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1

The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-?, IL-2, MIP-1?, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-?, MIP-1?, TNF ?, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1?, IL-8, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Metabolomic Response of Human Skin Tissue to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding how human organs respond to ionizing radiation (IR) at a systems biology level and identifying biomarkers for IR exposure at low doses can help provide a scientific basis for establishing radiation protection standards. Little is known regarding the physiological responses to low dose IR at the metabolite level, which represents the end-point of biochemical processes inside cells. Using a full thickness human skin tissue model and GC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we examined the metabolic perturbations at three time points (3, 24 and 48 hr) after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. PLS-DA score plots revealed dose- and time-dependent clustering between sham and irradiated groups. Importantly, a comparable number of metabolites were detected to have significant change 48 hr after exposure to 3 and 10 cGy of irradiation, when compared with the high dose of 200 cGy. Biochemical pathway analysis showed perturbations to DNA/RNA damage and repair, lipid and energy metabolisms, even at low doses of IR.

Hu, Zeping; Kim, Young-Mo; Sowa, Marianne B.; Robinson, Robert J.; Gao, Xiaoli; Metz, Thomas O.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

3

Computational aspects in numerical simulation of skin tissues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present some computational aspects in numerical simulation of the human skin tissue. A multi-layered model is considered for the skin tissue with emphasis on the mathematical modelling and numerical models in space 2D and ... Keywords: biothermomechanics, coupled problems, finite element method, numerical methods, skin tissue, thermal systems

Iulia Maria Cârstea; Ion Cârstea

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Appearance of Human Skin: A Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin is the outer-most tissue of the human body. As a result, people are very aware of, and very sensitive to, the appearance of their skin. Consequently, skin appearance has been a subject of great interest in various fields of science and technology. ...

Takanori Igarashi; Ko Nishino; Shree K. Nayar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tumors of the skin and soft tissues  

SciTech Connect

The majority of the body surface is covered by the skin. Many internal disorders are reflected in the condition of the skin. One of the major functions of the skin is protection of the other organ systems from a variety of environmental insults. In this role, the skin itself is exposed to factors that can ultimately cause chronic diseases and cancer. Since it is relatively easy to recognize skin abnormalities, most skin cancers are brought to professional attention sooner than other types of cancer. However, due to the close resemblance between many skin neoplasms and noncancerous dermatologic disorders, these neoplasms may be mistreated for months or even years. In veterinary oncology, as in human medicine, most cancers can be effectively treated or cured following an accurate diagnosis. Once diagnosed, skin neoplasms should be aggressively treated. If causal factors are known, exposure to these factors should be limited through removal of the agent (for chemical carcinogens) or limiting exposure to the agent (for other carcinogens such as sunlight). 10 tabs. (MHB)

Weller, R.E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

7

Numerical simulation of thermal response of the skin tissues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to develop a numerical model for the simulation the heat transfer process and the heat-induced mechanical response of the skin tissues. We present some models using the finite element method in 2D space. A multilayer model is ... Keywords: biothermomechanics, coupled problems, finite element method, numerical methods, skin tissue, thermal systems

Iulia Maria Cârstea; Ion Cârstea

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model John Miller 1 , Seema Varma 1 , William Chrisler 2 , Xihai Wang 2 and Marianne Sowa 2 1 Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, WA 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA Monte Carlo simulations of electrons stopping in liquid water are being used to model electron- beam irradiation of the full-thickness (FT) EpiDerm TM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes from a dermal layer of fibroblasts embedded in collagen. The simulations have shown the feasibility of exposing the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer (Miller et al. 2011). The variable-

9

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model John Miller Washington State University Tri-Cities Abstract Monte Carlo simulations of electrons stopping in liquid water are being used to model electronbeam irradiation of the full-thickness (FT) EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes from a dermal layer of fibroblasts embedded in collagen. The simulations have shown the feasibility of exposing the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer (Miller et al. 2011). The variableenergy electron microbeam at PNNL (Sowa et al. 2005) was used as a model of device characteristics and

10

In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin  

SciTech Connect

Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flow-through diffusion cells, and radiolabeled bifenthrin, deltamethrin or cis-permethrin was applied in acetone to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid were collected every 4 h. At 24 h, the skins were washed with soap and water to remove unabsorbed chemical. The skin was then solubilized. Two additional experiments were performed after washing the skin; the first was tape-stripping the skin and the second was the collection of receptor fluid for an additional 24 h. Receptor fluid, skin washes, tape strips and skin were analyzed for radioactivity. For rat skin, the wash removed 53-71% of the dose and 26-43% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid ranged from 1 to 5%. For human skin, the wash removed 71-83% of the dose and 14-25% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid was 1-2%. Tape-stripping removed 50-56% and 79-95% of the dose in rat and human skin, respectively, after the wash. From 24-48 h, 1-3% and about 1% of the dose diffused into the receptor fluid of rat and human skin, respectively. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin penetrated rat and human skin following dermal application in vitro. However, a skin wash removed 50% or more of the dose from rat and human skin. Rat skin was more permeable to the pyrethroids than human skin. Of the dose in skin, 50% or more was removed by tape-stripping, suggesting that permeation of pyrethroids into viable tissue could be impeded. The percentage of the dose absorbed into the receptor fluid was considerably less than the dose in rat and human skin. Therefore, consideration of the skin type used and fractions analyzed are important when using in vitro dermal absorption data for risk assessment.

Hughes, Michael F., E-mail: hughes.michaelf@epa.go [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Edwards, Brenda C. [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Low dose and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model Sally A. Amundson Columbia University Medical Center Abstract Significant structural abnormalities develop within several days of exposure of the 3-dimensional normal human skin tissue model EPI-200 (MatTek) to high or low doses of low LET radiation. Disruption of the basal layer occurs following high radiation doses, and premature cornification is evident after both high and low dose exposures. In bystander tissue that is near irradiated portions of the tissue, but is not itself irradiated, we also observe premature cornification, increased apoptosis and micronucleus formation. Changes in global gene expression also occur in both directly irradiated and bystander EPI-200 tissue. Although the unfolding over time

12

Low dose and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model. and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model. Sally A. Amundson and Alexandre Mezentsev Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Radiological Research, New York, NY 10032 Significant structural abnormalities develop within several days of exposure of the 3-dimensional normal human skin tissue model EPI-200 (MatTek) to high or low doses of low LET radiation. Disruption of the basal layer occurs following high radiation doses, and premature cornification is evident after both high and low dose exposures. In bystander tissue that is near irradiated portions of the tissue, but is not itself irradiated, we also observe premature cornification, increased apoptosis and micronucleus formation. Changes in global gene expression also occur

13

Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

14

The tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma  

SciTech Connect

During the last ten years at the National Cancer Institute, 11 patients have received 12 courses of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy to skin grafts used for wound closure after the resection of soft-tissue sarcomas. The intervals between grafting and the initiation of radiation ranged between 3 and 20 weeks, and 4 patients received chemotherapy at the same time as their radiation. Ten of the 12 irradiated grafts remained intact after the completion of therapy. One graft had several small persistently ulcerated areas that required no further surgical treatment, and one graft required a musculocutaneous flap for reconstruction of a persistent large ulcer. Acute radiation effects on the grafted skin sometimes developed at slightly lower doses than usually seen with normal skin, but these acute effects necessitated a break in therapy on only five occasions. Concurrent chemotherapy and a relatively short interval between grafting and the initiation of radiation seemed to contribute to more severe radiation reactions. This experience indicates that postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy can be delivered to skin grafted areas without undue fear of complications, especially if the graft is allowed to heal adequately prior to initiating therapy and if chemotherapy is not given in conjunction with radiation.

Lawrence, W.T.; Zabell, A.; McDonald, H.D. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

16

Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

“Humanized” mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury ...

Thomas, David K.

17

Regulation of Annexin A2 by Ionizing Radiation in Human Skin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annexin A2 by Ionizing Radiation in Human Skin Equivalent Culture: Does A Nuclear Annexin A2-Protein Kinase C Epsilon Complex Contribute To Reduced Cancer Risks At Low Dose...

18

Regulation of Annexin A2 by Ionizing Radiation in Human Skin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Annexin A2 by Ionizing Radiation in Human Skin Equivalent Culture: Does A Nuclear Annexin A2-Protein Kinase C Epsilon Complex Contribute To Reduced Cancer Risks At Low...

19

Sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissue, based upon the ratio of telomeric to centromeric DNA present in the tissue.

Bryant, Jennifer E. (Albuquerque, NM); Hutchings, Kent G. (Albuquerque, NM); Moyzis, Robert K. (Corona Del Mar, CA); Griffith, Jeffrey K. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

20

Identification of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin Feng Yang, Katrina M. Waters, Bobbie-Jo Webb-Robertson, Lye-Meng Markillie, Rachel M. Wirgau, Shawna M. Hengel, Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, and David L. Stenoien. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Our focus has been on identifying the early events that occur after low dose ionizing radiation exposure that precede and often regulate downstream events such as altered transcription, protein secretion and epigenetic regulation. Phosphorylation is one of the earliest detectible events that occurs following radiation exposure and plays important roles in multiple biological pathways including DNA damage repair, transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. Very robust

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF NORMAL HUMAN TISSUE FROM SEATTLE AND TACOMA, WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Data are tabulated on the chemica1 content of human tissue as determined by spectrographic analysis. (C.H.)

Tipton, I.H.; Cook, M.J.; Foland, J.M.; Rittner, J.; Hardwick, M.; McDaniel, K.K.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Skin melanin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin melanin Skin melanin Name: Janae Lepir Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How does the skin produce melanin? Replies: There are special cells in the skin called melanocytes. They synthesize melanin from an amino acid, tyrosine. (Amino acids make up proteins; there are about 20 different ones). Melanocytes can be stimulated by a hormone in the pituitary gland called melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH). I don't know how much biology you've had, but melanocytes are derived from an interesting embryonic tissue called the neural crest, which also gives rise to a lot of different types of neurons, so embryologically melanocytes are related to neurons. If melanocytes become malignant, it becomes a very bad form of cancer, called melanoma (often called "skin cancer", although there are other forms of skin cancer).

23

Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Halin, Cornelia [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: cornelia.halin@pharma.ethz.ch

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adipose) tissue from [72]. Data set 61 consists of humanheart tissue from [27]. Data set 62 consists of kidney (tissue from TCGA (KIRC). Data set 63 consists of liver (

Horvath, Steve

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This research discloses a sensitive method for measurement of telomeric DNA content in human tissue, based upon the ratio of telomeric to centromeric DNA present in the tissue. 5 figs.

Bryant, J.E.; Hutchings, K.G.; Moyzis, R.K.; Griffith, J.K.

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

26

Automatic segmentation of human facial tissue by MRI-CT fusion: A feasibility study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to develop automatic image segmentation methods to segment human facial tissue which contains very thin anatomic structures. The segmentation output can be used to construct a more realistic human face model for a variety of ... Keywords: Bayesian, Data fusion, Human facial tissue, Level Sets, Medical image segmentation, Partial volume

Emre H. Kale; Erkan U. Mumcuoglu; Salih Hamcan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Skin Evolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin Evolution Skin Evolution Name: Olga Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do you think it is possible that our ancestors were actually black, and that a gene mutation for an enzyme in the metabollic pathway of melanin meant that not enough melanin was produced some of us ended up with white skin. Primitive apes have black skin, and we evolved from them, so doesn't this mean that humans orginally had black skin??? Replies: Most likely, yes, humans probably evolved from dark-skinned ancestors. I will take issue, however, with your statement that "primitive apes have black skin;" we can't say that for absolute certain, because we have no primitive apes to compare to. All we have now are modern apes. All modern apes - homo sapiens, pan troglodytes, gorilla gorilla - are highly, probably equally, evolved. (One could make an argument that homo sapiens is in many ways more generalized - note the generalized dentition, fragile skeleton, etc. - than other modern apes, and thus could be said to be more primitive.) As far as that goes, the only modern apes with white skin I know of are a color variant of homo sapiens.

28

Mechanical and biochemical properties of human cervical tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanical integrity of cervical tissue is crucial for maintaining a healthy gestation. Altered tissue biochemistry can cause drastic changes in the mechanical properties of the cervix and contribute to premature ...

Myers, Kristin M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013  

SciTech Connect

During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

Rocke, David M. [University of California Davis

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

30

Light interaction with human skin: from believable images to predictable models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research efforts in image synthesis have been directed toward the rendering of believable and predictable images of biological materials. This course addresses an important topic in this area, namely the predictive simulation of skin's appearance. ...

Gladimir V. G. Baranoski; Aravind Krishnaswamy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

384 THE SEX CHROMATIN IN HUMAN MALIGNANT TISSUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A SEXUAL dimorphism in resting nuclei has been described for man and monkey among the primates, and for several species of the orders Carnivora and Artiodactyla. It is based on the presence of a special chromocentre, known as the sex chromatin, in the nuclei of females. Graham and Barr (1952) suggested that the sex chromatin may represent heterochromatic regions of the two X-chromosomes that adhere to each other. This hypothesis is strengthened by the meticulous study of chromocentres in epidermal cell nuclei by Sachs and Danon (1956). The literature pertaining to the sex chromatin and its clinical application in anomalies of sex development has been ably reviewed by Lennox (1956), Davidson and Smith (1956) and Nelson (1956). Several reports have appeared that deal with the sex chromatin of tumour cells and these will be referred to later in the paper. The observations recorded in the present report are a sequel to the study of sex characteristics in nuclei of benign tumours, where the nuclei were found to be like those of normal tissues (Moore and Barr, 1955).

K. L. Moore; M. L. Barr

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Transcription of Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Atria1 Natriuretic Peptide Genes in Human Tissues*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have compared the expression of atria1 natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) genes in various human tissues using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction technique. Tissues of three human subjects, obtained at autopsy, were analyzed. BNP transcripts could be detected in the central nervous system, lung, thyroid, adrenal, kidney, spleen, small intestine, ovary, uterus, and striated muscle. ANP transcripts could also be demonstrated in various human extracardiac tissues including several endocrine organs. In all periph-HE CARDIAC hormones atria1 natriuretic peptide (ANP) T and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exhibit similar pharmacological profiles, such as natriuresis and smooth muscle relaxation (1). Along with these common properties there are striking dissimilarities: Whereas the structure of ANP is highly conserved among different species, there is considerable

Alexander L. Gerbest; Lina Dagninos; Than Nguyen; Mona Nemerll

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Photochemical tissue bonding  

SciTech Connect

Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

Redmond, Robert W. (Brookline, MA); Kochevar, Irene E. (Charlestown, MA)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 6 Raman Detection of Carotenoids in Human Tissue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 6 Raman Detection of Carotenoids in Human Tissue Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloa

36

Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

Timper, Katharina [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Seboek, Dalma [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Eberhardt, Michael [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Linscheid, Philippe [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam [Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Keller, Ulrich [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller, Beat [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Zulewski, Henryk [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland) and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Healthy and Cancerous Human Tissues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Healthy and Cancerous Human Tissues Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 2526793B0420777596C5A5

38

Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Skin flicks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The written and artistic part of this thesis are both separated into the two categories of "SKIN" and "FLICKS". The Artistic part of my thesis consists of five artificial skins made on my body, and a series of video tapes ...

Orth, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann), 1964-

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations in the mean compositions of tissues affect low energy brachytherapy dosimetry. Dose differences between mean and one standard deviation of the mean composition increasing with distance from the source are observed. It is established that the {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs sources are the least sensitive to variations in elemental compositions while {sup 103}Pd is most sensitive. The EBS falls in between and exhibits complex behavior due to significant spectral hardening. Results from simulation (2) show that two prostate compositions are dosimetrically equivalent to water while the third shows D{sub 90} differences of up to 4%. Results from simulation (3) show that breast is more sensitive than prostate with dose variations of up to 30% from water for 70% adipose/30% gland breast. The variability of the breast composition adds a {+-}10% dose variation. Conclusions: Low energy brachytherapy dose distributions in tissue differ from water and are influenced by density, mean tissue composition, and patient-to-patient composition variations. The results support the use of a dose calculation algorithm accounting for heterogeneities such as MC. Since this work shows that variations in mean tissue compositions affect MC dosimetry and result in increased dose uncertainties, the authors conclude that imaging tools providing more accurate estimates of elemental compositions such as dual energy CT would be beneficial.

Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l'Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.  

SciTech Connect

To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

42

Chip-Based Comparison of the Osteogenesis of Human Bone Marrow- and Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Mechanical Stimulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are considered as an attractive stem cell source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We compared human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and hASCs ...

Park, Sang-Hyug

43

Action Spectra for Human Skin Cells: Estimates of the Relative Cytotoxicity of the Middle Ultraviolet, Near Ultraviolet, and Violet Regions of Sunlight on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Action spectra for the cytotoxic action of electromagnetic radiation in the solar range 280-434 nm have been determined for human fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes derived from the same foreskin biopsy. The spectra for the two cell types are close to identical and coincide with our previously published data for a human lymphoblastoid line indicating that the mechanism of inactivation of the three human cell types is similar at any given wavelength. Using published data for ultraviolet transmission of human skin and sample spectral irradiarÃa'data, we have estimated the relative biological effectiveness of the middle ultraviolet (UVB) (290-320 nm), near ultraviolet (UVA) (320-380 nm), and violet (380-434 nm) regions of sunlight for cytotoxicity at the basal layer of the epidermis. We conclude that the UVB component in noon summer sunlight (the most UVB rich spectral conditions tested) may contribute only about 40 % of the total cytotoxic effectiveness of sunlight at 290-

Rex M. Tyrrell; Mireille Pidoux; Cancer Res; Contact The Aacr Publications; Epidermal Keratinocytes; Rex M. Tyrrell; Mireille Pidoux

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Skin contamination dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR); Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Cazalas, Edward (Corvallis, OR)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

Received: 5 March 2010, Revised: 30 March 2010, Accepted: 31 March 2010, Published online in Wiley Online Library: 30 July 2010 Quantification of human body fat tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Online Library: 30 July 2010 Quantification of human body fat tissue percentage by MRI Hans-Peter Mu for the determination of the volumes of subcutaneous fat tissue (SFT) and visceral fat tissue (VFT) in either the whole distributions, as well as fat distributions of defined body slices, were analysed in detail. Complete three

Neumann, Heiko

46

Received: 5 March 2010, Revised: 30 March 2010, Accepted: 31 March 2010, Published online in Wiley InterScience: 2010 Quantification of human body fat tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InterScience: 2010 Quantification of human body fat tissue percentage by MRI Hans-Peter Mu for the determination of the volumes of subcutaneous fat tissue (SFT) and visceral fat tissue (VFT) in either the whole distributions, as well as fat distributions of defined body slices, were analysed in detail. Complete three

Neumann, Heiko

47

An investigation of the structure-function relationship in human cervical tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cervix plays a crucial role in maintaining a healthy pregnancy, acting as a mechanical barrier to hold the fetus inside the uterus during gestation. Altered biochemical and mechanical properties of the cervical tissue ...

Myers, Kristin M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Design of a thermal diffusion sensor for noninvasive assessment of skin surface perfusion and endothelial dysfunction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The skin microcirculation performs a range of vital functions, such as maintaining nutritional perfusion to the tissues and overall thermoregulation. Not only does impairment to the skin blood supply lead to tissue necrosis ...

Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

National Human Radiobiological Tissue Repository (NHRTR) at the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The NHRTR, one component of the USTUR, contains frozen tissues, tissue solutions, microscope slides, and paraffin blocks that were collected by the USTUR at the autopsy of workers with documented intakes of plutonium, americium, uranium, and thorium. The samples are available to qualified scientists for further research. Thousands of frozen, ashed, dried, and plastic embedded bone samples from the radium studies carried out by Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the New Jersey Radium Research Project are available and linked by case number to de-identified, published case data. These data include the person's source of exposure (dial painter, therapeutic injection, etc.), estimated body burden, radiochemical results, and medical history. Other samples, including organs and whole body donations, have come from volunteer donors who were impacted by elements such as plutonium, throium, etc. See the USTUR website for information on how to apply for research samples or how to become a volunteer donor. [Information taken from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/NHRTR/index.html#

50

United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: A human tissue research program. USTUR annual report for October 1, 1997 through January 31, 1999  

SciTech Connect

The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) are a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This annual report covers October 1, 1997, through January 31, 1999; the reporting period has been extended so that future annual reports will coincide with the period covered by the grant itself.

Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Integrated Experimental and Computational Approach to Understand the Effects of Heavy Ion Radiation on Skin Homeostasis.  

SciTech Connect

The effects of low dose high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on human health are of concern for both space and clinical exposures. As epidemiological data for such radiation exposures are scarce for making relevant predictions, we need to understand the mechanism of response especially in normal tissues. Our objective here is to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on tissue homeostasis in a realistic model system. Towards this end, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional skin equivalent to low fluences of Neon (Ne) ions (300 MeV/u), and determined the differentiation profile as a function of time following exposure using immunohistochemistry. We found that Ne ion exposures resulted in transient increases in the tissue regions expressing the differentiation markers keratin 10, and filaggrin, and more subtle time-dependent effects on the number of basal cells in the epidermis. We analyzed the data using a mathematical model of the skin equivalent, to quantify the effect of radiation on cell proliferation and differentiation. The agent-based mathematical model for the epidermal layer treats the epidermis as a collection of heterogeneous cell types with different proliferation/differentiation properties. We obtained model parameters from the literature where available, and calibrated the unknown parameters to match the observed properties in unirradiated skin. We then used the model to rigorously examine alternate hypotheses regarding the effects of high LET radiation on the tissue. Our analysis indicates that Ne ion exposures induce rapid, but transient, changes in cell division, differentiation and proliferation. We have validated the modeling results by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The integrated approach presented here can be used as a general framework to understand the responses of multicellular systems, and can be adapted to other epithelial tissues.

von Neubeck, Claere; Shankaran, Harish; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Robert J.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

52

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

CXCR6, a Newly Defined Biomarker of Tissue-Specific Stem Cell Asymmetric Self-Renewal, Identifies More Aggressive Human Melanoma Cancer Stem Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: A fundamental problem in cancer research is identifying the cell type that is capable of sustaining neoplastic growth and its origin from normal tissue cells. Recent investigations of a variety of tumor types have shown that phenotypically identifiable and isolable subfractions of cells possess the tumor-forming ability. In the present paper, using two lineage-related human melanoma cell lines, primary melanoma line IGR39 and its metastatic derivative line IGR37, two main observations are reported. The first one is the first phenotypic evidence to support the origin of melanoma cancer stem cells (CSCs) from mutated tissue-specific stem cells; and the second one is the identification of a more aggressive subpopulation of CSCs in melanoma that are CXCR6+. Conclusions/Significance: The association of a more aggressive tumor phenotype with asymmetric self-renewal phenotype reveals a previously unrecognized aspect of tumor cell physiology. Namely, the retention of some tissue-specific stem cell attributes, like the ability to asymmetrically self-renew, impacts the natural history of human tumor development. Knowledge of this new aspect of tumor development and progression may provide new targets for cancer prevention and treatment.

