Sample records for human skin tissue

  1. In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Michael F., E-mail: hughes.michaelf@epa.go [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Edwards, Brenda C. [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flow-through diffusion cells, and radiolabeled bifenthrin, deltamethrin or cis-permethrin was applied in acetone to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid were collected every 4 h. At 24 h, the skins were washed with soap and water to remove unabsorbed chemical. The skin was then solubilized. Two additional experiments were performed after washing the skin; the first was tape-stripping the skin and the second was the collection of receptor fluid for an additional 24 h. Receptor fluid, skin washes, tape strips and skin were analyzed for radioactivity. For rat skin, the wash removed 53-71% of the dose and 26-43% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid ranged from 1 to 5%. For human skin, the wash removed 71-83% of the dose and 14-25% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid was 1-2%. Tape-stripping removed 50-56% and 79-95% of the dose in rat and human skin, respectively, after the wash. From 24-48 h, 1-3% and about 1% of the dose diffused into the receptor fluid of rat and human skin, respectively. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin penetrated rat and human skin following dermal application in vitro. However, a skin wash removed 50% or more of the dose from rat and human skin. Rat skin was more permeable to the pyrethroids than human skin. Of the dose in skin, 50% or more was removed by tape-stripping, suggesting that permeation of pyrethroids into viable tissue could be impeded. The percentage of the dose absorbed into the receptor fluid was considerably less than the dose in rat and human skin. Therefore, consideration of the skin type used and fractions analyzed are important when using in vitro dermal absorption data for risk assessment.

  2. Simulation of Electron-Beam Irradiation of Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo simulation of electrons stopping in liquid water was used to model the penetration and dose distribution of electron beams incident on the full-thickness EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes in various stages of differentiation from a dermal layer of fibroblast embedded in collagen. The simulations were motivated by a desire to selectively expose the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer. Using the variable energy electron microbeam at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a model of device characteristics and irradiation geometry, we find that at the highest beam energy available (90 keV), the estimated 90th percentile of penetration remains in the epidermal layer. To investigate the depth-dose distribution, we calculated lineal energy spectra for 10um thick layers near the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile of penetration by the 90 keV electron beam. Biphasic spectra showed an increasing component of "stoppers" with increasing depth. Despite changes in the lineal energy spectra, the main effect on dose deposition with increasing depth is the screening effect of tissue above the layer of interest.

  3. Metabolomic Response of Human Skin Tissue to Low Dose Ionizing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for IR exposure at low doses can help provide a scientific basis for establishing radiation protection standards. Little is known regarding the physiological responses to...

  4. Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI Tolga Tasdizen, David for classifying multispectral MR scans of the human head into nine tissue classes. User initialization is adopted. #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Classification of head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data

  5. Total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, N.; Harsas, W.; Marolt, R.S.; Morton, M.; Pollack, J.K.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As far as the authors could ascertain only 4 well-documented analytical studies have been carried out in Australia determining the total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue. The latest of these studies was published over 16 years ago. Therefore it is timely and important to re-examine the total DDT and dieldrin concentration within the adipose tissue of the Australian population. The present investigation has analyzed 290 samples of human adipose tissue obtained from Westmead Hospital situated in an outer suburb of Sydney, New South Wales for their content of total DDT and dieldrin.

  6. High frequency ultrasonic characterization of human skin In vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raju, Balasundara I. (Balasundara Iyyavu), 1972-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound has numerous potential applications in dermatology because of its ability to penetrate several millimeters into the skin and provide information at a spatial resolution of tens of microns. ...

  7. Sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryant, Jennifer E. (Albuquerque, NM); Hutchings, Kent G. (Albuquerque, NM); Moyzis, Robert K. (Corona Del Mar, CA); Griffith, Jeffrey K. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissue, based upon the ratio of telomeric to centromeric DNA present in the tissue.

  8. A study of heat distribution in human skin: use of Infrared Thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A study of heat distribution in human skin: use of Infrared Thermography Domoina Ratovoson, Franck of this study is to be able to act quickly on body burns, to avoid propagating lesions due to heat diffusion the temperature change using an infra-red camera. Blood circulation in the veins was seen to clearly influence

  9. Real-time, Photo-realistic, Physically Based Rendering of Fine Scale Human Skin Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haro, Antonio

    structure samples, build models of fine scale structure production, and then render this detail usingReal-time, Photo-realistic, Physically Based Rendering of Fine Scale Human Skin Structure Antonio, which is clearly visible in close-up shots in a film or game. Methods that rely on simple texture

  10. Determination of refractive indices of porcine skin tissues and Intralipid at eight wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the presence of coherent and diffuse reflection near the specular reflection angle. An existing method has been biological tissues, however, light scattering dominates from ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral regions system for accurate measurement of coherent reflectance curves of turbid samples and analyzed

  11. Sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryant, J.E.; Hutchings, K.G.; Moyzis, R.K.; Griffith, J.K.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research discloses a sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissue, based upon the ratio of telomeric to centromeric DNA present in the tissue. 5 figs.

  12. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Halin, Cornelia [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: cornelia.halin@pharma.ethz.ch

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

  13. Mechanical and biochemical properties of human cervical tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Kristin M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanical integrity of cervical tissue is crucial for maintaining a healthy gestation. Altered tissue biochemistry can cause drastic changes in the mechanical properties of the cervix and contribute to premature ...

  14. Adsorption of Human Papillomavirus 16 to live human sperm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribbeck, Katharina

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a diverse group of viruses that infect the skin and mucosal tissues of humans. A high-risk subgroup of HPVs is associated with virtually all cases of cervical cancer [1]–[3]. High-risk ...

  15. A Probabilistic Model for the Human Skin Color T.S. Caetano and D.A.C. Barone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caetano, Tiberio

    ,barone}@inf.ufrgs.br _____________________________________________ Abstract We present a multivariate statistical model to represent the human skin color. In our approach part in a fully automated facial analysis system, the first important step in recognizing faces to detect faces [1-6]. However, it is a well-known fact that the majority of images acquired today

  16. S.N.A.K.E. : a dynamically reconfigurable Artificial Sensate Skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barroeta Pérez, Gerardo

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of an Artificial Sensate Skin device that mimics the characteristics and functions of its analogous living tissue whether human or animal is not new. Yet, most of the current related work has been focused in the ...

  17. Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of human skin was used for hydration experiments whereby itthe human skin, was used for the hydration experiments and

  18. r Human Brain Mapping 32:382396 (2011) r CENTS: Cortical Enhanced Neonatal Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    r Human Brain Mapping 32:382­396 (2011) r CENTS: Cortical Enhanced Neonatal Tissue Segmentation-quality magnetic resonance (MR) images of neonatal brains is largely ham- pered by their characteristically small head size and insufficient tissue contrast. As a result, subsequent image processing and analysis

  19. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs-liver, heart, lung and kidney-that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. 3:22 - 2 -...

  20. Tissue-specific classification of alternatively spliced human exons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Craig Jeremy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative splicing is involved in numerous cellular functions and is often disrupted and involved in disease. Previous research has identified methods to distinguish alternative conserved exons (ACEs) in human and mouse. ...

  1. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ? Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ? Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ? IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ? Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  2. Regulation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase from human lung tissue by nucleosides and nucleotides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, William Fredrick

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REGULATION OF CYCLIC AMP PHOSPHODIESTERASE FROM HUMAN LUNG TISSUE BY NUCLEOSIDES AND NUCLEOTIDES A Thesis by WILLIAM FREDRICK GLASS, II Submitted to the Graduate College oi Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John B. Moore, Jr. Cyclic nucleotide levels are important modulators of the re- les. se snd effects on target tissues of mediators of allergi?. bronchial asthma. Agents that cause a rise in cyclic AMP levels inhibit...

  3. Demonstration of tyrosinase in the vitiligo skin of human beings by a sensitive fluorometric method as well as by 14C(U)-L-tyrosine incorporation into melanin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Husain, I.; Vijayan, E.; Ramaiah, A.; Pasricha, J.S.; Madan, N.C.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tyrosinase activity (Monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.14.18.1) in vitiligo and normal epidermal homogenates of skin from human beings was measured by estimating beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) by a highly sensitive fluorometric method described in this paper. The tyrosine activity in the vitiligo skin was about 4 to 37% of corresponding normal skin. The activity of tyrosinase in normal human skin from different individuals and from different regions of the body was in the range of 4 to 140 picomoles of beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine formed per min/mg protein of epidermal homogenate. The enzyme from vitiligo and normal skin was severely inhibited by substance(s) of low molecular weight. The enzyme exhibits a lag of about 4 hr in the absence of added beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 1 hr in presence of 5 microM dopa. Tyrosinase from the normal and vitiligo skin was inhibited by excess concentration of tyrosine. The homogenates from vitiligo skin could synthesize melanin from C14(U)-L-Tyrosine. The rate of tyrosine incorporation into melanin by the epidermal homogenates is increased by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) disproportionate to its effect on tyrosinase activity. Based on the data presented in this paper it is concluded that melanocytes are present in the vitiligo skin. A tentative hypothesis is put forward to explain the lack of melanin synthesis by the vitiligo skin under in vivo conditions, although melanocytes are present.

  4. Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

  5. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timper, Katharina [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Seboek, Dalma [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Eberhardt, Michael [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Linscheid, Philippe [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam [Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Keller, Ulrich [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller, Beat [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Zulewski, Henryk [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland) and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

  6. Green tea polyphenol, (?)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, induces toxicity in human skin cancer cells by targeting ?-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Tripti [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The green tea polyphenol, (?)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), has been shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects in several skin tumor models, and efforts are continued to investigate the molecular targets responsible for its cytotoxic effects to cancer cells. Our recent observation that ?-catenin is upregulated in skin tumors suggested the possibility that the anti-skin carcinogenic effects of EGCG are mediated, at least in part, through its effects on ?-catenin signaling. We have found that treatment of the A431 and SCC13 human skin cancer cell lines with EGCG resulted in reduced cell viability and increased cell death and that these cytotoxic effects were associated with inactivation of ?-catenin signaling. Evidence of EGCG-induced inactivation of ?-catenin included: (i) reduced accumulation of nuclear ?-catenin; (ii) enhanced levels of casein kinase1?, reduced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3?, and increased phosphorylation of ?-catenin on critical serine{sup 45,33/37} residues; and (iii) reduced levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, which are down-stream targets of ?-catenin. Treatment of cells with prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) enhanced the accumulation of ?-catenin and enhanced ?-catenin signaling. Treatment with either EGCG or an EP2 antagonist (AH6809) reduced the PGE{sub 2}-enhanced levels of cAMP, an upstream regulator of ?-catenin. Inactivation of ?-catenin by EGCG resulted in suppression of cell survival signaling proteins. siRNA knockdown of ?-catenin in A431 and SCC13 cells reduced cell viability. Collectively, these data suggest that induction of cytotoxicity in skin cancer cells by EGCG is mediated by targeting of ?-catenin signaling and that the ?-catenin signaling is upregulated by inflammatory mediators. - Highlights: • EGCG inhibits cancer cell viability through inactivation of ?-catenin signaling. • Inactivation of ?-catenin involves the downregulation of inflammatory mediators. • EGCG inactivates ?-catenin in skin cancer cells by inhibition of cAMP and PGE{sub 2}. • siRNA knockdown of ?-catenin or COX-2 reduces the viability of cancer cells.

  7. Thermal Modeling and Experimental Validation of Human Hair and Skin Heated by Broadband Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    distribution within the hair follicle is highly non-uniform: the minimum temperature occurs at the follicle Sun, PhD,1 Alex Chaney,1 Robert Anderson, PhD,2 and Guillermo Aguilar, PhD 1 * 1 Department:(a)determinetheoveralleffectofPPxonskinhumidi- tyandassociatedskinopticalproperties,and;(b)developaPT numerical model to study the spatial and temporal hair and skin temperature

  8. Effects of the differentiated keratinocyte phenotype on expression levels of CYP1-4 family genes in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Liping [Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Neis, Mark M. [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University Hospital of the RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Ladd, Patricia A. [Department of Medicine/Dermatology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Lanza, Diane L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Yost, Garold S. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Keeney, Diane S. [VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States) and Department of Medicine/Dermatology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States) and Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)]. E-mail: diane.keeney@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids produced by mouse CYP2B19 have been implicated in mechanisms regulating epidermal cornification (Ladd, P.A., Du, L., Capdevila, J.H., Mernaugh, R., Keeney, D.S., 2003. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids activate transglutaminases in situ and induce cornification of epidermal keratinocytes. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 35184-35192). In this study, we aimed to identify CYPs that are up-regulated during keratinocyte differentiation and potentially responsible for epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation in human skin. The cellular differentiation state of human epidermal cell cultures was manipulated to resemble the basal, spinous, and granular cell phenotypes in vivo. Changes in CYP mRNA levels were measured as a function of differentiation state for a panel of 15 CYPs that included known and putative arachidonate monooxygenases. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that all of the CYPs were expressed in differentiating epidermal cell cultures and in human epidermis, with the exception of CYP2B6, which was poorly expressed in vitro. Six CYPs were strongly up-regulated at Day 6 and Day 8 of in vitro differentiation (CYP4B1, 2W1, 2C18, 3A4, 2C19, 2C9); the increase in mRNA levels ranged from 27- to 356-fold. Only CYP2U1 mRNA levels decreased (6-fold change) during cellular differentiation. Six CYPs showed little variation (<2-fold change) in mRNA levels during in vitro differentiation (CYP2S1, 2J2, 1B1, 1A1, 2E1, 2D6). No single CYP was identifiable as being a functional counterpart to CYP2B19 in mouse skin since none qualified as being mainly responsible for epidermal epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation. Rather, the data suggest that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in human skin are formed by several CYPs expressed in different cell layers of the epidermis. This would predict that CYP-derived eicosanoids have different functions in different epidermal cell layers.

  9. Cell-surface glycoproteins of human sarcomas: differential expression in normal and malignant tissues and cultured cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rettig, W.F.; Garin-Chesa, P.; Beresford, H.R.; Oettgen, H.F.; Melamed, M.R.; Old, L.J.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human cells are characterized by specific changes in surface antigen phenotype. In the present study, the authors have defined six cell-surface antigens of human sarcomas and normal mesenchymal cells, by using mixed hemadsorption assays and immunochemical methods for the analysis of cultured cells and immunohistochemical staining for the analysis of normal tissues and > 200 tumor specimens. Differential patterns of F19, F24, G171, G253, S5, and Thy-1 antigen expression were found to characterize (i) subsets of cultured sarcoma cell lines, (ii) cultured fibroblasts derived from various organs, (iii) normal resting and activated mesenchymal tissues, and (iv) sarcoma and nonmesenchymal tumor tissues. These results provide a basic surface antigenic map for cultured mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal tissues and permit the classification of human sarcomas according to their antigenic phenotypes.

  10. Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

  11. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  12. Skin flicks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann), 1964-

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The written and artistic part of this thesis are both separated into the two categories of "SKIN" and "FLICKS". The Artistic part of my thesis consists of five artificial skins made on my body, and a series of video tapes ...

  13. Efficient elasticity for character skinning with contact and collisions Aleka McAdams1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    -level character skinning system. CR Categories: I.6.8 [Simulation and Modeling]: Types of Simulation--Animation aspect is the production of life-like deformations for soft tissues comprising both humans and animals Animation Studios 2 PDI/DreamWorks 3 University of California, Los Angeles 4 University of Wisconsin

  14. Cartilage tissue engineering with human chondrocytes from osteoarthritic knees and a semi-permeable membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh-Bonassera, Nancy D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scaffolds in a closed bioreactor system . Biotechnol Bioengrelevance for automated bioreactor systems . Tissue Eng 13 :closed and scaffold-free bioreactor system that permits

  15. Skin contamination dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR); Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Cazalas, Edward (Corvallis, OR)

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

  16. An investigation of the structure-function relationship in human cervical tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Kristin M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cervix plays a crucial role in maintaining a healthy pregnancy, acting as a mechanical barrier to hold the fetus inside the uterus during gestation. Altered biochemical and mechanical properties of the cervical tissue ...

  17. Evolutionary dynamics and tissue specificity of human long noncoding RNAs in six mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washietl, Stefan

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) play diverse regulatory roles in human development and disease, but little is known about their evolutionary history and constraint. Here, we characterize human lincRNA expression ...

  18. Discovery of Human sORF-Encoded Polypeptides (SEPs) in Cell Lines and Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Jiao

    The existence of nonannotated protein-coding human short open reading frames (sORFs) has been revealed through the direct detection of their sORF-encoded polypeptide (SEP) products. The discovery of novel SEPs increases ...

  19. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamura, Akitoshi, E-mail: akitoshi-tamura@ds-pharma.co.jp; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased inflammatory cells and IgE, but the others did not. • The allergic drugs commonly induced germinal center hyperplasia in lymphoid tissues. • Some of these allergic drugs transiently increased CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in the spleen.

  20. National Human Radiobiological Tissue Repository (NHRTR) at the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The NHRTR, one component of the USTUR, contains frozen tissues, tissue solutions, microscope slides, and paraffin blocks that were collected by the USTUR at the autopsy of workers with documented intakes of plutonium, americium, uranium, and thorium. The samples are available to qualified scientists for further research. Thousands of frozen, ashed, dried, and plastic embedded bone samples from the radium studies carried out by Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the New Jersey Radium Research Project are available and linked by case number to de-identified, published case data. These data include the person's source of exposure (dial painter, therapeutic injection, etc.), estimated body burden, radiochemical results, and medical history. Other samples, including organs and whole body donations, have come from volunteer donors who were impacted by elements such as plutonium, throium, etc. See the USTUR website for information on how to apply for research samples or how to become a volunteer donor. [Information taken from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/NHRTR/index.html#

  1. Comparative DNA microarray analysis of human monocyte derived dendritic cells and MUTZ-3 cells exposed to the moderate skin sensitizer cinnamaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Python, Francois [Experimental Product Safety, Procter and Gamble Co., Cosmital SA, Marly (Switzerland); Goebel, Carsten [Product Safety, Human Safety Assessment, Procter and Gamble Service GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Aeby, Pierre [Experimental Product Safety, Procter and Gamble Co., Cosmital SA, Marly (Switzerland)], E-mail: pierre_aeby@bluewin.ch

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The number of studies involved in the development of in vitro skin sensitization tests has increased since the adoption of the EU 7th amendment to the cosmetics directive proposing to ban animal testing for cosmetic ingredients by 2013. Several studies have recently demonstrated that sensitizers induce a relevant up-regulation of activation markers such as CD86, CD54, IL-8 or IL-1{beta} in human myeloid cell lines (e.g., U937, MUTZ-3, THP-1) or in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (PBMDCs). The present study aimed at the identification of new dendritic cell activation markers in order to further improve the in vitro evaluation of the sensitizing potential of chemicals. We have compared the gene expression profiles of PBMDCs and the human cell line MUTZ-3 after a 24-h exposure to the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde. A list of 80 genes modulated in both cell types was obtained and a set of candidate marker genes was selected for further analysis. Cells were exposed to selected sensitizers and non-sensitizers for 24 h and gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results indicated that PIR, TRIM16 and two Nrf2-regulated genes, CES1 and NQO1, are modulated by most sensitizers. Up-regulation of these genes could also be observed in our recently published DC-activation test with U937 cells. Due to their role in DC activation, these new genes may help to further refine the in vitro approaches for the screening of the sensitizing properties of a chemical.

  2. Friction Induced Skin Tags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Duplantis KL, Jones BH. Friction blisters. Pathophysiology,Friction Induced Skin Tags Francisco Allegue MD 1 , Carmenetiopathogenic role for friction. Introduction Skin tags (

  3. Depth-resolved monitoring of diffusion of hyperosmotic agents in normal and malignant human esophagus tissues using optical coherence tomography in-vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Qingliang; Guo Zhouyi; Wei Huajiang; Yang Hongqin; Xie Shusen

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Depth-resolved monitoring with differentiation and quantification of glucose diffusion in healthy and abnormal esophagus tissues has been studied in vitro. Experiments have been performed using human normal esophagus and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues by the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The images have been continuously acquired for 120 min in the experiments, and the depth-resolved and average permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution have been calculated by the OCT amplitude (OCTA) method. We demonstrate the capability of the OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring, differentiation, and quantifying of glucose diffusion in normal esophagus and ESCC tissues. It is found that the permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution are not uniform throughout the normal esophagus and ESCC tissues and increase from (3.30 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and (1.57 {+-} 0.05) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the mucous membrane of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues to (1.82 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} and (3.53 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the submucous layer approximately 742 {mu}m away from the epithelial surface of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues, respectively. (optical coherence tomography)

  4. Terahertz spectroscopy of intrinsic biomarkers for non-melanoma skin Cecil S. Joseph1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Terahertz spectroscopy of intrinsic biomarkers for non-melanoma skin cancer. Cecil S. Joseph1 of human cancers. The aim of this study was to identify intrinsic biomarkers for non-melanoma skin cancer wave terahertz imaging, skin cancer imaging 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Non-melanoma

  5. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    cells of the airways due to internal exposure to alpha-particle emitters, e.g. radon. Inhalation of radon, a colorless and odorless gas, one of the products of the decay of uranium which occurs naturally in the earth?s crust, is the second major cause... epithelial tissue plays an important role in normal lung physiology. square4 lung epithelia are target tissues for occupational internal exposures and for radon exposure (26); square4 the epithelium of bronchioles appears to be the origin...

  6. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  7. DNA Double-Strand Breaks Form in Bystander Cells after Microbeam Irradiation of Three-dimensional Human Tissue Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Research Accelerator Facility, Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; and 3 Radiological implications for cancer radiother- apy and diagnostic radiology as well as for human health in general

  8. HISTORY OF SKIN GRAFTS and Hauben and colleagues2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    report of successful pinch grafts. Ollier in 1872 pointed out the importance of the dermis in skin grafts, Vandeput, and Olley4 gave us the technology to expand skin grafts with a machine that would cut the graft technology was published by Rheinwald and Green,5 and in 1979 cultured human keratinocytes were grown to form

  9. aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    --22000000 46 Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma of the skin Melanoma

  10. Skin metastases from lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mollet, Todd W; Garcia, Carlos A; Koester, Glenn

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cutaneous metastases from the lung frequently indicate aof skin metastases from lung cancer. Intern Med. 1996; 35:9. Coslett LM, Katlic MR. Lung cancer with skin metastasis.

  11. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Cornforth

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

  12. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  13. In Vivo characterization of skin using a weiner nonlinear stochastic identification method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi

    This paper describes an indentometer device used to identify the linear dynamic and nonlinear properties of skin and underlying tissue using an in vivo test. The device uses a Lorentz force actuator to apply a dynamic force ...

  14. MELANOMA OF THE SKIN 10. MELANOMA OF THE SKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    MELANOMA OF THE SKIN 85 10. MELANOMA OF THE SKIN 10.1. SUMMARY Melanoma of the skin was the seventh most common cancer in Ireland, accounting for 4.1% of all malignant neoplasms, excluding non-melanoma at approximately 5% per annum overall. The risk of developing melanoma up to the age of 74 was 1 in 89 for women

  15. Three-Dimensional Model on Thermal Response of Skin Subject to Laser Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    in human skin [3]. The #12;rst medical lasers were continuous beam lasers such as CO 2 laser, argon laser and Jun Zhang z Laboratory for High Performance Scienti#12;c Computing and Computer Simulation, Department to investigate the transient thermal response of human skin subject to laser heating. The temperature

  16. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y.D.; Springall, D.R.; Wharton, J.; Polak, J.M. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (England))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autoradiographic techniques and {sup 125}I-labeled endothelin-1 were used to study the distribution of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin. Specific endothelin-1 binding sites were localized to blood vessels (capillaries, deep cutaneous vascular plexus, arteries, and arterioles), the deep dermal and connective tissue sheath of hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, and arrector pili muscle. Specific binding was inhibited by endothelin-2 and endothelin-3 as well as endothelin-1. Non-specific binding was found in the epidermis and the medulla of hair follicles. No binding was found in connective tissue or fat. These vascular binding sites may represent endothelin receptors, in keeping with the known cutaneous vasoconstrictor actions of the peptide. If all binding sites are receptors, the results suggest that endothelin could also regulate the function of sweat glands and may have trophic effects in the skin.

