrate several types of promising candida

  18. CPsuperH2.3: an Updated Tool for Phenomenology in the MSSM with Explicit CP Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.S.; Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C.E.M.

    2013-04-01

    We describe the Fortran code CPsuperH2.3, which incorporates the following updates compared with its predecessor CPsuperH2.0. It implements improved calculations of the Higgs-boson masses and mixing including stau contributions and finite threshold effects on the tau-lepton Yukawa coupling. It incorporates the LEP limits on the processes e^+e^-->H_iZ,H_iH_j and the CMS limits on H_i->@t@?@t obtained from 4.6 fb^-^1 of data at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. It also includes the decay mode H_i->Z@c and the Schiff-moment contributions to the electric dipole moments of Mercury and Radium 225, with several calculational options for the case of Mercury. These additions make CPsuperH2.3 a suitable tool for analyzing possible CP-violating effects in the MSSM in the era of the LHC and a new generation of EDM experiments. Program summary: Program title: CPsuperH2.3 Catalogue identifier: ADSR_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSR_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24058 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 158721 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran77. Computer: PC running under Linux and computers in Unix environment. Operating system: Linux. RAM: 32 MB Classification: 11.1. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADSR_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180(2009)312 Nature of problem: The calculations of mass spectrum, decay widths and branching ratios of the neutral and charged Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with explicit CP violation have been improved. The program is based on renormalization-group-improved diagrammatic calculations that include dominant higher-order logarithmic and threshold corrections, b-quark and @t-lepton Yukawa-coupling resummation effects and improved treatment of Higgs-boson pole-mass shifts. The couplings of the Higgs bosons to the Standard Model gauge bosons and fermions, to their supersymmetric partners and all the trilinear and quartic Higgs-boson self-couplings are also calculated. Also included are a full treatment of the 4x4 (2x2) neutral (charged) Higgs propagator matrix together with the center-of-mass dependent Higgs-boson couplings to gluons and photons, and an integrated treatment of several B-meson observables. The new implementations include the EDMs of Thallium, neutron, Mercury, Deuteron, Radium, and muon, as well as the anomalous magnetic moment of muon, (g_@m-2), the top-quark decays, improved calculations of the Higgs-boson masses and mixing including stau contributions, the LEP limits, and the CMS limits on H_i->@t@t@?. It also implements the decay mode H_i->Z@c and includes the corresponding Standard Model branching ratios of the three neutral Higgs bosons in the array GAMBRN(IM,IWB = 2,IH). Solution method: One-dimensional numerical integration for several Higgs-decay modes and EDMs, iterative treatment of the threshold corrections and Higgs-boson pole masses, and the numerical diagonalization of the neutralino mass matrix. Reasons for new version: Mainly to provide the full calculations of the EDMs of Thallium, neutron, Mercury, Deuteron, Radium, and muon as well as (g_@m-2), improved calculations of the Higgs-boson masses and mixing including stau contributions, the LEP limits, the CMS limits on H_i->@t@t@?, the top-quark decays, H_i->Z@c decay, and the corresponding Standard Model branching ratios of the three neutral Higgs bosons. Summary of revisions: Full calculations of the EDMs of Thallium, neutron, Mercury, Deuteron, Radium, and muon as well as (g_@m-2). Improved treatment of Higgs-boson masses and mixing including stau contributions. The LEP limits. The CMS limits on H_i->@t@t@?. The top-quark decays. The H_i->Z@c decay. The corresponding Standard

  19. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) an early, small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. For the three technologies and scales at the selected site, this results in a total of nine deployment scenarios outlined in the report.