Rouzbeh Taghizadeh; Minsoo Noh; Yang Hoon Huh; Emilio Ciusani; Luca Sigalotti; Michele Maio; Beatrice Arosio; Maria R. Nicotra; PierGiorgio Natali; James L. Sherley; Caterina A. M. La Porta

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Skin supersolidity slipperizing ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consistency between theory predictions and measurements and calculations revealed that the skin of ice, containing water molecules with fewer than four neighbours, forms a supersolid phase that is highly polarized, elastic, hydrophobic, with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice.

Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

55

Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation at all human imprinted regions reveals preservation of epigenetic stability in adult somatic tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRAS3 (1) 60 80 100 at io n DIRAS3 (2) 60 80 100 at io n Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te Bl 0 20 40 % M et hy la Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te Bl 0 20 40 % M et hy la Tissue Tissue DIRAS3 (3) 100 ZDBF2 80 100 20 40 60 80 % M et hy la tio n 20 40 60 % M et hy... at io n SLC22A1 60 80 100 yl at io n Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te 0 20 40 Ti % M et hy Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te 0 20 40 Ti % M et hy ssue ssue SLC22A3 80 100 MEST (s) 80 100 20 40 60 % M et hy la tio n 20 40 60 % M et hy la tio n Bn Bt Co He Ki Li Pl Te 0...

Woodfine, Kathryn; Huddleston, Joanna E; Murrell, Adele

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Biodiversity of Borrelia burgdorferi Strains in Tissues of Lyme Disease Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant and animal biodiversity are essential to ecosystem health and can provide benefits to humans ranging from aesthetics to maintaining air quality. Although the importance of biodiversity to ecology and conservation biology is obvious, such measures have not been applied to strains of an invasive bacterium found in human tissues during infection. In this study, we compared the strain biodiversity of Borrelia burgdorferi found in tick populations with that found in skin, blood, synovial fluid or cerebrospinal fluid of Lyme disease patients. The biodiversity of B. burgdorferi strains is significantly greater in tick populations than in the skin of patients with erythema migrans. In turn, strains from skin are significantly more diverse than strains at any of the disseminated sites. The cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurologic Lyme disease harbored the least pathogen biodiversity. These results suggest that human tissues act as niches that can allow entry to or maintain only a subset of the total pathogen population. These data help to explain prior clinical observations on the natural history of B. burgdorferi infection and raise several questions that may help to direct future research to better understand the pathogenesis of this infection.

Dustin Brisson; Nilofer Baxamusa; Ira Schwartz; Gary P. Wormser

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Designing building skins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis involves framing criteria and discerning issues to be considered in the design of building skins in an urban environment. The 'information age' has paradoxically seen the demise of the facade as an important ...

Desai, Arjun

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Marianne B. Sowa, Claere von Neubeck, R. Joe Robinson, Paula M. Koehler, Norman J. Karin, Xihai Wang, Katrina M. Waters and Harish Shankaran Ionizing radiation exposure triggers a cell signaling program which includes proliferation, the DNA damage response, and tissue remodeling. The activated signaling pathways lead to the induction of both protective effects as well as adverse consequences. A fundamental question is whether signaling cascades initiated by low doses are fundamentally different than those initiated by high doses. To address this question we have applied a systems biology approach to examine the radiation induced temporal responses of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model. Using microarray-

59

Synthetic skins with humanlike warmth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic skins with humanlike characteristics, such as a warm touch, may be able to ease the social stigma associated with the use of prosthetic hands by enabling the user to conceal its usage during social touching situations. Similarly for social ... Keywords: prosthetics, rehabilitation robotics, social robotics, synthetic skin, warm skin

John-John Cabibihan; Rangarajan Jegadeesan; Saba Salehi; Shuzhi Sam Ge

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

Michael Cornforth

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The use of polarized light for skin cancer detecton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 50,000 people per year will be diagnosed with skin cancer in one of its various forms, making it the seventh most common form of cancer in the United States. Currently the only method to diagnose suspicious lesions is visual inspection and subsequent biopsy of suspicious lesions. Many cancerous lesions are missed and many benign lesions are biopsied using these techniques. This process is painful and expensive. The proposed research is driven by the need for a non-invasive skin cancer detection system. Presented here is a method for the optical determination of cancerous tissue using polarized light. This thesis describes the development of a polarimetric imaging system including its calibration and testing. In addition, experiments are performed to simulate changes in tissue, such as increased size of scatterers and increased scattering and absorption coefficients that often accompany tissue changes as it becomes cancerous. The effects of these simulated changes are tested on the Polarimetric imaging system in order to quantify changes in the Mueller matrix caused by the perturbations, and ultimately to relate them to observed changes in the Mueller matrices of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue. Finally, the Polarimetric imaging system is used to determine the Mueller matrix of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue to assess the system's capabilities for skin cancer diagnosis.

DeLaughter, Aimee Hill

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Critical Evaluation of Current Skin Thermal Property Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burn treatment is an area of major importance in medicine, however, there is not currently an analytic method to determine the depth and magnitude of burns. Complications, such as a relative lack of knowledge of the specific thermal properties of skin and the relation between heat transfer and biological processes, have prevented a comprehensive model to explain the field of bioheat transfer. Research was conducted to estimate the relevant thermal and material properties in the field of bioheat transfer. Subsequently, an experiment was proposed, and a mathematical model was developed for the experiment, to allow for detection of burns through the use of heat transfer analysis. Burned skin and healthy skin differ in that there is no blood flow and thus no directionality to the heat transfer in burned skin. Thus, the experiment was designed to determine if there was a directionality was present in the heat transfer in the skin. Using the estimated skin properties, calculations were done to determine the viability of the proposed experiment. The experiment was refined to account for the findings and modified to more accurately detect burns in human skin. 1

Anand Mani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The skin prick test ¿ European standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. : The skin prick test – European standards. Clinicalof results and thus make test Heinzerling et al. Clinical1: Table S3. Skin prick test panel – inhalant allergens.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

ARM - Measurement - Surface skin temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skin temperature skin temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface skin temperature The radiative surface skin temperature, from an IR thermometer measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface in its field of view. Categories Radiometric, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments IRT : Infrared Thermometer MFRIRT : Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer External Instruments

65

Sensitive skins and somatic processing for affective and sociable robots based upon a somatic alphabet approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sense of touch is one of the most important senses of the human body. This thesis describes the biologically inspired design of "sensitive skins" for two different robotic platforms: Leonardo, a high degree-of-freedom, ...

Stiehl, Walter Daniel, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Response in 3D Skin to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biological response. At PNNL we are applying a system biology approach to identify molecular targets in complex human tissue exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation. Our goal is...

67

Skin carcinogenicity of synthetic and natural petroleums. [Mice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a series of three separate experiments mice were exposed to various concentrations of fossil liquids obtained from coal, oil shale or natural petroleum. All materials were capable of inducing squamous cell carcinoma, but potency differed substantially. Skin carcinogenicity was markedly greater for both coal or oil shale liquids than for natural petroleums. None of the syncrudes approached the skin carcinogenicity of a pure reference carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene (BP). It is unlikely that determination of the concentration of an active compound in material applied to the test animal will allow meaningful comparison among the diverse agents of interest to the synthetic fuels industry. To better establish the relationship between actual tissue dose and surface concentration the authors are investigating various in vitro and biochemical measures of hydrocarbon-skin interaction to determine which, if any, could serve as a more definitive measure of surface dose. Results, using BP as a marker carcinogenic hydrocarbon, suggest that carcinogenic crudes inhibit both BP metabolism in skin organ culture and the interaction of BP adducts with epidermal DNA, in vivo.

Holland, J.M.; Rahn, R.O.; Smith, L.H.; Clark, B.R.; Chang, S.S.; Stephens, T.J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A critical comparison of human face rendering techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human skin exhibits complex light reflectance properties that make it difficult to render realistically. In recent years, many techniques have been introduced to render skin, with varying degrees of complexity and realism. ...

Arizpe, Arturo Andrew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Help:Skins | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skins Skins Jump to: navigation, search Clicking on the my preferences link in the upper right while logged in then click on the Skin button to change your skin. You can also preview the skin by clicking the (preview) links next to each skin. You can make changes to the current skin's stylesheet file (CSS) by creating a subpage of your userpage, "User:Yourname/monobook.css" for example. This requires your site admin to have enabled this feature -- if it is, you will see advice text at the top of your custom CSS page about clearing your browser's cache. Tools.png Tip for wiki admins: To enable this feature, you have to set $wgAllowUserCss to your LocalSettings.php. See also Help:Preferences Manual:Gallery of user styles (no official skins) Retrieved from

70

Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Oxide Skin Strength Measurements on Molten Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, OXIDE SKIN STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS ON MOLTEN ALUMINUM – MANGANESE ALLOYS WITH AND WITHOUT SALT ON SURFACE

72

Geometric skinning with approximate dual quaternion blending  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skinning of skeletally deformable models is extensively used for real-time animation of characters, creatures and similar objects. The standard solution, linear blend skinning, has some serious drawbacks that require artist intervention. Therefore, a ... Keywords: Skinning, dual quaternions, linear combinations, rigid transformations, transformation blending

Ladislav Kavan; Steven Collins; Ji?í Žára; Carol O'Sullivan

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Name: Richard Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A student in my anatomy and physiology class asked me, "When it's very cold outside in the winter, why does your skin hurt MORE than usual when you bang your finger or someone slaps you on the arm?" Replies: Wow! This is one outstanding question. Mammals respond to cold weather with the hypothalamus releasing thyrotropin releasing factor. This production increases with the severity of the cold weather and the length of the exposure to cold over a long period of time (at least three to four weeks). The thyroid responds by slowly increasing in size and releases thyroxine at higher quantities. Thyroxine increases the sensitivity of the entire nervous system. As a matter of fact, as you probably know, it increases the metabolism wholesale! within the body. This gets complicated so I'm keeping it simple. So, the bottom line is thyroxine. It just heightens our sensitivity not only to cold but our entire nervous system is enhanced.

74

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph The Influence of Fish Length on Tissue Mercury Dynamics: Implications for Natural Resource Management and Human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Consumption of fish has well-known human health benefits, though some fish may contain elevated levels of mercury (Hg) that are especially harmful to developing children. Fish length is most often the basis for establishing fishery harvest regulations that determine which fish will ultimately be consumed by humans. It is, therefore, essential to quantify the relationship between fish length and Hg accumulation in regard to harvest regulations for effective fishery and public health policy. We examined this relationship for three sportfish from six lakes across North Carolina, USA. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) had the lowest Hg levels and only the very largest fish in the most contaminated site exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Hg screening level. Black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) had an intermediate level of Hg and larger individuals exceeded the USEPA screening level; however, they tended not to exceed this level before reaching the harvest length limit. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exceeded the USEPA screening level at sizes below the fishery length limit in two lakes, leaving only higher risk fish for anglers to harvest and consume. Removing the effects of fish age and trophic position, we found strong positive correlations between Hg and fish length for

Health Risk; Dana K. Sackett; W. Gregory Cope; James A. Rice; D. Derek Aday

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Apparatus for testing skin samples or the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing the permeability of living skin samples has a flat base with a plurality of sample-holding cavities formed in its upper surface, the samples being placed in counterbores in the cavities with the epidermis uppermost. O-rings of Teflon washers are respectively placed on the samples and a flat cover is connected to the base to press the rings against the upper surfaces of the samples. Media to maintain tissue viability and recovery of metabolites is introduced into the lower portion of the sample-holding cavities through passages in the base. Test materials are introduced through holes in the cover plate after assembly of the chamber.

Holland, J.M.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Solubilization and molecular characterization of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor in human platelets: Comparison with ANP receptors in rat tissues  

SciTech Connect

We have previously demonstrated the presence of binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in human platelets. These sites have pharmacological characteristics similar to those of rat vascular smooth muscle. They are subject to regulation by circulating levels of ANP in plasma, varying inversely with the latter after high sodium intake, in arterial hypertension and congestive heart failure. We have now solubilized these platelet receptors with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 (0.6%). The preparations were incubated with (125I)ANP in the presence of increasing concentrations of ANP-(99-126), ANP-(101-126), ANP-(103-126), and ANP-(103-123). The order of potency of these peptides to displace (125I)ANP was similar for the solubilized and particulate receptor. Bound (125I)ANP was covalently cross-linked to the receptor with 5 mM disuccinimidyl suberate. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel showed that (125I)ANP specifically interacts with a 125-kDa membrane component, some of which may be reduced by 2% mercaptoethanol or 10 mmol/L dithiothreitol to a 70-kDa species. A small proportion of a 70-kDa peptide is also found under nonreducing conditions. The concentration of ANP-(99-126) that inhibits binding of (125I)ANP by 50% to both the 125-kDa and the 70-kDa species was 0.1 nM, while that for ANP-(103-123) was 3 nM. The internally ring-deleted analog Des(Gln116,Ser117,Gly118,Leu119,Gly120)ANP -(102-121) or C-ANP displaced with equal potency ANP binding to the high and low mol wt (Mr) bands, as also found in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells, but not in the mesemteric arteries these cells are derived from. In the latter, C-ANP displaced only binding from the lower Mr band. These results show that the ANP receptor in human platelets is heterogeneous.

Schiffrin, E.L.; Carrier, F.; Thibault, G.; Deslongchamps, M. (Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Stationary turbine component with laminated skin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

Skin-Like Prosthetic Polymer Surfaces  

transmit heat much more easily than untreated polymers. In addition, the material can be adjusted for color and skin smoothness, ... ••Thermal conduct ...

79

Tissue distribution and serum kinetics of T101 monoclonal antibody during passive anti-cancer therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have administered fifty-six 24 hr infusions of the anti-human T-cell monoclonal antibody T101 to 10 patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and 6 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in doses of 10, 50, 100, 150, and 500 mg. The larger doses of T101 resulted in higher, more persistent serum T101 concentrations, and CTCL patients generally developed higher serum T101 levels than CLL patients given equivalent doses. The presence of host anti-mIgG antibodies prior to infusion was associated with decreased serum concentrations of T101. Treatments that demonstrated measurable serum T101 levels were also associated with in vivo T101 binding and cytodestruction of circulating target cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of bone marrow and lymph node biopsies in CLL, and skin biopsies in CTCL, suggested that T101 had reached extravascular tumor sites. Infusion of /sup 111/In-conjugated T101 showed uptake in the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and (in CTCL) skin infiltrates. Our data demonstrate the tissue distribution of T101 and suggest that immunoconjugates of T101 with toxins, drugs, or radioisotopes may result in better therapeutic responses.

Shawler, D.L.; Beauregard, J.; Halpern, S.E.; Baird, S.M.; Dillman, R.O.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Locust skin: a thesis in creative nonfiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This creative thesis includes a critical introduction that discusses a brief history and definition of the creative nonfiction genre, the ethical dilemmas faced by the writer when telling a true story, and contextualizes my work within contemporary creative nonfiction. Locust Skin contains twenty-eight original pieces describing my experience adjusting to life as a single mother. Narrative segments alternate with short prose poems that add depth of feeling and a sense of wonder and beauty to contrast with the struggles voiced in the narrative. Through research and the study of works by authors such as Mary Karr, Terry Tempest Williams and Norma Cantú, I was able to establish a framework for the creative portion of the thesis. In writing the stories, I discovered the difficulty in negotiating an effective balance between telling a true story while maintaining privacy for the real people included in the narrative. Objectivity, avoiding sentimentality, and writing about myself without producing an overly self-absorbed collection was also a struggle. Overall, the collection contains short prose pieces that strive to reflect the precise poetic prose of Karr's The Liar's Club, while combining human suffering with detailed descriptions of nature illustrated by Williams' Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place in an unconventional form reminiscent of Norma Cantú's Canícula: Snapshots of a Girlhood en la Frontera.

Poff, Terri Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles With a modest effort, many of the energy-efficient technologies developed for buildings can be transferred to the transportation sector. The goal of vehicle thermal management research at LBL is to save the energy equivalent of one to two billion gallons of gasoline per year, and improve the marketability of next-generation vehicles using advanced solar control glazings and insulating shell components to reduce accessory loads. Spectrally selective and electrochromic window glass and lightweight insulating materials improve the fuel efficiency of conventional and hybrid vehicles and extend the range of electric vehicles by reducing the need for air conditioning and heating, and by allowing the downsizing of equipment.

84

Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens.

Ratliff, C.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Skin Bleaching in Jamaica: A Colonial Legacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light skin color sits within a space of privilege. While this has global significance and relevance, it is particularly true in Jamaica, a former British colony. The majority of the population is of African descent, yet there is an elevation of Eurocentric values and a denigration of Afrocentric values in many facets of life, specifically in the promotion of light skin as an indicator of beauty and social status. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological and socio-cultural factors that influence the practice of skin bleaching in the postcolonial society of Jamaica. Additionally, the study outlined the nation's efforts to combat the skin-bleaching phenomenon. The naturalistic paradigm of inquiry was used to frame the study and to collect and analyze data. The sample consisted of fifteen participants—twelve participants (six males and six females) with a history of skin bleaching; a retailer of skin lightening products; a local dermatologist who has written and published in local newspapers on the practice; and a representative from the Ministry of Health who was integrally involved in the national educational efforts to ban the practice. Data came from three sources: in-depth interviews with respondents; observation of participant's skin-bleaching practices; and a review of local cultural artifacts from popular culture and the media. Data from the audio recorded and transcribed interviews were analyzed using a thematic analysis. Some of the findings reveal that there are multiple and inconsistent definitions of bleaching; skin bleaching enjoys mixed reviews—much attributed to economic and social class distinctions; bleachers demonstrate and boast of their expertise in managing the bleaching process suggesting, that because of this expertise, they are immune to any negative side-effects of the practice; the bleaching practice was found to be intermittent, time consuming and laborious, costly and addictive; there are several motivations for the skin-bleaching practice, and these are primarily connected to issues of fashion, beauty, popularity, self-image and acceptability; there is a certain level of defiance towards the government‘s efforts to ban bleaching yet an expressed sense of responsibility among bleachers. The overall findings show that there is a bias in Jamaica for light skin over dark skin and these values are taught in non-formal and informal ways from very early in life. The practice of skin bleaching is of social and public health concern, and this study has implications for national policy, practice and theory.

Robinson, Petra Alaine

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

earth skin temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

earth skin temperature earth skin temperature Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords climate

88

Unconventional human computer interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This course focuses on how we can use the potential of the human body in experimental or unconventional interface techniques. It explores the biological or physiological characteristics of the separate parts of the body, from head to toe, and from skin ...

Steffi Beckhaus; Ernst Kruijff

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts  

SciTech Connect

Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of “array painting”.

Cornforth, Michael N [The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

90

The skin's role in human thermoregulation and comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is 3.8 met (ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, 2005). Swimmingcomfort. The ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals provides theEngineers) (2005), Handbook of Fundamentals, Atlanta,

Arens, Edward A; Zhang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has designated May as National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month. In 1996, an estimated 1 million cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed, of which approximately 95 % will be squamous cell or basal cell carcinomas (1). Although the incidence of melanoma is lower than those of squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas, the case-fatality rate is highest for persons with melanoma. During 1973–1992, mortality from melanoma increased 34%—the third highest increase of all cancers (2). CDC, in collaboration with the AAD, has initiated the National Skin Cancer Prevention Education Program (NSCPEP) to increase public awareness about skin cancer and to help reduce the occurrence of and deaths associated with skin cancer. Goals of this program are to develop and disseminate educational messages for children, their parents, and other caregivers; develop guidelines for school curricula; evaluate the utility and value of the ultraviolet (UV) index; and develop educational messages for health-care providers. Additional information about this month and the NSCPEP is available from

Among Children; Young Adults

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Design and potential clinical impact of a noninvasive thermal diffusion sensor to monitor human peripheral microvascular perfusion in real-time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perfusion in peripheral tissues is fundamental to the characterization of both local and global cardiovascular health. However, despite the inherent accessibility of tissues such as skin to microvascular measurements, there ...

Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nonlinear stochastic system identification techniques for biological tissues/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops a device capable of measuring the nonlinear dynamic mechanical properties of human tissue in vivo. The enabling technology is the use of nonlinear stochastic system identification techniques in ...

Chen, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has set the basic criteria for assessing skin dose stemming from hot particle contaminations. Compliance with IO CFR 20. 1 01 requires that exposure to the skin be evaluated over a I CM2 area at a depth of 0.007 cm. Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed between the hot particle source and the skin, and in cases where the hot particle is large in comparison to the range of beta particles. Once the protective clothing layer is thicker than the maximum range of the beta particles, skin dose is due solely to gamma radiation. Charged particle equilibrium is not established at shallow depths. The degree of electronic equilibrium establishment must be assessed for shallow doses to prevent the overassessment of skin dose because conventional fluence-to-dose conversion factors are not applicable. To assess the effect of electronic equilibrium, selected thicknesses of tissue equivalent material were interposed between radiochromic dye film and a 6OCo hot particle source and dose was measured as a function of depth. These measured values were then compared to models which are used to calculate charged particle equilibrium. The Miller-Reece model was found to agree closely with the experimental data while the Lantz-Lambert model overestimated dose at shallow depths.

Myrick, Jo Ann

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Tissue-like phantoms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA); De Grand, Alec M. (Boston, MA)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); Ivanov, Ilia N. (Knoxville, TN); Shibata, Jason (Manhattan Beach, CA)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

97

Light & Skin Interactions: Simulations for Computer Graphics Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light and Skin Interactions immerses you in one of the most fascinating application areas of computer graphics: appearance simulation. The book first illuminates the fundamental biophysical processes that affect skin appearance, and reviews seminal related ...

Gladimir V. G. Baranoski; Aravind Krishnaswamy

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Measurements of the Skin Temperature on Small Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus to measure the skin temperature and related variables on inland lakes is described. The apparatus is a transparent frame with sensors to measure the skin and bulk water temperature, the wind velocity, and the air temperature and ...

Robert Kurzeja; Malcolm Pendergast; Eliel Villa-Aleman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Generic-model based human-body modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a generic-model based human-body modeling method which take the anatomical structure of the human body into account. The generic model contains anatomical structure of bones and muscles of the human body. For a given target skin mesh, ... Keywords: anatomically-based modeling, generic model, human body modeling

Xiaomao Wu; Lizhuang Ma; Ke-Sen Huang; Yan Gao; Zhihua Chen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Space radiation-induced bystander signaling in 2D and 3D skin tissue models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space radiation poses a significant hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions, and the low fluences of charged particles characteristic of this field suggest that bystander effects, the phenomenon in which a greater ...

Lumpkins, Sarah B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Physics of Supercooling of Thin Water Skins Covering Gyrating Hailstones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid water skins on spongy deposits of hailstones that grow while gyrating in a wind tunnel environment, have been routinely observed to be supercooled at the water skin–air interface to as low as ?5°C and more. The average water skin thickness ...

Roland List

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of the human microbiome have revealed that even healthy individuals differ remarkably in the microbes that occupy habitats such as the gut, skin and vagina. Much of this diversity remains unexplained, although diet, ...

Alm, Eric J.

103

Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin  

SciTech Connect

A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

Marra, John J; McNamee, Sara

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

104

Skin-Like Prosthetic Polymer Surfaces - Energy Innovation Portal  

ORNL scientists combined superhydrophobic polymer inventions with carbon nanotubes to create a self-cleaning skin-like surface material with the ...