  17. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  18. Sensitive skins and somatic processing for affective and sociable robots based upon a somatic alphabet approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiehl, Walter Daniel, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sense of touch is one of the most important senses of the human body. This thesis describes the biologically inspired design of "sensitive skins" for two different robotic platforms: Leonardo, a high degree-of-freedom, ...

  19. Patient-Specific Interactive Ultrasound Image Simulation with Soft-Tissue Deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrinec, Kresimir

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    software developer (Systems Engineer), Soft- ware Imaging,i.e. , the system does not model soft-tissue mechanics andour system, we separated the simulations of skin and soft-

  20. Skinning Arbitrary Deformations Ladislav Kavan 1,2 Rachel McDonnell1 Simon Dobbyn1 Jiri Zara2 Carol O'Sullivan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    , such as moving human or animal figures. In this paper, we demonstrate how to automatically construct skinning way of representing the animation of quasi- articulated objects, such as virtual characters, is known as skinning (or matrix palette skinning). It is based on the observation that an animation of a virtual

  1. A critical comparison of human face rendering techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizpe, Arturo Andrew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human skin exhibits complex light reflectance properties that make it difficult to render realistically. In recent years, many techniques have been introduced to render skin, with varying degrees of complexity and realism. ...

  2. "Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    "Skin Cancer- What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf May 20, 2010 #12;Supporters for the Deaf ("REAP") #12;Overview Skin Overview What is skin cancer? Who is at risk? How common is skin cancer? Signs of skin cancer Prevention Treatments #12;Skin Overview Skin is the largest organ in your body

  3. Non-coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are direct agonists for the human pregnane-X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, and activate target gene expression in a tissue-specific manner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Salman, Fadheela; Plant, Nick, E-mail: N.Plant@Surrey.ac.uk

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The polychlorinated biphenyl group possesses high environmental persistence, leading to bioaccumulation and a number of adverse effects in mammals. Whilst coplanar PCBs elicit their toxic effects through agonism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor; however, non-coplanar PCBs are not ligands for AhR, but may be ligands for members of the nuclear receptor family of proteins. To better understand the biological actions of non-coplanar PCBs, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of their ability to activate PXR and CAR-mediated effects. Cells were exposed to a range of non-coplanar PCBs (99, 138, 153, 180 and 194), or the coplanar PCB77: Direct activation of PXR and CAR was measured using a mammalian receptor activation assay in human liver cells, with rifampicin and CITCO used as positive controls ligands for PXR and CAR, respectively; activation of target gene expression was examined using reporter gene plasmids for CYP3A4 and MDR1 transfected into liver, intestine and lung cell lines. Several of the non-coplanar PCBs directly activated PXR and CAR, whilst the coplanar PCB77 did not. Non-coplanar PCBs were also able to activate PXR/CAR target gene expression in a substitution- and tissue-specific manner. Non-coplanar PCBs act as direct activators for the nuclear receptors PXR and CAR, and are able to elicit transcriptional activation of target genes in a substitution- and tissue-dependent manner. Chronic activation of PXR/CAR is linked to adverse effects and must be included in any risk assessment of PCBs. -- Highlights: ? Several Non-coplanar PCBs are able to directly activate both PXR and CAR in vitro. ? PCB153 is the most potent direct activator of PXR and CAR nuclear receptors. ? Non-coplanar PCB activation of CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes is structure-dependent. ? Non-coplanar PCB activate CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes in a tissue-dependent. ? PCB153 is the most potent activator of PXR/CAR target gene in all tissues.

  4. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 28:113120 (2001) Inuence of Nozzle-to-Skin Distance in Cryogen Spray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dis- tance from the nozzle tip. Results: Size of spray cones and sprayed areas vary with distanceLasers in Surgery and Medicine 28:113±120 (2001) In¯uence of Nozzle-to-Skin Distance in Cryogen, the optimal atomizing nozzle design and operating conditions for cooling human skin remain to be determined

  5. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  7. Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

  8. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boulware, Stephen [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Vasquez, Karen M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (?-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ? 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ? This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ? 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ? This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  9. Confocal Microscopy for Modeling Electron Microbeam Irradiation of Skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John H.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For radiation exposures employing targeted sources such as particle microbeams, the deposition of energy and dose will depend on the spatial heterogeneity of the spample. Although cell structural variations are relatively minor for two-dimensional cell cultures, they can vary significantly for fully differential tissues. Employing high-resolution confocal microscopy, we have determined the spatial distribution, size, and shape of epidermal kerantinocyte nuclei for the full-thickness EpiDerm skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). Application of these data to claculate the microdosimetry and microdistribution of energy deposition by an electron microbeam is discussed.

  10. NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER 3. NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER 21 3. NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER 3.1. SUMMARY Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC their cancer diagnosis. Table 3.1 Summary information for non-melanoma skin cancer in Ireland, 1995 number of cases for both sexes presented in the 70­79 age group. Figure 3.1 Age distribution of non-melanoma

  11. Stationary turbine component with laminated skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

  12. Design and potential clinical impact of a noninvasive thermal diffusion sensor to monitor human peripheral microvascular perfusion in real-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perfusion in peripheral tissues is fundamental to the characterization of both local and global cardiovascular health. However, despite the inherent accessibility of tissues such as skin to microvascular measurements, there ...

  13. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornforth, Michael N. [The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX (United States)

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'.

  14. Nonlinear stochastic system identification techniques for biological tissues/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops a device capable of measuring the nonlinear dynamic mechanical properties of human tissue in vivo. The enabling technology is the use of nonlinear stochastic system identification techniques in ...

  15. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chun-Chin

    We utilize multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of noncancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from humans. Our results show that the combination of second-harmonic ...

  16. Low-dose radiation impacts skin sensitivity | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low-dose radiation impacts skin sensitivity Low-dose radiation impacts skin sensitivity Released: April 06, 2015 Systems approach suggests alterations in stability of cells and...

  17. autologous serum skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

  18. acute nontraumatic skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

  19. Detecting pornographic images by localizing skin Sotiris Karavarsamisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blekas, Konstantinos

    specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" / "porn" and "skin" / "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers. Index Terms convex hull calculation, multi-class classification, porn detection

  20. alter skin microcirculation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

  1. ameliorate genetic skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

  2. Beyond the skin bag: on the moral responsibility of extended agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, F. Allan

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and extended agency The view of the subject as only the human individual is known as methodological individualism. This theory holds that subjects are human beings entirely contained in their “skin bags” (Clark 2003), that maintain their identity... to ride a bicycle. “Be careful not to run into people or things, don’t crash your bike or hurt yourself, and especially don’t ride into the street without looking.” Her responsibility with the bicycle is, however, considerably less momentous than...

  3. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  4. Skin friction for steel piles in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOVEMENT 4) For dry pile tests at initial void ratio of 0. 63, the assumption of a Coulomb type failure applies and the envelope is shown in Figure 23. The skin friction computed is the total friction caused by applied load. and. the static load caused... Sand 43 22. Skin Friction-Chamber Pressure Ratio Versus Pile Movement for Dense Dry Sand 44 23 ~ 24. Mohr Envelope for Skin Friction Measured. and Assumed. Pile Deformation 49 25 ~ Computed and Actual Load-Movement Curves for Test Pile 1 26...

  5. Biomaterials for Tissue Regeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    fellows · US citizen or permanent resident · Enrolled in Materials Science and Engineering ProgramBiomaterials for Tissue Regeneration Mei Wei, Associate Professor Materials Science and Engineering Program Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Eng #12;GAANN - Materials Science

  6. Tissue-like phantoms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA); De Grand, Alec M. (Boston, MA)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  7. Adipose Tissue Invariant NKT Cells Protect against Diet-Induced Obesity and Metabolic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Immunity Article Adipose Tissue Invariant NKT Cells Protect against Diet-Induced Obesity in human and murine adipose tissue, and that as adipose tissue expanded in obesity, iNKT cells were, fatty livers, and insulin resis- tance on a high-fat diet. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells into obese

  8. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. “Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

  9. Tissue-material interactions : bioadhesion and tissue response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shazly, Tarek (Tarek Michael)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diverse interactions between soft tissues and implanted biomaterials directly influence the success or failure of therapeutic interventions. The nature and extent of these interactions strongly depend on both the tissue ...

  10. Active skin for turbulent drag reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Raghavendran

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pursued is "micro" in the sense that only micro-scale wave amplitudes (order of 30[]m) and energy inputs are sufficient to produce significant benefits. Two actuation principles are proposed and analyzed and different skin designs based on these two...

  11. Preventive Skin Care Fact or Fiction?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    and colors Many are birthmarks http://www.skinsight.com/images/dx/webInfant/congenitalMelanocyticNevus_33234 by skin biopsy to make sure not cancer http://www.skinsight.com/images/dx/webInfant/congenital://www.skincancer.org/understanding-uva-and-uvb.html #12;Practice GOOD habits! · Reapply sunscreen if: ­ Sweating ­ Swimming in water ­ Doing any activity

  12. Space radiation-induced bystander signaling in 2D and 3D skin tissue models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumpkins, Sarah B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space radiation poses a significant hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions, and the low fluences of charged particles characteristic of this field suggest that bystander effects, the phenomenon in which a greater ...

  13. Vaccine delivery with microneedle skin patches in nonhuman primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Adrienne V

    Transcutaneous drug delivery from planar skin patches is effective for small-molecule drugs and skin-permeable vaccine adjuvants. However, to achieve efficient delivery of vaccines and other macromolecular therapeutics ...

  14. The study of skin permeation mechanism and terpene-skin lipid interaction via nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, P. F. C.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Huang, Meng; Ho, P. C. L.; Chan, S. Y.

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    , lipid extraction, etc. In our case, the interaction between a terpene and a lipid was examinedwith nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which aims to provide some insight to enhancement in skin permeation. Palmitic acid (Fig 1), a 16-carbon fatty acid... and oxides were able to producea greater ??. National University of Singapore, 2006 PS77 -The Study of Skin Permeation Mechanism and Terpene-Lipid Interaction via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Perry Fung Chye Lim a, Xiang Yang Liu b, Meng Huang a, Paul Chi...

  15. SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD IN MELANOMA & SKIN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD IN MELANOMA & SKIN CANCER Sponsored by: The Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Melanoma & Skin Cancer University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Purpose The overall goals of the Melanoma & Skin Cancer SPORE are to improve the detection

  16. FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD IN MELANOMA & SKIN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD IN MELANOMA & SKIN CANCER Sponsored by: The Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Melanoma & Skin Cancer University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Purpose The overall goals of the Melanoma & Skin Cancer SPORE are to improve the detection

  17. absorption skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption skin First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Healthy Skin Matters Normal Skin...

  18. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  19. Topical treatment of melanoma skin metastases with Imiquimod: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisti, Andrea; Sisti, Giovanni; Oranges, Carlo Maria

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locoregional recurrences of melanoma: a new therapeuticthe treatment of metastatic melanoma to skin. Arch Dermatol,High W, and Stewart L, Melanoma in situ treated successfully

  20. allotransplanted vascularized skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Optimum pulse duration and radiant exposure for vascular laser therapy of dark port-wine skin: a theoretical study Engineering Websites Summary: Optimum pulse duration and...

  1. analyzing skin conductance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coupling between each tactile sensing chip and a ground Shinoda, Hiroyuki 8 HandWave: Design and Manufacture of a Wearable Wireless Skin Conductance Computer Technologies and...

  2. Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with coherence microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, James G.

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex ...

  3. Biodegradable Silicon-Containing Elastomers for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds and Shape Memory Polymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoener, Cody A.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Commonly used thermoplastic biodegradable polymers are generally brittle and lack appreciable elasticity at physiological temperature and thereby fail to mimic the elastic nature of many human soft tissues such as blood vessels. Thus, there is a...

  4. PASSAGE OF FISSION PRODUCTS THROUGH THE SKIN OF TUNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was slow. PASSAGE OF FISSION PRODUCTS THROUGH THE SKIN OF TUNA In relation to "fallout" from nuclear -bomb tests, it is of interest to measure the amounts of radioactive isotopes known to be present in mixtures of fission products which would pass through the skin of fish held under refrigera- tion on fishing vessels

  5. allergic skin test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    allergic skin test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The Skin Microbiome in Healthy and...

  6. Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

  7. INVESTIGATION The Lsktm1 Locus Modulates Lung and Skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broman, Karl W.

    INVESTIGATION The Lsktm1 Locus Modulates Lung and Skin Tumorigenesis in the Mouse Antonella Galvan to both skin and lung tumorigenesis over the susceptibility of the SWR/J strain. In an effort to map tumor.93) and lung (LOD score = 8.74) tumorigenesis. Two genes, Igfbp5 and Igfbp2, residing in this locus

  8. Mechanisms of mesothelial tissue lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Judy Li-Wen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the pleural space, sliding between the lung and chest wall induces shear stress that could damage the delicate mesothelial cells covering the tissue surfaces. Normally, the pleural space, which is filled with fluid, is ...

  9. Microscale Technologies for Tissue Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khademhosseini, Ali

    Microscale technologies are emerging as enabling tools for tissue engineering and biology. Here, we present our experience in developing microscale technologies to regulate cell-microenvironment interactions and generate ...

  10. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  11. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  12. Albumin extravasation rates in tissues of anesthetized and unanesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renkin, E.M.; Joyner, W.L.; Gustafson-Sgro, M.; Plopper, G.; Sibley, L.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with /sup 131/I was injected intravenously in chronically prepared, unanesthetized rats and into pentobarbital-anesthetized rats that had received 2 ml 5% BSA to help sustain plasma volume. Initial uptake rates (clearances) in skin, skeletal muscles, diaphragm, and heart (left ventricle) were measured over 1 h. BSA labeled with /sup 125/I was injected terminally to correct for intravascular /sup 131/I-BSA. Observed clearances were in the following order in both groups of animals: heart much greater than diaphragm approximately equal to skin greater than resting skeletal muscles. Differences between unanesthetized and anesthetized animals were small and inconsistently directed. Our results suggest that the lower albumin clearances reported in the literature for anesthetized rats are not the result of their immobility or any direct effect of anesthesia on albumin transport in these tissues. The lower transport rates appear to result indirectly from changes produced by anesthesia and/or surgery in controllable parameters such as plasma volume and intravascular protein mass.

  13. autologous fibrin-based skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

  14. atopic dermatitis-like skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

  15. acinetobacter baumannii-associated skin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

  16. In-situ measurement of skin friction and point bearing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehmet, Joseph Don

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I M ? S IT U ME~c S UBEME6'T OF SKIN FRICTION PHD POINT BEARIiiG A Thesis JOS'- P':i QOij' REAMS T Suhmitted to th Gradua. e Colloa of Texas ASM Univer "it@ ln oar i! al f ul fl11ment of the requi ri ment for tha ~loc ~ ec of NP STE!3...-Situ Measurement of Skin Friction and Point Bearing (January 1970) Joseph D . Rehmet, B. S . , Texas A&M University Supervised by: Dr. Harry M. Coyle Field tests are made using several in-situ testing devices and limiting values of skin friction and point...

  17. Influence of Tissue Conductivity Inhomogeneity and Anisotropy on EEG/MEG based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    source in the brain using a volume-conduction model of the head. The associated differential equations in the Human Brain #12;Die Deutsche Bibliothek - CIP-Einheitsaufnahme Wolters, Carsten Hermann: Influence of Tissue Conductivity Inhomogeneity and Anisotropy on EEG/MEG based Source Localization in the Human Brain

  18. Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montano, Gabriel A.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Allen, Amy; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Wheeler, David Roger

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is national interest in the development of sophisticated materials that can automatically detect and respond to chemical and biological threats without the need for human intervention. In living systems, cell membranes perform such functions on a routine basis, detecting threats, communicating with the cell, and triggering automatic responses such as the opening and closing of ion channels. The purpose of this project was to learn how to replicate simple threat detection and response functions within artificial membrane systems. The original goals toward developing 'smart skin' assemblies included: (1) synthesizing functionalized nanoparticles to produce electrochemically responsive systems within a lipid bilayer host matrices, (2) calculating the energetics of nanoparticle-lipid interactions and pore formation, and (3) determining the mechanism of insertion of nanoparticles in lipid bilayers via imaging and electrochemistry. There are a few reports of the use of programmable materials to open and close pores in rigid hosts such as mesoporous materials using either heat or light activation. However, none of these materials can regulate themselves in response to the detection of threats. The strategies we investigated in this project involve learning how to use programmable nanomaterials to automatically eliminate open channels within a lipid bilayer host when 'threats' are detected. We generated and characterized functionalized nanoparticles that can be used to create synthetic pores through the membrane and investigated methods of eliminating the pores either through electrochemistry, change in pH, etc. We also focused on characterizing the behavior of functionalized gold NPs in different lipid membranes and lipid vesicles and coupled these results to modeling efforts designed to gain an understanding of the interaction of nanoparticles within lipid assemblies.

  19. Component tissues of different morphological types of tomato fruit and their qualitative and quantitative effects on quality of processed product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Alfred Bernhart

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solids Acidity. Morphological Fruit Types. MATERIALS AND METHODS. 10 Raw Material 10 Processing Methods Evaluation of Fruit Areas. 10 13 Color. 13 Whole fruit color evaluations. 13 TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT' D) Page Peel color evaluation. 13... of the tomatoes were dissected into four tissue parts: peel, outer~all, cross~all and core, and locular contents. The nitrogen peeling process described by Brown et al. (1970) was used to remove the tomato skin. The various components were placed...

  20. Mpemba paradox: Hydrogen bond memory and water-skin supersolidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q Sun

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical reproduction of measurements, experimental evidence for skin super-solidity and hydrogen-bond memory clarified that Mpemba paradox integrates the heat emission-conduction-dissipation dynamics in the source-path-drain cycle system.

  1. Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep Stephen W. Carmichael Mayo Clinic. Coming Events 2011 EMAS 2011 May 15­19, 2011 Angers, France www.emas-web.net IUMAS-V May 22­27, 2011

  2. acute skin reaction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from a complex reaction induced by plant pigments exposed to ultraviolet (UV) wave length sunlight in the skin of animals that have eaten certain plants 1-3. This reaction is...

  3. artificial skin construct: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice. Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun 2013-10-03 66...

  4. attenuate skin dryness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice. Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun 2013-10-03 9 Journal...

  5. artificial skin applications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice. Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun 2013-10-03 117 An...

  6. allergic skin disease: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the microbiome...The Skin Microbiome in Healthy and Allergic Dogs Aline Rodrigues Hoffmann1*, Adam P. Patterson2, Alison Diesel2, Sara D. Lawhon4, Hoai Jaclyn Ly1, Christine...

  7. allergic skin diseases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the microbiome...The Skin Microbiome in Healthy and Allergic Dogs Aline Rodrigues Hoffmann1*, Adam P. Patterson2, Alison Diesel2, Sara D. Lawhon4, Hoai Jaclyn Ly1, Christine...

  8. Involvement of TGF-beta in skin photoaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Won Seon, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis study was to understand the role of TGF-[beta] in skin photoaging, especially in solar elastosis. Solar elastosis, the accumulation of elastotic material in the dermal extracelluar matrix, is a major ...

  9. Engineering human hepatic tissue for modeling liver-stage malaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Shengyong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plcsmodium liver stage is an attractive target for the development of antimalarial drugs and vaccines, as it provides an opportunity to interrupt the life cycle of the parasite at a critical early stage. However, ...

  10. Apparatus and method to control atmospheric water vapor composition and concentration during dynamic cooling of biological tissues in conjunction with laser irradiations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, J. Stuart (Laguna Niguel, CA); Anvari, Bahman (Houston, TX); Tanenbaum, B. Samuel (Irvine, CA); Milner, Thomas E. (Austin, TX)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogen spray cooling of skin surface with millisecond cryogen spurts is an effective method for establishing a controlled temperature distribution in tissue and protecting the epidermis from nonspecific thermal injury during laser mediated dermatological procedures. Control of humidity level, spraying distance and cryogen boiling point is material to the resulting surface temperature. Decreasing the ambient humidity level results in less ice formation on the skin surface without altering the surface temperature during the cryogen spurt. For a particular delivery nozzle, increasing the spraying distance to 85 millimeters lowers the surface temperature. The methodology comprises establishing a controlled humidity level in the theater of operation of the irradiation site of the biological tissues before and/or during the cryogenic spray cooling of the biological tissue. At cold temperatures calibration was achieved by mounting a thermistor on a thermoelectric cooler. The thermal electric cooler was cooled from from 20.degree. C. to about -20.degree. C. while measuring its infrared emission.

  11. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Zimmerman, George (Lafayette, CA); Jacques, Steven (Portland, OR)

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

  12. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Zimmerman, G.; Jacques, S.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or ``welded`` using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage. 8 figs.

  13. Gelatin based on Power-gel.TM. as solders for Cr.sup.4+laser tissue welding and sealing of lung air leak and fistulas in organs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R.; Tang, Jing; Evans, Jonathan M.; Ho, Peng Pei

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser tissue welding can be achieved using tunable Cr.sup.4+ lasers, semiconductor lasers and fiber lasers, where the weld strength follows the absorption spectrum of water. The use of gelatin and esterified gelatin as solders in conjunction with laser inducted tissue welding impart much stronger tensile and torque strengths than albumin solders. Selected NIR wavelength from the above lasers can improve welding and avoid thermal injury to tissue when used alone or with gelatin and esterified gelatin solders. These discoveries can be used to enhance laser tissue welding of tissues such as skin, mucous, bone, blood vessel, nerve, brain, liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, lung, bronchus, respiratory track, urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, or gynecologic tract and as a sealant for pulmonary air leaks and fistulas such as intestinal, rectal and urinary fistulas.

  14. A clamp ligation method for point mutational spectrometry : marked increase in scanning range for the human genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Andrea Seungsun, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of human mutagenesis requires methods of measuring somatic mutations in normal human tissues and inherited mutations in human populations. Such methods should permit measurement of rare mutations in the presence ...

  15. Mechanical formalism for tissue dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sham Tlili; Cyprien Gay; Francois Graner; Philippe Marcq; François Molino; Pierre Saramito

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding of morphogenesis in living organisms has been renewed by tremendous progress in experimental techniques that provide access to cell-scale, quantitative information both on the shapes of cells within tissues and on the genes being expressed. This information suggests that our understanding of the respective contributions of gene expression and mechanics, and of their crucial entanglement, will soon leap forward. Biomechanics increasingly benefits from models, which assist the design and interpretation of experiments, point out the main ingredients and assumptions, and ultimately lead to predictions. The newly accessible local information thus calls for a reflection on how to select suitable classes of mechanical models. We review both mechanical ingredients suggested by the current knowledge of tissue behaviour, and modelling methods that can help generate a rheological diagram or a constitutive equation. We distinguish cell scale ("intra-cell") and tissue scale ("inter-cell") contributions. We recall the mathematical framework developped for continuum materials and explain how to transform a constitutive equation into a set of partial differential equations amenable to numerical resolution. We show that when plastic behaviour is relevant, the dissipation function formalism appears appropriate to generate constitutive equations; its variational nature facilitates numerical implementation, and we discuss adaptations needed in the case of large deformations. The present article gathers theoretical methods that can readily enhance the significance of the data to be extracted from recent or future high throughput biomechanical experiments.