105

She, With a Warm Palm, the Skin Over My Spine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??She, with a Warm Palm, the Skin over My Spine is a collection of sixnonfiction essays and three vignettes divided into two parts. The first… (more)

Cambardella, Cara Maria Michele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Prevalence of skin neoplasma amont the atomic bomb survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 7,000 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki who participate in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Adult Health Study (AHS) were examined to define the relationship between skin neoplasms and exposure to ionizing radiation. Careful clinical inspection of the skin was undertaken to detect not only skin cancer but precancerous lesions such as senile keratosis. Five cases of basal cell carcinoma, five cases of senile keratosis and one case of Bowen`s disease were confirmed histologically among 5955 A-bomb survivors for whom Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) dose estimates are available. The relationship between the combined prevalence of skin cancer and precancerous lesions and DS86 dose was examined together with other factors that might affect skin neoplasms including occupational exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, age, sex and city. The prevalence of basal cell carcinoma and senile keratosis increased as the DS86 dose increased. The prevalent of skin cancer and senile keratosis among persons engaged in work involving frequent exposure to UV rays was higher than among those who were not engaged in such work. Sex and city were not significantly related to those skin diseases. Odds ratios of skin neoplasm for a 1-Gy dose, occupational exposure to UV rays and age at time of examination exposure to UV rays and age at time of examination (in 10-year increments) are 1.7, 5.9 and 1.9, respectively. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

Yamada, Michiko; Kodama, Kazunori; Akahoshi, Masazumi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Tube skin temperature prediction of catalytic reforming unit (CRU) heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum duty of reformer heaters is governed by the occurance of maximum tube skin temperature of the heaters. The value of maximum tube skin temperatures of the heaters must not exceed theirs' maximum allowable design temperature. The paper highlights ... Keywords: coke formation, finite element, simulations, tube furnance

Suzana Yusup; Nguyen Duy Vinh; Nurhayati Mellon; Abdullah Hassan

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections  

SciTech Connect

Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mechanistic investigation of skin barrier perturbation induced by surfactants in the presence of humectants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stratum corneum (SC) of the skin functions as a barrier between the body and the environment. Surfactants such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) are used in skin cleansers and in skin-care formulations because of their ...

Ghosh, Saswata

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Ozone, skin cancer, and the SST  

SciTech Connect

In 1971, the U.S. Congress cut off funding for development of supersonic transport aircraft prototypes when it was argued that the pollution created by SSTs could reduce the stratospheric ozone content and increase the incidence of skin cancer. At present, the theory of ozone depletion is in a rather uncertain state. Two examples of this are cited. First, ozone depletion may depend more on the availability of surfaces of aerosols and particles than on the content of chlorine. Second, it has been discovered that NO(x) can tie up active chlorine and thus reduce depletion from that source. We are therefore left with the paradoxical result that under certain circumstances SSTs flying in the lower stratospheric can actually counteract, at least partially, any ozone-depleting effects of CFCs. A recent study by scientists at the Brookhaven National Laboratory showed that melanoma rates would not be affected by changes in the ozone layer. If these results are confirmed, then much of the fear associated with ozone depletion disappears. It is difficult to tell how all this will affect a future supersonic transport program, since it is not clear whether a fleet of SSTs will increase or offset ozone depletion.

Singer, S.F.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is national interest in the development of sophisticated materials that can automatically detect and respond to chemical and biological threats without the need for human intervention. In living systems, cell membranes perform such functions on a routine basis, detecting threats, communicating with the cell, and triggering automatic responses such as the opening and closing of ion channels. The purpose of this project was to learn how to replicate simple threat detection and response functions within artificial membrane systems. The original goals toward developing 'smart skin' assemblies included: (1) synthesizing functionalized nanoparticles to produce electrochemically responsive systems within a lipid bilayer host matrices, (2) calculating the energetics of nanoparticle-lipid interactions and pore formation, and (3) determining the mechanism of insertion of nanoparticles in lipid bilayers via imaging and electrochemistry. There are a few reports of the use of programmable materials to open and close pores in rigid hosts such as mesoporous materials using either heat or light activation. However, none of these materials can regulate themselves in response to the detection of threats. The strategies we investigated in this project involve learning how to use programmable nanomaterials to automatically eliminate open channels within a lipid bilayer host when 'threats' are detected. We generated and characterized functionalized nanoparticles that can be used to create synthetic pores through the membrane and investigated methods of eliminating the pores either through electrochemistry, change in pH, etc. We also focused on characterizing the behavior of functionalized gold NPs in different lipid membranes and lipid vesicles and coupled these results to modeling efforts designed to gain an understanding of the interaction of nanoparticles within lipid assemblies.

Montano, Gabriel A.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Allen, Amy; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Wheeler, David Roger

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Molecular substrate design for the selective adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of marrow connective tissue progenitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multi-faceted approach was applied to the molecular design of substrates for the selective adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from human bone marrow aspirates. The basic ...

Au, Ada

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Integration of real time oxygen measurements with a 3D perfused tissue culture system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In vitro models that capture the complexity of human tissue and organ behaviors in a scalable and easy-to- use format are of increasing interest for both technological applications in drug development and in basic biology ...

Inman, Samuel Walker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Anisotropy of Land Surface Skin Temperature Derived from Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land skin temperature, an important feature for agricultural monitoring, convective processes, and the earth’s radiation budget, is monitored from limited-view satellite imagers. The angular dependence of this parameter is examined using ...

Patrick Minnis; Mandana M. Khaiyer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Analysis of Land Skin Temperature Using AVHRR Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using satellite remote sensing techniques to take quantitative observations of the climate system will advance our knowledge and ability to model the climate system and its changes. Polar-orbiting satellite records of global land surface skin ...

Menglin Jin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Second Skin : motion capture with actuated feedback for motor learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Second Skin aims to combine three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking with tactile feedback for the purpose of improving users' motor-learning ability. Such a system would track a user's body and limb movements as he or she ...

Miaw, Dennis (Dennis R.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Solid-State Radiometer Measurements of Sea Surface Skin Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite sea surface skin temperature (SSST) maps are readily available from precisely calibrated radiometer systems such as the ERS along-track scanning radiometer and, in the near future, from the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer. ...

C. J. Donlon; S. J. Keogh; D. J. Baldwin; I. S. Robinson; I. Ridley; T. Sheasby; I. J. Barton; E. F. Bradley; T. J. Nightingale; W. Emery

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mechanisms of mesothelial tissue lubrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the pleural space, sliding between the lung and chest wall induces shear stress that could damage the delicate mesothelial cells covering the tissue surfaces. Normally, the pleural space, which is filled with fluid, is ...

Lin, Judy Li-Wen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

An analysis of rate-sensitive skin in oil wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the results of the perforating program for the first forty wells in the Kuparuk River Field in Alaska. Several different types of perforating guns were used to perforate the wells at varying shot densities. Pressure transient tests were conducted on each well to measure skin damage and flow efficiency. A correlation of average flow efficiency with perforating gun type and shot density is presented. This shows that shot densities above 4 shots/ft result in less skin damage, and wells completed with 12 shots/ft have little or no damage. The effect of perforation penetration is also shown to be a factor in reducing damage, but with all other factors being equal, 12 shots/ft is shown to result in the least amount of damage. The above results are explained by a detailed analysis of multiple buildup tests at varying rates which were performed on some of the highly damaged wells completed during the early development of the field. These tests indicated skin damage to be rate sensitive with some true formation damage also present. Non-Darcy flow and gas saturation near the wellbore are shown to contribute to the rate-sensitive skin factors. A method of analysis is presented which allows non-Darcy flow skin factors to be calculated when gas saturation is also causing a skin effect. This can be accomplished without fluid property and relative permeability data, which is necessary to calculate saturation effects using standard analysis methods.

Blacker, L.K.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biomimetic electrical stimulation for cardiac tissue engineering.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A major challenge of tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the tissue being replaced. Electrical stimulation has been… (more)

Tandon, Nina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Human cloning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it will ever be possible. The reason is that most specialized cell (ie. skin, hair, heart . . .) may not have all the genetic information necessary to form a complete person....

122

A compendium of gene expression in normal human tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, carbonic an- hydrase III for CO2 metabolism, creatine kinase, mito- chondrial 2 (sarcomeric) for energy. In addition, the differences of age, gender, underlying health, and medications may also play roles Gregory Stephanopoulos) from the En- gineering Research Program of the Office of Basic Energy Science

Weng, Zhiping

123

Growing tissue in the lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tissue in the lab tissue in the lab Name: mike s Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do Scientists grow new tissue cells in the lab? Replies: I'm not quite sure what you mean by "new" cells. Several kinds of cell growing are done. One way is to break an organ or tissue apart into its individual cells and grow them in a medium of nutrients, controlled temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide/oxygen. This is called "primary culture" because the cells come right out of an organism. Another method is to create an "immortal cell line". This is a type of cell isolated from a cancerous tumor, or a non-tumor cell which is infected with a cancer gene after it's isolated. Being cancerous, these cells grow forever in a dish, with the appropriate nutrients etc as long as you remove cells from time to time to prevent overcrowding. These cells can be frozen at about -100F forever and rethawed when needed. There is a library of frozen cells, thousands of types, and a catalog. Scientists can order what they need any time! Finally, you can make specific mutant cell lines by starting as above with an immortal cell, and inserting a specific gene (or deleting one) permanently from the DNA of the cell to change almost any property you want. So there it is.

124

Apparatus and method to control atmospheric water vapor composition and concentration during dynamic cooling of biological tissues in conjunction with laser irradiations  

SciTech Connect

Cryogen spray cooling of skin surface with millisecond cryogen spurts is an effective method for establishing a controlled temperature distribution in tissue and protecting the epidermis from nonspecific thermal injury during laser mediated dermatological procedures. Control of humidity level, spraying distance and cryogen boiling point is material to the resulting surface temperature. Decreasing the ambient humidity level results in less ice formation on the skin surface without altering the surface temperature during the cryogen spurt. For a particular delivery nozzle, increasing the spraying distance to 85 millimeters lowers the surface temperature. The methodology comprises establishing a controlled humidity level in the theater of operation of the irradiation site of the biological tissues before and/or during the cryogenic spray cooling of the biological tissue. At cold temperatures calibration was achieved by mounting a thermistor on a thermoelectric cooler. The thermal electric cooler was cooled from from 20.degree. C. to about -20.degree. C. while measuring its infrared emission.

Nelson, J. Stuart (Laguna Niguel, CA); Anvari, Bahman (Houston, TX); Tanenbaum, B. Samuel (Irvine, CA); Milner, Thomas E. (Austin, TX)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Tissue architecture: the ultimate regulator of breast epithelial function  

SciTech Connect

A problem in developmental biology that continues to take center stage is how higher organisms generate diverse tissues and organs given the same cellular genotype. In cell and tumor biology, the key question is not the production of form, but its preservation: how do tissues and organs maintain homeostasis, and how do cells within tissues lose or overcome these controls in cancer? Undoubtedly, mechanisms that maintain tissue specificity should share features with those employed to drive formation of the tissues. However, they are unlikely to be identical. At a simplistic level, developmental pathways may be thought of as a series of extremely rapid short-term events. Each new step depends on what came before, and the outcome is the organism itself at birth. All organs, with a few notable exceptions, such as the mammary gland and the brain, 'arrive' together and are complete when the organism is born. In mice and humans, these events occur in a mere 21 days and 9 months respectively. The stability of the differentiated state and the homeostasis of the organism, on the other hand, will last 40-110 times longer. How does the organism achieve this feat? How are tissues maintained? These questions also relate fundamentally to how tissues become malignant and, although not discussed here, to aging. While there is much literature on differentiation - loosely defined as the gain of a single or a series of functions - we know much less about the forces and the pathways that maintain organ morphology and function as a unit. This may be partly because it is difficult to study a tissue as a unit in vivo and there are few techniques that allow maintenance of organs in vitro long enough and in such a way as to make cell and molecular biology experiments possible. Techniques for culturing cells in three-dimensional gels (3D) as a surrogate for tissues, however, have been steadily improving and the method is now used by several laboratories. In this commentary we discuss the following: first, how our laboratory came to develop a model of the mammary gland acinus; second, what this model has told us about mechanisms that govern tissue specificity and malignancy; and third, possible directions for future studies. We summarize the evidence for the central role of ECM signaling in the maintenance of mammary function in culture and (more briefly) its role in tumorigenesis. This is followed by a discussion of the role that tissue architecture and tissue polarity (as opposed to cell polarity) may play in these processes. In an elegantly written and reasoned essay, Kirschner et al. coined the new science of developmental biology 'molecular vitalism'. They framed new concepts for self-organization as well as schemes for information flow in biological organization. Rao et al. reviewed and elaborated on differential-equation-based models of biochemical reaction networks and intracellular noise, with emphasis on bacteria and phage. Similarly, Hartwell et al. discussed the synergy between experiment and theory in elucidating 'modules' - collections of interacting molecules - and in unraveling how these modules collaborate to perform cellular functions such as signal transduction. We believe that many of these ideas will also be applicable to the maintenance of tissue specificity. As much as we agree with Kirschner et al. regarding the limitations of the machine analogy to biological systems, we conclude with thoughts on how we may proceed to model the complex tissue networks that govern breast tissue architecture. We suggest that our understanding of the structure and function of breast tissue would benefit from examining recent techniques for modeling large complex networks such as the World Wide Web and the Internet backbone among others.

Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Mian, Saira

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wireless power transmission for medical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the wireless power transmission capabilities of microwave through human skin-tissue. Microwave transmission through simulated human skins was tested with rectenna array as a power receiver located under the ...

Payne, Joshua E.

127

Air humidity requirements for human comfort  

SciTech Connect

Upper humidity limits for the comfort zone determined from two recently presented models for predicting discomfort due to skin humidity and insufficient respiratory cooling are proposed. The proposed limits are compared with the maximum permissible humidity level prescribed in existing standards for the thermal indoor environment. The skin humidity model predicts discomfort as a function of the relative humidity of the skin, which is determined by existing models for human heat and moisture transfer based on environmental parameters, clothing characteristics, and activity level. The respiratory model predicts discomfort as a function of the driving forces for heat loss from the respiratory tract, namely, the temperature and humidity of the surrounding air. An upper humidity limit based on a relative skin humidity of 0.54, corresponding to 20% dissatisfied, results in a maximum permissible humidity level near 100% RH. The requirements for respiratory comfort are much more stringent and result in lower permissible indoor air humidities. Compared with the upper humidity limit specified in existing thermal comfort standards, e.g., ASHRAE Addendum 55a, the humidity limit based on skin humidity was less restrictive and the humidity limit based on respiratory comfort was far more restrictive.

Toftum, J.; Fanger, P.O.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Late Tissue Toxicity: Pilot Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the use of advanced ultrasonic imaging to quantitatively evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in breast-cancer radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighteen breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical study. Radiotherapy involved a radiation dose of 50.0 to 50.4 Gy delivered to the entire breast, followed by an electron boost of 10.0 to 16.0 Gy delivered to the tumor bed. Patients underwent scanning with ultrasound during follow-up, which ranged from 6 to 94 months (median, 22 months) postradiotherapy. Conventional ultrasound images and radio-frequency (RF) echo signals were acquired from treated and untreated breasts. Three ultrasound parameters, namely, skin thickness, Pearson coefficient, and spectral midband fit, were computed from RF signals to measure radiation-induced changes in dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue, respectively. Ultrasound parameter values of the treated breast were compared with those of the untreated breast. Ultrasound findings were compared with clinical assessment using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late-toxicity scores. Results: Significant changes were observed in ultrasonic parameter values of the treated vs. untreated breasts. Average skin thickness increased by 27.3%, from 2.05 {+-} 0.22mm to 2.61 {+-} 0.52mm; Pearson coefficient decreased by 31.7%, from 0.41 {+-} 0.07 to 0.28 {+-} 0.05; and midband fit increased by 94.6%, from -0.92 {+-} 7.35 dB to 0.87 {+-} 6.70 dB. Ultrasound evaluations were consistent with RTOG scores. Conclusions: Quantitative ultrasound provides a noninvasive, objective means of assessing radiation-induced changes to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. This imaging tool will become increasingly valuable as we continue to improve radiation therapy technique.

Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Yoshida, Emi J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Woodhouse, Shermian A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Schiff, Peter B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wang, Tony J.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Lu Zhengfeng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhang Pengpeng [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kutcher, Gerald J. [Department of History, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

An Improved Tissue Culture System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved Tissue Culture System for Embryogenic Callus Production and Plant Regeneration in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Jason N. Burris & David G. J. Mann & Blake L. Joyce & C. Neal Stewart Jr. Published online: 10 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract The increased emphasis on research of dedicated biomass and biofuel crops begs for biotechnology method improvements. For switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), one limitation is inefficient tissue culture and transformation systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate the utility of a new medium described here, LP9, for the production and maintenance of switchgrass callus and its regeneration, which also enables genetic transformation. LP9 medium is not based on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, the basal medium that all published switchgrass transformation has been

130

Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Zimmerman, George (Lafayette, CA); Jacques, Steven (Portland, OR)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Flow dynamics in a double-skin façade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamical study of the flow in an asymmetrically heated vertical plane channel was carried out experimentally and numerically. The experiments are carried out in water for modified Rayleigh numbers (Ra*) in a range corresponding to the boundary layer ... Keywords: double skin, laminar flow, natural convection, numerical simulation, recirculation zone, vertical channel, visualization technique, wall flux

Dan Ospir; Cristian Chereches; Catalin Popa; Stéphane Fohanno; Catalin Popovici

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Computational intelligence techniques: a study of scleroderma skin disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of microarray gene expression data from patients with and without scleroderma skin disease using computational intelligence and visual data mining techniques. Virtual reality spaces are used for providing unsupervised ... Keywords: Scleroderma disease, clustering, differential evolution, genetic programming, genomics, grid computing, hybrid evolutionary-classical optimization, particle swarm optimization, rough sets, similarity structure preservation, virtual reality spaces, visual data mining

Julio J. Valdes; Alan J. Barton

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

REGULAR ARTICLE Malleable skin coloration in cephalopods: selective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a fiber optic spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA; spectra recorded on PC, using OOIBase 32 software fiber-optic microscope-light source. The spectral range of measure- ments was limited from 400 nm to 800 spectrum, this study provides an insight into the optical mechanisms employed by the elaborate skin

Hanlon, Roger T.

134

Neutron skin uncertainties of Skyrme energy density functionals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Neutron-skin thickness is an excellent indicator of isovector properties of atomic nuclei. As such, it correlates strongly with observables in finite nuclei that depend on neutron-to-proton imbalance and the nuclear symmetry energy that characterizes the equation of state of neutron-rich matter. A rich worldwide experimental program involving studies with rare isotopes, parity violating electron scattering, and astronomical observations is devoted to pinning down the isovector sector of nuclear models. Purpose: We assess the theoretical systematic and statistical uncertainties of neutron-skin thickness and relate them to the equation of state of nuclear matter, and in particular to nuclear symmetry energy parameters. Methods: We use the nuclear superfluid Density Functional Theory with several Skyrme energy density functionals and density dependent pairing. To evaluate statistical errors and their budget, we employ the statistical covariance technique. Results: We find that the errors on neutron skin increase with neutron excess. Statistical errors due to uncertain coupling constants of the density functional are found to be larger than systematic errors, the latter not exceeding 0.06 fm in most neutron-rich nuclei across the nuclear landscape. The single major source of uncertainty is the poorly determined slope L of the symmetry energy that parametrizes its density dependence. Conclusions: To provide essential constraints on the symmetry energy of the nuclear energy density functional, next-generation measurements of neutron skins are required to deliver precision better than 0.06 fm.

M. Kortelainen; J. Erler; W. Nazarewicz; N. Birge; Y. Gao; E. Olsen

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

135

SkinDeEP: A Profiling Instrument for Upper-Decameter Sea Surface Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin Depth Experimental Profiler (SkinDeEP) is an autonomous, self-contained, hydrodynamic instrument capable of making repeated, high-resolution profiles of temperature and conductivity within the ocean's upper decameter. Autonomous ...

Brian Ward; Rik Wanninkhof; Peter J. Minnett; Michael J. Head

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 8 Skin Care Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 8 Skin Care Products Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 8 Skin Care Products from ...

137

Design and optimization of actuation mechanisms for rapid skin closure device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovative mechanism designs were explored for the actuation of critical components in a novel rapid skin closure device used to close long surgical incisions. The rapid skin closure device is designed to speed up the wound ...

Erickson, Andrew T. (Andrew Thomas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Management of Pediatric Skin Abscesses in Pediatric, General Academic and Community Emergency Departments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oral rather than skin flora. The study was approved by each participating site’s institutional review board.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work describes the integration of novel microfabrication techniques for vascular tissue engineering applications in the context of a novel biodegradable elastomer. The field of tissue engineering and organ regeneration ...

Bettinger, Christopher John, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

High throughput 3-D tissue cytometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the ongoing technological development of high throughput 3-D tissue cytometry.and its applications in biomedicine. 3-D tissue cytometry has been developed in our laboratory based on two-photon microscopy ...

Kwon, Hyuk-Sang, 1971-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Biomimetic electrical stimulation for cardiac tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major challenge of tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the tissue being replaced. Electrical stimulation has been used to induce synchronous contractions of ...

Tandon, Nina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Method for localizing heating in tumor tissue  

SciTech Connect

A method for a localized tissue heating of tumors is disclosed. Localized radio frequency current fields are produced with specific electrode configurations. Several electrode configurations are disclosed, enabling variations in electrical and thermal properties of tissues to be exploited.

Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM); McCabe, Charles W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Threshold Levels for Nonstochastic Skin Effects From Low Energy Discrete Radioactive Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessment of risk from skin contamination by low-energy discrete radioactive particles (DRPs) is difficult because the particles produce nonuniform external radiation exposures. This study, which provides data on the relationship between DRP dose to the skin and biological skin response, can form the technical basis for developing regulations for controlling exposures.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal ... Keywords: Bone, biodegradable polymers, biomaterials, cell therapy, fracture repair, orthopaedics, tissue engineering

Glenn Dickson; Fraser Buchanan; David Marsh; Eileen Harkin-Jones; Uel Little; Mervyn McCaigue

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A clamp ligation method for point mutational spectrometry : marked increase in scanning range for the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of human mutagenesis requires methods of measuring somatic mutations in normal human tissues and inherited mutations in human populations. Such methods should permit measurement of rare mutations in the presence ...

Kim, Andrea Seungsun, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

147

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

148

Breast Tissue Imaging | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the hydrogen-sensitive neutron imaging capabilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to image healthy and cancerous breast tissue specimens. Working with Hassina Bilheux,...

149

Integration of contractile forces during tissue invagination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contractile forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton within individual cells collectively generate tissue-level force during epithelial morphogenesis. During Drosophila mesoderm invagination, pulsed actomyosin ...

Martin, Adam C.

150

Shape factor, C /SUB A/ , expressed as skin, S /SUB CA/  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the conversion of the shape factor, C /SUB A/ , to a pseudosteady-state skin term, S /SUB CA/ . When the shape factor is expressed as a skin term, it becomes easier to see the effect that a well placement in a given drainage area will have on the well's performance. Skin factors for published drainage shapes and well locations are given.