  16. High throughput 3-D tissue cytometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Hyuk-Sang, 1971-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the ongoing technological development of high throughput 3-D tissue cytometry.and its applications in biomedicine. 3-D tissue cytometry has been developed in our laboratory based on two-photon microscopy ...

  17. Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettinger, Christopher John, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the integration of novel microfabrication techniques for vascular tissue engineering applications in the context of a novel biodegradable elastomer. The field of tissue engineering and organ regeneration ...

  18. A Supersolid Skin Covering both Water and Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Chang Q

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mysterious nature and functionality of water and ice skins remain baffling to the community since 1859 when Farady firstly proposed liquid skin lubricating ice. Here we show the presence of supersolid phase that covers both water and ice using Raman spectroscopy measurements and quantum calculations. In the skin of two molecular layers thick, molecular undercoordination shortens the H-O bond by ~16% and lengthens the OH nonbond by ~25% through repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent O atoms, which depresses the density from 0.92 for bulk ice to 0.75 gcm-3. The O:H-O cooperative relaxation stiffens the H-O stretching phonon from 3200/3150 cm-1 to the same value of 3450 cm-1 and raises the melting temperature of both skins by up to ~310 K. Numerical derivatives on the viscosity and charge accumulation suggests that the elastic, polarized, and thermally stable supersolid phase makes the ice frictionless and water skin hydrophobic and ice like at room temperature.

  19. Factors Associated with the Decision to Hospitalize Emergency Department Patients with a Skin and Soft Tissue Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). 2 Hospitalizations for SSTICo-morbidity - n (%) Any Prior MRSA infection Diabetesmagnetic resonance imaging; MRSA, methicillin-resistant S.

  20. InVERT molding for scalable control of tissue microarchitecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungrin, M. D.

    Complex tissues contain multiple cell types that are hierarchically organized within morphologically and functionally distinct compartments. Construction of engineered tissues with optimized tissue architecture has been ...

  1. The Impact of Biomechanics in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David L.

    Biomechanical factors profoundly influence the processes of tissue growth, development, maintenance, degeneration, and repair. Regenerative strategies to restore damaged or diseased tissues in vivo and create living tissue ...

  2. The use of polarized light for skin cancer detecton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLaughter, Aimee Hill

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and subsequent biopsy of suspicious lesions. Many cancerous lesions are missed and many benign lesions are biopsied using these techniques. This process is painful and expensive. The proposed research is driven by the need for a non-invasive skin cancer...

  3. MOBILE PHONE USE AND TEMPORAL SKIN HEAT SENSATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in the phone by the battery currents and running of the radiofrequency (RF) electronic circuits measured the temperature of the temporal skin due to GSM 1800 MHz MP radiated power (125 mW). We suppressed of the heat produced in the phone by the battery currents and running of the radiofrequency (RF) electronic

  4. In-situ measurement of skin friction and point bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehmet, Joseph Don

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in order to produce a specified sensitivity. The Skin FricCion Device This device (See Fig. 2a) was iabr'cated of 2. 375 in O. D. si e. . l tubing and 2 standard drill rod coupl- ings we Lded Lo Che Cube, ma). c on one &=n&l, female on Lhe other. Th...

  5. Subclonal variation and skin russeting in potato, (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehlke, Leslie Lashaun

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of subclonal selection for putative russet skin mutations of 'Century Russet' was conducted in Texas and Colorado to improve the russeting character in 'Century Russet'. RAPD analysis of a segregating F I family derived from a russet x white cross and of three...

  6. Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy Yan Zhou Cheng-Hui Liu Yi Sun Yang Pu://biomedicaloptics.spiedigitallibrary.org/ on 11/16/2012 Terms of Use: http://spiedl.org/terms #12;Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro

  7. HandWave : design and manufacture of a wearable wireless skin conductance sensor and housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Marc D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis report details the design and manufacture of HandWave, a wearable wireless Bluetooth skin conductance sensor, and dedicated housing. The HandWave collects Electrodermal Activity (EDA) data by measuring skin ...

  8. A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies...

  9. Tumor Engineering: The Other Face of Tissue Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghajar, Cyrus M; Bissell, Mina J

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in tissue engineering have been accomplished for years by employing biomimetic strategies to provide cells with aspects of their original microenvironment necessary to reconstitute a unit of both form and function for a given tissue.We believe that the most critical hallmark of cancer is loss of integration of architecture and function; thus, it stands to reason that similar strategies could be employed to understand tumor biology. In this commentary, we discuss work contributed by Fischbach-Teschl and colleagues to this special issue of Tissue Engineering in the context of 'tumor engineering', that is, the construction of complex cell culture models that recapitulate aspects of the in vivo tumor microenvironment to study the dynamics of tumor development, progression, and therapy on multiple scales. We provide examples of fundamental questions that could be answered by developing such models, and encourage the continued collaboration between physical scientists and life scientists not only for regenerative purposes, but also to unravel the complexity that is the tumor microenvironment. In 1993, Vacanti and Langer cast a spotlight on the growing gap between patients in need of organ transplants and the amount of available donor organs; they reaffirmed that tissue engineering could eventually address this problem by 'applying principles of engineering and the life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes. Mortality figures and direct health care costs for cancer patients rival those of patients who experience organ failure. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States (Source: American Cancer Society) and it is estimated that direct medical costs for cancer patients approach $100B yearly in the United States alone (Source: National Cancer Institute). In addition, any promising therapy that emerges from the laboratory costs roughly $1.7B to take from bench to bedside. Whereas we have indeed waged war on cancer, the training grounds have largely consisted of small rodents, despite marked differences between human and mouse physiology, or plastic dishes, even though just like our tissues and organs most tumors exist within three-dimensional proteinacious milieus. One could argue that this is comparable to training for a desert war in the arctic. In this special issue of tissue engineering, Fischbach-Teschl and colleagues build a strong case for engineering complex cultures analogous to normal organs to tractably model aspects of the human tumor microenvironment that simply cannot be reproduced with traditional two-dimensional cell culture techniques and that cannot be studied in a controlled fashion in vivo. This idea has gained considerable traction of late as concepts presented and convincingly shown years ago have only now begun to be appreciated. Perhaps, then, it is time to organize those who wish to build complex tumor models to study cancer biology under a common umbrella. Accordingly, we propose that tumor engineering be defined as the construction of complex culture models that recapitulate aspects of the in vivo tumor microenvironment to study the dynamics of tumor development, progression, and therapy on multiple scales. Inherent in this definition is the collaboration that must occur between physical and life scientists to guide the design of patterning techniques, materials, and imaging modalities for the study of cancer from the subcellular to tissue level in physiologically relevant contexts. To date, the most successful tissue engineering approaches have employed methods that recapitulate the composition, architecture, and/or chemical presentation of native tissue. For instance, induction of blood vessel growth for therapeutic purposes has been achieved with sequential release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet derived growth factor to induce and stabilize blood vessels. This approach imitates that which occurs during physiological angiogenesis as a result of heterotypic interactions between endothelium and stroma. Employing such biomimetic

  10. ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE, MONIQUE DAUGE, ERWAN FAOU, VICTOR P´ERON suitable skin depth function is introduced on the interface ­ and here the sign of the curvature has a major influence, which means that the skin depth is larger

  11. The Effect of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elias, Damian Octavio

    The Effect of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin. PLoS ONE 7(2): e31203

  12. Skin tone of targets, lineup type, and confidence levels in cross-racial identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Jessica Lynne

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The current experiment investigated facial recognition memory for own and other-race faces. Two variations (light-skin and dark-skin) were presented for the Black targets. The purpose of this experiment was to observe the effect of skin variations...

  13. Skin cancer is the most com-mon form of cancer in the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skin cancer is the most com- mon form of cancer in the United States. Excessive and unprotected exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation (UV light) is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. Howev- er, skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer! The damaging and cumulative effects

  14. Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14 is that this behavior is extremely unhealthy and risky for their bodies, specifically their skin. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer found in young adults and second most common cancer found in adolescents

  15. Reusable Skinning Templates Using Cage-based Deformations Qian-Yi Zhou2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Reusable Skinning Templates Using Cage-based Deformations Tao Ju1 Qian-Yi Zhou2 Michiel van de- lows skinning solutions to be shared and reused, and they allow a user to quickly explore many possible template. Skinning templates can be shared by users because they are not represented in a model

  16. Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drug discovery, molecular biology, and biochemistry. Citation: Laskin J, BS Heath, PJ Roach, LH Cazares, and OJ Semmes.2012."Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption...

  17. The adipose tissue to serum dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE) ratio: Some methodological considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Carrillo, L. (Mexico Secretariat of Health, Cuernavaca (Mexico). National Inst. of Public Health John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (United States)); Torres-Sanchez, L.; Lopez-Cervantes, M. (Mexico Secretariat of Health, Cuernavaca (Mexico). National Inst. of Public Health); Blair, A. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)); Cebrian, M.E.; Uribe, M. (National Polytechnic Inst. (United States). Center for Research and Advanced Studies)

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE) adipose tissue level has been regarded as a preferred indicator of accumulated human exposure to DDT; however, blood sera are more feasible to obtain and analyze than adipose tissue samples. Inconsistent and scarce information exists in relation to the adipose tissue/serum DDE ratio. As a part of a hospital-based case-control study performed in Mexico City from 1994 to 1996, 198 paired serum and adipose tissue samples were obtained from 72 women with histologically confirmed breast cancer and 126 women with benign breast disease. Both adipose tissue and serum DDE levels were determined by gas-liquid chromatography and reported as ppb lipid weight (ng/g) as well as wet basis (ng/ml). Results showed that the adipose tissue/serum DDE ratio (ADSE) varies according to the type of information (lipid vs wet basis, arithmetic vs geometric means) used for its estimation. ADSE gets a value near 1 (1.1) only when the geometric DDE levels in lipid basis are used for its estimation. The correlation between DDE serum and adipose tissue levels was found (r = 0.364, P < 0.001). The ADSE did not vary by disease status, nor was it altered by parity, history of breast-feeding, and other reproductive characteristics. The authors endorse the use of venipuncture instead of biopsy as a way to estimate DDT body burden levels in further research.

  18. Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Timothy D.; Oka, Daichi; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have emerged as a leading candidate for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes. However, the low electrical conductivity of Si requires the use of conductive additives in the anode film. Here we report a solution-based synthesis of Si nanowires with a conductive carbon skin. Without any conductive additive, the Si nanowire electrodes exhibited capacities of over 2000 mA h g-1 for 100 cycles when cycled at C/10 and over 1200 mA h g-1 when cycled more rapidly at 1C against Li metal.. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation reveals that the carbon skin performs dual roles: it speeds lithiation of the Si nanowires significantly, while also constraining the final volume expansion. The present work sheds light on ways to optimize lithium battery performance by smartly tailoring the nanostructure of composition of materials based on silicon and carbon.

  19. Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, G., E-mail: gohar.abbas@gcu.edu.pk; Sarfraz, M. [Department of Physics, GC University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Forman Christian College University, Farozpur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

  20. TFE 2014-2015 Computational Tissue Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolper, Pierre

    CellsCarriers Culture Tissue Engineering 1924/04/2014 All rights reserved © 2014 #12;Patient CellsCarriers Culture Tissue Engineering 2024/04/2014 All rights reserved © 2014 #12;Gene network modeling 2124/04/2014 All rights reserved © 2014 Complexity Mechanisticmodelling Phenomenologicalmodelling Scope Data

  1. Heart valve tissue engineering Frank Baaijens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavroulakis, Georgios E.

    Heart valve tissue engineering Frank Baaijens Department of Biomedical Engineering Eindhoven University of Technology Netherlands Tissue engineered heart valves appear promising as autologous valvular functionality and durability of the heart valve relies on the strength and anisotropic properties of the valve

  2. Skin effect with arbitrary specularity in Maxwellian plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatoly V. Latyshev; Alexander A. Yushkanov

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of skin effect with arbitrary specularity in maxwellian plasma with specular--diffuse boundary conditions is solved. A new analytical method is developed that makes it possible to to obtain a solution up to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The method is based on the idea of symmetric continuation not only the electric field, but also electron distribution function. The solution is obtained in a form of von Neumann series.

  3. The use of polarized light for skin cancer detecton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLaughter, Aimee Hill

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detection system. Presented here is a method for the optical determination of cancerous tissue using polarized light. This thesis describes the development of a polarimetric imaging system including its calibration and testing. In addition, experiments...

  4. The Production and Analysis of Biodiesel from Waste Chicken Skin and Pork Skin Fat and a Comparison of Fuel Properties to Petroleum Derived Diesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krish T Bharat; Agni Bhattacharya

    Abstract—People today are increasingly health conscious and therefore shopkeepers tend to dispose of fatty chicken and pork skin. Chicken and pork skins thus are sources of solid waste that are usually not utilized. This paper deals with the production of useful biodiesel from utilizing the waste chicken and pork skins. Fat from the waste chicken and pork skins (sourced from local shops), was first extracted and subjected to transesterification. The products of transesterification were FAME (Fatty acid methyl esters) and glycerol. The FAME produced was tested for five parameters namely calorific value, pour point and cloud point when compared to ASTM E2515-11 standard values. Comparison of the obtained values of the five parameters with the standard values for diesel was performed to determine the viability of the biodiesel produced. The results of this experiment showed that the calorific values of FAME produced from chicken skin and pork skin fat were close to that of petroleum derived diesel. However, two test parameters namely kinematic viscosity and pour point differed when compared to diesel; this problem can be circumvented by modifying an automobile’s internal combustion engine. Due to the relatively high yield value of biodiesel, it is feasible to utilize chicken skin and pork skin fat at a rural level to produce FAME that can be an alternative to diesel in this time of acute fuel scarcity.

  5. THERMAL INTERACTION OF CRYOGEN SPRAY WITH HUMAN SKIN UNDER VACUUM PRESSURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    During the treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks laser energy is irradiated at appropriate Riverside, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA. gaguilar@engr.ucr.edu Abstract. Clinical results of port wine stain of this procedure is that laser energy is also absorbed by epidermal melanin, causing localized heating therein

  6. Tissue oxymetry using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lisa Chiawen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A noninvasive method for in vivo measurement of tissue oxygen concentration has been developed. Several techniques currently used suffer limitations that prevent their practical clinical use. Our method is to use the ...

  7. Controlling the Porosity and Microarchitecture of Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annabi, Nasim

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for regeneration and repair of diseased tissues, making the development of tissue engineering scaffolds a topic of great interest in biomedical research. Because of their biocompatibility ...

  8. augment tissue perfusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the development of a device designed for culturing liver tissue in a 3D perfused environment. Cells form tissue inside miniature channels of a scaffold, and the tissue is...

  9. Systematics of nucleon density distributions and neutron skin of nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seif, W M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton and neutron density profiles of 760 nuclei in the mass region of A=16-304are analyzed using the Skyrme energy density for the parameter set SLy4. Simple formulae are obtained to fit the resulting radii and diffuseness data. These formulae may be useful to estimate the values of the unmeasured radii, and especially in extrapolating charge radius values for nuclei which are far from the valley of stability or to perform analytic calculations for bound and/or scattering problems. The obtained neutron and proton root-mean-square radii and the neutron skin thicknesses are in agreement with the available experimental data.

  10. Tumor Engineering: The Other Face of Tissue Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Cyrus M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacanti, J.P. Tissue engineering. Science 260, 920, 1993. 2.dynamic reciprocity: engineering three-dimensional cultureRonnov-Jessen, L. TUMOR ENGINEERING: OTHER FACE OF TISSUE

  11. Mechanical behavior of tissue simulants and soft tissues under extreme loading conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalcioglu, Zeynep Ilke

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in computer-integrated surgery and in tissue-engineered constructs necessitate advances in experimental and analytical techniques in characterizing properties of mechanically compliant materials such ...

  12. Management of Pediatric Skin Abscesses in Pediatric, General Academic and Community Emergency Departments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in skin abscesses presentingmeeting on management of MRSA in Conflicts of Interest: Byfor clinical management of MRSA in the community: Summary of

  13. Mechanisms of NDV-3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infectionFig. 1) and suppression of MRSA proliferation (Fig. 2). Eachseverity and suppression of MRSA bioluminescence (Figs. 1

  14. Zo Rebecca Hunter Plasticity of the adult human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    Zoë Rebecca Hunter Plasticity of the adult human brain and motor recovery after stroke PICS © Institute of Cognitive Science #12;1 Bachelor's Thesis Plasticity of the adult human brain and motor brain and motor recovery after stroke 2 Abstract Stroke may cause a major destruction of brain tissue

  15. Nonstochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Wells, J.; Charles, M.W.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circular areas of pig skin from 1- to 40-mm diameter were irradiated with ..beta.. emitters of high, medium, and low energies, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 170/Tm, and /sup 147/Pm, respectively. The study provides information for radiological protection problems of localized skin exposures. During the first 16 weeks after irradiation /sup 90/Sr produced a first reaction due to epithelial cell death followed by a second reaction attributable to damage to the dermal blood vessels. /sup 170/Tm and /sup 147/Pm produced the epithelial reaction only. The epithelial dose response varied as a function of ..beta.. energy. The doses required to produce moist desquamation in 50% of 15- to 22.5-mm fields (ED/sub 50/) were 30-45 Gy from/sup 90/Sr, approx.80 Gy from /sup 170/Tm, and approx.500 Gy from /sup 147/Pm. An area effect was observed in the epithelial response to /sup 90/Sr irradiation. The ED/sub 50/ for moist desquamation ranged from approx.25 Gy for a 40-mm source to approx.450 Gy for a 1-mm source. It is also suggested that the area effects could be explained by different modes of epithelial repopulation after irradiation.

  16. LIPOGENESIS IN OVINE ADIPOSE TISSUE IN TISSUE CULTURE R.G. VERNON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    responsi- ble for the low rate of glucose utilization for fatty acid synthesis in ovine adipose tissue-antagonists in ovine adipose tissue. The very low rate of utilization of glucose carbon for fatty acid synthesis) but there is circumstantial evi- dence for an impaired flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (Vernon, 1979b). Demonstra- tion

  17. Video Capture of Skin Motion using Calibrated Fabien DELLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    3D mesh can easily be integrated and adapted in a sequence of an animated virtual human. We of virtual humans remains exhaustive and tedious. For animating virtual characters, 3D animators work similarly as drawers for car- toons, that implies hundreds of hours for only few seconds of animation

  18. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/[mu]), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of [sup 14]C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ([sup 3]H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The [sup 14]C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with [sup 14]C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

  19. Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M. [Departament d'Estructura i Conastituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano , Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Katedra Fizyki Teoretycznej, Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skodowskiej ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

  20. ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauge, Monique

    ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE #12;2 GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE, ERWAN FAOU, VICTOR P´ERON electromagnetic field at high is larger ­ and here the sign of the curvature has a major influence, which means that the skin depth

  1. ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faou, Erwan

    ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE conductivity are proved in [3], whereas in the note [4] a 1 #12;2 GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE, ERWAN FAOU of the curvature has a major influence, which means that the skin depth is larger in convex than in concave

  2. Theory of thin-skin eddy-current interaction with surface cracks N. Harfielda)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowler, John R.

    Theory of thin-skin eddy-current interaction with surface cracks N. Harfielda) and J. R. Bowler; accepted for publication 14 July 1997 Eddy-current non-destructive evaluation is commonly performed of a typical crack. A thin-skin analysis of eddy currents is presented in which the electromagnetic fields

  3. Antenna-based "Smart Skin" Sensors for Sustainable, Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Antenna-based "Smart Skin" Sensors for Sustainable, Wireless Sensor Networks Hoseon Leet, George-less, or sustainable, wireless sensor networks with "smart skin" sensor nodes. These sensors are highly applicable a wireless sensor network with smart sensors requires a lot of power due to the mass number of sensor nodes

  4. Assisting diagnosis of melanoma through the "noninvasive biopsy" of skin lesions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, Ela

    Assisting diagnosis of melanoma through the "noninvasive biopsy" of skin lesions Symon D-180. #12;Assisting diagnosis of melanoma through the "noninvasive biopsy" of skin lesions Symon Cotton1 to ensure a good prognosis, malignant melanoma needs to be diagnosed whilst the level of invasion

  5. Recently, doctors in Texas have been seeing an increasing number of patients with skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that kill bacteria), also called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-- "MRSA." The Texas Department this is happening and how to prevent antibiotic (drug) resistant Staph/MRSA skin infections from spreading. What is a Staph/MRSA skin infection? It can be a pimple, rash, boil, or an open wound. Staph/MRSA is often

  6. Towards a Minimal Architecture for a Printable, Modular, and Robust Sensing Skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Ron

    . Bachrach, and R.S. Fearing Abstract-- This work presents a low-complexity modular sensor grid architecture to provide a smart skin to non-convex shapes, such as a robot body and legs. To configure a sensing skin shaped by arbitrary cuts and rapid changes in designs, we use a wavefront planning approach to generate

  7. Collaborators and Funding Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proven to be effective treatment for non-melanoma skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    for non-melanoma skin cancers with excellent cosmetic outcome. PDT treatment and diagnostics apply light - solution for non-melanoma skin cancer treatment III Fluorescence imaging camera for PDT diagnostics I

  8. Method and apparatus for determining fat content of tissue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Jon R. (Edgewood, NM); Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Shagam, Richard N. (Albuquerque, NM); Gooris, Luc (Rancho Santa Margarita, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining characteristics of tissue is disclosed. The method comprises supplying optical energy to a tissue and detecting at a plurality of locations consequent energy scattered by the tissue. Analysis of the scattered energy as taught herein provides information concerning the properties of the tissue, specifically information related to the fat and lean content and thickness of the tissue. The apparatus comprises a light source adapted to deliver optical energy to a tissue. A plurality of detectors can be mounted at different positions relative to the source to detect energy scattered by the tissue. A signal processor as taught herein can determine characteristics of the tissue from the signals from the detectors and locations of the detectors, specifically information related to the fat and lean content and thickness of the tissue.

  9. Human Ecology Human ecology Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    Channel, Latin America. STUDIOS Architecture. #12;HUMAN ECOLOGY · APRIL 2005 1 Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph Frey spins a green alternative for textiles. Fibers from rapidly renewable materials

  10. Mutational analysis of tissue-tissue interaction required for otic placode induction in zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendonsa, Emidio Savio

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the vertebrate inner ear begins with aphics. the induction of the otic placate. Several embryonic tissues have been implicated as potential sources of otic inducing signals, including cephalic mesoderm, notochord, and hindbrain...

  11. ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

  12. ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

  13. Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [ENEA Laboratories, Rome (Italy); Dragani, Tommaso A. [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: tommaso.dragani@istitutotumori.mi.it

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

  14. The second skin approach : skin strain field analysis and mechanical counter pressure prototyping for advanced spacesuit design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bethke, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the theory of advanced locomotion mechanical counter pressure (MCP) spacesuits by studying the changes in the human body shape during joint motion. Two experiments take advantage ...

  15. Mechanical properties of collagen-based scaffolds for tissue regeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanungo, Biraja Prasad, 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds for the regeneration of skin and nerve have previously been fabricated by freeze-drying a slurry containing a co-precipitate of collagen and glycosaminoglycan. Recently, mineralized ...

  16. p27{sup Kip1} inhibits tissue factor expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breitenstein, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.breitenstein@usz.ch [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland) [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland); Akhmedov, Alexander; Camici, Giovanni G.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Tanner, Felix C. [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland) [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •p27{sup Kip1}regulates the expression of tissue factor at the transcriptional level. •This inhibitory effect of p27{sup Kip1} is independently of its cell regulatory action. •The current study provides new insights into a pleiotrophic function of p27{sup Kip1}. -- Abstract: Background: The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) p27{sup Kip1} regulates cell proliferation and thus inhibits atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. Expression of tissue factor (TF), the key initator of the coagulation cascade, is associated with atherosclerosis. Yet, it has not been studied whether p27{sup Kip1} influences the expression of TF. Methods and results: p27{sup Kip1} overexpression in human aortic endothelial cells was achieved by adenoviral transfection. Cells were rendered quiescent for 24 h in 0.5% fetal-calf serum. After stimulation with TNF-? (5 ng/ml), TF protein expression and activity was significantly reduced (n = 4; P < 0.001) in cells transfected with p27{sup Kip1}. In line with this, p27{sup Kip1} overexpression reduced cytokine-induced TF mRNA expression (n = 4; P < 0.01) and TF promotor activity (n = 4; P < 0.05). In contrast, activation of the MAP kinases p38, ERK and JNK was not affected by p27{sup Kip1} overexpression. Conclusion: This in vitro study suggests that p27{sup Kip1} inhibits TF expression at the transcriptional level. These data indicate an interaction between p27{sup Kip1} and TF in important pathological alterations such as atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  17. Nano-biolistics: a method of biolistic transfection of cells and tissues using a gene gun with novel nanometer-sized projectiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, John A; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    to transfect neurones (some of which are notor- iously difficult to transfect), cells deep in tissues (DNA can be carried considerable distances through other cells such as layers of skin), and bacteria [4-7]. Currently there is much interest in its use... spread of the gold parti- cles, which were subsequently dried with a flow of nitro- gen. The tubing was cut using a tubing cutter (Bio-Rad) into 1 cm lengths to create bullets, which were either used immediately or stored with desiccant at 4°C until...

  18. Sensitivity of the electric dipole polarizability to the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Agrawal, B. K.; Colo, G.; Nazarewicz, W.; Paar, N.; Piekarewicz, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Vretenar, D. [INFN, sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The static dipole polarizability, {alpha}{sub D}, in {sup 208}Pb has been recently measured with highresolution via proton inelastic scattering at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) [1]. This observable is thought to be intimately connected with the neutron skin thickness, r{sub skin}, of the same nucleus and, more fundamentally, it is believed to be associated with the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of r{sub skin} on {alpha}{sub D} in {sup 208}Pb is investigated and discussed on the basis of a large and representative set of relativistic and non-relativistic nuclear energy density functionals (EDF) [2].

  19. A common supersolid low-density skin sliperizing ice and toughening water surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Weitao Zheng; Ji Zhou; Chang Q. Sun

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Skins of water and ice share the same attribute of supersolidity characterized by the identical H-O vibration frequency of 3450 cm-1. Molecular undercoordination and inter-electron-pair repulsion shortens the H-O bond and lengthen the O:H nonbond, leading to a dual process of nonbonding electron polarization. This relaxation-polarization process enhances the dipole moment, elasticity,viscosity, thermal stability of these skins with 25% density loss, which is responsible for the hydrophobicity and toughness of water skin and for the slippery of ice.

  20. Precursors to radiopharmaceutical agents for tissue imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Prem C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of radiolabeled compounds to be used in tissue imaging that exhibits rapid brain uptake, good brain:blood radioactivity ratios, and long retention times. The imaging agents are more specifically radioiodinated aromatic amines attached to dihydropyridine carriers, that exhibit heart as well as brain specificity. In addition to the radiolabeled compounds, classes of compounds are also described that are used as precursors and intermediates in the preparation of the imaging agents.

  1. HOXB1 Founder Mutation in Humans Recapitulates the Phenotype of Hoxb1[superscript ?/?] Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Bryn D.

    Members of the highly conserved homeobox (HOX) gene family encode transcription factors that confer cellular and tissue identities along the antero-posterior axis of mice and humans. We have identified a founder homozygous ...

  2. Predicting the Occurrence of Cosmetic Defects in Automotive Skin Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, S.; Williams, D.; Roy, R. [University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Aylmore, R.; Allen, M.; Hollingdale, D. [Land Rover, Banbury Rd, Gaydon, Warwick, CV35 0RR (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The appearance of defects such as 'hollows' and 'shock lines' can affect the perceived quality and attractiveness of automotive skin panels. These defects are the result of the stamping process and appear as small, localized deviations from the intended styling of the panels. Despite their size, they become visually apparent after the application of paint and the perceived quality of a panel may become unacceptable. Considerable time is then dedicated to minimizing their occurrence through tool modifications. This paper will investigate the use of the wavelet transform as a tool to analyze physically measured panels. The transform has two key aspects. The first is its ability to distinguish small scale local defects from large scale styling curvature. The second is its ability to characterize the shape of a defect in terms of its wavelength and a 'correlation value'. The two features of the transform enable it to be used as a tool for locating and predicting the severity of defects. The paper will describe the transform and illustrate its application on test cases.

  3. Theoretical evaluation on burn injury of human respiratory tract due to inhalation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    at tissue temperature (kPa) mQ Metabolic rate of tissue (W/m3 ) R Ideal gas constant (J/molK) Re Reynolds1 Theoretical evaluation on burn injury of human respiratory tract due to inhalation of hot gas to predict the thermal impact of inhaled hot air during the early stage of fires. Influences of individual

  4. A tissue engineering strategy for integrative cartilage repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroszczyk, Keri A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue engineering for cartilage repair is a promising approach for improving the healing of articular defects, as biomaterials and growth factors can be supplied directly to a focal lesion. However, integrating neo-tissue ...

  5. Decellularized cartilage as a chondroinductive material for cartilage tissue engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renth, Amanda

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    for tissue engineering scaffolds. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate decellularized cartilage (DCC) as a chondroinductive material for cartilage tissue engineering applications. This work was successful in developing a...

  6. Optical Mapping of Impulse Propagation in Engineered Cardiac Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radisic, Milica

    Cardiac tissue engineering has a potential to provide functional, synchronously contractile tissue constructs for heart repair, and for studies of development and disease using in vivo–like yet controllable in vitro settings. ...

  7. The Effect of Altered Plasma on Tissue Proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Robert Lee

    1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection The Effect of Altered Plasma on Tissue Proliferation 1913 by Robert Lee Hoffman This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU... of Altered Plasma on Tissue Proliferation Thesis prepared and presented for a Masters Degree by Robert Lee Hoffmann Fellow in Anatomy. Kansas State University* I9JI3. The Effect of Altered Plasma on Tissue Proliferations. Tissue proliferation...

  8. FRACTURE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRACTURE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES by Darrin John to the other graduate students in the composite materials group for your smiles and friendships over the past Material .........................................................................................10

  9. Meeting report for the 1st skin microbiota workshop, Boulder, CO October 15-16 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Jack A

    This report details the outcome of the 1st Skin Microbiota Workshop, Boulder, CO, held on October 15th-16th 2012. The workshop was arranged to bring Department of Defense personnel together with experts in microbial ecology, ...

  10. A Systematic Study of Matrix Acidizing Treatments Using Skin Monitoring Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandya, Nimish

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work was to evaluate matrix acidizing treatments of vertical and horizontal wells in carbonate reservoirs. Twenty field cases for acidizing treatments were analyzed by evaluating the skin factor evolution from on-site rate...

  11. REFLEXIVE COLLISION RESPONSE WITH VIRTUAL SKIN Roadmap Planning Meets Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Förster, Alexander

    REFLEXIVE COLLISION RESPONSE WITH VIRTUAL SKIN Roadmap Planning Meets Reinforcement Learning Svizzera italiana, CH-6928 Manno-Lugano Keywords: Roadmap Planning: Reinforcement Learning: Collision to a changing environment, but not both. This work proposes a simple integration of roadmap planning

  12. Certain basic surgical principles of full-thickness free skin grafts in the dog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevino, Gilberto Stephenson

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THICK GRAFT FULL THICKNESS GRAFT DERMIS ~i-/) HYPODERMIS 8 grafts 1n use todayo, . = - - Co HISTOHI QP SKIE GBAPTINQ ?' Hux earliest efforts to utilize skin for the reparation of integu- mentary defects vere undertalaen centuries ago...

  13. Depth data improves non-melanoma skin lesion segmentation and diagnosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Examining surface shape appearance by touching and observing a lesion from different points of view is a part of the clinical process for skin lesion diagnosis. Motivated by this, we hypothesise that surface shape embodies ...

  14. Is the duration of skin disease visits decreasing in the united states?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Scott A; Feldman, Steven R; Fleischer Jr., Alan B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on fridays. J Dermatolog Treat 2013 Dec;24(6):405-7. [PMID:treatment. J Dermatolog Treat 2014 Dec;25(6):453-8. [PMID:Although non-dermatologists treat about half of all skin

  15. Design and fabrication of an optical pressure micro sensor for skin mechanics studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Siddarth

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanics of skin is as central to touch as optics is to vision and acoustics is to hearing. With the advent of novel imaging technologies such as the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), we are now able to view structures ...

  16. Has a thick neutron skin in ${}^{208}$Pb been ruled out?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattoyev, F J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) has provided the first model-independent evidence in favor of a neutron-rich skin in ${}^{208}$Pb. Although the error bars are large, the reported large central value of 0.33\\,fm is particularly intriguing. To test whether such a thick neutron-skin in ${}^{208}$Pb is already incompatible with laboratory experiments or astrophysical observations, we employ relativistic models with neutron-skin thickness in ${}^{208}$Pb ranging from 0.16 to 0.33 fm to compute ground state properties of finite nuclei, their collective monopole and dipole response, and mass-{\\sl vs}-radius relations for neutron stars. No compelling reason was found to rule out models with large neutron skins in ${}^{208}$Pb from the set of observables considered in this work.

  17. FATIGUE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FATIGUE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES by Robert B in the Instron and Composite Laboratories toward the end of the experimental research. Finally, special thanks

  18. Hair follicles are required for optimal growth during lateral skin expansion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heath, Jack; Langton, Abigail K.; Hammond, Nigel L.; Dixon, Michael J.; Overbeek, Paul A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hair follicles and the interfollicular epidermis of intact mature skin are maintained by distinct stem cell populations. Upon wounding, however, emigration of hair follicle keratinocytes to the interfollicular epidermis plays a role in acute...

  19. Study of Cell Material Interactions for Vascular Tissue Engineering Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Xin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    construct to the target tissue. For in situ regeneration, the scaffold alone can be injected directly into the defect to promote local tissue repair with the body?s own cells (9). In addition to the therapeutic application, tissue engineering can also... ............................................... 20 2.2.9 Endpoint Construct Analyses .......................................... 21 2.2.10 Statistical Analyses ....................................................... 24 2.3 Results...

  20. Development and Construction of Bioclimatic Double Skin Active Facade for Hot and Humid Climate of UAE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karbor, R. G.; Mohamed, I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tracking venetian blinds, LED (light emitting diodes) lighting and Building Management system. 1.01 Modeling And Simulation Of Double Skin Active Facade The modeling and simulation of the Double Skin Fa?ade Cavity is a complicated task, since... sweating/condensation on the water coil. 3.06 LED (Light Emitting Diode) Lighting The building is illuminated using extremely energy efficient LED?s which last 5 times as long as fluorescents and 50 times longer than typical incandescent. So...

  1. Development and Construction of Bioclimatic Double Skin Active Facade for Hot and Humid Climate of UAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karbor, R. G.; Mohamed, I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tracking venetian blinds, LED (light emitting diodes) lighting and Building Management system. 1.01 Modeling And Simulation Of Double Skin Active Facade The modeling and simulation of the Double Skin Fa?ade Cavity is a complicated task, since... sweating/condensation on the water coil. 3.06 LED (Light Emitting Diode) Lighting The building is illuminated using extremely energy efficient LED?s which last 5 times as long as fluorescents and 50 times longer than typical incandescent. So...

  2. Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jixia; Malakhova, Margarita; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Reddy, Kanamata; Kurinov, Igor; Carper, Andria; Langfald, Alyssa; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Myoung Ok; Zhu, Feng; Sosa, Carlos P.; Zhou, Keyuan; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang (Cornell); (Guangdong); (UMM)

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the leading factor in the development of skin cancer, prompting great interest in chemopreventive agents for this disease. In this study, we report the discovery of norathyriol, a plant-derived chemopreventive compound identified through an in silico virtual screening of the Chinese Medicine Library. Norathyriol is a metabolite of mangiferin found in mango, Hypericum elegans, and Tripterospermum lanceolatum and is known to have anticancer activity. Mechanistic investigations determined that norathyriol acted as an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity to attenuate UVB-induced phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling cascades. We confirmed the direct and specific binding of norathyriol with ERK2 through a cocrystal structural analysis. The xanthone moiety in norathyriol acted as an adenine mimetic to anchor the compound by hydrogen bonds to the hinge region of the protein ATP-binding site on ERK2. Norathyriol inhibited in vitro cell growth in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells at the level of G{sub 2}-M phase arrest. In mouse skin tumorigenesis assays, norathyriol significantly suppressed solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis indicated that norathyriol mediates its chemopreventive activity by inhibiting the ERK-dependent activity of transcriptional factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B during UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Taken together, our results identify norathyriol as a safe new chemopreventive agent that is highly effective against development of UV-induced skin cancer.

  3. Polymers, both natural and synthetic, play an integral role in our daily lives. Naturally-occurring polymers include cellulose (mentioned in gun cotton demo), rubber, skin, hair,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    . Naturally- occurring polymers include cellulose (mentioned in gun cotton demo), rubber, skin, hair, DNA, etc

  4. Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Jo Ann

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed...

  5. Relevance of in vivo models in melanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A discussion of possible wavelength dependence of induction of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is provided. Strengths and weaknesses of various experimental approaches to better understanding of the prevalence of CMM in different human populations including latitude effects are compared. Further the advantages and limitations of the use of the laboratory opossum (Monodelphis domestic), transgenic mice containing SV40 ongogene sequences under tyrosinase promoter control, and a backcross hybrid fish of the genus Xenophorus are contrasted.

  6. WHAT IS PLANT TISSUE CULTURE? Plant tissue culture involves the growth of plant cells, tissues or segments for purposes such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durako, Michael J.

    or segments for purposes such as generating or cloning large amounts of new cells, tissues or plants; to study of generating exact and multiple copies of a parent plant, Cloning can be done by making cuttings, grafts pieces of tissues such as axillary buds, tubers or rhizomes for rapid cloning or generation of new plants

  7. Soft-Tissue-Anchored Transcutaneous Port for Long-Term Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, Rickard, E-mail: rickard.nyman@akademiska.se; Ekloef, Hampus; Eriksson, Lars-Gunnar [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Sweden); Karlsson, Britt-Marie; Rasmussen, Ib [University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Sweden); Lundgren, Dan; Thomsen, Peter [Goeteborg University, Biomaterials/Cell Biology (Sweden)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. A transcutaneous port (T-port) has been developed allowing easy exchange of a catheter, which was fixed inside the device, using the Seldinger technique. The objective of the study was to test the T-port in patients who had percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Methods. The T-port, made of titanium, was implanted using local anesthesia in 11 patients (mean age 65 years, range 52-85 years) with biliary duct obstruction (7 malignant and 4 benign strictures). The subcutaneous part of the T-port consisted of a flange with several perforations allowing ingrowth of connective tissue. The T-port allowed catheter sizes of 10 and 12 Fr. Results. All wounds healed uneventfully and were followed by a stable period without signs of pronounced inflammation or infection. It was easy to open the port and to exchange the drainage tube. The patient's quality of life was considerably improved even though several patients had problems with repeated bile leakage due to frequent recurrent obstructions of the tubes. The ports were implanted for a mean time of 9 months (range 2-21 months). Histologic examination in four cases showed that the port was well integrated into the soft tissue. Tilting of the T-port in two cases led to perforation of the skin by the subcutaneous part of the ports, which were removed after 7 and 8 months. Conclusion. The T-port served as an excellent external access to the biliary ducts. The drainage tubes were well fixed within the ports. The quality of life of the patients was considerably improved. Together with improved aesthetic appearance they found it easier to conduct normal daily activities and personal care. However, the problem of recurrent catheter obstruction remained unsolved.

  8. Influence of neutron-skin thickness on $?^{-}/?^{+}$ ratio in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao-Feng Wei; Bao-An Li; Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model IBUU11 using as an input nucleon density profiles from Hartree-Fock calculations based on a modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we study the influence of the uncertainty of the neutron skin thickness on the $\\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+}$ ratio in both central and peripheral Pb+Pb collisions at beam energies of 400 MeV/nucleon and 1000 MeV/nucleon. Within the current experimental uncertainty range of neutron skin in $^{208}$Pb, while the neutron skin effect on the \\rpi ratio is negligible in central reactions at both energies, it increases gradually with increasing impact parameter and becomes comparable with or even larger than the symmetry energy effect in peripheral collisions especially at 400 MeV/nucleon. Moreover, we found that while the \\rpi ratio is larger with a softer \\esym in central collisions, above certain impact parameters depending on the size of the neutron skin, a stiffer \\esym can lead to a larger \\rpi ratio as most of the pions are produced at densities below the saturation density in these peripheral reactions. Thus, a clear impact parameter selection is important to extract reliable information about the \\esym at suprasaturation densities (size of neutron skin) from the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio in central (peripheral) heavy-ion collisions.

  9. Generation of a suite of 3D computer-generated breast phantoms from a limited set of human subject data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Christina M. L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Palmeri, Mark L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Veress, Alexander I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Dobbins, James T. III [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The authors previously reported on a three-dimensional computer-generated breast phantom, based on empirical human image data, including a realistic finite-element based compression model that was capable of simulating multimodality imaging data. The computerized breast phantoms are a hybrid of two phantom generation techniques, combining empirical breast CT (bCT) data with flexible computer graphics techniques. However, to date, these phantoms have been based on single human subjects. In this paper, the authors report on a new method to generate multiple phantoms, simulating additional subjects from the limited set of original dedicated breast CT data. The authors developed an image morphing technique to construct new phantoms by gradually transitioning between two human subject datasets, with the potential to generate hundreds of additional pseudoindependent phantoms from the limited bCT cases. The authors conducted a preliminary subjective assessment with a limited number of observers (n= 4) to illustrate how realistic the simulated images generated with the pseudoindependent phantoms appeared. Methods: Several mesh-based geometric transformations were developed to generate distorted breast datasets from the original human subject data. Segmented bCT data from two different human subjects were used as the 'base' and 'target' for morphing. Several combinations of transformations were applied to morph between the 'base' and 'target' datasets such as changing the breast shape, rotating the glandular data, and changing the distribution of the glandular tissue. Following the morphing, regions of skin and fat were assigned to the morphed dataset in order to appropriately assign mechanical properties during the compression simulation. The resulting morphed breast was compressed using a finite element algorithm and simulated mammograms were generated using techniques described previously. Sixty-two simulated mammograms, generated from morphing three human subject datasets, were used in a preliminary observer evaluation where four board certified breast radiologists with varying amounts of experience ranked the level of realism (from 1 ='fake' to 10 ='real') of the simulated images. Results: The morphing technique was able to successfully generate new and unique morphed datasets from the original human subject data. The radiologists evaluated the realism of simulated mammograms generated from the morphed and unmorphed human subject datasets and scored the realism with an average ranking of 5.87 {+-} 1.99, confirming that overall the phantom image datasets appeared more 'real' than 'fake.' Moreover, there was not a significant difference (p > 0.1) between the realism of the unmorphed datasets (6.0 {+-} 1.95) compared to the morphed datasets (5.86 {+-} 1.99). Three of the four observers had overall average rankings of 6.89 {+-} 0.89, 6.9 {+-} 1.24, 6.76 {+-} 1.22, whereas the fourth observer ranked them noticeably lower at 2.94 {+-} 0.7. Conclusions: This work presents a technique that can be used to generate a suite of realistic computerized breast phantoms from a limited number of human subjects. This suite of flexible breast phantoms can be used for multimodality imaging research to provide a known truth while concurrently producing realistic simulated imaging data.

  10. Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods provide spectroscopic OCT contrast in excised human breast tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Amy

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods provide spectroscopic OCT contrast in excised human breast tumors Oval Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907 ABSTRACT Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods have been demonstrated molecular contrast in human tissues. Keywords: Plasmon-resonance, nanorods, optical coherence tomography

  11. Adaptive processing of thin structures to augment segmentation of dual-channel structural MRI of the human brain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a method for the segmentation of dual-channel structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes of the human brain into four tissue classes. The state-of-the-art FSL FAST segmentation software ...

  12. Illusory Sense of Human Touch from a Warm and Soft Artificial Hand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabibihan, John-John; Srinivasa, Yeshwin Mysore; Chan, Mark Aaron; Muruganantham, Arrchana

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To touch and be touched are vital to human development, well being, and relationships. However, to those who have lost their arms and hands due to accident or war, touching becomes a serious concern that often leads to psychosocial issues and social stigma. In this paper, we demonstrate that the touch from a warm and soft rubber hand can be perceived by another person as if the touch were coming from a human hand. We describe a three step process toward this goal. First, we made participants select artificial skin samples according to their preferred warmth and softness characteristics. At room temperature, the preferred warmth was found to be 28.4 deg C at the skin surface of a soft silicone rubber material that has a Shore durometer value of 30 at the OO scale. Second, we developed a process to create a rubber hand replica of a human hand. To compare the skin softness of a human hand and artificial hands, a robotic indenter was employed to produce a softness map by recording the displacement data when const...

  13. Skin: Major target organ of allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merk, Hans F. [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Univ.-Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: hans.merk@post.rwth-aachen.de; Baron, Jens M.; Neis, Mark M.; Obrigkeit, Daniela Hoeller [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Univ.-Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Karlberg, Ann-Therese [Dermatochemistry and Skin Allergy, Department of Chemistry, Goeteborg University, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin is a major target organ for allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds. Drug allergic reactions may be life-threatening such as in the case of anaphylactic reactions or bullous drug reactions and occur in about 5% of all hospitalized patients. Allergic contact dermatitis has an enormous influence on the social life of the patient because it is the most frequent reason for occupational skin diseases and the treatment and prevention of this disease cost approximately Euro 3 billion per year in Germany. The different proposed pathophysiological pathways leading to a drug eruption are discussed in this paper. All major enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotica were shown to be present in skin. Evidence supporting the role of metabolism in the development of drug allergy and allergic contact dermatitis is demonstrated in the example of sulphonamides and fragrances.

  14. adipose tissue lipolysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fitzgibbons, Timothy P. 2012-01-01 5 Factors controlling brown adipose tissue development D. RICQUIER, G. MORY, F. BOUILLAUD, Michle COMBES-GEORGE Computer Technologies and...

  15. adipose tissue mitochondria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Factors controlling brown adipose tissue development D. RICQUIER, G. MORY, F. BOUILLAUD, Michle COMBES-GEORGE Computer Technologies and...

  16. adipose tissue development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elizabeth J. 1988-01-01 3 Factors controlling brown adipose tissue development D. RICQUIER, G. MORY, F. BOUILLAUD, Michle COMBES-GEORGE Computer Technologies and...