Fetkovich, M.J.; Vienot, M.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Soluble/Shed Factors Released from Skin Cells Following Low Dose...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SolubleShed Factors Released from Skin Cells Following Low Dose Irradiation Exposure David Springer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Abstract The purpose of this work is to...

152

Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Health Print E-mail Climate change can have a number of direct and indirect effects on human health. For example, rising temperatures can contribute to the number of deaths...

153

Characteristics of Radiation-Induced Basal Cell Skin Cancer in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in human hematopoietic cell transplant patients had shown that total body irradiation selectively induced basal cell carcinoma but not squamous cell carcinoma or...

154

Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (< 0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles as produced in the work environments of nuclear reactors. Hanford mini-pigs were exposed, both on a slightly off the skin, to localized replicate doses from 0.31 to 64 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70 {mu}m depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC{sub 2} isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs.

Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Influence of skin effect on the series resistance of millimeter-wave IMPATT devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made in this paper to study the influence of skin depth on the parasitic series resistance of millimeter-wave IMPATT devices based on Silicon. The method is based on the concept of depletion width modulation of the device under large-signal ... Keywords: Large-signal simulation, Millimeter-wave IMPATTs, Series resistance, Skin effect

Aritra Acharyya, Suranjana Banerjee, J. P. Banerjee

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Tissue oxymetry using magnetic resonance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A noninvasive method for in vivo measurement of tissue oxygen concentration has been developed. Several techniques currently used suffer limitations that prevent their practical clinical use. Our method is to use the ...

Liu, Lisa Chiawen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Tissue distribution as a factor in species susceptibility to toxicity and hazard assessment. Example: methylmercury  

SciTech Connect

Data on the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of methylmercury(MeHg) in cats and humans were utilized as an example of how such data can assist in extrapolating toxicity data between animal species. These data demonstrate that the whole-body half-time for clearance of MeHg was the same for cats and humans and that the concentration of MeHg in the brain at comparable signs of toxicity were the same (10 ppM) in the two species. However, the blood:brain ratio of MeHg concentration was 10 times as high in cats (1:1) as humans (1:10). From these data it was hypothesized that the no-effect level of methylmercury intake in cats should be 10 times that for humans. This hypothesis was verified from toxia data on MeHg toxicity in cats and humans.

Willes, R.F.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Organ printing: computer-aided jet-based 3D tissue engineering, Trends in Biotechnology 21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue engineering technology promises to solve the organ transplantation crisis. However, assembly of vascularized 3D soft organs remains a big challenge. Organ printing, which we define as computer-aided, jet-based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, offers a possible solution. Organ printing involves three sequential steps: pre-processing or development of ‘blueprints ’ for organs; processing or actual organ printing; and postprocessing or organ conditioning and accelerated organ maturation. A cell printer that can print gels, single cells and cell aggregates has been developed. Layer-by-layer sequentially placed and solidified thin layers of a thermo-reversible gel could serve as ‘printing paper’. Combination of an engineering approach with the developmental biology concept of embryonic tissue fluidity enables the creation of a new rapid prototyping 3D organ printing technology, which will dramatically accelerate and optimize tissue and organ assembly. 'Give us the tools and we will finish the job'-Winston Churchill Although the terms ‘tissue engineering ’ and ‘organ printing ’ were introduced only recently (1987 and 1999 respectively), the study of cell coalescence and tissue assembly has a much longer history and is deeply rooted in developmental biology [1]. The classic work

Vladimir Mironov; Thomas Bol; Thomas Trusk; Gabor Forgacs; Roger; R. Markwald

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of WR-2721, a radioprotective drug  

SciTech Connect

Pre-irradiation intravenous administration of the radioprotective drug S- 2-[3-aminopropylamino]ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) has potential value in radiotherapy because it doubles the radiation resistance of normal mouse tissues while affording only minimal protection to tumors. Deficient deposition of WR- 2721 in tumor tissue has recently been demonstrated and this is thought to be a major reason for the preferential protection of normal tissues by the drug. Data originally obtained in studies using the mouse and rat indicated that the tissue distribution of WR-2721 was possibly more closely related to dose per unit surface area than to dose per unit weight. To test this hypothesis an interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of $sup 35$S-labeled WR-2721 was carried out in normal mice, rats, rabbits, and dogs at 15 and 30 minutes after intravenous administration. Results suggest that the surface area and body weight exert equal effects on the tissue concentration of WR-2721. The results further suggest that lower absolute doses of WR-2721 in the human, possibly as low as 20 mg/kg, may provide a radioprotective effect equivalent to that produced from 100 mg/kg in the mouse, i.e., a 50 to 80 percent increase in radiation resistance (CH)

Washburn, L.C.; Rafter, J.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Yuhas, J.M.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Mechanical behavior of tissue simulants and soft tissues under extreme loading conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent developments in computer-integrated surgery and in tissue-engineered constructs necessitate advances in experimental and analytical techniques in characterizing properties of mechanically compliant materials such ...

Kalcioglu, Zeynep Ilke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Genomic organization of the human ATP1AL1 gene encoding a ouabain-sensitive H,K-ATPase  

SciTech Connect

The human ATP1AL1 gene belongs to the family of Na,K-ATPase and H,K-ATPase (X,K-ATPases) genes. It encodes a catalytic subunit of hitherto unknown human ouabain-sensitive H,K-ATPase that represents a novel third group of X,K-ATPases distinct from the known Na,K-ATPase and gastric H,K-ATPase. Cloning of the ATP1AL1 gene is described in this report. The exon-intron structure of ATP1AL1 was found to be very similar to that of related genes. It contains 23 exons and spans approximately 32 kb of genomic DNA. All ATP1AL1 exons and 12 of its 22 introns were entirely sequenced. A total of nine Alu repeats were identified in introns. The transcription initiation site was mapped 187 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon by primer extension and S{sub 1} nuclease protection analyses of RNA from human skin and colon. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime}-flanking region (1.48 kb) revealed numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors Sp1 and AP2 and one putative NF-{kappa}B binding site. The 0.85-kb region from position -484 (5{prime}-flanking region) to position + 369 (intron 1) meets the structural criteria of a CpG island. It is suggested that the ATP1AL1 gene contains two poly(A) addition sites that may function in a tissue-specific manner. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Sverdlov, V.E.; Modyanov, N.N. [Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States)] [Medical College of Ohio, Toledo, OH (United States); Kostina, M.B. [Ovchinnikov Inst. of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Ovchinnikov Inst. of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

The second skin approach : skin strain field analysis and mechanical counter pressure prototyping for advanced spacesuit design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the theory of advanced locomotion mechanical counter pressure (MCP) spacesuits by studying the changes in the human body shape during joint motion. Two experiments take advantage ...

Bethke, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [ENEA Laboratories, Rome (Italy); Dragani, Tommaso A. [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: tommaso.dragani@istitutotumori.mi.it

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Variation in Tissue...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variation in Tissue Responses to Low-dose Radiation Eugene Rinchik Oak Ridge National Laboratory Why this Project? To address how individual genetic background affects tissue...

165

Dosimeter for measuring skin dose and more deeply penetrating radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with netruon-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

Jones, Donald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parker, DeRay (Idaho Falls, ID); Boren, Paul R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method for preparing dosimeter for measuring skin dose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with neutron-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

Jones, Donald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parker, DeRay (Idaho Falls, ID); Boren, Paul R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.  

SciTech Connect

A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C. (X-Ray Science Division); (Northwestern Univ.); (Diamond Light Source, Ltd.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanisms of Tissue Response to Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project? In the past, the effects of ionizing radiation on humans has been attributed in great part to its ability to damage DNA, which transmits information from cell to cell, and generation to generation. Damaged DNA can lead to cell death or perpetuate the damage to daughter cells and to future generations. In addition to the information contained with the genome (i.e., DNA sequence), information directing cell behavior and tissue function is also stored outside the DNA. The success in cloning sheep from the DNA contained in the nucleus of an adult cell shows how important signals from the outside are in defining how the genome is expressed. This

169

Adaptive Breast Radiation Therapy Using Modeling of Tissue Mechanics: A Breast Tissue Segmentation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To validate and compare the accuracy of breast tissue segmentation methods applied to computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiation therapy planning and to study the effect of tissue distribution on the segmentation accuracy for the purpose of developing models for use in adaptive breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients receiving postlumpectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer underwent CT imaging in prone and supine positions. The whole-breast clinical target volume was outlined. Clinical target volumes were segmented into fibroglandular and fatty tissue using the following algorithms: physical density thresholding; interactive thresholding; fuzzy c-means with 3 classes (FCM3) and 4 classes (FCM4); and k-means. The segmentation algorithms were evaluated in 2 stages: first, an approach based on the assumption that the breast composition should be the same in both prone and supine position; and second, comparison of segmentation with tissue outlines from 3 experts using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Breast datasets were grouped into nonsparse and sparse fibroglandular tissue distributions according to expert assessment and used to assess the accuracy of the segmentation methods and the agreement between experts. Results: Prone and supine breast composition analysis showed differences between the methods. Validation against expert outlines found significant differences (P<.001) between FCM3 and FCM4. Fuzzy c-means with 3 classes generated segmentation results (mean DSC = 0.70) closest to the experts' outlines. There was good agreement (mean DSC = 0.85) among experts for breast tissue outlining. Segmentation accuracy and expert agreement was significantly higher (P<.005) in the nonsparse group than in the sparse group. Conclusions: The FCM3 gave the most accurate segmentation of breast tissues on CT data and could therefore be used in adaptive radiation therapy-based on tissue modeling. Breast tissue segmentation methods should be used with caution in patients with sparse fibroglandular tissue distribution.

Juneja, Prabhjot, E-mail: Prabhjot.Juneja@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Harris, Emma J. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kirby, Anna M. [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Evans, Philip M. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Numerical Model of Skin Electropermeabilization Based on In Vivo Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a protective barrier preventing internal tissues from exposure to trauma, ultraviolet radiation, temperature

Ljubljana, University of

171

Assimilation of Satellite-Derived Skin Temperature Observations into Land Surface Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface (or “skin”) temperature (LST) lies at the heart of the surface energy balance and is a key variable in weather and climate models. In this research LST retrievals from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are ...

Rolf H. Reichle; Sujay V. Kumar; Sarith P. P. Mahanama; Randal D. Koster; Q. Liu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Surface Skin Temperature and the Interplay between Sensible and Ground Heat Fluxes over Arid Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over arid regions, two community land models [Noah and Community Land Model (CLM)] still have difficulty in realistically simulating the diurnal cycle of surface skin temperature. Based on theoretical arguments and synthesis of previous ...

Xubin Zeng; Zhuo Wang; Aihui Wang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Explicit integration of identity information from skin regions to improve face recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the possibility of exploiting facial skin texture regions to further improve the performance of face recognition systems. Information extracted from the forehead region is combined with scores produced by a kernel-based face recognition ...

Garsah Farhan Al-Qarni; Farzin Deravi

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Colonial Faces: Beauty and Skin Color Hierarchy in the Philippines and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

76, no.4 (1971): 734-742. Herring, Cedric, Verna Keith, andof Illinois Press, 2004. Herring, Cedric. “Skin Deep: RaceEra, edited by Cedric Herring, Verna Keith, and Hayward

Rondilla, Joanne Laxamana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Variations in Ocean Surface Temperature due to Near-Surface Flow: Straining the Cool Skin Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aqueous thermal boundary layer near to the ocean surface, or skin layer, has thickness O(1 mm) and plays an important role in controlling the exchange of heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. Theoretical arguments and experimental ...

Andrew J. Wells; Claudia Cenedese; J. Thomas Farrar; Christopher J. Zappa

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part I: Design and Laboratory Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An untended instrument to measure ocean surface heat flux has been developed for use in support of field experiments and the investigation of heat flux parameterization techniques. The sensing component of the Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Polycaprolactone Blends for Tissue Engineering and  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain limitations of PCL in tissue engineering and drug delivery are due to their ... A7: On-the-fly System Design for High Precision/Ultra Fast/Wide Area Fabrication .... C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array ... Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation.

178

EXPLORING THE POTENTIAL OF SHORT-TIME FOURIER TRANSFORMS FOR ANALYZING SKIN CONDUCTANCE AND PUPILLOMETRY IN REAL-TIME APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The development of real-time predictors of mental workload is critical for the practical application of augmented cognition to human-machine systems. This paper explores a novel method based on a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) for analyzing galvanic skin conductance (SC) and pupillometry time-series data to extract estimates of mental workload with temporal bandwidth high-enough to be useful for augmented cognition applications. We tested the method in the context of a process control task based on the DURESS simulation developed by Vincente and Pawlak (1994; ported to Java by Cosentino,& Ross, 1999). SC, pupil dilation, blink rate, and visual scanning patterns were measured for four participants actively engaged in controlling the simulation. Fault events were introduced that required participants to diagnose errors and make control adjustments to keep the simulator operating within a target range. We were interested in whether the STFT of these measures would produce visible effects of the increase in mental workload and stress associated with these events. Graphical exploratory data analysis of the STFT showed visible increases in the power spectrum across a range of frequencies directly following fault events. We believe this approach shows potential as a relatively unobtrusive, low-cost, high bandwidth measure of mental workload that could be particularly useful for the application of augmented cognition to human-machine systems.

Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Steffen Werner; Jeffrey C. Joe; Brian Wotring; Tuan Tran

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Percutaneous characterization of the insect repellent DEET and the sunscreen oxybenzone from topical skin application  

SciTech Connect

The synergistic percutaneous enhancement between insect repellent DEET and sunscreen oxybenzone has been proven in our laboratory using a series of in vitro diffusion studies. In this study, we carried out an in vivo study to characterize skin permeation profiles from topical skin application of three commercially available repellent and sunscreen preparations. The correlation between skin disposition and drug metabolism was attempted by using data collected. Both DEET and oxybenzone permeated across the skin after the application and achieved substantial systemic absorption. Combined use of DEET and oxybenzone significantly enhanced the percutaneous penetration percentages (ranging 36-108%) due to mutual enhancement effects. Skin disposition indicated that DEET produced a faster transdermal permeation rate and higher systemic absorption extent, but oxybenzone formed a concentrated depot within the skin and delivered the content slowly over the time. In vivo AUC{sub P}/MRT of DEET and oxybenzone was increased by 37%/17% and 63%/10% when the two compounds were used together. No DEET was detected from the urine samples 48 h after the application. Tape stripping seemed to be a satisfactory approach for quantitative assessment of DEET and oxybenzone penetration into the stratum corneum. It was also concluded that pharmacological and toxicological perspectives from concurrent application of insect repellent and sunscreen products require further evaluation to ensure use efficacy and safety of these common consumer healthcare products.

Kasichayanula, Sreeneeranj [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); House, James D. [Department of Animal Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Wang Tao [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Gu Xiaochen [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)], E-mail: xgu@cc.umanitoba.ca

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Precursors to radiopharmaceutical agents for tissue imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A class of radiolabeled compounds to be used in tissue imaging that exhibits rapid brain uptake, good brain:blood radioactivity ratios, and long retention times. The imaging agents are more specifically radioiodinated aromatic amines attached to dihydropyridine carriers, that exhibit heart as well as brain specificity. In addition to the radiolabeled compounds, classes of compounds are also described that are used as precursors and intermediates in the preparation of the imaging agents.

Srivastava, Prem C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy J. Tyson McDonald Steward St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center Abstract Primary tissue represents a better model for studies than immortalized cell lines that are adapted to culture conditions and may no longer reflect a realistic biological state. In this study, normal tissues from clinically indicated robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were grossly identified, sectioned into frozen or formalin fixed samples, and processed as primary cultures. Normal epithelial and fibroblast primary cell cultures were derived from regions of normal tissue, as confirmed by analysis on adjacent tissue by hematoxylin and eosin staining, were exposed to acute

182

The Effect of the iBEAM Evo Carbon Fiber Tabletop on Skin Sparing  

SciTech Connect

Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

Simpson, John B., E-mail: john.simpson@aro.co.nz; Godwin, Guy A.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body Speaker(s): Miriam Byrne Date: April 14, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Miriam Byrne is a participating guest in the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group at LBL. She is an academic member of staff in the Physics Department at the National University of Galway, Ireland. Her research interests, primarily funded by European Commission radiation protection programs, focus on the mechanisms of aerosol transport to and from human body surfaces. Over the last ten years, she has been involved in tracer aerosol experiments to determine rates of particle deposition and resuspension from skin, hair and clothing, as well as studying particle transport into skin pores and hair follicles, and contact transfer from

184

Coupled Electromagnetic and Thermal Modeling of Microwave Tissue Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study deals with 3D finite element modeling of microwave tissue processing using Comsol software 4.0. Maxwell’s equations are coupled with heat conduction equation to determine electromagnetic field distribution and temperature profile within tissue sample in a reagent inside a domestic microwave oven. The microwave power generation term is calculated. Also, temperature distribution obtained is compared with experimental point measurements recorded in the centre of the tissue using a shielded K type thermocouple. Good agreement is found between numerical and experimental data. The effect of size of both reagent and tissue as well as tissue type on microwave heating patterns within tissue sample is investigated. Studies shows that the reagent volume has greater effect than other factors. The results of the study is considered as a basic foundation for development of coupled electromagnetic thermal models of microwave heating of tissue specimens. The model assists in choosing appropriate process parameters for achieving uniform temperature distribution within tissue specimen.

Osama A Hassan; Ahmed H K; Il Ences; Ahmed M El Bialy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Optical Mapping of Impulse Propagation in Engineered Cardiac Tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cardiac tissue engineering has a potential to provide functional, synchronously contractile tissue constructs for heart repair, and for studies of development and disease using in vivo–like yet controllable in vitro settings. ...

Radisic, Milica

186

Strategies to Promote Mammalian Cell Functions Pertinent to Tissue ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fabrication of a Cellulosic Nanocomposite Scaffold with Improved Supermolecular Structure as a Potential Cardiovascular Tissue-Engineered Graft .

187

Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues - Energy Innovation Portal  

Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues Inventors: Christoph Benning, Changcheng Xu, Binbin Lu, Jinpeng Gao Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center

188

Nanoscopic Dynamic Mechanical Properties of a Mineralized Tissue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fabrication of a Cellulosic Nanocomposite Scaffold with Improved Supermolecular Structure as a Potential Cardiovascular Tissue-Engineered Graft .

189

Artificial Skin Ridges Enhance Local Tactile Shape Discrimination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the fundamental requirements for an artificial hand to successfully grasp and manipulate an object is to be able to distinguish different objects' shapes and, more specifically, the objects' surface curvatures. In this study, we investigate the possibility of enhancing the curvature detection of embedded tactile sensors by proposing a ridged fingertip structure, simulating human fingerprints. In addition, a curvature detection approach based on machine learning methods is proposed to provide the embedded sensors with the ability to discriminate the surface curvature of different objects. For this purpose, a set of experiments were carried out to collect tactile signals from a 2 \\times 2 tactile sensor array, then the signals were processed and used for learning algorithms. To achieve the best possible performance for our machine learning approach, three different learning algorithms of Na\\"ive Bayes (NB), Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), and Support Vector Machines (SVM) were implemented and compared ...

Salehi, Saba; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; 10.3390/s110908626

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies Program What does this mean for me? Investments by major companies like the Redskins show the growing market demand for solar technology, as the SunShot Initiative works to accelerate this growth to make solar energy cheaper. If solar power could score a touchdown, then this week's news would definitely count. On Wednesday, the Washington Redskins announced they are working with NRG Energy, one of America's largest energy companies, to bring renewable energy to the football franchise. This means more than just a few panels on the roof. Through the partnership, NRG will install 8,000 translucent solar panels to

191

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies Program What does this mean for me? Investments by major companies like the Redskins show the growing market demand for solar technology, as the SunShot Initiative works to accelerate this growth to make solar energy cheaper. If solar power could score a touchdown, then this week's news would definitely count. On Wednesday, the Washington Redskins announced they are working with NRG Energy, one of America's largest energy companies, to bring renewable energy to the football franchise. This means more than just a few panels on the roof. Through the partnership, NRG will install 8,000 translucent solar panels to

192

Automated segmentation of tissue images for computerized IHC analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents two automated methods for the segmentation of immunohistochemical tissue images that overcome the limitations of the manual approach as well as of the existing computerized techniques. The first independent method, based on unsupervised ... Keywords: Image processing, Immunohistochemistry, Nuclear segmentation, Tissue images, Tissue segmentation

S. Di Cataldo; E. Ficarra; A. Acquaviva; E. Macii

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluation of the mechanical properties of human liver and kidney through aspiration experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proper mechanical characterization of soft biological tissues of the human body has a strong impact on several medical applications such as surgical planning, virtual reality simulators, trauma research, and for diagnostic purposes. Adequate experimental ...

Alessandro Nava; Edoardo Mazza; Frederic Kleinermann; Nick J. Avis; John McClure; Michael Bajka

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin -Heart Rate Monitors -Popular Mechanics http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/breakthroughs/new-electronic-sensors-stick-to-your-skin?click=pm_latest[8/14/2011 5:59:45 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin - Heart Rate Monitors - Popular Mechanics http://www Electronic Sensors That Stick to Your Skin Like Temporary Tattoos Nice tattoo. Or is it a heart-rate monitor to measure the electrical activity of the heart, muscles and brain. And using the same principles behind

Rogers, John A.

195

Modeling the Heating of Biological Tissue based on the Hyperbolic Heat Transfer Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In modern surgery, a multitude of minimally intrusive operational techniques are used which are based on the punctual heating of target zones of human tissue via laser or radio-frequency currents. Traditionally, these processes are modeled by the bioheat equation introduced by Pennes, who considers Fourier's theory of heat conduction. We present an alternative and more realistic model established by the hyperbolic equation of heat transfer. To demonstrate some features and advantages of our proposed method, we apply the obtained results to different types of tissue heating with high energy fluxes, in particular radiofrequency heating and pulsed laser treatment of the cornea to correct refractive errors. Hopefully, the results of our approach help to refine surgical interventions in this novel field of medical treatment.

Tung, M M; Molina, J A Lopez; Rivera, M J; Berjano, E J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

On Sea Surface Salinity Skin Effect Induced by Evaporation and Implications for Remote Sensing of Ocean Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of a cool and salty sea surface skin under evaporation was first proposed by Saunders in 1967, but few efforts have since been made to perceive the salt component of the skin layer. With two salinity missions scheduled to launch in ...

Lisan Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

DOI: 10.1007/s10439-010-0190-4 Effect of Surfactant Mixtures on Skin Structure and Barrier Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associate Editor Daniel Takashi Kamei oversaw the review of this article. Abstract—We investigated the effect of two commonly studied surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (C 12TAB), on skin barrier properties. Using skin conductivity, FT-IR of stratum corneum samples, and penetration of radiolabelled SDS, we determined that addition of C12TAB lowers the ability of SDS to perturb skin’s barrier properties. Ultrafiltration experiments revealed that addition of C12TAB serves to decrease the concentration of monomers and sub-micellar aggregates. None of the measured skin properties including enhancement of skin conductivity, perturbation of lipid structure and skin concentration of SDS correlated with the total SDS concentration in the donor compartment (i.e., the total SDS concentration). However, all these parameters correlated well against the concentration of monomers and sub-micellar aggregates. These findings provide the evidence of the importance of monomer and sub-micellar components in altering skin barrier properties.

Monica A. James-smith; Brittney Hellner; Nancy Annunziato; Samir Mitragotri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Climate: monthly and annual average Earth skin temperature GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth skin temperature GIS data at Earth skin temperature GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of the region is +0.5 added to the the Lat/Lon value. These data are

199

Requirement for vasoactive amines for production of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injection of antigen into the dermis of the flank of an appropriately immunized rat, guinea pig, monkey, or man results, 24-48 h later, in the formation of an erythematous, indurated lesion. Similar skin testing of immunized mice generally fails to produce such lesions (1-3). The explanation for this particular difference between mice and men is unknown but there is reason to believe that it may not stem from differences in immunologically competent cells. Two observations support this view. (a) Appropriately immunized mice exhibit antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) ' reactions when the site of elicitation is the foot pad (4) or the ear (5). (b) Mice exhibit most other manifestations of cell-mediated immunity, in a normal fashion, despite their failure to produce DTH reactions in the flank skin. Thus, mice must have appropriately reactive T cells but there may be some difficulty in delivering the cells required for the production of DTH reactions to the flank skin. In support of this notion, it has been shown that ifperitoneal exudate cells are added to the eliciting dose of antigen placed in the flank skin the lesions that result are morphologically

K. Gershon; Philip W. Askenase; Michael; D. Gershon

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Interfacial Mechanics of the Thin Oxide Skin on Liquid Gallium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to micromold the metal for these applications is enabled by the ... The oxide skin is elastic and yields under a critical stress, at which point the metal flows. ... Interface Bond Strength of HIP-Clad Depleted Uranium and 6061- Aluminum ... Quantitative NanoSIMS Analysis of Grain Boundary Segregation in Bulk ...

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201

Evaluation and design of double-skin facades for office buildings in hot climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this research are (a) to investigate the thermal effect of double skin facades in office buildings in hot climates and (b) to propose guidelines for their efficient design based on this evaluation. The study involves the energy performance analysis of two buildings in India. A base case with the existing building skin was simulated for both the cities. The main source for the high cooling loads was found to be heat gain through windows and walls. This led to the evolution of a series of facade strategies with the goals of reducing heat gain, providing ventilation and day-lighting. The buildings were then simulated for their energy performance with the proposed double-skin strategies. Each of these strategies was varied according to the layers constituting the facade, the transparency of the facade and the orientation of the facade to which it is applied. Final comparisons of energy consumption were made between the proposed options and the base case to find the most efficient strategy and also the factors that affected this efficiency. The simulations were done using the building simulation software, Ener-Win. The double skin was simulated as per an approximate and simplistic calculation of the u-value, solar heat gain coefficient and transmissivity properties of the layers constituting the facade. The model relied on logically arrived at assumptions about the facade properties that were approximately within 10% range of measured values. Based on inferences drawn from these simulations, a set of design guidelines comprised of goals and parameters was generated for design of double-skin facades in hot climates typical to most of the Indian subcontinent. It was realized that the double-skin defined typically as a 'pair of glass skins separated by an air corridor' may not be an entirely energy efficient design strategy for hot climates. However, when used appropriately in combination with other materials, in the right orientation and with the right transparency, a double-layered facade turns out to be an energy efficient solution.

Yellamraju, Vijaya

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The influence of dietary Cu and diabetes on tissue sup 67 Cu retention kinetics in rats  

SciTech Connect

Compared to controls, diabetes results in higher plasma, liver and kidney Cu concentrations. Since alterations in Cu metabolism may be associated with diabetic pathology, the authors investigated how Cu metabolism is affected by diabetes and dietary Cu intake. Nondiabetic and STZ diabetic rats were fed Cu suppl. or Cu def. diets for 5 wks. Rats were intubated with 28 {mu}Ci {sup 67}Cu and killed after 8, 16, 24, 32, 64, or 128 h. There were marked effects of both diet and diabetes on {sup 67}Cu metabolism. Independent of diabetes, deficient rats had a higher % of retained {sup 67}Cu, in liver, plasma, RBC, muscle, spleen, brain, lung, uterus, and intestine than adequate Cu rats. Independent of dietary Cu, diabetic rats had a lower % of retained {sup 67}Cu in liver, plasma, RBC, muscle, spleen, lung, bone, pancreas, skin, uterus and heart than controls. Differential effects were noted for kidney; adequate Cu diabetic rats had a higher % of retained {sup 67}Cu than all other groups. Marked effects of both diet and diabetes were evident when tissue Cu turnover was examined. Compared to Cu suppl. rats, Cu def. rats had a slower turnover of {sup 67}Cu, in liver, plasma, intestine, pancreas, eye, brain, muscle, spleen, lung and heart. Diabetic rats had a slower turnover of {sup 67}Cu than nondiabetic rats in liver, plasma, intestine, pancreas, eye, kidney, RBC and uterus. The data imply that a focus on Cu metabolism with regard to cellular Cu trafficking and pathology may be warranted.

Uriu-Hare, J.Y.; Rucker, R.B.; Keen, C.L. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

203

Generation of a suite of 3D computer-generated breast phantoms from a limited set of human subject data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The authors previously reported on a three-dimensional computer-generated breast phantom, based on empirical human image data, including a realistic finite-element based compression model that was capable of simulating multimodality imaging data. The computerized breast phantoms are a hybrid of two phantom generation techniques, combining empirical breast CT (bCT) data with flexible computer graphics techniques. However, to date, these phantoms have been based on single human subjects. In this paper, the authors report on a new method to generate multiple phantoms, simulating additional subjects from the limited set of original dedicated breast CT data. The authors developed an image morphing technique to construct new phantoms by gradually transitioning between two human subject datasets, with the potential to generate hundreds of additional pseudoindependent phantoms from the limited bCT cases. The authors conducted a preliminary subjective assessment with a limited number of observers (n= 4) to illustrate how realistic the simulated images generated with the pseudoindependent phantoms appeared. Methods: Several mesh-based geometric transformations were developed to generate distorted breast datasets from the original human subject data. Segmented bCT data from two different human subjects were used as the 'base' and 'target' for morphing. Several combinations of transformations were applied to morph between the 'base' and 'target' datasets such as changing the breast shape, rotating the glandular data, and changing the distribution of the glandular tissue. Following the morphing, regions of skin and fat were assigned to the morphed dataset in order to appropriately assign mechanical properties during the compression simulation. The resulting morphed breast was compressed using a finite element algorithm and simulated mammograms were generated using techniques described previously. Sixty-two simulated mammograms, generated from morphing three human subject datasets, were used in a preliminary observer evaluation where four board certified breast radiologists with varying amounts of experience ranked the level of realism (from 1 ='fake' to 10 ='real') of the simulated images. Results: The morphing technique was able to successfully generate new and unique morphed datasets from the original human subject data. The radiologists evaluated the realism of simulated mammograms generated from the morphed and unmorphed human subject datasets and scored the realism with an average ranking of 5.87 {+-} 1.99, confirming that overall the phantom image datasets appeared more 'real' than 'fake.' Moreover, there was not a significant difference (p > 0.1) between the realism of the unmorphed datasets (6.0 {+-} 1.95) compared to the morphed datasets (5.86 {+-} 1.99). Three of the four observers had overall average rankings of 6.89 {+-} 0.89, 6.9 {+-} 1.24, 6.76 {+-} 1.22, whereas the fourth observer ranked them noticeably lower at 2.94 {+-} 0.7. Conclusions: This work presents a technique that can be used to generate a suite of realistic computerized breast phantoms from a limited number of human subjects. This suite of flexible breast phantoms can be used for multimodality imaging research to provide a known truth while concurrently producing realistic simulated imaging data.

Hsu, Christina M. L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Palmeri, Mark L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Veress, Alexander I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Dobbins, James T. III [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Transport Pathways and Enhancement Mechanisms within Localized and Non-Localized Transport Regions in Skin Treated with Low-Frequency Sonophoresis and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in transdermal drug delivery utilizing low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) have revealed that skin permeability enhancement is not homogenous across the skin surface. Instead, ...

Polat, Baris E.

205

Application of the Aqueous Porous Pathway Model to Quantify the Effect of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate on Ultrasound-Induced Skin Structural Perturbation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigated the effect of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) on skin structural perturbation when utilized simultaneously with low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS). Pig full-thickness skin (FTS) and pig split-thickness ...

Polat, Baris E.

206

Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

Jian Li

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

Quantification of differences in the effective atomic numbers of healthy and cancerous tissues: A discussion in the context of diagnostics and dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: There are a range of genetic and nongenetic factors influencing the elemental composition of different human tissues. The elemental composition of cancerous tissues frequently differs from healthy tissue of the same organ, particularly in high-Z trace element concentrations. For this reason, one could suggest that this may be exploited in diagnostics and perhaps even influence dosimetry. Methods: In this work, for the first time, effective atomic numbers are computed for common cancerous and healthy tissues using a robust, energy-dependent approach between 10 keV and 100 MeV. These are then quantitatively compared within the context of diagnostics and dosimetry. Results: Differences between effective atomic numbers of healthy and diseased tissues are found to be typically less than 10%. Fibrotic tissues and calcifications of the breast exhibit substantial (tens to hundreds of percent) differences to healthy tissue. Expectedly, differences are most pronounced in the photoelectric regime and consequently most relevant for kV imaging/therapy and radionuclides with prominent low-energy peaks. Cancerous tissue of the testes and stomach have lower effective atomic numbers than corresponding healthy tissues, while diseased tissues of the other organ sites typically have higher values. Conclusions: As dose calculation approaches improve in accuracy, there may be an argument for the explicit inclusion of pathologies. This is more the case for breast, penile, prostate, nasopharyngeal, and stomach cancer, less so for testicular and kidney cancer. The calculated data suggest dual-energy computed tomography could potentially improve lesion identification in the aforementioned organs (with the exception of testicular cancer), with most import in breast imaging. Ultimately, however, the differences are very small. It is likely that the assumption of a generic 'tissue ramp' in planning will be sufficient for the foreseeable future, and that the Z differences do not notably aid lesion detection beyond that already facilitated by differences in mass density.

Taylor, M. L. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovation Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3001 (Australia) and Medical Physics, WBRC, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Cheryl Burrell Loma Linda University Abstract Our study proposes that the level of...

209

Human exposure to dioxin from combustion sources  

SciTech Connect

Because of their extreme toxicity, much concern and debate has arisen about the nature and extent of human exposure to dioxin. Since municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators are known to emit polychorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polycholorinated dibenzofurnas (PCDFs) many people who live near MSW incinerators fear that they will be exposed to high levels of dioxin and subsequently develop cancer. What is often overlooked in this debate, however, is the fact that the general population is continuously being exposed to trace amounts of dioxin as exemplified by the fact that virtually all human adipose tissue samples contain dioxin at levels of 3 parts per trillion (ppt) or greater. This paper provides a perspective on MSW incineration as a source of human exposure to dioxin by comparing this exposure source with exposure to background environmental contamination and evaluates some of the potential key sources of PCDD/PCDF input into the enviroment. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

Hattemer-Frey, H.A.; Travis, C.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Beyond differential expression : methods and tools for mining the transcriptomic landscape of human tissue and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although there are a variety of high-throughput technologies used to perform biological experiments, DNA microarrays have become a standard tool in the modern biologist's arsenal. Microarray experiments provide measurements ...

Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Aging effects on DNA methylation modules in human brain and blood tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes in chromosomes cause aging? Cell 1996, 86:9-12. 2.M: Cross-Talk between Aging and Cancer. Annals of the NewMF, Esteller M: Epigenetics and aging: the targets and the

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Recommendation of short tandem repeat profiling for authenticating human cell lines, stem cells, and tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards Partnership (CSP) recommends new or revisedcomment period concurrent with CSP Review ATCC SDO respondsthen forwards to ANSI and CSP for concurrent 45 day public

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Quantification of total mercury in liver and heart tissue of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) from Alaska USA  

SciTech Connect

This study quantified the Hg levels in the liver (n=98) and heart (n=43) tissues of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) (n=102) harvested from Prince William Sound and Kodiak Island Alaska. Mercury tissue dry weight (dw) concentrations in the liver ranged from 1.7 to 393 ppm dw, and in the heart from 0.19 to 4.99 ppm dw. Results of this study indicate liver and heart tissues' Hg ppm dw concentrations significantly increase with age. Male Harbor Seals bioaccumulated Hg in both their liver and heart tissues at a significantly faster rate than females. The liver Hg bioaccumulation rates between the harvest locations Kodiak Island and Prince William Sound were not found to be significantly different. On adsorption Hg is transported throughout the Harbor Seal's body with the partition coefficient higher for the liver than the heart. No significant differences in the bio-distribution (liver:heart Hg ppm dw ratios (n=38)) values were found with respect to either age, sex or geographic harvest location. In this study the age at which Hg liver and heart bioaccumulation levels become significantly distinct in male and female Harbor Seals were identified through a Tukey's analysis. Of notably concern to human health was a male Harbor Seal's liver tissue harvested from Kodiak Island region. Mercury accumulation in this sample tissue was determined through a Q-test to be an outlier, having far higher Hg concentrarion (liver 392 Hg ppm dw) than the general population sampled. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury accumulation in the liver and heart of seals exceed food safety guidelines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accumulation rate is greater in males than females with age. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Liver mercury accumulation is greater than in the heart tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury determination by USA EPA Method 7473 using thermal decomposition.

Marino, Kady B. [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Hoover-Miller, Anne; Conlon, Suzanne; Prewitt, Jill [Alaska SeaLife Center, City of Seward, AK (United States)] [Alaska SeaLife Center, City of Seward, AK (United States); O'Shea, Stephen K., E-mail: soshea@rwu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Anomalous skin effects in relativistic parallel propagating weakly magnetized electron plasma waves  

SciTech Connect

Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized electron plasma is presented and general expressions for longitudinal and transverse permittivites are derived. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves increases as we move from non-relativistic to highly relativistic regime. The ambient magnetic field reduces/enhances the skin effects for R-wave/L-wave as the strength of the field is increased. In general, the weak magnetic field effects are pronounced for the weakly relativistic regime as compared with other relativistic cases. The results are also graphically illustrated. On switching off the magnetic field, previous results for field free case are retrieved [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Priniples of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1984), Vol. 9, p. 106].

Abbas, Gohar; Bashir, M. F. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Human-machine interactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Guidelines for the Optimization of Protective Clothing: Heat Stress and Skin Contamination Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protective clothing (PCs) requirements present a challenge to radiation protection managers, particularly in environments that could potentially lead to an increased risk of heat stress. This report presents a guide to the development of a technically sound worker optimization program addressing skin contamination and heat stress risks. Project managers have successfully implemented this approach at one nuclear power plant and two Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites.

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

217

ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subjects Protecting Human Subjects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Program exists to ensure that all research conducted at DOE institutions, whether...

218

Human Measure and Architecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This book bundles the human measure and architecting articles. The articles address the relationship between product creation and humans and the role of the system architect.

Gerrit Muller

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to organize the databases/information and organize and move the tissues from the long-term dog (4,000 dogs) and mouse (over 30,000 mice) radiation experiments done at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1970's and 80's to Northwestern University. These studies were done with the intention of understanding the effects of exposure to radiation at a variety of different doses, dose-rates, and radiation qualities on end-points such as life-shortening, carcinogenesis, cause of death, shifts in disease incidence and other biological parameters. Organ and tissue samples from these animals including cancers, metastases and other significant degenerative and inflammatory lesions and those in a regular protocol of normal tissues were preserved in paraffin blocks, tissue impressions and sections and represent a great resource for the radiation biology community. These collections are particularly significant since these experiments are not likely to be repeated because of the extreme cost of monies and time for such large-scale animal studies. The long-term goal is to make these tissues and databases available to the wider scientific community so that questions such as tissue sensitivity, early and late effects, low dose and protracted dose responses of normal and tumor tissues, etc. can be examined and defined. Recent advances in biology particularly at the subcellular and molecular level now permit microarray-based gene expression array analyses from paraffin-embedded tissues (where RNA samples are significantly degraded), synchrotron-based studies of metal and other elemental distribution patterns in tissues, PCR-based analyses for mutation detection, and other similar approaches that were not available when the long¬ term animal studies were designed and initiated. Understanding the basis and progression of radiation damage should also permit rational approaches to prevention and mitigation of those damages. Therefore, as stated earlier, these tissues and their related documentation, represent a significant resource for future studies. For this project, we propose to accomplish the following objectives: (1) inventory and organize the tissues, blood smears, wet-tissues and paper-¬based information that is available in the tissue bank at Argonne National Laboratory; (2) convert the existing Oracle database of the mouse studies to MS Access( the dog data is already in this format which is far more user friendly and widely used in business and research) , (3) move the remaining samples and documentation from dogs that had been transferred from ANL to New Mexico (in Dr. F. Hahn's care) to Northwestern University and add these to the inventory; (4) move the tissues and Access database at Argonne National Laboratory to Northwestern University.

Gayle Woloschak

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Developing an Index to Measure Urban Heat Island Effect Using Satellite Land Skin Temperature and Land Cover Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new index of calculating the intensity of urban heat island effects (UHI) for a city using satellite skin temperature and land cover observations is recommended. UHI, the temperature difference between urban and rural regions, is traditionally ...

Menglin S. Jin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of Various CFD Modelling Strategies in Predicting Airflow and Temperature in a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

insulation, to shade solar radiation and to provide suitabledouble skin is shown. The solar radiation was not directlyas different values of solar radiation. Nomenclature u i,j,k

Pasut, Wilmer; De Carli, Michele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Evaluations of Land–Ocean Skin Temperatures of the ISCCP Satellite Retrievals and the NCEP and ERA Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the skin temperature (ST) datasets of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) D satellite product, the ISCCP FD satellite product, the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40), the NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis, and the ...

Ben-Jei Tsuang; Ming-Dah Chou; Yuanchong Zhang; Andreas Roesch; Kun Yang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Background Error Correlation between Surface Skin and Air Temperatures: Estimation and Impact on the Assimilation of Infrared Window Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper makes use of ensemble forecasts to infer the correlation between surface skin temperature Ts and air temperature Ta model errors. The impact of this correlation in data assimilation is then investigated. In the process of assimilating ...

Louis Garand; Mark Buehner; Nicolas Wagneur

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Spatiotemporal and spatial threshold models for relating UV exposures and skin cancer in the central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exact mechanisms relating exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and elevated risk of skin cancer remain the subject of debate. For example, there is disagreement on whether the main risk factor is duration of the exposure, its intensity, or some ...

Laura A. Hatfield; Richard W. Hoffbeck; Bruce H. Alexander; Bradley P. Carlin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Toward an Integrated Land–Ocean Surface Skin Temperature Analysis from the Variational Assimilation of Infrared Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-East and -West window channel radiances are directly assimilated using a 1D variational technique, providing surface skin temperature (Ts) estimates over all surface types (land, water, or ...

Louis Garand

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part II: Field Measurements of Surface Heat Flux and Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI) described by Sromovsky et al. (Part I, this issue) was field-tested in a combination of freshwater and ocean deployments. Solar irradiance monitoring and field calibration techniques were ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

doi:10.5402/2011/617082 Research Article Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and the Occurrence of Skin Cancer in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2011 Catharina C. van Niekerk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. A cross-sectional study within a large populationbased dataset. Results. Skin cancer was found in 2.7 % (95 % CI: 2.3–3.1) of the 5366 individuals forming our dataset. The odds ratio (OR) for endometrioid cancer in the ovary to skin cancer in the under 50 age group was 8.9 (95 % CI: 3.2–25.0). The OR decreased in older patients to 1.2. Conclusions. Patients with epithelial ovarian malignancies show an increased risk of skin cancer. A significantly increased risk (4.3%) for endometrioid ovarian cancer was found in the group aged under 50. 1.

Isrn Obstetrics; Catharina C. Van Niekerk; Johan Bulten; Andrél. M. Verbeek

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Regeneration of Tissues and Organs Using Autologous Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed work aims to address three major challenges to the field of regenerative medicine: 1) the growth and expansion of regenerative cells outside the body in controlled in vitro environments, 2) supportive vascular supply for large tissue engineered constructs, and 3) interactive biomaterials that can orchestrate tissue development in vivo. Toward this goal, we have engaged a team of scientists with expertise in cell and molecular biology, physiology, biomaterials, controlled release, nanomaterials, tissue engineering, bioengineering, and clinical medicine to address all three challenges. This combination of resources, combined with the vast infrastructure of the WFIRM, have brought to bear on projects to discover and test new sources of autologous cells that can be used therapeutically, novel methods to improve vascular support for engineered tissues in vivo, and to develop intelligent biomaterials and bioreactor systems that interact favorably with stem and progenitor cells to drive tissue maturation. The Instituteâ??s ongoing programs are aimed at developing regenerative medicine technologies that employ a patientâ??s own cells to help restore or replace tissue and organ function. This DOE program has provided a means to solve some of the vexing problems that are germane to many tissue engineering applications, regardless of tissue type or target disease. By providing new methods that are the underpinning of tissue engineering, this program facilitated advances that can be applied to conditions including heart disease, diabetes, renal failure, nerve damage, vascular disease, and cancer, to name a few. These types of conditions affect millions of Americans at a cost of more than $400 billion annually. Regenerative medicine holds the promise of harnessing the bodyâ??s own power to heal itself. By addressing the fundamental challenges of this field in a comprehensive and focused fashion, this DOE program has opened new opportunities to treat conditions where other approaches have failed.

Anthony Atala, M.D.

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Human Performance - Fossil Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All humans make errors. Industrial human errors can result in a loss of life and can significantly impact the productivity and cost effectiveness of any facility or company. Several industries in which human error has had a significant impact (for example, airline, medical, military, nuclear power, aviation, and chemical) have implemented human performance programs with excellent results. Human errors by fossil plant operators can easily challenge plant safety and production. In the fossil operations are...

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Health burden of skin lesions at low arsenic exposure through groundwater in Pakistan. Is river the source?  

SciTech Connect

A significant proportion of groundwater in south Asia is contaminated with arsenic. Pakistan has low levels of arsenic in groundwater compared with China, Bangladesh and India. A representative multi-stage cluster survey conducted among 3874 persons {>=}15 years of age to determine the prevalence of arsenic skin lesions, its relation with arsenic levels and cumulative arsenic dose in drinking water in a rural district (population: 1.82 million) in Pakistan. Spot-urine arsenic levels were compared among individuals with and without arsenic skin lesions. In addition, the relation of age, body mass index, smoking status with arsenic skin lesions was determined. The geographical distribution of the skin lesions and arsenic-contaminated wells in the district were ascertained using global positioning system. The total arsenic, inorganic and organic forms, in water and spot-urine samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The prevalence of skin lesions of arsenic was estimated for complex survey design, using surveyfreq and surveylogistic options of SAS 9.1 software.The prevalence of definitive cases i.e. hyperkeratosis of both palms and soles, was 3.4 per 1000 and suspected cases i.e. any sign of arsenic skin lesions (melanosis and/or keratosis), were 13.0 per 1000 among {>=}15-year-old persons in the district. Cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) was calculated from levels of arsenic in water and duration of use of current drinking water source. Prevalence of skin lesions increases with cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) in drinking water and arsenic levels in urine. Skin lesions were 2.5-fold among individuals with BMI <18.5 kg/m{sup 2}. Geographically, more arsenic-contaminated wells and skin lesions were alongside Indus River, suggests a strong link between arsenic contamination of groundwater with proximity to river.This is the first reported epidemiological and clinical evidence of arsenic skin lesions due to groundwater in Pakistan. Further investigations and focal mitigation measures for arsenic may be carried out alongside Indus River.