  17. adipose tissue layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  18. adipose tissue oestrogen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  19. adipose tissue play: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  20. adipose tissue reference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  1. adipose tissue stromal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  2. adipose tissue studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  3. adipose tissue explants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  4. adipose tissue implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  5. adipose tissue expansion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  6. adipose tissue impact: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  7. adipose tissue provoke: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  8. adipose tissue lipoprotein: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  9. adipose tissue distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  10. avian adipose tissue: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  11. adipose tissue: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  12. adipose tissue depending: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  13. adipose tissue engineering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  14. adipose tissue status: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  15. adipose tissue characteristics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  16. adipose tissue fibrosis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  17. adipose tissue blood: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  18. adipose tissue reveals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  19. adipose tissue show: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  20. adipose tissue inflammation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  1. adipose tissue layers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  2. adipose tissue treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  3. adipose tissue polysynaptically: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  4. adipose tissue serves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  5. adipose tissue heart: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  6. adipose tissue interstitial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  7. adipose tissue cultures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  8. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MSMS experiments enabled...

  9. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowley, Brooke E.; Carter, Melinda L.; Karpanty, Sarah M.; Zihlman, Adrienne L.; Koch, Paul L.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissuesfactor (a) and isotope enrichment values (e), which provideisotope values from different modern primate tissues. Additionally, using these mean apparent enrichment

  10. antiretroviral tissue kinetics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Models of Multicellular Growing Systems to Macroscopic Biological Tissue Models A, Maroc b Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy Abstract This paper...

  11. adenomyosis tissue injury: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Statistical prediction of tissue fate in acute ischemic brain injury Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: ) and apparent diffusion coefficient...

  12. adipose tissue assessing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into mitochondria. When Boyer, Edmond 35 New CT imaging method for adipose tissue analysis in mouse model of obesity SYLVAIN ORDUREAU Physics Websites Summary: New CT imaging...

  13. adipose tissue assessed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into mitochondria. When Boyer, Edmond 35 New CT imaging method for adipose tissue analysis in mouse model of obesity SYLVAIN ORDUREAU Physics Websites Summary: New CT imaging...

  14. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the iron associated with fossil tissues, which occurred primarily as the mineral goethite. They then employed experiments to show that iron, derived from hemoglobin lysate,...

  15. ACES: Evaluation of Tissue Response to Inhaled 2007-Compliant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phase 3 of the ACES study produced minimal inflammatory and tissue remodeling in their lungs and no soot accumulation in macrophages. deer12shaikh.pdf More Documents &...

  16. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowley, Brooke E.; Carter, Melinda L.; Karpanty, Sarah M.; Zihlman, Adrienne L.; Koch, Paul L.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissues Brooke E.and nitrogen apparent enrichment (e*) values ± one standardexplored the apparent enrichment (e*) between bone collagen

  17. Chronic cellular responses of rat skin to 13 Mev proton irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkle, Donald King

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AErM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject: Laboratory Animal Medicine CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial...

  18. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain)] [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain)] [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about ?3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than ?1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet ?3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were ?7% for {sup 60}Co, ?0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and ?2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For lower energy radionuclides like {sup 169}Yb, bolus may be needed; and (iii) for the interstitial case, at least a 0.1 cm bolus is advised for {sup 60}Co to avoid underdosing superficial target layers. For {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb, no bolus is needed. For those cases where no bolus is needed, its use might be detrimental as the lack of radiation scatter may be beneficial to the patient, although the 2% tolerance for dose calculation accuracy recommended in the AAPM TG-56 report is not fulfilled.

  19. New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin -Heart Rate Monitors -Popular Mechanics http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/breakthroughs/new-electronic-sensors-stick-to-your-skin?click=pm_latest[8/14/2011 5:59:45 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin - Heart Rate Monitors - Popular Mechanics http://www Electronic Sensors That Stick to Your Skin Like Temporary Tattoos Nice tattoo. Or is it a heart-rate monitor to measure the electrical activity of the heart, muscles and brain. And using the same principles behind

  20. THE MECHANICS OF LUNG TISSUE UNDER HIGH-FREQUENCY VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Mark

    THE MECHANICS OF LUNG TISSUE UNDER HIGH-FREQUENCY VENTILATION MARKUS R. OWEN AND MARK A. LEWIS SIAM­1761 Abstract. High-frequency ventilation is a radical departure from conventional lung ventilation question concerns ventilator-induced damage to the lung tissue, and a clear protocol for the most effective

  1. THE MECHANICS OF LUNG TISSUE UNDER HIGH-FREQUENCY VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE MECHANICS OF LUNG TISSUE UNDER HIGH-FREQUENCY VENTILATION MARKUS R. OWEN AND MARK A. LEWIS Abstract. High frequency ventilation is a radical departure from conventional lung ventilation question concerns ventilator induced damage to the lung tissue, and a clear protocol for the most effective

  2. Determining the mechanical properties of equine laminar corium tissue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallab, Nadim James

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    elastic orthotropic material. BACKGROUND Mechanical Testing of Biological Materials The field of biomechanics has long dealt with the issue of mechanically characterizing soft and hard tissue. Biological tissue has eluded well defined characterization... Toby Selcer for his assistance with the MTS testing system. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS, TABLE OF CONTENTS. . LIST OF TABLES. . LIST OF FIGURES. . INTRODUCTION. Motivation. Objectives. BACKGROUND. . Mechanical Testing...

  3. Biomechanics in bone tissue engineering Dominique P. Pioletti*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerraoui, Rachid

    such a procedure truly is, we report, in Figure 1(a), the particular case of a posterior surgical approachBiomechanics in bone tissue engineering Dominique P. Pioletti* Laboratory of Biomechanical 18 January 2010) Biomechanics may be considered as central in the development of bone tissue

  4. Discriminative, Semantic Segmentation of Brain Tissue in MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Discriminative, Semantic Segmentation of Brain Tissue in MR Images Zhao Yi1 , Antonio Criminisi2 , Jamie Shotton2 , and Andrew Blake2 1 University of California, Los Angeles, USA. zyi@ucla.edu. 2 is presented for the automatic segmentation and classification of brain tissue from 3D MR scans. It uses

  5. DISTRIBUTED, WEB-BASED MICROSTRUCTURE DATABASE FOR BRAIN TISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTED, WEB-BASED MICROSTRUCTURE DATABASE FOR BRAIN TISSUE A Thesis by WONRYULL KOH Submitted-BASED MICROSTRUCTURE DATABASE FOR BRAIN TISSUE A Thesis by WONRYULL KOH Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial) __________________________ Ian S. Russell (Member) __________________________ Wei Zhao (Head of Department

  6. Signal processing in scanning thermoacoustic tomography in biological tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Signal processing in scanning thermoacoustic tomography in biological tissues Yuan Xu and Lihong V Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography was explored to image biological tissues. Short microwave pulses-induced thermoacoustic waves were detected with a focused ultrasonic transducer to obtain two-dimensional tomographic

  7. LUCIFERASE ASSAY PROTOCOL FROM TRANSFORMED TISSUE Special Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    LUCIFERASE ASSAY PROTOCOL FROM TRANSFORMED TISSUE Special Note: The Luciferase enzyme is unstable-ground samples. 2. Collect liquid nitrogen from downstairs and place 24 frozen tissue samples inside. 3. Place the power. 14.The luminometer cuvettes can be reused, BUT ONLY if they have been thoroughly soaked

  8. Host-defense peptides isolated from the skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Carlos

    Host-defense peptides isolated from the skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora J. Michael Conlona,*, Agnes Sonnevendb , Carlos Davidsonc , Anni Demandtd , Thierry Jouennee-stimulated skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora and their primary structures

  9. Evidence from peptidomic analysis of skin secretions that the red-legged frogs, Rana aurora draytonii and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Carlos

    Evidence from peptidomic analysis of skin secretions that the red-legged frogs, Rana aurora draytonii and Rana aurora aurora, are distinct species J. Michael Conlon a, *, Nadia Al-Ghafari a , Laurent peptides Rana aurora Rana draytonii Skin secretions a b s t r a c t The northern red-legged frog Rana

  10. NON-MELANOMA SKIN LESION CLASSIFICATION USING COLOUR IMAGE DATA IN A HIERARCHICAL K-NN CLASSIFIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    NON-MELANOMA SKIN LESION CLASSIFICATION USING COLOUR IMAGE DATA IN A HIERARCHICAL K-NN CLASSIFIER an algorithm for classification of non- melanoma skin lesions based on a novel hierarchical K- Nearest lesions, including two non-melanoma cancer types. This is the most extensive published result on non-melanoma

  11. A Prospective Study of Blood Selenium Levels and the Risk of Arsenic-2 related Premalignant Skin Lesions3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    1 1 A Prospective Study of Blood Selenium Levels and the Risk of Arsenic-2 related Premalignant-related premalignant skin lesions and prediagnostic blood Se levels in 30357 cases of skin lesions newly-diagnosed from in the Health Effects59 of As Longitudinal Study with available baseline blood and urine samples collected in60

  12. A numerical study of the effects of superhydrophobic surface on skin-friction drag in turbulent channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, John

    A numerical study of the effects of superhydrophobic surface on skin- friction drag in turbulent;PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 110815 (2013) A numerical study of the effects of superhydrophobic surface on skin; accepted 21 May 2013; published online 11 September 2013) Superhydrophobic surfaces have attracted much

  13. Tissue-based standoff biosensors for detecting chemical warfare agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A tissue-based, deployable, standoff air quality sensor for detecting the presence of at least one chemical or biological warfare agent, includes: a cell containing entrapped photosynthetic tissue, the cell adapted for analyzing photosynthetic activity of the entrapped photosynthetic tissue; means for introducing an air sample into the cell and contacting the air sample with the entrapped photosynthetic tissue; a fluorometer in operable relationship with the cell for measuring photosynthetic activity of the entrapped photosynthetic tissue; and transmitting means for transmitting analytical data generated by the fluorometer relating to the presence of at least one chemical or biological warfare agent in the air sample, the sensor adapted for deployment into a selected area.

  14. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); Balish, Rebecca S. (Oxford, OH); Tehryung, Kim (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth C. (Athens, GA)

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  15. ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE) 1053-1068" DOI : 10.1016/j.cma.2010.11.011 #12;2 GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE, ERWAN FAOU, VICTOR P of the conducting body surface is larger ­ and here the sign of the curvature has a major influence, which means

  16. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining...

  17. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Sang Jun [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoon Taek, E-mail: htl3675@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  18. HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H and the sheet metal: This is ventilation by natural convection. The remaining conductive heat from the sheet or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers

  19. Evaluation and design of double-skin facades for office buildings in hot climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yellamraju, Vijaya

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    efficient strategy and also the factors that affected this efficiency. The simulations were done using the building simulation software, Ener-Win. The double skin was simulated as per an approximate and simplistic calculation of the u-value, solar heat gain...

  20. Exact volume preserving skinning with shape control Damien Rohmer1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    skinning, perfectly fits into the usual production pipeline. It can be used whatever the desired locality the way rubber-like materials and organic shapes respectively deform can be modeled. An improved algorithm is a complex process, which needs to fit into the standard production pipe-line for efficient use by artists

  1. Early detection of malignant skin can-cers, in particular melanoma, is crucial as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Mark S.

    MOTIVATION · Early detection of malignant skin can- cers, in particular melanoma, is crucial). EXPERIMENTS AND RESULTS Melanoma Melanin Haemoglobin Geo­mean BCC Spits Nevus Task n Precision Recall F-measure AUC Segmentation 120 0.89 0.90 0.89 ­ Malignant vs. Benign 500 0.89 0.89 0.89 0.95 Melanoma vs. Benign

  2. Original Paper Skin Self-Examination Education for Early Detection of Melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Original Paper Skin Self-Examination Education for Early Detection of Melanoma: A Randomized Background: Early detection of melanoma improves survival. Since many melanoma patients and their spouses seek the care of a physician after discovering their melanoma, an ongoing study will determine

  3. Three-dimensional imaging of skin melanoma in vivo by dual-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Three-dimensional imaging of skin melanoma in vivo by dual-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy Jung to noninvasively obtain three-dimensional 3-D images of subcutaneous melanomas and their surrounding vasculature in nude mice in vivo. The absorption coefficients of blood and melanin- pigmented melanomas vary greatly

  4. INTRODUCTION Skin temperature (ST) retrievals are currently made every hour from 1145 to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haines, Stephanie L.

    temperature measurements are an important input for operational meteorology applications such as model). Land skin temperature measurements have important applications in agriculture including frost detection of the urban heat island effect (Hafner and Kidder 1999; Lo et al. 1997) and the study of the earth's energy

  5. Water skin anomalies: density, elasticity, hydrophobicity, thermal stability, interface repulsivity, etc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q. Sun

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular undercoordination induced O:H-O bond relaxation and dual polarization dictates the supersolid behavior of water skins interacting with other substances such as flowing in nanochannels, dancing of water droplets, floating of insects. The BOLS-NEP notion unifies the Wenzel-Cassie-Baxter models and explains controllable transition between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity.

  6. Detection of blood deprived regions in SIAgraph images of pigmented skin lesions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, Ela

    Detection of blood deprived regions in SIAgraph images of pigmented skin lesions Francesca Sattaa for the diagnosis of malignant melanoma has shown that the presence of blood deprivation regions within the lesion of the blood deprived regions. The results of the computer method compared to the clinical assessment show very

  7. Have we observed the skin vibration of realistic strange stars (ReSS) ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monika Sinha; Jishnu Dey; Mira Dey; Subharthi Ray; Siddhartha Bhowmick

    2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin vibration of ReSS and consequent resonance absorption can account for the absorption lines in the spectrum of X-ray emission from many compact stellar objects and in particular, the stars J1210$-$5226 and RXJ1856$-$3754. Observations of the X-ray spectrum of these stars is difficult to explain, if they are neutron stars.

  8. Isolation of stem cells from adult telogen skin Elizabeth Deschene Greco Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Valentina

    piece of skin of 1 inch wide by 2 inches long. Take a small piece for OCT embedding if necessary. · Put solution: Our SIGMA stock is 200 mg/ml. I then dilute this stock 1:80 in 37 pre-warmed HBBS media and put

  9. Human-machine interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  10. Brown Adipose Tissue Quantification in Human Neonates Using Water-Fat Separated MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1) derived directly from the Siemens operating system, aMRI was performed on a Siemens 3 T Tim Trio system (VB17the re-shim and default Siemens pre-scan preparations. The

  11. Beyond differential expression : methods and tools for mining the transcriptomic landscape of human tissue and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although there are a variety of high-throughput technologies used to perform biological experiments, DNA microarrays have become a standard tool in the modern biologist's arsenal. Microarray experiments provide measurements ...

  12. Reactivity of atropaldehyde, a felbamate metabolite in human liver tissue in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    ( 0 2 ) 0 0 0 5 8 - 3 #12;of this class of compounds, acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), are known

  13. Modeling of Human Brain Tissues and Head Injuries Induced by Blast and Ballistic Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Sahil G

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    (Bilisik and Turhan, 2009). The ACH thus has a higher ballistic and impact protection capability than the PASGT helmet at a smaller weight. The ACH also has a pad system inside the helmet, replacing the nylon cord suspension system used in the PASGT... helmet with the PASGT helmet (Ivins et al., 2007) Problem Type Percentage of all ACH users (n = 535) Percentage of all PASGT users (n = 570) Loose Screws 11 1.8 Loose/Broken Straps 5.8 3.7 Hard/Loose pads 4.1 No padding Heat Retention 1.5 0...

  14. Predictive models of tissue outcome in acute human cerebral ischemia using diffusion and perfusion weighted MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ona

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffusion (DWI) and perfusion weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide significant insight into acute stroke and can potentially be useful for clinical decision-making. In particular, current therapeutic ...

  15. Brown Adipose Tissue Quantification in Human Neonates Using Water-Fat Separated MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with computed tomography (PET/CT) due to it’s ability toattenuation. However, because PET/CT utilizes an ionizingregions are visible in PET/CT studies, with more pronounced

  16. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenome Engineering with TALGenomevivo

  17. Microfluidics for Tissue and Cell Applications JST CREST, "Cell and Tissue Showcasing by Micro-Nano Integrated Devices" Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Microfluidics for Tissue and Cell Applications JST CREST, "Cell and Tissue Showcasing by Micro-Nano Integrated Devices" Project JST-VINNOVA/SSF SICP, "Microfluidic Cancer Diagnosis Platform" Project JST ERATO 2 : Prof. Shuichi Takayama (University of Michigan) "Microfluidic Tools to Model and Analyze

  18. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  19. Transport Pathways and Enhancement Mechanisms within Localized and Non-Localized Transport Regions in Skin Treated with Low-Frequency Sonophoresis and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polat, Baris E.

    Recent advances in transdermal drug delivery utilizing low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) have revealed that skin permeability enhancement is not homogenous across the skin surface. Instead, ...

  20. DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    you sneeze or cough; cough or sneeze into a tissue and dispose of used tissues. Wash your hands after sneezing or coughing. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Avoid others with respiratory illnesses/or cough stuffy nose and /or chills headache, body aches, and /or fatigue Some people with H1N1 flu also

  1. 1622 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2006 Skin-Effect Self-Heating in Air-Suspended RF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

    1622 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2006 Skin-Effect Self-Heating

  2. Regeneration of Tissues and Organs Using Autologous Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Atala, M.D.

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed work aims to address three major challenges to the field of regenerative medicine: 1) the growth and expansion of regenerative cells outside the body in controlled in vitro environments, 2) supportive vascular supply for large tissue engineered constructs, and 3) interactive biomaterials that can orchestrate tissue development in vivo. Toward this goal, we have engaged a team of scientists with expertise in cell and molecular biology, physiology, biomaterials, controlled release, nanomaterials, tissue engineering, bioengineering, and clinical medicine to address all three challenges. This combination of resources, combined with the vast infrastructure of the WFIRM, have brought to bear on projects to discover and test new sources of autologous cells that can be used therapeutically, novel methods to improve vascular support for engineered tissues in vivo, and to develop intelligent biomaterials and bioreactor systems that interact favorably with stem and progenitor cells to drive tissue maturation. The Instituteâ??s ongoing programs are aimed at developing regenerative medicine technologies that employ a patientâ??s own cells to help restore or replace tissue and organ function. This DOE program has provided a means to solve some of the vexing problems that are germane to many tissue engineering applications, regardless of tissue type or target disease. By providing new methods that are the underpinning of tissue engineering, this program facilitated advances that can be applied to conditions including heart disease, diabetes, renal failure, nerve damage, vascular disease, and cancer, to name a few. These types of conditions affect millions of Americans at a cost of more than $400 billion annually. Regenerative medicine holds the promise of harnessing the bodyâ??s own power to heal itself. By addressing the fundamental challenges of this field in a comprehensive and focused fashion, this DOE program has opened new opportunities to treat conditions where other approaches have failed.

  3. Characterization of Lung Tissues using Liquid-Crystal Tunable Filter and Hyperspectral Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won, Chang-Hee

    Characterization of Lung Tissues using Liquid-Crystal Tunable Filter and Hyperspectral Imaging to characterize lung tissue for detecting emphysematous tissues in lung volume reduction surgery. The system, the spectral signature of healthy lung tissue and simulated smokers lung tissue is obtained and compared

  4. Developing osteoarthritis treatments through cartilage tissue engineering and molecular imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casasnovas Ortega, Nicole

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue engineering can be applied to develop therapeutic techniques for osteoarthritis, a degenerative disease caused by the progressive deterioration of cartilage in joints. An inherent goal in developing cartilage-replacement ...

  5. adipose tissue pathways: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the expression of the UCP1 gene 293 D. Norepinephrine is an apoptosis inhibitor in brown adipocytes 294 IV. How Significant Is Brown Adipose Tissue? 295 A. Parameters of...

  6. adipose tissue gene: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the expression of the UCP1 gene 293 D. Norepinephrine is an apoptosis inhibitor in brown adipocytes 294 IV. How Significant Is Brown Adipose Tissue? 295 A. Parameters of...

  7. adipose tissue expression: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the expression of the UCP1 gene 293 D. Norepinephrine is an apoptosis inhibitor in brown adipocytes 294 IV. How Significant Is Brown Adipose Tissue? 295 A. Parameters of...

  8. Distribution and metabolism of antibodies and macromolecules in tumor tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Greg M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tumor targeting drugs that selectively treat cancerous tissue are promising agents for lowering the morbidity and mortality of cancer. Within this field, antibody treatments for cancer are currently being developed for ...

  9. A feasibility study of a gelatin-based tissue substitute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Jody Lee

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was performed with relative ease and showed minimal loss of thermoluminescence in the recovered powder. It was therefore determined that the gelatin mixture was a suitable tissue-equivalent substitute to be used in volumetric dosimetry studies....

  10. BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spector, Myron

    Principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein ...

  11. Automation of single-cell techniques in neural tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, Joseph D. (Joseph Daly)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly heterogeneous nature of cells in the context of native tissue environments necessitates the development of tools and techniques that can manipulate and analyze samples with single-cell resolution. While the past ...

  12. Driving tissue morphogenetic cascades using tunable nanolayered surface coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Nisarg Jaydeep

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harnessing the synergy between materials at the nanoscale can be a valuable tool in understanding and probing cellular phenomena and in driving specific processes that lead to tissue and organ regeneration and repair. ...

  13. Injectable hyaluronic acid scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Cindy D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Every year tens of millions worldwide suffer from cartilage damage, caused by mechanical degradation, trauma or disease. Because of the lack of blood supply and low cell concentration within the tissue, cartilage has very ...

  14. Collagen scaffolds and injectable biopolymer gels for cardiac tissue engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Karen Kailin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds have begun to shown promise for cell delivery for cardiac tissue engineering. Although various polymers and material forms have been explored, there is a need for: injectable gels ...

  15. Tissue-specific gene silencing monitored in circulating RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sehgal, Alfica

    Pharmacologic target gene modulation is the primary objective for RNA antagonist strategies and gene therapy. Here we show that mRNAs encoding tissue-specific gene transcripts can be detected in biological fluids and that ...

  16. Intrinsic optical signals in neural tissues: measurements, mechanisms, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    Intrinsic optical signals in neural tissues: measurements, mechanisms, and applications Christopher optical signals, including changes in absorption, scattering, birefringence, refractive index, and nerve in scattering, birefringence (2), and optical activity (3) during the action potential in numerous invertebrate

  17. Laser Ablation-ICP-MS Analysis of Dissected Tissue: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Laser Ablation-ICP-MS Analysis of Dissected Tissue: A Conservation-Minded Approach to Assessing the animal. In this paper, we report on the application of laser ablation-ICP-MS (LA- ICP-MS) for sampling

  18. articular cartilage tissue: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 50% of the equilibrium compressive elastic modulus of the tissue. The bottle-brush-shaped ... Lee, Hsu-Yi 2010-01-01 74 Mechanical injury and inflammatory cytokines...

  19. Development of novel dynamic indentation techniques for soft tissue applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Asha, 1974-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Realistic material models to simulate the behavior of brain tissue at large deformations and high strain rates are necessary when designing equipment to protect against ballistic impacts. Acquiring experimental data for ...

  20. BE.410J Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamm, Roger D.

    This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include: structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic ...

  1. Design, construction and implementation of spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Nunez, Delia Josefina

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used for medical and space activities whenever a combination of high and low LET (lineal energy transfer) radiations are present. With the frequency and duration of space activities increasing...