Fatmi, Zafar, E-mail: zafar.fatmi@aku.edu [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)] [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan); Azam, Iqbal; Ahmed, Faiza; Kazi, Ambreen; Gill, Albert Bruce; Kadir, Muhmmad Masood; Ahmed, Mubashir; Ara, Naseem; Janjua, Naveed Zafar [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)] [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Adipogenesis and angiogenesis : roles in tissue engineering and glucose metabolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adipose tissue serves two main functions in the body: (1) it is the body's primary energy depot; and (2) it also serves as an important endocrine organ, producing and secreting various enzymes, growth factors, cytokines, ...

Tam, Joshua

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Carbon NanoFiber Systems for Tissue Interfacing  

Scientists at ORNL have created vertically aligned carbon nano?fibers (VACNF) that are well suited for cell and tissue interfacing applications, such as electrophysiological stimulus and recording, and drug and gene delivery. VACNFs are produced in an ...

233

BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein ...

Spector, Myron

234

Distribution and metabolism of antibodies and macromolecules in tumor tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tumor targeting drugs that selectively treat cancerous tissue are promising agents for lowering the morbidity and mortality of cancer. Within this field, antibody treatments for cancer are currently being developed for ...

Thurber, Greg M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Indirect Tissue Scaffold Fabrication via Additive Manufacturing and Biomimetic Mineralization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unlike traditional stochastic scaffold fabrication techniques, additive manufacturing (AM) can be used to create tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolds with controlled porosity and pore geometry (meso-structure). However,… (more)

Bernardo, Jesse Raymond

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sequence motifs predictive of tissue-specific skipping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative splicing plays a major role in protein diversity and regulating gene expression. Motifs that regulate tissue-specific alternative splicing have been identified by groups studying small sets of genes. We introduce ...

Soni, Neha

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Variation in Tissue...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Variation in Tissue Responses to Low-Dose Radiation Authors: E. M. Rinchik,1,2 P. Hoyt,3 L. Branstetter,1 R. Olszewski,1 K. T. Cain,1 and B. Voy1,3 Institutions: 1Life...

238

BE.410J Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include: structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic ...

Kamm, Roger D.

239

Collagen scaffolds and injectable biopolymer gels for cardiac tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds have begun to shown promise for cell delivery for cardiac tissue engineering. Although various polymers and material forms have been explored, there is a need for: injectable gels ...

Ng, Karen Kailin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

NF45/ILF2 tissue expression, promoter analysis, and interleukin-2 transactivating function  

SciTech Connect

NF45/ILF2 associates with NF90/ILF3 in the nucleus and regulates IL-2 gene transcription at the antigen receptor response element (ARRE)/NF-AT DNA target sequence (P.N. Kao, L. Chen, G. Brock, J. Ng, A.J. Smith, B. Corthesy, J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 20691-20699). NF45 is widely expressed in normal tissues, especially testis, brain, and kidney, with a predominantly nuclear distribution. NF45 mRNA expression is increased in lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. The human and murine NF45 proteins differ only by substitution of valine by isoleucine at amino acid 142. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the human NF45 gene to chromosome 1q21.3, and mouse NF45 gene to chromosome 3F1. Promoter analysis of 2.5 kB of the murine NF45 gene reveals that significant activation is conferred by factors, possible including NF-Y, that bind to the CCAAT-box sequence. The function of human NF45 in regulating IL-2 gene expression was characterized in Jurkat T-cells stably transfected with plasmids directing expression of NF45 cDNA in sense or antisense orientations. NF45 sense expression increased IL-2 luciferase reporter gene activity 120-fold, and IL-2 protein expression 2-fold compared to control cells. NF45 is a highly conserved, regulated transcriptional activator, and one target gene is IL-2.

Zhao Guohua [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Shi Lingfang [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Qiu Daoming [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Hu Hong [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Kao, Peter N. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States)]. E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Skin-to-Skin Replenishment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The proposed approach of resupplying the Sea Base may be unconventional from current US Navy operational methods, but is not without ...

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

242

Interstitial brachytherapy of periorificial skin carcinomas of the face: A retrospective study of 97 cases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze outcomes after interstitial brachytherapy of facial periorificial skin carcinomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 97 skin carcinomas (88 basal cell carcinomas, 9 squamous cell carcinomas) of the nose, periorbital areas, and ears from 40 previously untreated patients (Group 1) and 57 patients who had undergone surgery (Group 2). The average dose was 55 Gy (range, 50-65 Gy) in Group 1 and 52 Gy (range, 50-60 Gy) in Group 2 (mean implantation times: 79 and 74 hours, respectively). We calculated survival rates and assessed functional and cosmetic results de visu. Results: Median age was 71 years (range, 17-97 years). There were 29 T1, 8 T2, 1 T3, and 2 Tx tumors in Group 1. Tumors were <2 cm in Group 2. Local control was 92.5% in Group 1 and 88% in Group 2 (median follow-up, 55 months; range, 6-132 months). Five-year disease-free survival was better in Group 1 (91%; range, 75-97) than in Group 2 (80%; range, 62-90; p = 0.23). Of the 34 patients whose results were reassessed, 8 presented with pruritus or epiphora; 1 Group 2 patient had an impaired eyelid aperture. Cosmetic results were better in Group 1 than in Group 2 with, respectively, 72% (8/11) vs. 52% (12/23) good results and 28 (3/11) vs. 43% (10/23) fair results. Conclusions: Brachytherapy provided a high level of local control and good cosmetic results for facial periorificial skin carcinomas that pose problems of surgical reconstruction. Results were better for untreated tumors than for incompletely excised tumors or tumors recurring after surgery.

Rio, Emmanuel [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France)]. E-mail: e-rio@nantes.fnclcc.fr; Bardet, Etienne [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Ferron, Christophe [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France); Peuvrel, Patrick [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Supiot, Stephane [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Campion, Loic [Department of Biostatistics, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Beauvillain De Montreuil, Claude [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France); Mahe, Marc Andre [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Dreno, Brigitte [Department of Dermatology, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development and Construction of Bioclimatic Double Skin Active Facade for Hot and Humid Climate of UAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transparency in architecture is desirable for many reasons. In order to build transparent buildings with high levels of occupant comfort without compromising energy performance, facade technology and integration of facade and environmental systems become still more advanced. The present paper deals with the development and construction of mechanically ventilated double skin facade with HVAC integration for hot and humid climate like UAE. A case study is presented, illustrating potential benefits of careful application of the available technologies adopting an integrated approach from the early design phases. Moreover, the paper gives an introduction to test and demonstrate the performance of the facade and HVAC integration.

Karbor, R. G.; Mohamed, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Performance Assessment of Bi-Directional Knotless Tissue-Closure Devices in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters, 2009 - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to assess the performance of bi-directional knotless tissue-closure devices for use in tagging juvenile salmon. This study is part of an ongoing effort at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to reduce unwanted effects of tags and tagging procedures on the survival and behavior of juvenile salmonids, by assessing and refining suturing techniques, suture materials, and tag burdens. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of the knotless (barbed) suture, using three different suture patterns (treatments: 6-point, Wide “N”, Wide “N” Knot), to the current method of suturing (MonocrylTM monofilament, discontinuous sutures with a 2×2×2×2 knot) used in monitoring and research programs with a novel antiseptic barrier on the wound (“Second Skin”).

Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Bryson, Amanda J.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

246

Volumetric reconstruction of tissue structure from two-dimensional microscopy images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell morphology of tissue is naturally three-dimensional. Most current methods for tissue analysis use two dimensional histological images of the tissue samples, restricting the analysis to 2D. Existing approaches do not ...

Cruz, Francisco (Francisco Ui)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Development of a high throughput 3D perfused liver tissue bioreactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development of a device designed for culturing liver tissue in a 3D perfused environment. Cells form tissue inside miniature channels of a scaffold, and the tissue is perfused with culture medium ...

Inman, Samuel Walker

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of computational and experimental tools to study mechanotransduction in C.elegans and primates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When an object comes into contact with the human fingertip, surface loads imposed on the fingerpad are transmitted to thousands of specialized nerve endings embedded in the skin tissue. These nerve endings, called ...

Kumar, Siddarth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after low dose radiation exposure. Cells viability/cytotoxicity analysis data are currently being analyzed to determine how these endpoints are affected under our experimental conditions. The results from this study will be translatable to risk assessment for assigning limits to radiation workers, pre-dosing for more effective radiotherapy and the consequences of long duration space flight. The data from this study has been presented a various scientific meetings/workshops and a manuscript, containing the findings, is currently being prepared for publication. Due to unforeseen challenges in collecting the data and standardizing experimental procedures, the second and third aims have not been completed. However, attempts will be made, based on the availability of funds, to continue this project so that these aims can be satisfied.

Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Human Rights and Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration, Human Rights and Security in Europe MRU Student Conference Proceedings 2012 Edited by Siril Berglund, Helen McCarthy and Agata Patyna #12;2 "Migration, Human Rights and Security...............................................................................................58 #12;3 "Migration, Human Rights and Security in Europe", MRU Student Conference Proceedings

Saunders, Mark

251

Nuclear matter symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei RID A-2398-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlations between the thickness of the neutron skin in finite nuclei and the nuclear matter symmetry energy are studied in the Skyrme Hartree-Fock model. From the most recent analysis of the isospin diffusion data in heavy-ion collisions based on an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model with in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, a value of L = 88 +/- 25 MeV for the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density is extracted, and this imposes stringent constraints on both the parameters in the Skyrme effective interactions and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei. Predicted thickness of the neutron skin is 0.22 +/- 0.04 fm for (208)Pb, 0.29 +/- 0.04 fm for (132)Sn, and 0.22 +/- 0.04 fm for (124)Sn.

Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor  

SciTech Connect

The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

ORISE: Human Subjects Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Protection Human Subjects Protection The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs technical assessments to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories involved in human subjects research projects. Under DOE Order and Policy 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, and 10 CFR 745, DOE employees and contractors are expected to protect the rights and welfare of human research subjects. In support of the DOE Office of Science and the Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP), ORISE has most recently assisted with the development and distribution of tools to address classified research and to track potential human social cultural behavior systems (HSCB) research conducted by DOE laboratories. Examples of products that ORISE has developed in support of the HSPP

254

A Tissue-Level Electromechanical Model of the Left Ventricle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EA are stochastic search methods inspired from the natural selection process. ..... Ten Tusscher KH, Noble D, Noble PJ, Panfilov AV (2004) A model for human ...

255

Mouse skin tumor initiation-promotion and complete carcinogenesis bioassays: mechanisms and biological activities of emission samples. Environ. Health Perspect. 47  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil shale soot, and gasoline vehicle exhaust materials have been examined by this method. The studies reported here have been constructed to compare the carcinogenic and tumorigenic potency of extracts from various particulate emissions: coke ovens, diesel and gasoline vehicles and a roofing tar pot. Automobile emission samples were obtained by collecting the diluted and cooled exhaust on Teflon-coated glass fiber filters. Coke oven and roofing tar samples were particulate emission samples collected by impaction and filtration. The organic components associated with each of the particles were extracted with dichloromethane and dermally applied to SENCAR mice. All agents were applied as tumor initiators by using a five-dose protocol. Selected extracts were also applied as complete carcinogens and as tumor promotors. Statistical analyses of the resulting tumor data were performed by using nonlinear Poisson and probit models. The results from these experiments provide a suitable data base for comparative potency estimation of complex mixtures.

S. Nesnow; L. L. Triplettt; T. J. Slagat

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

New gel phantoms simulating optical properties of biological tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gel phantoms made of polyacrylamide gel, India ink, and TiO2 were prepared to simulate biological tissues in optical properties. India ink and TiO2were used to imitate the absorption and scattering properties, respectively, of biological tissues. The amounts of absorption and scattering were controlled by varying the concentrations of India ink and TiO2 since India ink is purely absorbing and TiO2 is purely scattering. The oblique incidence reflectometry technique was used to measure the optical properties of our phantoms.[1] The advantages of the TiO2 phantoms include good stability, low cost, and simple preparation.

Lee, Mija

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Digital optical phase conjugation of fluorescence in turbid tissue  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a method for phase conjugating fluorescence. Our method, called reference free digital optical phase conjugation, can conjugate extremely weak, incoherent optical signals. It was used to phase conjugate fluorescent light originating from a bead covered with 0.5 mm of light-scattering tissue. The phase conjugated beam refocuses onto the bead and causes a local increase of over two orders of magnitude in the light intensity. Potential applications are in imaging, optical trapping, and targeted photochemical activation inside turbid tissue.

Vellekoop, Ivo M.; Cui Meng; Yang Changhuei [Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Fitzgerald, Jason (Sacramento, CA); Troppmann, Christoph (Sacramento, CA); Michalopoulou, Andromachi (Athens, GR)

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

259

Human In Vivo Dose Response to Controlled,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exposure of LDIR in the normal skin of men undergoing therapeutic radiation for prostate cancer (research protocol: HIPAA compliant, IRB approved). Using newly developed...

260

Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expressing explicitly the parameters of the standard Skyrme interaction in terms of the macroscopic properties of asymmetric nuclear matter, we show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and the double neutron/proton ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies leads to a more stringent limit on L approximately independent of E(sym)(rho(0)). The implication of these new constraints on the Delta r(np) of (208)Pb as well as the core-crust transition density and pressure in neutron stars is discussed.

Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Phorbol myristate acetate and catechol as skin cocarcinogens in SENCAR mice. Environ. Health Perspect. 68  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enhancement of the carcinogenicity of benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P) and 3-propiolactone (BPL) by the mouse skin cocarcinogens phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and catechol were examined in female SEN-CAR mice, 30 per group. The carcinogen and cocarcinogen were applied simultaneously, three times weekly for 490-560 days. B(a)P and BPL were used at constant doses of 5 and 50 jig, respectively, in all experiments. PMA was used at three doses, 2.5, 1.0, and 0.5 p.g per application, and catechol was used at one dose, 2 mg per application. Control groups included animals that received carcinogen only, cocarcinogen only, acetone only, and no treatment. The carcinogenicity of B(a)P and BPL were enhanced by the cocarcinogens, particularly in terms of tumor multiplicity. For both carcinogens, the most marked cocarcinogenic effects were observed at the lowest dose of PMA used (0.5,ug per application). This observation applied for days to first tumor, animals with tumors, tumor multiplicity, and incidence of malignant skin tumors. Catechol applied alone did not induce any tumors; with PMA alone there were significant incidences of benign and malignant tumors, e.g., at a dose of only 0.5,ug per application, 15 of 30 animals had 28 tumors, 5 of which were squamous carcinomas. In two-stage carcinogenesis experiments with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as initiator and PMA as promoter, SENCAR mice showed a greater susceptibility to tumor induction when compared to ICR/Ha mice used in earlier work. This susceptibility was most notable in terms of rate of tumor appearance and tumor multiplicity.

Benjamin L. Van Duuren; Susan Melchionne; Irving Seidmant

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Analysis of Conductor Impedances Accounting for Skin Effect and Nonlinear Permeability  

SciTech Connect

It is often necessary to protect sensitive electrical equipment from pulsed electric and magnetic fields. To accomplish this electromagnetic shielding structures similar to Faraday Cages are often implemented. If the equipment is inside a facility that has been reinforced with rebar, the rebar can be used as part of a lighting protection system. Unfortunately, such shields are not perfect and allow electromagnetic fields to be created inside due to discontinuities in the structure, penetrations, and finite conductivity of the shield. In order to perform an analysis of such a structure it is important to first determine the effect of the finite impedance of the conductors used in the shield. In this paper we will discuss the impedances of different cylindrical conductors in the time domain. For a time varying pulse the currents created in the conductor will have different spectral components, which will affect the current density due to skin effects. Many construction materials use iron and different types of steels that have a nonlinear permeability. The nonlinear material can have an effect on the impedance of the conductor depending on the B-H curve. Although closed form solutions exist for the impedances of cylindrical conductors made of linear materials, computational techniques are needed for nonlinear materials. Simulations of such impedances are often technically challenging due to the need for a computational mesh to be able to resolve the skin depths for the different spectral components in the pulse. The results of such simulations in the time domain will be shown and used to determine the impedances of cylindrical conductors for lightning current pulses that have low frequency content.

Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Speer, R D

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

Azzam, Edouard I

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

FULL ARTICLE Bond-selective imaging of deep tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FULL ARTICLE Bond-selective imaging of deep tissue through the optical window between 1600 and 1850 nm Pu Wang**; 1 , Han-Wei Wang**; 1 , Michael Sturek2 , and Ji-Xin Cheng*; 1; 3 1 Weldon School nm for bond-selective deep tis- sue imaging through harmonic vibrational excitation and acoustic

Cheng, Ji-Xin

266

Self-protecting transistor oscillator for treating animal tissues  

SciTech Connect

A transistor oscillator circuit wherein the load current applied to animal tissue treatment electrodes is fed back to the transistor. Removal of load is sensed to automatically remove feedback and stop oscillations. A thermistor on one treatment electrode senses temperature, and by means of a control circuit controls oscillator transistor current.

Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Synthetic Collagen Fascicles for the Regeneration of Tendon Tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and mass transport. In this report we describe the fabrication of a novel multi-fibre collagen fascicle structure, based on type-I collagen with failure stress of 25 – 49 MPa, approximating the strength and structure of native tendon tissue. We demonstrate...

Kew, SJ; Gwynne, JH; Enea, D; Brooks, R; Rushton, N; Best, Serena Michelle; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Contact List, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division Contact List Human Resources Guest, User, Visitor (GUV) Center Occupational Medicine Training and Qualifications Office Note: All listed phone extensions are in the format of (631) 344-xxxx. Human Resources Robert Lincoln, Chief Human Resources Officer x7435 rlincoln@bnl.gov Margaret Hughes x2108 hughes@bnl.gov Elizabeth Gilbert x2315 gilbert@bnl.gov Human Resources Generalists Christel Colon, HR Manager - BES, GARS & ELS x8469 ccolon@bnl.gov Joann Williams, HR Manager - Support Operations x8356 williamsj@bnl.gov Joanna Hall, HR Manager - Photon Sciences x4410 jhall@bnl.gov Donna Dowling, HR Manager - Nuclear & Particle Physics x2754 dowling@bnl.gov Terrence Buck x8715 tbuck@bnl.gov

269

Human Error Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing human error is recognized in the power-generation industry as a key factor in reducing safety-related events as well as improving asset availability. Achieving a sustainable culture change that leads to human error reduction in plant operations and maintenance remains a significant challenge to the industry. This report presents a behavior-based approach to human performance improvement and error reduction. The report explains fundamental elements of culture change and describes proven practices...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

270

Human and Gorilla Genes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human and Gorilla Genes Name: Eileen B Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the differences between the genetic mechanisms which affect...

271

Human Reliability Program (HRP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of SecurityHRP Training Certification- HTML- Flash10 CFR 712, Human Reliability ProgramHRP HandbookTools for Clinicians- Medication List- Medical Records Checklist

272

HQ - Human Resources Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

HQs Human Recources Operations delivers services, including position management, recruitment, staffing and classification, and reduction in force at Headquarters.  Click the "Contacts" Link to find...

273

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

274

Publications & Resources, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or approved by Brookhaven National Laboratory or the Human Resources Division. Manuals Scientific Staff Manual Supervisors Personnel Manual SBMS Subject Areas Compensation...

275

Interacting with human physiology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel system that incorporates physiological monitoring as part of the human-computer interface. The sensing element is a thermal camera that is employed as a computer peripheral. Through bioheat modeling of facial imagery almost the full ... Keywords: Blood flow, Breath rate, Cardiac pulse, Facial tracking, Human-computer interaction, Sleep apnea, Stress, Thermal imaging

I. Pavlidis; J. Dowdall; N. Sun; C. Puri; J. Fei; M. Garbey

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Articular human joint modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work reported in this paper encapsulates the theories and algorithms developed to drive the core analysis modules of the software which has been developed to model a musculoskeletal structure of anatomic joints. Due to local bone surface and contact ... Keywords: 6DOF, Joint Modelling, Software, Tissue wrapping, bilateral, constraints, forced contact based articulation, unilateral

Ibrahim i. Esat; Neviman Ozada

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Humans and Gills  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Humans and Gills Humans and Gills Name: Shelley Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is it true that some babies are born with some sort of gills? How and when do humans adapt from breathing inside to breathing outside of the womb? Replies: Whoa! You have received a great deal of false information. First, babies are not born with gills! Get that out of your thinking! Babies do not "breath" for oxygen in the womb. They do "practice breathing" using the amniotic fluid of the womb, but it is not doing them any good otherwise. All of the embryo and fetal needs are received through the placenta. The mother provides everything that is needed. As for the gills, there is a stage in the early human embryo development whereby humans do show gill slits, but not functional gills. Slits are not gills!! As a matter of fact, all vertebrates show these same gill slits.

278

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation Munira Kadhim Oxford Brookes University Abstract Radiation-induced responses at the cellular and whole body levels are influenced by genetic predisposition, with implications for environmental and potentially, diagnostic exposures. Currently, the extent to which genetic background play a role in the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in radiation-induced delayed Genomic Instability (GI) is not fully understood. In previous studies, our results have shown that the CBA/H and C57BL/6 mouse strains, have differing sensitivities in the induction of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) in terms of chromosomal instability, following exposure to high dose-high LET and high dose-low LET

279

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction between Tissue and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of TGF-ß Depletion on Radiation-Induced p53 Response M.H. Barcellos-Hoff, S.A. Ravani, R.L. Henshall, K.B. Ewan, R.L. Warters,* B. Parvin Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *University of Utah One of the most widely studied cellular responses to radiation is the activation of the transcription factor, p53, whose abundance and action dictates individual cellular fate decisions regarding proliferation, differentiation and death. A cell's response to damage needs to be rapid. Thus, it is not surprising that the activation of the p53 stress response primarily involves post-translational changes in the p53 protein. Whereas intracellular radiation-induced mediators of p53 stability have been the subject of intense study, little is known about the extracellular factors

280

Design, construction and implementation of spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used for medical and space activities whenever a combination of high and low LET (lineal energy transfer) radiations are present. With the frequency and duration of space activities increasing, exposure to fast heavy ions from galactic cosmic radiation and solar events is a major concern. The optimum detector geometry is spherical; to obtain an isotropic response, but simple spherical detectors have the disadvantage of a non-uniform electric field. In order to achieve a uniform electric field along the detector axis, spherical tissue equivalent proportional counters have been designed with different structures to modify the electric field. Some detectors use a cylindrical coil that is coaxial with the anode, but they are not reliable because of their sensitivity to microphonic noise and insufficient mechanical strength. In this work a new spherical TEPC was developed. The approach used was to divide the cathode in several rings with different thicknesses, and adjust the potential difference between each ring and the anode to produce an electric field that is nearly constant along the length of the anode. A-150 tissue equivalent plastic is used for the detector walls, the insulator material between the cathode rings is low density polyethylene, and the gas inside the detector is propane. The detector, along with the charge sensitive preamplifier, is encased in a stainless steel vacuum chamber. The gas gain was found to be 497.5 at 782 volts and the response to neutrons as a function of angle was constant ±7%. This spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter detector system will improve the accuracy of dosimetry in space, and as a result improve radiation safety for astronauts.