  2. Distributed, web-based microstructure database for brain tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wonryull

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite element model of the cerebral cortex enables a structured visualization of its gross anatomy and provides access to the neuronal databases associated with each unite element of tissue. Partitioned by finite elements, the distributed, web-based...

  3. Polyelectrolyte multilayer growth factor delivery : mediating tissue/device interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Mara Lee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the use of ultrathin therapeutic protein delivery films to control host tissue/medical device implant interactions, thereby reducing complications that lead to implant failure. The Layer by Layer ...

  4. Synthetic Collagen Fascicles for the Regeneration of Tendon Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kew, SJ; Gwynne, JH; Enea, D; Brooks, R; Rushton, N; Best, Serena Michelle; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of an ideal scaffold for tendon regeneration must be designed to provide a mechanical, structural and chemotactic microenvironment for native cellular activity to synthesise functional (i.e. load bearing) tissue. Collagen fibre...

  5. Novel polypyrrole derivatives to enhance conductive polymer-tissue interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Paul M. (Paul Matthew)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing materials that interact effectively with surrounding tissue is a major obstacle in sensor and drug delivery research. The body's natural immune response prevents foreign objects from easily integrating with an ...

  6. Increasing the safety and precision of medical tissue puncture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begg, Nikolai David Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue puncture is ubiquitous in medicine, from percutaneous injections and biopsies to laparoscopic surgical access, epidural anesthesia, and cranial drilling; over 10 million puncture procedures are performed each year ...

  7. Adipogenesis and angiogenesis : roles in tissue engineering and glucose metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Joshua

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adipose tissue serves two main functions in the body: (1) it is the body's primary energy depot; and (2) it also serves as an important endocrine organ, producing and secreting various enzymes, growth factors, cytokines, ...

  8. An experimental study of tissue damage due to microvascular occlusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Bradley Thomas

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to cheek pouch tissue Figure 4. Architecture of vascular bed of Experiment Eight Figure 5. Stagnation in an 8-micron arteriole (C) following microocclusion upstream Figure 6. Time required to completely arrest the pouch circulation vs. magnitude.... Such ulcers are localized areas of cellular necrosis (Kosiak, 1961) which tend to occur between under- lying bony prominences and overlying compressing surfaces such as a brace, chai r, cast, bed, or other external object (Merlino, 1969). Those tissues...

  9. Multirobot Lunar Excavation and ISRU Using Artificial-Neural-Tissue Controllers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thangavelautham, Jekanthan; Smith, Alexander; Abu El Samid, Nader; Ho, Alexander; D'Eleuterio, Gabriele M. T. [Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, 4925 Dufferin St., Toronto, ON M3H 5T6 (Canada); Boucher, Dale [Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, 1400 Barrydowne Rd., Sudbury, ON P3A 3V8 (Canada); Richard, Jim [Electric Vehicle Controllers Ltd, 2200 ValleyView Rd., Val Caron, ON P3N 1L1 (Canada)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Automation of site preparation and resource utilization on the Moon with teams of autonomous robots holds considerable promise for establishing a lunar base. Such multirobot autonomous systems would require limited human support infrastructure, complement necessary manned operations and reduce overall mission risk. We present an Artificial Neural Tissue (ANT) architecture as a control system for autonomous multirobot excavation tasks. An ANT approach requires much less human supervision and pre-programmed human expertise than previous techniques. Only a single global fitness function and a set of allowable basis behaviors need be specified. An evolutionary (Darwinian) selection process is used to 'breed' controllers for the task at hand in simulation and the fittest controllers are transferred onto hardware for further validation and testing. ANT facilitates 'machine creativity', with the emergence of novel functionality through a process of self-organized task decomposition of mission goals. ANT based controllers are shown to exhibit self-organization, employ stigmergy (communication mediated through the environment) and make use of templates (unlabeled environmental cues). With lunar in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) efforts in mind, ANT controllers have been tested on a multirobot excavation task in which teams of robots with no explicit supervision can successfully avoid obstacles, interpret excavation blueprints, perform layered digging, avoid burying or trapping other robots and clear/maintain digging routes.

  10. Development of a high throughput 3D perfused liver tissue bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Samuel Walker

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development of a device designed for culturing liver tissue in a 3D perfused environment. Cells form tissue inside miniature channels of a scaffold, and the tissue is perfused with culture medium ...

  11. Abstract Successful transformation of plant tissue using Agrobacterium relies on several factors including bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finer, John J.

    Abstract Successful transformation of plant tissue using Agrobacterium relies on several factors including bacterial infection, host recognition, and transformation competency of the target tissue particle bombardment, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of this tissue has not been demonstrated. We

  12. Anomalous skin effects in relativistic parallel propagating weakly magnetized electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Gohar; Bashir, M. F. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized electron plasma is presented and general expressions for longitudinal and transverse permittivites are derived. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves increases as we move from non-relativistic to highly relativistic regime. The ambient magnetic field reduces/enhances the skin effects for R-wave/L-wave as the strength of the field is increased. In general, the weak magnetic field effects are pronounced for the weakly relativistic regime as compared with other relativistic cases. The results are also graphically illustrated. On switching off the magnetic field, previous results for field free case are retrieved [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Priniples of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1984), Vol. 9, p. 106].

  13. Heat transfers in a double-skin roof ventilated by natural convection in summer time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biwole, Pascal; Pompeo, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The double-skin roofs investigated in this paper are formed by adding a metallic screen on an existing sheet metal roof. The system enhances passive cooling of dwellings and can help diminishing power costs for air conditioning in summer or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers are investigated. Depending on its surface properties, the screen reflects a large amount of oncoming solar radiation. Natural convection in the channel underneath drives off the residual heat. The bi-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters for the system's efficiency. They are, by order of importance, the sheet metal surface emissivity, the screen internal and external surface emissivity, the insulation thickness and the inclination angle for a channel width over 6 cm. The influence of those parameters on Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers is also investigated. Temperature and air velocity profiles on seve...

  14. Performance Assessment of Bi-Directional Knotless Tissue-Closure Devices in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters, 2009 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Bryson, Amanda J.

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to assess the performance of bi-directional knotless tissue-closure devices for use in tagging juvenile salmon. This study is part of an ongoing effort at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to reduce unwanted effects of tags and tagging procedures on the survival and behavior of juvenile salmonids, by assessing and refining suturing techniques, suture materials, and tag burdens. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of the knotless (barbed) suture, using three different suture patterns (treatments: 6-point, Wide “N”, Wide “N” Knot), to the current method of suturing (MonocrylTM monofilament, discontinuous sutures with a 2×2×2×2 knot) used in monitoring and research programs with a novel antiseptic barrier on the wound (“Second Skin”).

  15. Dose profiles through the dermis for on and off-skin hot particle exposures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Kimberly Rochelle

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reports measurements of depth-dose profiles for on- and off-skin hot particle exposures using radiochromic dye film. Dose profiles from both a "Co hot particle, and activated depleted uranium oxide microspheres were measured with the film. Exposures... Page Off-Contact of Film 13. ' Co Dose Profile Measured with 6 mm Thick Plexiglass Between Film and Hot Particle 48 14. Radial Dose Profile of Uranium Microsphere Measured at Various Depths Below the Sphere 51 15. Dose Profile of Uranium...

  16. THERMAL SKIN DAMAGE AND MOBILE PHONE USE Elmountacer Billah Elabbassi(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in thé phone by thé battery currents and running of thé radiofrequency (RF) electronic circuits measured thé température of thé temporal skin due to GSM 1800 MHz MP radiated power (125 mW). To perforai a substantial part of thé radiated power is absorbed. Many epidemiological investigations of MP users [1, 2

  17. An evaluation of floor surfaces on the basis of skin temperature during constrained standing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monford, Leo Gabriel

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    popliteal fossa (popliteal region), and the medial side of abductor hallucis on the non-load bearing region of the foot (near the intersection of the top of the arch and the instep) or the foot region. All thermistors were located on the left leg... between an average ending temperature and an average start-up temperature. The foot skin temperature region was the only temperature region to indicate statistically significant results between the floor surfaces. The other two lower leg temperature...

  18. Development of computational and experimental tools to study mechanotransduction in C.elegans and primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Siddarth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When an object comes into contact with the human fingertip, surface loads imposed on the fingerpad are transmitted to thousands of specialized nerve endings embedded in the skin tissue. These nerve endings, called ...

  19. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Krasznahorkay; L. Stuhl; M. Csatlós; A. Algora; J. Gulyás; J. Timár; N. Paar; D. Vretenar; K. Boretzky; M. Heil; Yu. A. Litvinov; D. Rossi; C. Scheidenberger; H. Simon; H. Weick; A. Bracco; S. Brambilla; N. Blasi; F. Camera; A. Giaz; B. Million; L. Pellegri; S. Riboldi; O. Wieland; S. Altstadt; M. Fonseca; J. Glorius; K. Göbel; T. Heftrich; A. Koloczek; S. Kräckmann; C. Langer; R. Plag; M. Pohl; G. Rastrepina; R. Reifarth; S. Schmidt; K. Sonnabend; M. Weigand; M. N. Harakeh; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; C. Rigollet; S. Bagchi; M. A. Najafi; T. Aumann; L. Atar; M. Heine; M. Holl; A. Movsesyan; P. Schrock; V. Volkov; F. Wamers; E. Fiori; B. Löher; J. Marganiec; D. Savran; H. T. Johansson; P. Diaz Fernández; U. Garg; D. L. Balabanski

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) has been measured to the isobaric analog state excited in the p(124Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutron-skin thickness (\\DeltaR_(pn)). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the \\DeltaR_(pn) value for 124Sn was deduced to be 0.175 \\pm 0.048 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The energy of the AGDR measured previously for ^(208)Pb was also used to determine the \\DeltaR_(pn) for ^(208)Pb. In this way a very precise \\DeltaR_(pn) = 0.181 \\pm 0.031 neutron-skin thickness has been obtained for 208Pb. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  20. Does phentolamine mesylate reverse soft-tissue anesthesia after 3% mepivacaine?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvera, Andreia Minasian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reversal of soft-tissue anesthesia after dental procedures.following local anesthesia reversal with phentolamineet al. Reversal of soft-tissue anesthesia with phentolamine

  1. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption...

  2. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and related nutrients on sebum lipids, and skin and hair coat condition in canines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Naomi Anne

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to investigate the effect of diets rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and other related nutrients, in the effort to improve skin and hair coat conditions in canines. The study included 24 dogs fed a ...

  3. Investigation of Skin Tribology and Its Effects on Coefficient of Friction and Other Tactile Attributes Involving Polymer Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darden, Matthew Aguirre

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    concerning tactility, examining environmental and material properties that affect skin on fabric coefficient of friction. In this study, similar friction procedure was used to compare coefficients of friction of a fingerpad across varying polymer fabrics...

  4. Technical Note: Skin thickness measurements using high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study population mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions did not differ significantly with pathology. The study also underscored the importance of considering breast curvature in estimating breast skin thickness.

  5. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece); Medical Diagnostic Center 'Ayios Therissos,' P.O. Box 28405, Nicosia 2033, Cyprus and Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Panepistimioupolis, Dragana 68100, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Heraklion 71110, Crete (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of signal-to-noise ratio mainly to the peripheral region of the phantom. Conclusions: Despite typical peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain, and RBM from the standard low-dose brain perfusion 256-slice CT protocol are well below the corresponding thresholds for the induction of erythema, cataract, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively, every effort should be made toward optimization of the procedure and minimization of dose received by these tissues. The current study provides evidence that the use of the narrower bowtie filter available may considerably reduce peak absorbed dose to all above radiosensitive tissues with minimal deterioration in image quality. Considerable reduction in peak eye-lens dose may also be achieved by positioning patient head center a few centimeters above isocenter during the exposure.

  6. Human Resources Assistant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Headquarters (HQ) Operations Division of the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer in Washington, DC. The Division provides a full range of human capital...

  7. Patenting Human Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to thorough analysis and debate prior to the imminent arrival of human genetic enhancement technologies. Otherwise, patent law may drive human evolution in directions either unplanned - or worse - undesired....

  8. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

  9. integration division Human Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    integration division Human Systems Eye-Movement Metrics: Non-Intrusive Quantitative Tools for Monitoring Human Visual Performance Objective Approach Impact A reliable quantitative yet non-intrusive methodologies that provide quantitative yet non-intrusive measures of human visual performance for use

  10. Health burden of skin lesions at low arsenic exposure through groundwater in Pakistan. Is river the source?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatmi, Zafar, E-mail: zafar.fatmi@aku.edu [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)] [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan); Azam, Iqbal; Ahmed, Faiza; Kazi, Ambreen; Gill, Albert Bruce; Kadir, Muhmmad Masood; Ahmed, Mubashir; Ara, Naseem; Janjua, Naveed Zafar [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)] [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant proportion of groundwater in south Asia is contaminated with arsenic. Pakistan has low levels of arsenic in groundwater compared with China, Bangladesh and India. A representative multi-stage cluster survey conducted among 3874 persons {>=}15 years of age to determine the prevalence of arsenic skin lesions, its relation with arsenic levels and cumulative arsenic dose in drinking water in a rural district (population: 1.82 million) in Pakistan. Spot-urine arsenic levels were compared among individuals with and without arsenic skin lesions. In addition, the relation of age, body mass index, smoking status with arsenic skin lesions was determined. The geographical distribution of the skin lesions and arsenic-contaminated wells in the district were ascertained using global positioning system. The total arsenic, inorganic and organic forms, in water and spot-urine samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The prevalence of skin lesions of arsenic was estimated for complex survey design, using surveyfreq and surveylogistic options of SAS 9.1 software.The prevalence of definitive cases i.e. hyperkeratosis of both palms and soles, was 3.4 per 1000 and suspected cases i.e. any sign of arsenic skin lesions (melanosis and/or keratosis), were 13.0 per 1000 among {>=}15-year-old persons in the district. Cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) was calculated from levels of arsenic in water and duration of use of current drinking water source. Prevalence of skin lesions increases with cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) in drinking water and arsenic levels in urine. Skin lesions were 2.5-fold among individuals with BMI <18.5 kg/m{sup 2}. Geographically, more arsenic-contaminated wells and skin lesions were alongside Indus River, suggests a strong link between arsenic contamination of groundwater with proximity to river.This is the first reported epidemiological and clinical evidence of arsenic skin lesions due to groundwater in Pakistan. Further investigations and focal mitigation measures for arsenic may be carried out alongside Indus River.

  11. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Fitzgerald, Jason (Sacramento, CA); Troppmann, Christoph (Sacramento, CA); Michalopoulou, Andromachi (Athens, GR)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  12. Lattice Percolation Approach to Numerical Modeling of Tissue Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privman, Vladimir; Libert, Sergiy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a percolation-type approach to modeling of the processes of aging and certain other properties of tissues analyzed as systems consisting of interacting cells. Tissues are considered as structures made of regular healthy, senescent, dead (apoptotic) cells, and studied dynamically, with the ongoing processes including regular cell division to fill vacant sites left by dead cells, healthy cells becoming senescent or dying, and other processes. Statistical-mechanics description can provide patterns of time dependence and snapshots of morphological system properties. An illustrative application of the developed theoretical modeling approach is reported, confirming recent experimental findings that inhibition of senescence can lead to extended lifespan.

  13. Enrichment of selected fatty acids in broiler tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yau, Jia-Chyi

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENRICHMENT OF SELECTED FATTY ACIDS IN BROILER TISSUES A Thesis by JIA-CHYI YAU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Study of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990... Major Subject: Food Science and Technology ENRICHMENT OF SELECTED FATTY ACIDS IN BROILER TISSUES A Thesis by JIA-CHYI YAU Approved as to style and content by A. R. Sams (Chair of Comittee) C. A. Bailey (Member) J. T Eeet n (M mber) R. Creg...

  14. Computer-aided evaluation of protein expression in pathological tissue images Elisa Ficarra, Enrico Macii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    by pathologists via visual inspection of tissue sam- ples images. Our techniques streamlines this errorComputer-aided evaluation of protein expression in pathological tissue images Elisa Ficarra, Enrico in pathological tissues by using, for example, images of the tissue where the localization of pro- teins, as well

  15. Beagle Dog Tissue Archive (previously part of National Radiobiology Archives): from the Janus Tissue Archive at Northwestern University

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Watson, Charles R.

    Following the advent of the atomic age, many nations have investigated the effects of radioactive exposure in animal models. Some of these investigations involved costly and unique experiments that produced tissue and data archives which are unlikely to be reproduced. In an effort to extract the value from these collections, programs have started in Japan, Europe, and America to preserve and make public the data and tissues from these studies for further investigation. The Beagle Dog Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1952 to 1991 by Thomas Fritz, William Norris, and Tom Seed and supported by grants from the Atomic Energy Commission, investigated the effects of Cobalt-60 radiation on beagle dogs. Documentation from these studies is availible in pdf form. This web portal seeks to make accessible the animal tissues and study data from the Beagle Dog Experiments using data organized by Charles Watson. Use the search form to the left to look for dog data from particular experimental conditions. Click a dog number to return the full dog record. Use the dog record to find tissues of interest and make a sample tissue request. These tissue samples and the data were known until recently as the the U.S. National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) and were maintained as the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) at Washington State University. Life-span studies using beagle dogs were done at the Argonne National Laboratory, University of California at Davis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and the University of Utah. The results and many microscope slides from these life-span studies, totaling some 6000 dogs, are now available to researchers. A seminal work included in the Archive is The Atlas of Experimentally-Induced Neoplasia in the Beagle Dog (Watson et al, 1997).

  16. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  17. aberrant tissue localization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - DSpace Summary: Optical aberrations of the human eye are currently corrected using eyeglasses, contact lenses, or surgery. We describe a fourth option: modifying the composition...

  18. Dose profiles through the dermis for on and off-skin hot particle exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Kimberly Rochelle

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compared to gamma-rays. Gamma-rays are monoenergetic photons with energies ranging from a few keV to several MeV. Unlike beta particles, gamma-rays are indirectly ionizing radiation. Because a gamma-ray is uncharged, it undergoes no direct ionization... detailed data on dose profiles This thesis follows the format of Radiation Protection Dosimetry. through the dermis from fuel fragments or from mixed beta-gamma activation products. The effects of beta-emitting hot particles suspended above skin without...

  19. Constraining the symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of Tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Jun Xu; Bao-An Li

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. Using this correlation analysis to existing data on the neutron skin thickness of Sn isotopes, we find important constraints on the value E_{sym}(rho_0) and density slope L of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density. Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and double neutron/proton ratio in heavy ion collisions leads to a value of L=58\\pm 18 MeV approximately independent of E_{sym}(\\rho_0).

  20. Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Howland D. T. (Albuquerque, NM); Thomas, Edward V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

  1. Leica EG1160 Compact, programmable tissue embedding station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    and exemplary comfort and safety standards characterize this tissue embed- ding station as much of the Leica CLS series, with especially intense illumination and focusing fiber-optic light guide, to a vacuum / 60 Hz 230 V / 50 Hz Operating temperature range: 18 °C ­ 40 °C Dimensions (W x H x D): 910 x 320 x

  2. Scleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    . Wildsoet, O.D., Ph.D.1 Enzymatically degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) were Polymer Network James Su, M.Eng.,1 Samuel T. Wall, Ph.D.,2 Kevin E. Healy, Ph.D.,2,3 and Christine FScleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable Semi-Interpenetrating

  3. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography in soft biological tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakadzic, Sava

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasound-modulated Optical Tomography in Soft Biological Tissues. (May 2006) Sava Sakad•zi¶c, B.S., University of Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro; M.S., University of Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Lihong V. Wang Optical...

  4. animal brain tissues: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    animal brain tissues First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Temperature Effects on Brain...

  5. avian brain tissue: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    brain tissue First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Song recognition in the avian brain...

  6. absorption tissue distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption tissue distribution First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Absorption and...

  7. Probing the neutron-skin thickness by photon production from reactions induced by intermediate-energy protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Gao-Feng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon from neutron-proton bremsstrahlung in p+Pb reactions is examined as a potential probe of the neutron-skin thickness in different centralities and at different proton incident energies. It is shown that the best choice of reaction environment is about 140MeV for the incident proton and the 95\\%-100\\% centrality for the reaction system since the incident proton mainly interacts with neutrons inside the skin of the target and thus leads to different photon production to maximal extent. Moreover, considering two main uncertainties from both photon production probability and nucleon-nucleon cross section in the reaction, I propose to use the ratio of photon production from two reactions to measure the neutron-skin thickness because of its cancellation effects on these uncertainties simultaneously, but the preserved about 13\\%-15\\% sensitivities on the varied neutron-skin thickness from 0.1 to 0.3fm within the current experimental uncertainty range of the neutron-skin size in $^{208}$Pb.

  8. A revised model for radiation dosimetry in the human gastrointestinal tract 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhuiyan, Md. Nasir Uddin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents...

  9. In vivo ultrasonographic exposimetry: Human tissuespecific attenuation coefficients in the gynecologic examination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    866 In vivo ultrasonographic exposimetry: Human tissue­specific attenuation coefficients. O'Brien, Jr, PhDc Cincinnati, Ohio, and Urbana, Illinois OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the current study. Experimental observations from animal studies would unequivocally suggest that high-intensity ultra- sound has

  10. Site-Specific GlcNAcylation of Human Erythrocyte Potential Biomarker(s) for Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh-Wilson, Linda

    Site-Specific GlcNAcylation of Human Erythrocyte Proteins Potential Biomarker(s) for Diabetes Zihao. Hart1 OBJECTIVE--O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is up- regulated in diabetic tissues and plays diabetic and normal individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS--GlcNAcylated eryth- rocyte proteins or Glc

  11. Homogenization of a Multiscale Viscoelastic Model with Nonlocal Damping, Application to the Human Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lungs PAUL CAZEAUX, Laboratoire J.­L. Lions, UMR 7598, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 Place of the deformation of the human lung tissue, called the lung parenchyma, during the respiration process bronchi and enters the lungs. It is then distributed by the bronchial tree to the acini or alveolar

  12. Constraints on neutron skin thickness in 208Pb and density-dependent symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianmin Dong; Wei Zuo; Jianzhong Gu

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate knowledge about the neutron skin thickness $\\Delta R_{np}$ in $^{208}$Pb has far-reaching implications for different communities of nuclear physics and astrophysics. Yet, the novel Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) did not yield stringent constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$ recently. We employ a more practicable strategy currently to probe the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb based on a high linear correlation between the $\\Delta R_{np}$ and $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$, where $J$ and $a_{\\text{sym}}$ are the symmetry energy (coefficient) of nuclear matter at saturation density and of $^{208}$Pb. An accurate $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ thus places a strong constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$. Compared with the parity-violating asymmetry $A_{\\text{PV}}$ in the PREX, the reliably experimental information on the $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ is much more easily available attributed to a wealth of measured data on nuclear masses and on decay energies. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is also well constrained with the $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$. Finally, with a `tomoscan' method, we find that one just needs to measure the nucleon densities in $^{208}$Pb starting from $R_{m} = 7.61\\pm0.04$ fm to obtain the $\\Delta R_{np}$ in hadron scattering experiments, regardless of its interior profile that is hampered by the strong absorption.