Perez Nunez, Delia Josefina

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Numerical Computation of Human Dose Due to 50/60-Hz Fields: Data Set Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Victoria electric and magnetic fields (EMF) dosimetry data set contains calculated internal electrical parameters in anatomically correct human models resulting from exposures to electric fields, magnetic fields, and contact currents. The data set provides descriptive statistics for dose to specific organs and tissues resulting from a variety of exposure scenarios.

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Determination of Friction Coefficient in Unconfined Compression of Brain Tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconfined compression tests are more convenient to perform on cylindrical samples of brain tissue than tensile tests in order to estimate mechanical properties of the brain tissue because they allow for homogeneous deformations. The reliability of these tests depends significantly on the amount of friction generated at the specimen/platen interface. Thus, there is a crucial need to find an approximate value of the friction coefficient in order to predict a possible overestimation of stresses during unconfined compression tests. In this study, a combined experimental-computational approach was adopted to estimate the dynamic friction coefficient mu of porcine brain matter against metal platens in compressive tests. Cylindrical samples of porcine brain tissue were tested up to 30% strain at variable strain rates, both under bonded and lubricated conditions in the same controlled environment. It was established that mu was equal to 0.09 +/- 0.03, 0.18 +/- 0.04, 0.18 +/- 0.04 and 0.20 +/- 0.02 at strain rates of...

Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.05.001

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Continuous human cell lines and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Substantially genetically stable continuous human cell lines derived from normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and processes for making and using the same. In a preferred embodiment, the cell lines are derived by treating normal human mammary epithelial tissue with a chemical carcinogen such as benzo[a]pyrene. The novel cell lines serve as useful substrates for elucidating the potential effects of a number of toxins, carcinogens and mutagens as well as of the addition of exogenous genetic material. The autogenic parent cells from which the cell lines are derived serve as convenient control samples for testing. The cell lines are not neoplastically transformed, although they have acquired several properties which distinguish them from their normal progenitors.

Stampfer, Martha R. (Oakland, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

HUMAN BRAIN IMAGING AT 9.4 TESLA USING A COMBINATION OF TRAVELING WAVE EXCITATION WITH A 15-CHANNEL RECEIVE-ONLY ARRAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HUMAN BRAIN IMAGING AT 9.4 TESLA USING A COMBINATION OF TRAVELING WAVE EXCITATION WITH A 15-CHANNEL is a successful setup for routine human brain imaging at 7 Tesla. For reception, the use of multiple surface coils multichannel transmit coils. At 9.4 Tesla, however, the even shorter RF wavelength in tissue causes the B1

285

Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments This database contains information on records collections related to human radiation...

286

Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The curative potential of external beam radiation therapy is critically dependent on having the ability to accurately aim radiation beams at intended targets while avoiding surrounding healthy tissues. However, existing technologies are incapable of real-time, volumetric, soft-tissue imaging during radiation beam delivery, when accurate target tracking is most critical. The authors address this challenge in the development and evaluation of a novel, minimally interfering, telerobotic ultrasound (U.S.) imaging system that can be integrated with existing medical linear accelerators (LINACs) for therapy guidance. Methods: A customized human-safe robotic manipulator was designed and built to control the pressure and pitch of an abdominal U.S. transducer while avoiding LINAC gantry collisions. A haptic device was integrated to remotely control the robotic manipulator motion and U.S. image acquisition outside the LINAC room. The ability of the system to continuously maintain high quality prostate images was evaluated in volunteers over extended time periods. Treatment feasibility was assessed by comparing a clinically deployed prostate treatment plan to an alternative plan in which beam directions were restricted to sectors that did not interfere with the transabdominal U.S. transducer. To demonstrate imaging capability concurrent with delivery, robot performance and U.S. target tracking in a phantom were tested with a 15 MV radiation beam active. Results: Remote image acquisition and maintenance of image quality with the haptic interface was successfully demonstrated over 10 min periods in representative treatment setups of volunteers. Furthermore, the robot's ability to maintain a constant probe force and desired pitch angle was unaffected by the LINAC beam. For a representative prostate patient, the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for a plan with restricted sectors remained virtually identical to the DVH of a clinically deployed plan. With reduced margins, as would be enabled by real-time imaging, gross tumor volume coverage was identical while notable reductions of bladder and rectal volumes exposed to large doses were possible. The quality of U.S. images obtained during beam operation was not appreciably degraded by radiofrequency interference and 2D tracking of a phantom object in U.S. images obtained with the beam on/off yielded no significant differences. Conclusions: Remotely controlled robotic U.S. imaging is feasible in the radiotherapy environment and for the first time may offer real-time volumetric soft-tissue guidance concurrent with radiotherapy delivery.

Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Radiosensitivity of skin fibroblasts from atomic bomb survivors with and without breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

Fibroblasts were established in vitro from skin biopsies obtained from 55 women and 1 man with or without breast cancer and with or without exposure to radiation from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. The radiosensitivity of these cells was evaluated by clonogenic assays after exposure to X-rays or to fission neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf source. Data were fitted to a multitarget model, S/S0 = A (1 - (1 - ekD)N), for both X-ray and neutron dose-survival curves. A single hit model, S/S0 = AekD, fits the neutron dose-survival responses as well. There were no differences in the means or variances of radiosensitivity between exposed and nonexposed groups or between patients with or without breast cancer. Hence, although the sample is not large, it provides no support for the hypothesis that atomic bomb radiation preferentially induces breast cancer in women whose cells in vitro are sensitive to cell killing by radiation.

Ban, S.; Setlow, R.B.; Bender, M.A.; Ezaki, H.; Hiraoka, T.; Yamane, M.; Nishiki, M.; Dohi, K.; Awa, A.A.; Miller, R.C. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Global Environmental Change and Human Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with human rights, human security or environmental change ifEnvironmental Change and Human Security By Matthew, RichardChange and Human Security. Cambridge, Massachusetts &

Kunnas, Jan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Simulation and Analysis of Human Phantoms Exposed to Heavy Charged Particle Irradiations Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport System (PHITS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anthropomorphic phantoms are commonly used for testing radiation fields without the need to expose human subjects. One of the most widely known is RANDO phantom. This phantom is used primarily for medical X-ray applications, but a similar design known as "MATROSHKA" is now being used for space research and exposed to heavy ion irradiations from the Galactic environment. Since the radiation field in the phantom should respond in a similar manner to how it would act in human tissues and organs under an irradiation, the tissue substitute chosen for soft tissue and the level of complexity of the entire phantom are crucial issues. The phantoms, and the materials used to create them, were developed mainly for photon irradiations and have not been heavily tested under the conditions of heavy ion exposures found in the space environment or external radiotherapy. The Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) was used to test the phantoms and their materials for their potential as human surrogates for heavy ion irradiation. Stopping powers and depth-dose distributions of heavy charged particles (HCPs) important to space research and medical applications were first used in the simulations to test the suitability of current soft tissue substitutes. A detailed computational anthropomorphic phantom was then developed where tissue substitutes and ICRU-44 tissue could be interchanged to verify the validation of the soft tissue substitutes and and determine the required level of complexity of the entire phantom needed to achieve a specified precision as a replacement of the human body. The materials tested were common soft tissue substitutes in use and the materials which had a potential for the soft tissue substitute. Ceric sulfate dosimeter solution was closest to ICRU-44 tissue; however, it was not appropriate as the phantom material because it was a solution. A150 plastic, ED4C (fhw), Nylon (Du Pont Elvamide 8062), RM/SR4, Temex, and RW-2 were within 1% of the mean normalized difference of mass stopping powers (or stopping powers for RW-2) when compared to the ICRU-44 tissue, and their depth-dose distributions were close; therefore, they were the most suitable among the remaining solid materials. Overall, the soft tissue substitutes which were within 1% of ICRU-44 tissue in terms of stopping power produced reasonable results with respect to organ dose in the developed phantom. RM/SR4 is the best anthropomorphic phantom soft tissue substitute because it has similar interaction properties and identical density with ICRU-44 tissue and it is a rigid solid polymer giving practical advantages in manufacture of real phantoms.

Lee, Dongyoul

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Optimizing Normal Tissue Sparing in Ion Therapy Using Calculated Isoeffective Dose for Ion Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate how the selection of ion type affects the calculated isoeffective dose to the surrounding normal tissue as a function of both normal tissue and target tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios. Methods and Materials: A microdosimetric biologic dose model was incorporated into a Geant4 simulation of parallel opposed beams of protons, helium, lithium, beryllium, carbon, and neon ions. The beams were constructed to give a homogeneous isoeffective dose to a volume in the center of a water phantom for target tissues covering a range of cobalt equivalent {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 1-20 Gy. Concomitant normal tissue isoeffective doses in the plateau of the ion beam were then compared for different ions across the range of normal tissue and target tissue radiosensitivities for a fixed isoeffective dose to the target tissue. Results: The ion type yielding the optimal normal tissue sparing was highly dependent on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of both the normal and the target tissue. For carbon ions, the calculated isoeffective dose to normal tissue at a 5-cm depth varied by almost a factor of 5, depending on the {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the normal and target tissue. This ranges from a factor of 2 less than the isoeffective dose of a similar proton treatment to a factor of 2 greater. Conclusions: No single ion is optimal for all treatment scenarios. The heavier ions are superior in cases in which the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of the target tissue is low and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of normal tissue is high, and protons are superior in the opposite circumstances. Lithium and beryllium appear to offer dose advantages similar to carbon, with a considerably lower normal tissue dose when the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the target tissue is high and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the normal tissue is low.

Remmes, Nicholas B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Herman, Michael G., E-mail: Herman.Michael@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Kruse, Jon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Defense Report Finding Aids Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiments Records 1944-1994 Exit Human Radiation Experiments Site This...

293

Spontaneous Human Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spontaneous Human Combustion Spontaneous Human Combustion Name: S. Phillips. Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: One of our 8th grade students has tried to find information in our library about spontaneous human combustion, but to no avail. Could you tell us where we might locate a simple reference, or provide some in information about this subject for him. Replies: Sorry, but this is definitely "fringe science"...try asking in bookstores. I seem to recall one of those "believe it or not" type of TV shows did an episode on spontaneous human combustion a few years ago in which they reported on some British scientists who investigated this purported phenomenon. Remember that people (back in the Dark Ages, and before) used to believe in "spontaneous generation" of certain plants and animals because they were not aware of the reproduction methods used by those plants and animals.

294

Macintosh human interface guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Macintosh Human Interface Guidelines describes the way to create products that optimize the interaction between people and Macintosh computers. It explains the whys and hows of the Macintosh interface in general terms and specific details. Macintosh ...

Apple Computer, Inc.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Medical Humanities Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the making: Memoirs and medical education. Iowa City, IA:shoes: empathy and othering in medical students' education.through the thread of medical humanities 1 . The essay by

Shapiro, Johanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Dogs and Human Diseases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diseases Name: Doris Status: Other Grade: 9-12 Location: OK Date: NA Question: Can a dog contact the shingles or chicken pox virus from a human? Replies: Hi Doris, Great...

298

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Communication Mercury Levels in Locally Manufactured Mexican Skin-Lightening Creams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Mercury is considered one of the most toxic elements for plants and animals. Nevertheless, in the Middle East, Asia and Latin America, whitening creams containing mercury are being manufactured and purchased, despite their obvious health risks. Due to the mass distribution of these products, this can be considered a global public health issue. In Mexico, these products are widely available in pharmacies, beauty aid and health stores. They are used for their skin lightening effects. The aim of this work was to analyze the mercury content in some cosmetic whitening creams using the cold vapor technique coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). A total of 16 skin-lightening creams from the local market were investigated. No warning information was noted on the packaging. In 10 of the samples, no mercury was detected. The mercury content in six of the samples varied between 878 and 36,000 ppm, despite the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that the limit for mercury in creams should be less than 1 ppm. Skin creams containing mercury are still available and commonly used in Mexico and many developing countries, and their contents are poorly controlled.

Claudia P. Peregrino; Myriam V. Moreno; Silvia V. Mir; Alma D. Rubio; Luz O. Leal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Non-linear inversion modeling for Ultrasound Computer Tomography: transition from soft to hard tissues imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-linear inversion modeling for Ultrasound Computer Tomography: transition from soft to hard, the tomographic procedure used is adapted to broadband data acquired in scattering configurations while, Iterative Approximation, Soft Tissues Imaging, Hard Tissues Imaging, Breast, Bones 1. INTRODUCTION

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of tissue printed nitrocellulose cards/arrays for real time PCR amplification and detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue print technology allows for the transfer of cellular material from tissue onto a nitrocellulose film for immunocytochemical assays. The MIT BioInstrumentation Laboratory is currently developing a novel cancer marker ...

Chia, Helena Nien-Hwa, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tissue elongation of the developing egg in Drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of appreciation for the sources of force generation to shapepotential source tissues of force generation may identify

Haigo, Saori Lillian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Integrated Ocean Skin and Bulk Temperature Measurements Using the Calibrated Infrared In Situ Measurement System (CIRIMS) and Through-Hull Ports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and performance of a shipboard-integrated system for underway skin and bulk temperature is presented. The system consists of the Calibrated Infrared In situ Measurement System (CIRIMS) and through-hull temperature sensors. The CIRIMS ...

A. T. Jessup; R. Branch

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Retrieval of Lake Bulk and Skin Temperatures Using Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR-2) Data: A Case Study Using Lake Tahoe, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1999, four monitoring stations were permanently moored on Lake Tahoe, California–Nevada. Each monitoring station provides near-real-time measurements of the surface skin temperature and bulk temperature on a near-continuous basis. Day and ...

Simon J. Hook; Fred J. Prata; Ronald E. Alley; Ali Abtahi; Robert C. Richards; S. Geoffrey Schladow; SveinnÓ Pálmarsson

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Developing Human Performance Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Differential action on cancer and normal tissue by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate and cytochrome C combined with radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility that radioprotective effects on potent natural killer (NK) cells by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate (AMM) + cytochrome C during radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer might result in the radiosensitization of human lung cancer cells in vivo is examined. Human lung cancer xenografts in the right hind legs of KSN mice (10 weeks old) were locally irradiated with 20 Gy of X ray. AMM (10 mg/kg/day) and/or cytochrome C (CCC) (5 mg/kg/day) were given intraperitoneally immediately before or after RT, followed by daily administration for 4 days. Natural killer activities of host splenocytes were also tested with the standard [sup 51]Cr releasing assay with YAC-1 cells as target cells. In a clinical study, 65 patients with lung cancer were treated with more than 50 Gy of RT with or without combination with AMM + CCC, OK-432 or AMM + CCC + OK-432. Before and after RT, lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were examined with dichromatic analysis using an Ortho Spectrum IIIFCM system and fluorescent MABs. In this study, the change in the absolute number of each subset was investigated. AMM + cytochrome C augumented NK activity in KSN nude mice, protected potent NK cells in patients with lung cancer against RT and sensitized the human lung cancer xenografts to RT. AMM + cytochrome C may have potential as a differential modulator of radiosensitivity of normal tissues and of tumors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Nakatsugawa, S. (Fukui Medical School (Japan)); Sugahara, T. (Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan))

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Synthesis of catechol estrogens by human uterus and leiomyoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homogenates of human endometrial, myometrial and leiomyoma tissues were incubated with (2,4,6,7-/sub 3/H)-estradiol and tritiated catechol estrogens were isolated and identified. Though 2- and 4-hydroxylations were about the same in endometrium, 4-hydroxylation was two to four fold higher than 2-hydroxylation in myometrium and leiomyoma. However, endometrium showed greater capacity to form both 2- and 4-hydroxyestrogens than the other two tissues. Both 2- and 4-hydroxylations were significantly less than in myometrium. In view of the reports indicating that inhibitors of catechol 0-methyl transferase (COMT) might act as antineoplastic agents due to their interference with t-RNA methylases and since catechol estrogens inhibit COMT, the present results suggest that endogenous synthesis of catechol estrogens may play an important role in the pathophysiology of uterine leiomyoma.

Reddy, V.V.; Hanjani, P.; Rajan, R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Technical Note MR Properties of Brown and White Adipose Tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-voxel MR spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: 1 H MR STEAM spectra were acquired from a 3 Tesla clinical the ana- tomical distribution of BAT depots in rodents is known and the interscapular BAT depot is well- tomical distribution in adult humans is limited. Several works have successfully imaged and char

Southern California, University of

309

A Primer to Human Threading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human Threading(TM) is new approach in developing innovative computing technologies. It uses novel physiologic combinations to measure the human brain and body in an effort to create greater efficiency among human and machine. A divergent group of measurement ... Keywords: BCI, EEG, HCI, Human ThreadingTM, Information systems

Christopher Liapis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Aging and Fracture of Human Cortical Bone and Tooth Dentin  

SciTech Connect

Mineralized tissues, such as bone and tooth dentin, serve as structural materials in the human body and, as such, have evolved to resist fracture. In assessing their quantitative fracture resistance or toughness, it is important to distinguish between intrinsic toughening mechanisms which function ahead of the crack tip, such as plasticity in metals, and extrinsic mechanisms which function primarily behind the tip, such as crack bridging in ceramics. Bone and dentin derive their resistance to fracture principally from extrinsic toughening mechanisms which have their origins in the hierarchical microstructure of these mineralized tissues. Experimentally, quantification of these toughening mechanisms requires a crack-growth resistance approach, which can be achieved by measuring the crack-driving force, e.g., the stress intensity, as a function of crack extension ("R-curve approach"). Here this methodology is used to study of the effect of aging on the fracture properties of human cortical bone and human dentin in order to discern the microstructural origins of toughness in these materials.

Ager, Joel; Koester, Kurt J.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

1995-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Turkey vs. human digestion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turkey vs. human digestion Turkey vs. human digestion Name: wallyb Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How is the digestive system of turkeys different from that of humans? Replies: Hmmm.. been a while since I had sophomore biology, so I can't completely answer this one, but I can say a few things. One, since turkeys are birds, and birds as a general rule have not had teeth for several million years at least, the turkey needs a way to mash up its food -- thus, the crop, which is essentially like another stomach: the turkey (and many other birds, for that matter) swallows small stones which serve in lieu of teeth, mashing up food via muscular action in the crop, from whence the "chewed" food moves on into the rest of the digestive tract. As for any other differences, I'll have to leave that to someone else with more ornithological experience...

313

Relocation Guide, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relocation Information Guide Relocation Information Guide The Human Resources Division is providing this Information Guide to you to help ease the transition of relocating to Long Island. Relocating to a new place can be an exciting as well as stressful time. We have compiled information that can be very helpful with the many issues you may face. You may also seek assistance from the recruiter you work with in Human Resources. Service Disclaimer - This web page contains links to other Internet sites. These links are not endorsements of any products or services and no information in such site has been endorsed or approved by Brookhaven National Laboratory or the Human Resources Division. Here are some of the issues: Cost of living Buying or renting a home Schools in the area

314

THE HUMAN FACTOR* By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*I gratefully acknowledge the advice, encouragement, and inspiration of Nuria Chinchilla from IESE who encouraged me to think about the issue of human sustainability in both societies and companies. The helpful comments of the editor and the reviewers substantially clarified the arguments. ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVES, (in press) Although most of the research and public pressure concerning sustainability has been focused on the effects of business and organizational activity on the physical environment, companies and their management practices profoundly affect the human and social environment as well. This article briefly reviews the literature on the direct and indirect effects of organizations and their decisions about people on human health and mortality. It then considers some possible explanations for why social sustainability has received relatively short shrift in management writing, and outlines a research agenda for investigating the links between social sustainability and organizational effectiveness as well as the role

Jeffrey Pfeffer; R Esearch; P Aper; S Eries; Building Sustainable Organizations; Jeffrey Pfeffer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The effect of Stromal cell Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) and collagen-GAG (Glycosaminoglycan) scaffold on skin wound healing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wound healing is an intricate biological process requiring the appropriate balance of matrix and growth factors. Apart from causing physical deformity, adult wound healing results in the formation of scar tissue, which can ...

Sarkar, Aparajita

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

317

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

de la Chapelle, Albert (Helsingfors, FI); Vogelstein, Bert (Baltimore, MD); Kinzler, Kenneth W. (Baltimore, MD)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Studies of Bystander Effects in 3-D Tissue Systems Using a Low-LET Microbeam  

SciTech Connect

It is now accepted that biological effects may occur in cells that were not themselves traversed by ionizing radiation but are close to those that were. Little is known about the mechanism underlying such a bystander effect, although cell-to-cell communication is thought to be important. Previous work demonstrated a significant bystander effect for clonogenic survival and oncogenic transformation in C3H 10T(1/2) cells. Additional studies were undertaken to assess the importance of the degree of cell-to-cell contact at the time of irradiation on the magnitude of this bystander effect by varying the cell density. When 10% of cells were exposed to a range of 2-12 alpha particles, a significantly greater number of cells were inactivated when cells were irradiated at high density than at low density. In addition, the oncogenic transformation frequency was significantly higher in high-density cultures. These results suggest that when a cell is hit by radiation, the transmission of the bystander signal through cell-to-cell contact is an important mediator of the effect, implicating the involvement of intracellular communication through gap junctions. Additional studies to address the relationship between the bystander effect and the adaptive response were undertaken. A novel apparatus, where targeted and non-targeted cells were grown in close proximity, was used to investigate these. It was further examined whether a bystander effect or an adaptive response could be induced by a factor(s) present in the supernatants of cells exposed to a high or low dose of X-rays, respectively. When non-hit cells were co-cultured for 24 h with cells irradiated with 5 Gy alpha-particles, a significant increase in both cell killing and oncogenic transformation frequency was observed. If these cells were treated with 2 cGy X-rays 5 h before co-culture with irradiated cells, approximately 95% of the bystander effect was cancelled out. A 2.5-fold decrease in the oncogenic transformation frequency was also observed. When cells were cultured in medium donated from cells exposed to 5 Gy X-rays, a significant bystander effect was observed for clonogenic survival. When cells were cultured for 5 h with supernatant from donor cells exposed to 2 cGy and were then irradiated with 4 Gy X-rays, they failed to show an increase in survival compared with cells directly irradiated with 4 Gy. However, a twofold reduction in the oncogenic transformation frequency was seen. An adaptive dose of X-rays cancelled out the majority of the bystander effect produced by alpha-particles. For oncogenic transformation, but not cell survival, radioadaption can occur in unirradiated cells via a transmissible factor(s). A pilot study was undertaken to observe the bystander effect in a realistic multicellular three-dimensional morphology. We found bystander responses in a three-dimensional, normal human-tissue system. Endpoints were induction of micronucleated and apoptotic cells. A charged-particle microbeam was used, allowing irradiation of cells in defined locations in the tissue yet guaranteeing that no cells located more than a few micrometers away receive any radiation exposure. Unirradiated cells up to 1 mm distant from irradiated cells showed a significant enhancement in effect over background, with an average increase in effect of 1.7-fold for micronuclei and 2.8-fold for apoptosis. The surprisingly long range of bystander signals in human tissue suggests that bystander responses may be important in extrapolating radiation risk estimates from epidemiologically accessible doses down to very low doses where nonhit bystander cells will predominate. Finally, it would be of great benefit to develop a reproducible tissue system suitable for critical radiobiological assays. We have developed a reliable protocol to harvest cells from tissue samples and to investigate the damage induced on a single cell basis. In order to result in a valid tool for bystander experiments, the method focuses on processing and analyzing radiation damage in individual cells as a function of their rela

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

Protection against 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) - induced cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes by an inducer of the glutathione detoxification pathway  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur mustard (SM or mustard gas) was first used as a chemical warfare agent almost 100 years ago. Due to its toxic effects on the eyes, lungs, and skin, and the relative ease with which it may be synthesized, mustard gas remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. SM exposed skin develops fluid filled bullae resulting from potent cytotoxicity of cells lining the basement membrane of the epidermis. Currently, there are no antidotes for SM exposure; therefore, chemopreventive measures for first responders following an SM attack are needed. Glutathione (GSH) is known to have a protective effect against SM toxicity, and detoxification of SM is believed to occur, in part, via GSH conjugation. Therefore, we screened 6 potential chemopreventive agents for ability to induce GSH synthesis and protect cultured human keratinocytes against the SM analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). Using NCTC2544 human keratinocytes, we found that both sulforaphane and methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) stimulated nuclear localization of Nrf2 and induced expression of the GSH synthesis gene, GCLM. Additionally, we found that treatment with CDDO-Me elevated reduced GSH content of NCTC2544 cells and preserved their viability by {approx} 3-fold following exposure to CEES. Our data also suggested that CDDO-Me may act additively with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a nucleophilic scavenging agent, to increase the viability of keratinocytes exposed to CEES. These results suggest that CDDO-Me is a promising chemopreventive agent for SM toxicity in the skin. - Highlights: > CDDO-Me treatment increased intracellular GSH in human keratinocytes. > CDDO-Me increased cell viability following exposure to the half-mustard, CEES. > The cytoprotective effect of CDDO-Me was likely due to scavenging with endogenous GSH.