  13. Constraints on neutron skin thickness in 208Pb and density-dependent symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Jianmin; Gu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate knowledge about the neutron skin thickness $\\Delta R_{np}$ in $^{208}$Pb has far-reaching implications for different communities of nuclear physics and astrophysics. Yet, the novel Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) did not yield stringent constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$ recently. We employ a more practicable strategy currently to probe the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb based on a high linear correlation between the $\\Delta R_{np}$ and $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$, where $J$ and $a_{\\text{sym}}$ are the symmetry energy (coefficient) of nuclear matter at saturation density and of $^{208}$Pb. An accurate $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ thus places a strong constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$. Compared with the parity-violating asymmetry $A_{\\text{PV}}$ in the PREX, the reliably experimental information on the $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ is much more easily available attributed to a wealth of measured data on nuclear masses and on decay energies. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is also well constrained with the $J-a_{\\...

  14. Symmetry energy at subsaturation densities and the neutron skin thickness of 208Pb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Xiaohua; Zuo, Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass-dependent symmetry energy coefficients $a_{sym}(A)$ has been extracted by analysing the heavy nuclear mass differences reducing the uncertainties as far as possible in our previous work. Taking advantage of the obtained symmetry energy coefficient $a_{sym}(A)$ and the density profiles obtained by switching off the Coulomb interaction in $^{208}\\text{Pb}$, we calculated the slope parameter $L_{0.11}$ of the symmetry energy at the density of $0.11\\text{fm}^{-3}$. The calculated $L_{0.11}$ ranges from 40.5 MeV to 60.3 MeV. The slope parameter $L_{0.11}$ of the symmetry energy at the density of $0.11\\text{fm}^{-3}$ is also calculated directly with Skyrme interactions for nuclear matter and is found to have a fine linear relation with the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}\\text{Pb}$, which is the difference of the neutron and proton rms radii of the nucleus. With the linear relation the neutron skin thickness $ \\Delta R_{np} $ of $^{208}\\text{Pb}$ is predicted to be 0.15 - 0.21 fm.

  15. HUMAN BRAIN IMAGING AT 9.4 TESLA USING A COMBINATION OF TRAVELING WAVE EXCITATION WITH A 15-CHANNEL RECEIVE-ONLY ARRAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HUMAN BRAIN IMAGING AT 9.4 TESLA USING A COMBINATION OF TRAVELING WAVE EXCITATION WITH A 15-CHANNEL is a successful setup for routine human brain imaging at 7 Tesla. For reception, the use of multiple surface coils multichannel transmit coils. At 9.4 Tesla, however, the even shorter RF wavelength in tissue causes the B1

  16. HQ- Human Resources Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HQs Human Recources Operations delivers services, including position management, recruitment, staffing and classification, and reduction in force at Headquarters.  Click the "Contacts" Link to find...

  17. Human Embryology & Developmental Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Biology is the modern synthesis of biological and medical sciences that looks at how the tissues, and is at the forefront of recent advances in modern medicine. Current research has shown that many of the molecular Web Pages for names). The Head of School of Medical Sciences is always available for advice regarding

  18. Skin cancer in albinos at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asuquo, M E; Otei, O O; Omotoso, J; Bassey, E E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the human P gene in tyrosinase positive oculocutaneousJenkins T, Ramsay M. The tyrosinase positive oculocutaneousrecessive forms involves the tyrosinase gene (OCA1), whereas

  19. DDT residues in human milk samples from Delhi, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaidi, S.S.A.; Bhatnagar, V.K.; Banerjee, B.D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Shah, M.P.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread use of DDT in India has resulted in increased levels of the insecticide in the ecosystem and, therefore, the potential possible health hazards has been voiced. DDT-residues excreted in milk have been reported from different parts of the world; however, very few reports did appear from India. In fact, there is no report on DDT-content in human milk from Delhi area where higher levels of DDT and BHC in human adipose tissues and blood have already been reported. Higher bioaccumulation of DDT might reflect the higher excretion of residues in milk. The authors have, therefore, attempted a systematic study to monitor DDT-residues in human milk samples collected from various hospitals of Delhi (India).

  20. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

  1. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

  2. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

  3. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  4. Integral equation models for thermoacoustic imaging of dissipative tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowar, Richard

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In case of non-dissipative tissue the inverse problem of thermoacoustic imaging basically consists of two inverse problems. First, a function $\\phi$ depending on the \\emph{electromagnetic absorption function}, is estimated from one of three types of projections (spherical, circular or planar) and secondly, the \\emph{electromagnetic absorption function} is estimated from $\\phi$. In case of dissipative tissue, it is no longer possible to calculate explicitly the projection of $\\phi$ from the respective pressure data (measured by point, planar or line detectors). The goal of this paper is to derive for each of the three types of pressure data, an integral equation that allows estimating the respective projection of $\\phi$. The advantage of this approach is that all known reconstruction formulas for $\\phi$ from the respective projection can be exploited.

  5. Photoacoustic computed tomography in biological tissues: algorithms and breast imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Minghua

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    are investigated in Chapter III and IV, respectively. Finally, a prototype of an RF-induced PA imaging system is introduced and experiments using phantom samples as well as a preliminary study of breast imaging for cancer detection are reported in Chapter V... PHOTOACOUSTIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUES: ALGORITHMS AND BREAST IMAGING A Dissertation by MINGHUA XU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  6. Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskin, Julia; Heath, Brandi S.; Roach, Patrick J.; Cazares, Lisa H.; Semmes, O. John

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results showing the ambient imaging of biological samples in their native environment using nanospray desorption ionization (nanoDESI) mass spectrometry. NanoDESI is an ambient pressure ionization technique that enables precise control of ionization of molecules from substrates. We demonstrate highly sensitive and robust analysis of tissue samples with high spatial resolution (<12 {mu}m) without sample preparation, which will be essential for applications in clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, molecular biology, and biochemistry.

  7. Conversion of radioactive tryptophan to indoleacetic acid by plant tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannenburg, Warren Nathaniel

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was the immediate precursor of indoleacetic acido It was shown that indoleacetonitrile can be converted to indoleacetic acid by sections of Avena coleoptiles (21), but the logical intermediate, indoleacetamide, was not demonstrated. Since that time... exists for indoleacetic acid formation by the condensation of in? dole and glycolic acid to form indoleglycolic acid which is then probably reduced to indoleacetic acido Whether this reaction actually occurs with intact plant tissue or whether...

  8. Beliefs about Human Extinction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onda, Kenji [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)]. E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kawakubo, Yo [Department of Dermatology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Ichihara Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Inoue, Shota [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Hirano, Toshihiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Oka, Kitaro [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  10. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The curative potential of external beam radiation therapy is critically dependent on having the ability to accurately aim radiation beams at intended targets while avoiding surrounding healthy tissues. However, existing technologies are incapable of real-time, volumetric, soft-tissue imaging during radiation beam delivery, when accurate target tracking is most critical. The authors address this challenge in the development and evaluation of a novel, minimally interfering, telerobotic ultrasound (U.S.) imaging system that can be integrated with existing medical linear accelerators (LINACs) for therapy guidance. Methods: A customized human-safe robotic manipulator was designed and built to control the pressure and pitch of an abdominal U.S. transducer while avoiding LINAC gantry collisions. A haptic device was integrated to remotely control the robotic manipulator motion and U.S. image acquisition outside the LINAC room. The ability of the system to continuously maintain high quality prostate images was evaluated in volunteers over extended time periods. Treatment feasibility was assessed by comparing a clinically deployed prostate treatment plan to an alternative plan in which beam directions were restricted to sectors that did not interfere with the transabdominal U.S. transducer. To demonstrate imaging capability concurrent with delivery, robot performance and U.S. target tracking in a phantom were tested with a 15 MV radiation beam active. Results: Remote image acquisition and maintenance of image quality with the haptic interface was successfully demonstrated over 10 min periods in representative treatment setups of volunteers. Furthermore, the robot's ability to maintain a constant probe force and desired pitch angle was unaffected by the LINAC beam. For a representative prostate patient, the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for a plan with restricted sectors remained virtually identical to the DVH of a clinically deployed plan. With reduced margins, as would be enabled by real-time imaging, gross tumor volume coverage was identical while notable reductions of bladder and rectal volumes exposed to large doses were possible. The quality of U.S. images obtained during beam operation was not appreciably degraded by radiofrequency interference and 2D tracking of a phantom object in U.S. images obtained with the beam on/off yielded no significant differences. Conclusions: Remotely controlled robotic U.S. imaging is feasible in the radiotherapy environment and for the first time may offer real-time volumetric soft-tissue guidance concurrent with radiotherapy delivery.

  11. Optimizing Normal Tissue Sparing in Ion Therapy Using Calculated Isoeffective Dose for Ion Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remmes, Nicholas B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Herman, Michael G., E-mail: Herman.Michael@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Kruse, Jon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate how the selection of ion type affects the calculated isoeffective dose to the surrounding normal tissue as a function of both normal tissue and target tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios. Methods and Materials: A microdosimetric biologic dose model was incorporated into a Geant4 simulation of parallel opposed beams of protons, helium, lithium, beryllium, carbon, and neon ions. The beams were constructed to give a homogeneous isoeffective dose to a volume in the center of a water phantom for target tissues covering a range of cobalt equivalent {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 1-20 Gy. Concomitant normal tissue isoeffective doses in the plateau of the ion beam were then compared for different ions across the range of normal tissue and target tissue radiosensitivities for a fixed isoeffective dose to the target tissue. Results: The ion type yielding the optimal normal tissue sparing was highly dependent on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of both the normal and the target tissue. For carbon ions, the calculated isoeffective dose to normal tissue at a 5-cm depth varied by almost a factor of 5, depending on the {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the normal and target tissue. This ranges from a factor of 2 less than the isoeffective dose of a similar proton treatment to a factor of 2 greater. Conclusions: No single ion is optimal for all treatment scenarios. The heavier ions are superior in cases in which the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of the target tissue is low and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of normal tissue is high, and protons are superior in the opposite circumstances. Lithium and beryllium appear to offer dose advantages similar to carbon, with a considerably lower normal tissue dose when the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the target tissue is high and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the normal tissue is low.

  12. Proc. 3rd International Conference on Networked Sensing Systems (INSS 2006), pp. 55-60, Rosemont, Illinois (USA), May, 2006. A Whole Body Artificial Skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinoda, Hiroyuki

    are required to be more cautious about surrounding environments than robots in industrial factories because a tactile sensor skin as one of applications of the system. In this application, the cells are not only within its sensing area. The resulting robot skin is soft, stretchable, and able to cover a large area

  13. Melanocytes can absorb ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and survive con-siderable genotoxic stress. The skin is the main barrier to the exter-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    to the appearance of skin and provide protection from damage by ultraviolet radiation. Pigmentation mutantsMelanocytes can absorb ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and survive con- siderable genotoxic stress. Thisreviewsummarizeshowpigmentationisregulatedatthemolecu- lar level and how the tanning response provides protection against dam- age and skin cancer. We

  14. A Tactile Luminous Floor Used as a Playful Space's Skin* Tobi Delbrck, Adrian M. Whatley, Rodney Douglas, Kynan Eng, Klaus Hepp and Paul F.M.J. Verschure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delbruck, Tobi

    A Tactile Luminous Floor Used as a Playful Space's Skin* Tobi Delbrück, Adrian M. Whatley, Rodney of the novel tactile luminous floor and how the floor is used as the skin of the playful interactive space Ada--interactive space, tactile surface, luminous floor, people tracking, gamse I. INTRODUCTION Many luminous floors have

  15. Evaluating self-reported pressure ulcer prevention measures in persons with1 spinal cord injury using the revised Skin Management Needs Assessment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    using the revised Skin Management Needs Assessment2 Checklist : reliability study3 Gélis Anthony, MD 1, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de20 Bordeaux, France21 22 Corresponding author:23 Dr. Anthony GELIS, M: to translate, evaluate the reliability and cross-culturally adapt the Skin2 Management Needs Assessment

  16. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A. [Inst. of Nucl. Res. of the Hungarian Acad. of Sci. (ATOMKI), H-4001 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); and others

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  17. The neutron skin in neutron-rich nuclei at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, Mark M. [University of Virginia (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Lab program to measure the symmetry energy of neutron-rich nuclear matter, using precision electroweak methods, is progressing well. The initial measurement by the PREX experiment, leading to a 2-sigma determination of the 'neutron skin' in {sup 208}Pb, has been published. Design and preparation for a further, more-precise measurement on {sup 208}Pb is progressing well and there is general acceptance of the great advantage to a further measurement on {sup 48}Ca. The surprising ancillary result that the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry for {sup 208}Pb is consistent with zero is also now in the literature. This paper will discuss the current experimental situation of the program.

  18. Effect of temperature on the effective mass and the neutron skin of nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Yüksel; E. Khan; K. Bozkurt; G. Colò

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the finite temperature Hartree-Fock-BCS approximation for selected stable Sn nuclei with zero-range Skyrme forces. Hartree Fock BCS approximation allows for a straightforward interpretation of the results since it involves u and v's which are not matrices as in HFB. Pairing transitions from superfluid to the normal state are studied with respect to the temperature. The temperature dependence of the nuclear radii and neutron skin are also analyzed. An increase of proton and neutron radii is obtained in neutron rich nuclei especially above the critical temperature. Using different Skyrme energy functionals, it is found that the correlation between the effective mass in symmetric nuclear matter and the critical temperature depends on the pairing prescription. The temperature dependence of the nucleon effective mass is also investigated, showing that proton and neutron effective masses display different behavior below and above the critical temperature, due to the small temperature dependence of the density.

  19. Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  20. Comparison of blood flow and cell function in ischemic skin flaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bean, D.; Rees, R.S.; O'Leary, J.P.; Lynch, J.B.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellular function and blood flow in acute, steroid-treated, and surgically delayed random skin flaps have been examined. In these studies, the period following flap elevation could be divided into early (0-2 hr), intermediate (4-6 hr), and late (12 hr) periods of ischemia, based on the cutaneous blood flow and cellular function measured by thallium-201 uptake. There was a close correlation between blood flow and cellular function during the early period of ischemia which became worse with time. Blood flow studies demonstrated a significant difference between the early and intermediate periods of ischemia which was abolished by surgical delay. Improvement in cellular function was accomplished by improved blood flow in the surgically delayed flaps, while steroid-treated flaps enhanced cellular metabolism by another mechanism. Cellular function approximated blood flow during the early and immediate period of ischemia. Steroids may augment cellular function without improving blood flow, while surgical delay improves cellular function by improving blood flow.

  1. Ice-templated structures for biomedical tissue repair: From physics to final scaffolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawelec, K. M.; Husmann, A; Best, Serena Michelle; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature and solutes. The porous structures created using ice-templating allow scaffolds to be used for many diverse applications, from microfluidics to biomedical tissue engineering. Within the field of tissue engineering, scaffold structure can influence...

  2. Modeling Frameworks for Representing the Mechanical Behavior of Tissues with a Specific Look at Vasculature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersohn, Alexander

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Many mechanicstic models aimed at predicting tissue behavior attempt to connect constitutive factors (such as effects due to collagen or fibrin concentrations) with the overall tissue behavior. Such a link between constitutive and material behaviors...

  3. T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging used to detect coagulative necrosis in tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Hyfte, John Bruce

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to prevent unnecessary collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. This research focuses on using T2*-weighted FLASH magnetic resonance imaging to detect irreversible changes in i . n vitro bovine liver tissue and tissuesimulating polyacrylamide gel...

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Humanities Academic Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Humanities Academic Human Resources VOLUNTARY WORKLOAD/or Spring ____ Quarter(s) Funding Source: ________________________________________ (Salary adjustments

  5. Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits be obtained from the Public Health Agency Canada (PHAC) to facilitate customs clearance. 2) If a permit

  6. Double trisomy mosaic (47,XXX/48,XXX,+13) confirmed by FISH and skin fibroblast culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieber, E.; Grady, V.; Dosik, H. [Interfaith Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4 lb 8 oz female was born to a 49-year-old woman (P1200G12) at 40 weeks. The baby had tetralogy of Fallot, polydactyly, microcephaly, low set simple ears, posterior cleft of the soft palate and overlapping flexion deformities of both hands. The eyes were deep set. The clinical impression was trisomy 13. The baby is not doing well and needs a gastrotomy tube for feeding. Sucking is allright but swallowing is impeded. An MRI showed an anomaly of the corpus callosum. The ophthalmological examination showed no abnormalities. A chromosome study on a 2-day peripheral blood sample resulted in poor growth and poor morphology; however, 20 Giemsa-banded cells revealed a 47,XXX karyotype. A second specimen was obtained to search for mosaicism and a blood smear revealed nuclear projections on the neutrophils. FISH analysis using whole chromosome painting probe (Life Technologies) first identified the extra chromosome number 13, the final results showing five of sixty metaphase cells (8.3%) with trisomy 13. Cytogenetic analysis using Giemsa-banding technique revealed four cells in fifty examined (8.0%) with a 48,XXX,+13 karyotype. In order to further evaluate the mosaicism, cytogenetic analysis of a skin fibroblast culture was performed. Twenty one of twenty three cells examined (91.3%) showed the 48,XXX,+13 karyotype. FISH analysis of the skin biopsy revealed eighteen of twenty cells (90.9%) with the trisomy 13. The FISH technique is an important enhancement to routine cytogenetic studies when they do not immediately correlate with clinical impressions.

  7. Analysis of Conductor Impedances Accounting for Skin Effect and Nonlinear Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Speer, R D

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is often necessary to protect sensitive electrical equipment from pulsed electric and magnetic fields. To accomplish this electromagnetic shielding structures similar to Faraday Cages are often implemented. If the equipment is inside a facility that has been reinforced with rebar, the rebar can be used as part of a lighting protection system. Unfortunately, such shields are not perfect and allow electromagnetic fields to be created inside due to discontinuities in the structure, penetrations, and finite conductivity of the shield. In order to perform an analysis of such a structure it is important to first determine the effect of the finite impedance of the conductors used in the shield. In this paper we will discuss the impedances of different cylindrical conductors in the time domain. For a time varying pulse the currents created in the conductor will have different spectral components, which will affect the current density due to skin effects. Many construction materials use iron and different types of steels that have a nonlinear permeability. The nonlinear material can have an effect on the impedance of the conductor depending on the B-H curve. Although closed form solutions exist for the impedances of cylindrical conductors made of linear materials, computational techniques are needed for nonlinear materials. Simulations of such impedances are often technically challenging due to the need for a computational mesh to be able to resolve the skin depths for the different spectral components in the pulse. The results of such simulations in the time domain will be shown and used to determine the impedances of cylindrical conductors for lightning current pulses that have low frequency content.

  8. Associate Vice President Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Associate Vice President Human Resources Enjoy Athens! Great schools Affordable housing Eclectic Vice President for Human Resources. This position reports directly to the Vice President for Finance and Administration and provides leadership for the University's human resources programs and services

  9. Human Resources Simon Fraser University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Human Resources Simon Fraser University Administrative and Professional Staff Job Description A. Identification Position Number: 31482 Position Title: Administrative Assistant (Human Resources Liaison) Name guidance, direction, coordination and effective management and implementation of SFU's Human Resources

  10. Special Issue on Human Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijholt, Anton

    The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

  11. Morphogenetic and regulatory mechanisms during developmental chondrogenesis: New paradigms for cartilage tissue engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quintana, Lluís

    Cartilage is the first skeletal tissue to be formed during embryogenesis leading to the creation of all mature

  12. The uptake, tissue distribution and depuration of a polychlorinated naphthalene (Halowax 1099) in relation to tissue lipid levels in the American oyster Crassostrea virginica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rue, William James

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & mantle & riiuscle, while those pre- viously exposed to 60 ppb were visceral mass & mantle & gill & muscle. The exchange in order between gill and mantle tissues under maximum uptake and depuration conditions probably indicates their similarity rather...THE UPTAKE, TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND DEPURATION OF A POLYCHLORINATED NAPHTHALENE (HALOWAX 1099) IN RELATION TO TISSUE LIPID LEVELS IN THE AMERICAN OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA A Thesis by WILLIAM JAMES RUE, JR. Submitted to the Graduate...

  13. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid and related nutrients on plasma lipids, and skin and hair coat condition in canines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hester, Shaleah Lynnae

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to investigate the effect of diet modifications on skin and hair coat condition in canines. The study included 24 normal adult dogs fed a baseline diet (Ol'Roy[trademark]), during an acclimation period of 12 wk (Phase I). Nine...

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 36, NO. 1, JANUARY 2000 281 Thin-Skin Eddy-Current Interaction with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowler, John R.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 36, NO. 1, JANUARY 2000 281 Thin-Skin Eddy-Current Interaction with Semielliptical and Epicyclic Cracks J. R. Bowler, Member, IEEE, and N. Harfield Abstract--Eddy-current probe current, nondestructive evaluation. I. INTRODUCTION IN EDDY-CURRENT nondestructive evaluation, cracks

  15. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid and related nutrients on plasma lipids, and skin and hair coat condition in canines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hester, Shaleah Lynnae

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to investigate the effect of diet modifications on skin and hair coat condition in canines. The study included 24 normal adult dogs fed a baseline diet (Ol'Roy[trademark]), during an acclimation period of 12 wk (Phase I). Nine...

  16. Nuclear matter symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei RID A-2398-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations between the thickness of the neutron skin in finite nuclei and the nuclear matter symmetry energy are studied in the Skyrme Hartree-Fock model. From the most recent analysis of the isospin diffusion data in heavy-ion collisions based...

  17. Semi-analytical methods for the analysis and interpretation of well test data distorted by wellbore storage and skin effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prachumchon, Sompong

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our objective is to develop approximations of the pressure-time behavior for use in analyzing the pressure response of a well in an infinite-acting reservoir influenced by wellbore storage and skin effects. Our resulting approximate models are semi...

  18. Elimination of influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao-Feng Wei

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model using as an input nucleon density profiles from Hartree-Fock calculations based on a modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we study how to eliminate the influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in probing the nuclear symmetry energy. Within the current experimental uncertainty range of neutron-skin size of $^{208}$Pb, the Pb+Pb collisions are performed in semicentral and peripheral collisions with impact parameters of 5 and 9fm and at beam energies from 50 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon, respectively. It is shown that combination of neutron and proton collective flows, i.e., neutron-proton differential elliptic flow, neutron-proton elliptic flow difference, neutron-proton differential transverse flow and neutron-proton transverse flow difference, can effectively eliminate the effects of neutron-skin size difference and thus can be as useful sensitive observables in probing nuclear matter symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions. Moreover, the combined neutron-proton stopping power including the neutron-proton differential stopping power and neutron-proton stopping power difference can also eliminate the effects of neutron-skin size difference and shows some sensitivities to symmetry energy especially at the lower beam energy.

  19. Surgical technique, using skin, for repair of simultaneously ruptured anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments of the canine femorotibial articulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chastain, Jamie Neal

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texan In Partial Fulfillnent of the !Iequireaents for the Degree Meeter of Science in Veterinary Medicine and Surgery by Janie Neal Chaetain January 1&359 SURGICAL TECHNI((UE ~ USIN'G SKIN ~ FOR REPAIR...

  20. A Query-by-Example Content-Based Image Retrieval System of Non-Melanoma Skin Lesions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    A Query-by-Example Content-Based Image Retrieval System of Non-Melanoma Skin Lesions Lucia classes, including two non-melanoma cancer types are used. Colour and texture features are extracted from for images acquired by epiluminescence microscopy (ELM or dermoscopy) and they focus on melanoma, which

  1. Proper Setup of HVAC System in Conjunction with Sound Building 'Skin' Design for Alleviation of IAQ and Energy Performance Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climates, not only because of the loss of energy, but also because of damage that can result to insulation, drywall, and structure in addition to promotion of mold and mildew growth. Proper setup of the HVAC system, in conjunction with sound building “skin...

  2. Global Environmental Change and Human Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with human rights, human security or environmental change ifEnvironmental Change and Human Security By Matthew, RichardChange and Human Security. Cambridge, Massachusetts &

  3. Changes in the Mechanical and Biochemical Properties of Aortic Tissue due to Cold Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Katherine Yanhang

    Changes in the Mechanical and Biochemical Properties of Aortic Tissue due to Cold Storage Ming Background. Temporary cold storage is a common procedure for preserving tissues for a short time be- fore; collagen; mechan- ical properties; arteries; cold storage; soft tissue; mechanical testing; vascular

  4. Mathematical modelling of fibre-enhanced perfusion inside a tissue-engineering bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, Sarah

    Mathematical modelling of fibre-enhanced perfusion inside a tissue-engineering bioreactor Robert J Accepted 7 October 2008 Available online 25 October 2008 Keywords: Tissue engineering Bioreactor Darcy flow through a porous scaffold in a tissue-engineering bioreactor. Porous-walled hollow fibres penetrate

  5. Mise en vidence d'une activit lipoprotine-lipasique dans le tissu adipeux de chvre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    partir de poudres acéto- #12;niques (Korn et Quigley, 1955) puis acéto-éthérées du tissu (Robinson, 1963'homogénats aqueux du tissu adipeux (Korn et Quigley, 1955). D'après Benson (1969), la L.P.L. du tissu adipeux de

  6. LIVER BIOLOGY AND PATHOBIOLOGY Liver Tissue Engineering at Extrahepatic Sites in Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    LIVER BIOLOGY AND PATHOBIOLOGY BIOLOGY Liver Tissue Engineering at Extrahepatic Sites in Mice indicate that liver tissues can be engineered and maintained at extrahepatic sites, retain their capacity and Mark A. Kay1 Liver tissue engineering using hepatocyte transplantation has been proposed as an alterna

  7. Enhanced Background Rejection in Thick Tissue with Differential-Aberration Two-Photon Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to superficial tissue damage, then the power density of the ballistic light near the surface can be so high and the ballistic light so weak that the power density of the ballistic light cannot compete at the beam focus can lead to significant power densities near the tissue surface. If the tissue

  8. Scanning thermoacoustic tomography in biological tissue Geng Ku and Lihong V. Wanga)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Scanning thermoacoustic tomography in biological tissue Geng Ku and Lihong V. Wanga) Optical-induced thermoacoustic tomography was explored to image biological tissue. Short microwave pulses irradiated tissue to generate acoustic waves by thermoelastic expansion. The microwave-induced thermoacoustic waves were

  9. The Evolution of Human Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gintis, Herbert; Doebeli, Michael; Flack, Jessica

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    684 Gintis, H. 2011. The Evolution of Human Cooperation.misunderstandings about cultural evolution. Human Nat. 19,Feldman, M. , 1981. Cultural Evolution. Princeton University

  10. Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

  11. Human Resource Management Delegation

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The notice is to clarifies and updates existing Human Resource Management Delegation Authorities and the levels to which they are delegated. Expired 6-28-97. Does not cancel any directives.

  12. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

  13. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

  14. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  15. New gel phantoms simulating optical properties of biological tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Mija

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . TABLE OF CONTENTS vt LIST OF FIGURES . CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. Tissue Optical Properties . . Beer's Law. Snell's Law Optical Fiber. Optical Parameters 1. 5. 1 N(r, s), 1. 5. 2 Radiance L(r, s). 1. 5. 3 Fluence Rate $( r) 1. 5. 4 Net Flux... reflection . . 3 Cross section of an optical fiber 4 Geometry used to depict the definition of radiance . . . . 5 Scattering of radiance 6 The preparation of the new phantom. 7 Schematic of experimental setup . 8 Phantom setup 9 Schematic of reiractive...

  16. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at higher magnetic fields. On the exit side there is mostly moderate to high skin dose increases for 0.2-3 T with the only exception being large positive angles. Exit bolus of 1 cm thickness will have a significant impact on lowering such exit skin dose increases that occur as a result of the ERE.

  17. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

  18. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States); Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 ?M) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1?, Il-1?, IL-6 and TNF? in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol at similar concentrations in vitro.

  19. Use of proton beams with breast prostheses and tissue expanders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyers, Michael F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.com [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Mah, Dennis; Boyer, Sean P.; Chang, Chang [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Pankuch, Mark [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Warrenville, IL (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 2000s, a small but rapidly increasing number of patients with breast cancer have been treated with proton beams. Some of these patients have had breast prostheses or tissue expanders in place during their courses of treatment. Procedures must be implemented to plan the treatments of these patients. The density, kilovoltage x-ray computed tomography numbers (kVXCTNs), and proton relative linear stopping powers (pRLSPs) were calculated and measured for several test sample devices. The calculated and measured kVXCTNs of saline were 1% and 2.4% higher than the values for distilled water while the calculated RLSP for saline was within 0.2% of the value for distilled water. The measured kVXCTN and pRLSP of the silicone filling material for the test samples were approximately 1120 and 0.935, respectively. The conversion of kVXCTNs to pRLSPs by the treatment planning system standard tissue conversion function is adequate for saline-filled devices but for silicone-filled devices manual reassignment of the pRLSPs is required.

  20. Regulation of biological tissue mineralization through post-nucleation shielding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua C. Chang; Robert M. Miura

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are present at high concentrations throughout body fluids -- at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this Letter, we use ideas from mean-field classical nucleation theory to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system.

  1. CONSTRUCTING VIRTUAL HUMAN LIFE SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallmann, Marcelo

    , Virtual Environments, Behavioral Animation, Object Interaction, Python. 1. INTRODUCTION Virtual humanCONSTRUCTING VIRTUAL HUMAN LIFE SIMULATIONS Marcelo Kallmann, Etienne de Sevin and Daniel Thalmann human life simulations. Our main goal is to have virtual human actors living and working autonomously

  2. Measurement of pressure-displacement kinetics of hemoglobin in normal breast tissue with near-infrared spectral imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Laughney, Ashley M.; Kogel, Christine A.; Paulsen, Keith D

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying localized external displacement to the breast surface can change the interstitial fluid pressure such that regional transient microvascular changes occur in oxygenation and vascular volume. Imaging these dynamic responses over time, while different pressures are applied, could provide selective temporal contrast for cancer relative to the surrounding normal breast. In order to investigate this possibility in normal breast tissue, a near-infrared spectral tomography system was developed that can simultaneously acquire data at three wavelengths with a 15 s time resolution per scan. The system was tested first with heterogeneous blood phantoms. Changes in regional blood concentrations were found to be linearly related to recovered mean hemoglobin concentration (HbT) values (R{sup 2}=0.9). In a series of volunteer breast imaging exams, data from 17 asymptomatic subjects were acquired under increasing and decreasing breast compression. Calculations show that a 10 mm displacement applied to the breast results in surface pressures in the range of 0-55 kPa depending on breast density. The recovered human data indicate that HbT was reduced under compression and the normalized change was significantly correlated to the applied pressure with a p value of 0.005. The maximum HbT decreases in breast tissue were associated with body mass index (BMI), which is a surrogate indicator of breast density. No statistically valid correlations were found between the applied pressure and the changes in tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) or water percentage (H2O) across the range of BMI values studied.

  3. Elevated levels of plasma Big endothelin-1 and its relation to hypertension and skin lesions in individuals exposed to arsenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Islam, Khairul; Yeasmin, Fouzia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Karim, Md. Rezaul [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mashiur; Agarwal, Smita; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Aziz, Abdul; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Sheikh, Afzal; Haque, Abedul; Hossain, M. Tofazzal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Hossain, Mostaque [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh)] [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh); Haris, Parvez I. [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)] [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Ikemura, Noriaki; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan); Hossain, Khaled, E-mail: khossain69@yahoo.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic arsenic (As) exposure affects the endothelial system causing several diseases. Big endothelin-1 (Big ET-1), the biological precursor of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a more accurate indicator of the degree of activation of the endothelial system. Effect of As exposure on the plasma Big ET-1 levels and its physiological implications have not yet been documented. We evaluated plasma Big ET-1 levels and their relation to hypertension and skin lesions in As exposed individuals in Bangladesh. A total of 304 study subjects from the As-endemic and non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited for this study. As concentrations in water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The plasma Big ET-1 levels were measured using a one-step sandwich enzyme immunoassay kit. Significant increase in Big ET-1 levels were observed with the increasing concentrations of As in drinking water, hair and nails. Further, before and after adjusting with different covariates, plasma Big ET-1 levels were found to be significantly associated with the water, hair and nail As concentrations of the study subjects. Big ET-1 levels were also higher in the higher exposure groups compared to the lowest (reference) group. Interestingly, we observed that Big ET-1 levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive and skin lesion groups compared to the normotensive and without skin lesion counterpart, respectively of the study subjects in As-endemic areas. Thus, this study demonstrated a novel dose–response relationship between As exposure and plasma Big ET-1 levels indicating the possible involvement of plasma Big ET-1 levels in As-induced hypertension and skin lesions. -- Highlights: ? Plasma Big ET-1 is an indicator of endothelial damage. ? Plasma Big ET-1 level increases dose-dependently in arsenic exposed individuals. ? Study subjects in arsenic-endemic areas with hypertension have elevated Big ET-1 levels. ? Study subjects with arsenic-induced skin lesions show elevated plasma Big ET-1 levels. ? Arsenic-induced hypertension and skin lesions may be linked to plasma Big ET-1 levels.

  4. Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Consultation on proposals to transfer functions from the Human Fertilisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Consultation on proposals Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Human Tissue Authority Response by the Wellcome Trust September. We do not regard this option as maintaining the status quo, but as a positive step towards regulatory

  5. CANDU human performance analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, I.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of human performance is presented in this paper in the context of the operational safety management system. To focus on problems, an experience review program has been developed to establish trends, demonstrate the degree of compliance with standards, and determine the causes of poor performance. The primary method by which the experience review takes place is significant event reporting (SER). A significant event is an incident that causes an undesirable effect on safety, product quality, environmental protection, or product cost. In spite of advanced technology and the degree of automation of the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) design, mistakes and malfunctions to occur. Considerable effort has been made to prevent or reduce the incidence of error. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations developed a system to analyze human error, called the Human Performance Evaluation System (HPES). To encourage an open exchange of information, the system is anonymous and nonpunitive. All data gathered during HPES evaluations are kept confidential.

  6. Human MSH2 protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    de la Chapelle, Albert (Helsingfors, FI); Vogelstein, Bert (Baltimore, MD); Kinzler, Kenneth W. (Baltimore, MD)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  7. Human MSH2 protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  8. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human Resources

  9. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human Resources

  10. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human

  11. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human print

  12. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human

  13. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources HumanAppraisal

  14. Vacuum Energy and Casimir Force in a Presence of Skin-depth Dependent Boundary Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. L. Lebedev

    2000-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum energy-momentum tensor (EMT) and the vacuum energy corresponding to massive scalar field on $\\Re_{t}\\times [0,l] \\times \\Re^{D-2}$ space-time with boundary condition involving a dimensional parameter ($\\delta$) are found. The dependent on the cavity size $l$ Casimir energy $\\wt E_{C}$ is a uniquely determinable function of mass $m$, size $l$ and "skin-depth" $\\delta$. This energy includes the "bulk" and the surface (potential energy) contributions. The latter dominates when $l \\sim \\delta$. Taking the surface potential energy into account is crucial for the coincidence between the derivative $-\\d \\wt E_{C}/\\d l$ and the $ll$-component of the vacuum EMT. Casimir energy $\\wt E_C$ and the bulk contribution to it are interconnected through Legendre transformation, in which the quantity $\\delta^{-1}$ is conjugate to the vacuum surface energy multiplied by $\\delta$. The surface singularities of the vacuum EMT do not depend on $l$ and, for even $D$, $\\delta =0$ or $\\infty$, possess finite interpretation. The corresponding vacuum energy is finite and retains known analytical dependence on the dimension $D$.

  15. Magnetic reconnection on the ion-skin-depth scale in the dusty magnetotail of a comet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K.; Morfill, G. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistive magnetic reconnection is studied in a dusty plasma configuration without a guide magnetic field, typical for cometary tails. For a high-{beta} plasma ({beta}{approx}1) consisting of electrons, ions, and immobile dust grains that constitute a neutralizing background, a two-fluid description is used to study electromagnetic perturbations with the frequency below the ion gyrofrequency, propagating at an arbitrary angle relative to the background magnetic field and including the effects of the Hall current. The perturbations consist of both the compressional and torsional components of the magnetic field, as well as of the acoustic perturbations and the electrostatic potential. The symmetry breaking between electrons and ions, introduced by the presence of dust grains, gives rise to an E-vectorxB-vector current in the unperturbed state which can support an antiparallel magnetic field configuration even in a cold plasma. In the perturbed state, the emergence of a new electromagnetic mode in a dusty plasma, which is evanescent below the Rao cutoff frequency and has the characteristic wavelength comparable to the ion skin depth, enables the reconnection at short spatial scales. The growth rate of the tearing instability is evaluated analytically.

  16. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ?{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ?{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, ?{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p?=?1.

  17. Thermal alteration of collagenous tissue subjected to biaxial isometric constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Paul B.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    facing down, and the mounting rods were placed in the device load carriages. 14 Load Cells Tissue Fluid Chamber Motor Constrained Region Unconstrained Region Figure 2.3 Top view diagram of the biaxial testing system. The chamber is constructed of 0.5 inch... isometric tests heated in glycerol and saline??... Page 38 58 87 104 106 109 127 129 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Myocardium was carefully peeled from the epicardium, yielding a clean, undamaged...

  18. An exploratory study of heart rate, respiration, and galvanic skin response as they relate to affective rating of recorded music

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruner, Gordon Carl

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that because of the autonomic equilibrium maintained in the body, it is impossible to stimulate a system, no matter how mildly, without some evidence of the disturbance being produced. So the question faced by the researcher was not whether the body... of autonomic reactivity (heart rate, respiration, and galvanic skin response) and the level at which a person rated a song. Further, the main product of the study is a statement oi some of the salient issues and factors involved in the testing...

  19. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop ...

  20. Automated algorithm for differentiation of human breast tissue using low coherence interferometry for fine needle aspiration biopsy guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iftimia, Nicusor V.

    Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a rapid and cost-effective method for obtaining a first-line diagnosis of a palpable mass of the breast. However, because it can be difficult to manually discriminate between adipose ...

  1. Human Processing (Position Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Edward Y.

    and describe remaining challenges in the area (Section 6). 2. MOTIVATING EXAMPLE "Priam," the editor below, we explain how Priam might go about accomplishing this task. Figure 1: Basic Buyer human. The programmer (Priam) writes a normal program. 2. That program can, in the course of execution, create HTML

  2. CATHETER SURFACE INTERACTIONS WITH HUMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müftü, Sinan

    and Porosity positively impacts lubricity and reduces tissue trauma. Con: Hydrogel tends to delaminate due of Polyurethane Catheter (uncoated) Polyurethane coated with Poly (MCP-co- BMA) polymer Test enviroments: Vacuum

  3. The effect of Stromal cell Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) and collagen-GAG (Glycosaminoglycan) scaffold on skin wound healing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Aparajita

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wound healing is an intricate biological process requiring the appropriate balance of matrix and growth factors. Apart from causing physical deformity, adult wound healing results in the formation of scar tissue, which can ...

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Cell-Responsive Biodegradable Polyureas for Ligament Tissue Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Nicholas

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ,54 Finally, the Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device (LAD) is a cylindrical prosthesis with a diamond-braided construction, and it was designed for simultaneous implantation with a biologic graft to augment the tissue and protect it during the early stages... majority of the physiological load is borne by the prosthesis, effectively stress shielding the surrounding tissue.4,9,57,58 Without proper mechanical cues to direct collagen alignment and tissue organization, the load-bearing capacity of the native...

  5. Brain Tissue Depth (mm) LightPowerDensity(mW/mm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Mark

    Brain Tissue Depth (mm) LightPowerDensity(mW/mm2 ) Power Meter Tissue block Bare Fiber = 12° = 6 with the beveled cannula over CeA. d) Chart indicating estimated light power density seen at various distances from the fiber tip in mouse brain tissue when the light power density seen at the fiber tip was 7 mW (~99 mW/mm2

  6. Policy on Human Subjects Research Policy on Human Subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Human Subjects Research 10/15/2014 Policy on Human Subjects Research I. Purpose and Scope requirements that the rights and welfare of human subjects receive adequate protection. This policy applies, except that research conducted or assigned as part of their coursework is governed by the Policy

  7. adipose tissue stromal-vascular: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study investigates the potential anti-inflammatory effects of in vivo oxytocin (OT) infusion on adipose tissue inflammation in the Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidimic Rabbits...

  8. Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for tissue engineering from amino alcohol-based poly(ester amide) elastomers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jane

    Biodegradable polymers with high mechanical strength, flexibility and optical transparency, optimal degradation properties and biocompatibility are critical to the success of tissue engineered devices and drug delivery ...

  9. Manipulation of lignin composition in plants using a tissue-specific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manipulation of lignin composition in plants using a tissue-specific promoter Re-direct Destination: The present invention relates to methods and materials in the field of...

  10. DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS FOR INFINITE DOUBLE-POROSITY SYSTEMS WITHOUT WELLBORE SKIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sageev, A.; Da Prat, G.; Ramey Jr., H.J.

    1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a transient pressure analysis method for analyzing the rate decline of a constant pressure well producing in an infinite double-porosity reservoir, without wellbore skin. This analysis method may be used to interpret well test rate data, and to compute the rate behavior of an infinitely acting reservoir that is being produced at constant pressure. The development of the pseudo steady state log-log type curve Is presented along with a hypothetical example of its use. This type curve allows the estimation of the two controlling parameters in double-porosity systems: {lambda} and {omega}. The first parameter, {lambda}, describes the interporosity flow, and the second parameter, {omega} describes the relative fracture storativity. This paper considers the estimation of these two parameters. The estimations of permeabilities and storativities have been described in the past, hence, are not considered. In a double-porosity system, with pseudo steady state interporosity flow, the initial infinite acting rate decline, representing only the fracture system, is followed by a constant rate flow period. The length of this constant rate flow period is controlled by the parameter {omega}. The beginning of this period is controlled by the interporosity flow parameter, {lambda}. Following this constant rate period, the rate resumes an infinite homogeneous decline, representing the total system, fractures and matrix. The parameters {lambda} and {omega} may be estimated from a log-log match of rate data to the type curve. A comparison between rate responses of two transient flowing matrices and the pseudo steady state matrix Is presented. Transient interporosity flow allows the matrix to increase the well flowrate in the early and transition portions of the flow. The final decline, representing the total system, is identical to the decline with a pseudo steady state matrix.

  11. Effects of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} on human melanocytes and regulation of the FP receptor by ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Glynis [Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Box 697, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)]. E-mail: Glynis_Scott@urmc.rochester.edu; Jacobs, Stacey [Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Box 697, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Leopardi, Sonya [Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Box 697, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Anthony, Frank A. [Schering-Plough HealthCare Products Inc., Memphis TN (United States); Learn, Doug [Charles River DDS, Argus Division, Horsham, PA (United States); Malaviya, Rama [University of Medicine and Dentistry, RWJMS, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Pentland, Alice [Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Box 697, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prostaglandins are potent lipid hormones that activate multiple signaling pathways resulting in regulation of cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the skin, prostaglandins are rapidly released by keratinocytes following ultraviolet radiation and are chronically present in inflammatory skin lesions. We have shown previously that melanocytes, which provide photoprotection to keratinocytes through the production of melanin, express several receptors for prostaglandins, including the PGE{sub 2} receptors EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} and the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor FP, and that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates melanocyte dendricity. We now show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates the activity and expression of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. Analysis of FP receptor regulation showed that the FP receptor is regulated by ultraviolet radiation in melanocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. We also show that ultraviolet irradiation stimulates production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} by melanocytes. These results show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} binding to the FP receptor activates signals that stimulate a differentiated phenotype (dendricity and pigmentation) in melanocytes. The regulation of the FP receptor and the stimulation of production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} in melanocytes in response to ultraviolet radiation suggest that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} could act as an autocrine factor for melanocyte differentiation.

  12. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  13. Lung tissue engineering : in vitro synthesis of lung tissue from neonatal and fetal rat lung cells cultured in a three-dimensional collagen matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Patty P., 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this study was to investigate the histology of tissue formed when fetal (16-20 days gestation) and neonatal (2 days old) rat lung cells were grown in a collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold. This project employed ...

  14. Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selection, to a human experiment that employed pretraining (group (white) in human experiment by Beckers et al. (2005).set used for the human experiments, we increased the

  15. Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongjing Lu; Randall R. Rojas; Tom Beckers; Alan Yuille

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selection, to a human experiment that employed pretraining (group (white) in human experiment by Beckers et al. (2005).set used for the human experiments, we increased the

  16. Human Capital Management Accountability Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements, roles and responsibilities for the Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) for human resources programs and personnel and ensures that human capital activities are regulatory and procedurally compliant with Federal statutes and Departmental policies. Does not cancel other directives.

  17. Understanding Human Experience Henry Kautz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kautz, Henry

    Understanding Human Experience Henry Kautz One of the earliest goals of research in artificial intelligence was to create systems that can interpret and understand day to day human experience. Early work on the goal of building systems that understand human experience. Each of the previous barriers is weakened

  18. Probing embryonic tissue mechanics with laser hole-drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Scully, Peter C; Hutson, M Shane

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used laser hole-drilling to assess mechanical changes in an embryonic epithelium during development - in vivo and with subcellular resolution. This method uses a single laser pulse to ablate a cylindrical hole (1 micron in diameter, 5-7 micron tall) clean through the epithelium, and tracks the subsequent recoil of adjacent cells (with ms time resolution). We investigate dorsal closure in the fruit fly with emphasis on apical constriction of amnioserosa cells. We find that substantial in-plane tension is carried across each cell surface and not just along cell-cell interfaces. In early phases of constriction, the tension is 1.6-fold greater along cell-cell interfaces. Later, the two tensions are indistinguishable. Other changes associated with constriction include a decrease in the characteristic recoil times and an increased anisotropy. The smaller time constants imply a more solid-like tissue. The anisotropy matches changes in the underlying quasi-hexagonal cellular mesh. The results of these laser h...

  19. Tissue phantom ratios for a Clinac 4/100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, P.J.; Doppke, K.P.; Leong, J.C.; Russell, M.D.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue phantom ratios (TPR), based on a normalization depth of 5 cm, have been measured in water for field sizes from 5 x 5 cm/sup 2/ to approximately 40 x 40 cm/sup 2/ and for depths from 1 to 40 cm for a Varian Clinac 4/100. These TPR's have been compared with those calculated from percent depth doses measured at the same time, and the two sets of data generally agree to better than 1%, with an average ratio of measured to calculated TPR of 0.999 +- 0.013. Beam profiles have been measured for open and wedged fields, with particular concern for the often observed ''horns,'' or the increase in dose at the corners of the field. The maximum dose at a depth of 1 cm, along the diagonal of the field for this machine, is approximately 5% higher than at the same depth on the central axis, whereas along the principal plane the maximum dose is only about 3% higher.

  20. Expression of human cytokines dramatically improves reconstitution of specific human-blood lineage cells in humanized mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingfeng

    Adoptive transfer of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) into mice lacking T, B and natural killer (NK) cells leads to development of human-blood lineage cells in the recipient mice (humanized mice). Although human B ...