Abel, Erika L.; Bubel, Jennifer D.; Simper, Melissa S.; Powell, Leslie; McClellan, S. Alex [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Andreeff, Michael [Department of Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, John, E-mail: john.digiovanni@austin.utexas.edu [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Numerical Computation of Human and Rodent Dose Due to 50/60-Hz Field and Current Sources: Data Set Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Victoria electric and magnetic field (EMF) dosimetry data set contains calculated internal electrical parameters in anatomically correct human and rodent models resulting from exposures to electric fields, magnetic fields, and/or contact currents. The data set provides descriptive statistics for dose to specific organs and tissues resulting from a variety of exposure scenarios.

2002-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Variability in Raman Spectra of Single Human Tumor Cells Cultured in Vitro: Correlation with Cell Cycle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Victoria, Victoria, B.C., Canada (A.G.B.) In this work we investigate the capability of Raman microscopy of a human tumor cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to identify interest in applying RM to live cells and tissues for cancer detection and diagnosis. Due to the complexity

Brolo, Alexandre G.

324

Human computing and machine understanding of human behavior: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A widely accepted prediction is that computing will move to the background, weaving itself into the fabric of our everyday living spaces and projecting the human user into the foreground. If this prediction is to come true, then next generation computing ... Keywords: affective computing, analysis, human behavior understanding, human sensing, multimodal data, socially-aware computing

Maja Pantic; Alex Pentland; Anton Nijholt; Thomas S. Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Objective method to report planner-independent skin/rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: An objective method was proposed and compared with a manual selection method to determine planner-independent skin and rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning. Methods: The maximal dose to skin and rib was objectively extracted from a dose volume histogram (DVH) of skin and rib volumes. A virtual skin volume was produced by expanding the skin surface in three dimensions (3D) external to the breast with a certain thickness in the planning computed tomography (CT) images. Therefore, the maximal dose to this volume occurs on the skin surface the same with a conventional manual selection method. The rib was also delineated in the planning CT images and its maximal dose was extracted from its DVH. The absolute (Abdiff=|D{sub max}{sup Man}-D{sub max}{sup DVH}|) and relative (Rediff[%]=100x(|D{sub max}{sup Man}-D{sub max}{sup DVH}|)/D{sub max}{sup DVH}) maximal skin and rib dose differences between the manual selection method (D{sub max}{sup Man}) and the objective method (D{sub max}{sup DVH}) were measured for 50 balloon-based HDR (25 MammoSite and 25 Contura) patients. Results: The average{+-}standard deviation of maximal dose difference was 1.67%{+-}1.69% of the prescribed dose (PD). No statistical difference was observed between MammoSite and Contura patients for both Abdiff and Rediff[%] values. However, a statistically significant difference (p value dose difference compared with maximal skin dose difference for both Abdiff (2.30%{+-}1.71% vs 1.05%{+-}1.43%) and Rediff[%] (2.32%{+-}1.79% vs 1.21%{+-}1.41%). In general, rib has a more irregular contour and it is more proximally located to the balloon for 50 HDR patients. Due to the inverse square law factor, more dose difference was observed in higher dose range (D{sub max}>90%) compared with lower dose range (D{sub max}low dose ranges. Conclusions: The objective method using volumetric information of skin and rib can determine the planner-independent maximal dose compared with the manual selection method. However, the difference was dose point in 3D planning CT images.

Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States) and Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Using Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an Adaptive Response in Mammary Epithelial Cells Mina Bissell Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Exposure of tissues to ionizing radiation results in targeted effect on cells as well as non-targeted effects on tissues. Although, targeted effects such as the DNA damage response have been studied extensively, non-targeted effects leading to modification in tissue architecture and tumor progression have been less studied and are not well understood. The mammary gland is a tissue that has been shown to be susceptible to tumor formation and cancer progression following exposure to ionizing radiation. In conjunction with the laboratories of Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff and Catherine Park we showed previously that in the presence of TGF-β,

327

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "��non-targeted"� responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell lineages will include the role of cytokines which have been shown to be in the initiation of instability. These studies also aim to uncover the possible mechanism of the initiation, perpetuation and delayed pathways of the instability response using relevant biological endpoints i.e. chromosomal instability, apoptosis induction, cytokine and gene array analysis. Integral to these studies will be an assessment of the role of genetic susceptibility in these responses, using CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J mice. The overall results suggest that low dose low LET X-irradiation induced delayed GI in both CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J haemopoeitic tissue. Using several biological approaches, some key strain and dose-specific differences have been identified in radiation-induced signalling in the initiation and perpetuation of the instability process. Furthermore, the induction of non-targeted radiation effects and genetic dependency may be linked to the use of alternative signalling pathways and mechanisms which have potential implications on evaluation of non-targeted effects in radiation risk assessment.

Kadhim, Munira A

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

Human Capital Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan Human Capital Plan More Documents & Publications Strategic Use of Human Capital DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2011 - 2015) Energy.gov Careers & Internships For Staff &...

329

Modelling postures of human movements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to present a novel modelling of postures of human activities such us walk, run... Effectively, human action is, in general, characterized by a sequence of specific body postures. So, from an incoming sequence video, we determine ... Keywords: human activities, modelling, shape matching, skeleton, thinning

Djamila Medjahed Gamaz; Houssem Eddine Gueziri; Nazim Haouchine

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Eye Color in Humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eye Color in Humans Eye Color in Humans Name: Kristi Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: The dominant characteristic is the one most likely to appear in the offspring. In human beings, brown is the dominant color for eyes. The children who inherit at least on dominant gene will have either brown, green, or hazel eyes. Only childten who inherit two recessive genes will have pure blue eyes. If there are eight children in the family, what color eyes will most of them have? Replies: http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/archive.htm Search under eye color Steve Sample You answer is of course dependent on the genes of the parents. If both parents do not have the recessive gene, then no children will have light colored eyes. If one has a recessive gene and the other not, then still no children will have light color eyes and on the average 25% of the eight children could have the recessive gene. If both parents have the recessive gene, then 25% of the eight children could have light color eyes.

331

Dog vs. human language  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dog vs. human language Dog vs. human language Name: Michelle Conte Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why can't dogs talk like humans? Replies: In very simple terms, they aren't made for it. In order to produce any kind of vocal sound, we not only need a set of vocal chords (or vibratory organs of some sort), we also need an air pipe and cranium shaped to deliver the vibrations in the right way -- you actually use your own head as a sort of sounding plate for several primary sounds (non-percussive) Dogs don't have the right shaped heads for the job, as well as the inability to vocalize many of the percussive sounds which make up a good percentage of our languages due to a differently shaped mouth. However, all things considered, we'd be ill-equipped to call meetings over long distances by simply howling, like dogs and their kin are wont to do in the wild.

332

Human factoring administrative procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mercury concentrations in tissues of Florida bald eagles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We collected 48 blood and 61 feather samples from nestling bald eagles at 42 nests and adult feather samples from 20 nests in north and central Florida during 1991-93. We obtained 32 liver, 10 feather, and 5 blood samples from 33 eagle carcasses recovered in Florida during 1987-93. For nestlings, mercury concentrations in blood (GM = 0.16 ppm wet wt) and feather (GM = 3.23 ppm) samples were correlated (r = 0.69, P = 0.0001). Although nestlings had lower mercury concentrations in feathers than did adults (GM = 6.03 ppm), the feather mercury levels in nestlings and adults from the same nest were correlated (r = 0.63, P eagles (GM = 0.23 ppm) was similar to Florida nestlings but some Florida nestlings had blood mercury concentrations up to 0.61 ppm, more than twice as high as captive adults. Feather mercury concentrations in both nestlings and adults exceeded those in captive eagles, but concentrations in all tissues were similar to, or lower than, those in bald eagles from other wild populations. Although mercury concentrations in Florida eagles are below those that cause mortality, they are in the range of concentrations that can cause behavioral changes or reduce reproduction. We recommend periodic monitoring of mercury in Florida bald eagles for early detection of mercury increases before negative effects on reproduction occur. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Wood, P.B.; Wood, J.M. [Wes Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); White, J.H. [Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, Eustis, FL (United States)] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Retention of plutonium in mouse tissues as affected by antiviral compounds and their analogs  

SciTech Connect

The chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) is an effective therapeutic substance for decorporation of extracellar monomeric plutonium in the mouse and dog, but is much less effective in removing intracellular polymeric plutonium (Pu-P). In the absence of effective therapy, this intracellular plutonium is long retained in the body, particularly in reticuloendothelial tissues like the liver. Our interest, therefore, turned to the development of adjunct substances capable of removing additional plutonium from the liver beyond that removable by DTPA alone. We showed that glucan, a yeast cell wall polysaccharide, is a useful adjunct to DTPA for removal of Pu-P from the mouse liver. Its toxicity, however, makes it a less than desirable drug for potential human use. Therefore, we initiated a search for more soluble (and presumably less hazardous) therapeutic agents similar to glucan, i.e., capable of adjunct action with DTPA. Of over 20 substances tested the most successful results were obtained with two antiviral, antitumor compounds, the pyran copolymers XA-124-177 and XA-146-85-2. These are condensation products of divinyl ether and maleic anhydride. Another analog, EMH-227, prepared by condensation of acrylic acid and itaconic acid, was similarly successful. Maximal removal of plutonium from mouse liver was obtained with a single intravenous (I.V.) injection of 10 to 90 mg/kg of pyran copolymer given 5 days after I.V. Pu-P administration. Although these doses increased splenic uptake of plutonium, a dose of 10 mg/kg produced a minimal increase in the splenic burden while producing maximal removal of hepatic plutonium. (auth)

Lindenbaum, A.; Rosenthal, M.W.; Guilmette, R.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Is collagen type II antiangiogenic in printed scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cartilage is an avascular tissue, which becomes vascularized during arthritis. The main component of cartilage is collagen type II. We want to know if collagen… (more)

Bürgisser, P.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for tissue engineering from amino alcohol-based poly(ester amide) elastomers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradable polymers with high mechanical strength, flexibility and optical transparency, optimal degradation properties and biocompatibility are critical to the success of tissue engineered devices and drug delivery ...

Wang, Jane

337

NIST: X-Ray Mass Atten. Coef. - Tissue-Equiv. Gas (Methane)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table of Contents Back to table 4 Tissue-Equivalent Gas (Methane Based) HTML table format. Energy, ?/?, ? en /?. (MeV), (cm 2 /g), (cm 2 /g). ...

338

NIST: X-Ray Mass Atten. Coef. - Tissue-Equivalent Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table of Contents Back to table 4 Tissue-Equivalent Gas (Propane Based) HTML table format. Energy, ?/?, ? en /?. (MeV), (cm 2 /g), (cm 2 /g). ...

339

Use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy for archival tissue sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). We have access to a large collection of archival dog tissue samples from external beam gamma-ray and internal radionuclide exposures. A...

340

Does phentolamine mesylate reverse soft-tissue anesthesia after 3% mepivacaine?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles Does phentolamine mesylate reverseABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Does phentolamine mesylate reversein which the needle does not penetrate the tissues) using

Silvera, Andreia Minasian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. George Voelz, M.D., November 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dr. George Voelz was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). This oral history covers Dr. Voelz`s research on Manhattan Engineering District plutonium workers, the acute and long term effects of radiation, his inhalation studies, and his activities at the 1961 INL reactor accident (SL-1 Reactor). After a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Voelz his remembrances on tissue studies of plutonium workers, the plutonium injection studies of 1945-1946, the controlled environmental radioiodine tests of 1963-1968, and tracer studies with human volunteers at Los Alamos. Dr. Voelz states his opinions concerning misconceptions about the Los Alamos Human Radiation Experiments.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

343

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

344

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

345

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

346

Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses  

SciTech Connect

The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be transmitted to children conceived after exposure. Studies of these risks in exposed population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relations hi between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contracts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any number of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to study the biological basis of the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and there it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

2002-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses  

SciTech Connect

The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be indicate that they are low. As a result, the risks are impossible to detect in population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relationship between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contrasts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any numbers of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to study the biological ha sis of the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in low-dose radiation risk. This project therefore also examines how cells are damaged by treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and therefore it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

Kathy Held; Kevin Prise; Barry Michael; Melvyn Folkard

2002-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

349

Virtual Human Problem Solving Environments  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Interest in complex integrated digital or virtual human modeling has seen a significant increase over the last decade. Coincident with that increased interest, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated the development of a human simulation tool, the Virtual Human. The Virtual Human includes a problem-solving environment (PSE) for implementing the integration of physiological models in different programming languages and connecting physiological function to anatomy. The Virtual Human PSE (VHPSE) provides the computational framework with which to develop the concept of a "Virtual Human." Supporting the framework is a data definition for modeling parameters, PhysioML, a Virtual Human Database (VHDB), and a Web-based graphical user interface (GUI) developed using Java. Following description of the VHPSE, we discuss four example implementations of models within the framework. Further expansion of a human modeling environment was carried out in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Virtual Soldier Project. SCIRun served as the Virtual Soldier problem solving environment (VSPSE). We review and compare specific developments in these projects that have significant potential for the future of Virtual Human modeling and simulation. We conclude with an evaluation of areas of future work that will provide important extensions to the VHPSE and VSPSE and make possible a fully-integrated environment for human anatomical and physiological modeling: the Virtual Human.

Ward, Richard C [ORNL; Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Munro, Nancy B [ORNL; Fischer, Sarah Kathleen [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Human activity recognition based on surrounding things  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes human activity recognition based on the actual semantics of the human’s current location. Since predefining the semantics of location is inadequate to identify human activities, we process information about things to automatically ...

Naoharu Yamada; Kenji Sakamoto; Goro Kunito; Kenichi Yamazaki; Satoshi Tanaka

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sun Protection Intervention for Highway Workers: Long-Term Efficacy of UV Photography and Skin Cancer Information on Men’s Protective Cognitions and Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Background The risk for skin cancer is increased among older males and outdoor workers who have high levels of ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Purpose This study was designed to examine the long-term efficacy of UV photography interventions on male outdoor workers, the potential mediators of its impact, and the efficacy of UV photography and skin cancer vs. aging information with this population. Methods One hundred forty-eight male outdoor workers were randomly assigned to one of four intervention conditions or a control condition in a two by two plus one

Frederick X. Gibbons; Laura A. Walsh; James A. Kulik, Ph.D.; M. Gerrard; F. X. Gibbons; J. L. Dykstra; H. I. M. Mahler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hybrid Polyethylene Glycol Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, organ transplant procedures are insufficient to address the needs of the number of patients that suffer of organ failure related disease. In the United States alone, only around 19% of the patients are able to get an organ transplant surgery and 25% die while waiting for a suitable donor. Tissue engineering (TE) has emerged as an alternative to organ transplant; thus, the aim of the present study was to validate a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogel system as a model for material scaffolding in TE applications. This work explores the influence of scaffold material properties on cell behavior. Specifically, scaffold modulus, mesh size, and biochemical stimuli were characterized and their influence on cell response was analyzed at the biochemical, histological and microenvironmental levels. Three different TE targets were evaluated: vocal fold restoration, vascular grafts and osteochondral applications. Vocal fold fibroblast (VFF) phenotype and extracellular matrix (ECM) production were impacted by initial scaffold mesh size and modulus. The results showed increasing levels of SM-?-actin and collagen production with decreasing initial mesh size/increasing initial modulus, which indicated that VFFs were induced to take an undesirable myofibroblast-like phenotype. In addition, it was possible to preserve VFF phenotype in long-term cultured hydrogels containing high molecular weight hyaluronan (HAHMW). On the other hand, regarding vascular graft applications, smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype was enhanced by increasing scaffold mesh size and modulus. Finally, the effect of scaffold inorganic content (siloxane) on rat osteoblasts and mouse mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated. Interestingly, the impact of inorganic content on cell differentiation seemed to be highly dependent on the initial cell state. Specifically, mature osteoblasts underwent transdifferentiation into chondrocyte-like cells with increasing inorganic content. However, Mesenchymal stem cells appeared to be preferentially driven toward osteoblast-like cells with an associated increase in osteocalcin and collagen type I production.

Munoz Pinto, Dany 1981-

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory More Documents & Publications PIA - Human Resources Information...

354

Human portable preconcentrator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated.

Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hannum, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Experimental Setup Measurements were made with the experimental configuration depicted in Figure 1. Tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depicted in Figure 1. Tissue samples were heated in an insulated tank that was filled with deionized water, which had been degassed by vacuum pumping in an appropriate vessel. Tissue was placed with a MetroTek pulser and echoes recorded. The transducer was moved to the next site of interest and a new

Arthur, R. Martin

356

Engineered Heart Tissue Enables Study of Residual Undifferentiated Embryonic Stem Cell Activity in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE Engineered Heart Tissue Enables Study of Residual Undifferentiated Embryonic Stem Cell, Canada, M5S 3G9 6 Heart and Stroke/Richard Lewar Centre of Excellence, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3G9 cell survival. As an alternative, we have used an engineered heart tissue (EHT) based on neonatal rat

Zandstra, Peter W.

357

Engineered Heart Tissue Model of Diabetic Myocardium Hannah Song, Ph.D.,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineered Heart Tissue Model of Diabetic Myocardium Hannah Song, Ph.D.,1 Peter W. Zandstra, Ph of cardiomyocytes (CMs) is a leading cause of heart failure. Previously, we reported an in vitro test-bed for screening cell integration between injected test cells and host CM using the engineered heart tissue

Zandstra, Peter W.

358

Jaw tissues segmentation in dental 3D CT images using fuzzy-connectedness and morphological processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of oral surgery is subject to accurate advanced planning. In order to properly plan for dental surgery or a suitable implant placement, it is necessary an accurate segmentation of the jaw tissues: the teeth, the cortical bone, the trabecular ... Keywords: Automatic computer-aided surgery, Fuzzy connectedness, Inferior alveolar nerve, Jaw tissue segmentation/reconstruction

Roberto LloréNs; Valery Naranjo; Fernando LóPez; Mariano AlcañIz

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Osteochondral defect repair using a novel tissue engineering approach: Sheep model study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) constructs of desired density were formed by sintering CPP powders. Articular cartilage was formed on these constructs in cell culture over an 8-week period with the resulting cartilage layer forming on the CPP surface ... Keywords: Articular cartilage repair, implants, in vitro and in vivo studies, osteochondral implants, porous calcium polyphosphate, tissue engineering, tissue ingrowth

R. M. Pilliar; R. A. Kandel; M. D. Grynpas; P. Zalzal; M. Hurtig

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

ANTIGENIC STRUCTURE OF GLOBULIN FRACTION MADE FROM PERFUSE TISSUES FROM IRRADIATED DOG  

SciTech Connect

Test data on desensitization anaphylotis in guinea pigs showed decreased antigen complexes in gamma -globulin from perfuse tissues from irradiated dogs. Immunization of healthy dogs by homologous gamma -globulin from irradiated dog perfuse tissues also indicated antigenic changes. (R.V.J.)

L' vitsina, G.M.; Balin, Yu.D.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

NONE

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Proper Setup of HVAC System in Conjunction with Sound Building 'Skin' Design for Alleviation of IAQ and Energy Performance Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption in buildings is a growing concern. Many buildings are energy hogs simply because they were not set up properly to begin with. The building envelope and infiltration of unconditioned air is also a major concern in hot and humid climates, not only because of the loss of energy, but also because of damage that can result to insulation, drywall, and structure in addition to promotion of mold and mildew growth. Proper setup of the HVAC system, in conjunction with sound building “skin” design, can alleviate many of these problems. This paper will explain how most mixed air HVAC systems are set up with problems to begin with and how to identify and solve those problems. It will explain different control schemes that specifically deal with proper building pressurization

Rosenberg, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Low-energy E1 strength in select nuclei: Possible constraints on the neutron skins and the symmetry energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlations between low-lying electric dipole (E1) strength and neutron skin thickness are systematically investigated with the fully self-consistent random-phase approximation using the Skyrme energy functionals. The presence of strong correlation among these quantities is currently under dispute. We find that the strong correlation is present in properly selected nuclei, namely in spherical neutron-rich nuclei in the region where the neutron Fermi levels are located at orbits with low orbital angular momenta. The significant correlation between the fraction of the energy-weighted sum value and the slope of the symmetry energy is also observed. The deformation in the ground state seems to weaken the correlation.

Tsunenori Inakura; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Kazuhiro Yabana

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

Cadmium induces autophagy through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling in skin epidermal cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal which is environmentally and occupationally relevant. The mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced autophagy are not yet completely understood. The present study shows that cadmium induces autophagy, as demonstrated by the increase of LC3-II formation and the GFP-LC3 puncta cells. The induction of autophagosomes was directly visualized by electron microscopy in cadmium-exposed skin epidermal cells. Blockage of LKB1 or AMPK by siRNA transfection suppressed cadmium-induced autophagy. Cadmium-induced autophagy was inhibited in dominant-negative AMPK-transfected cells, whereas it was accelerated in cells transfected with the constitutively active form of AMPK. mTOR signaling, a negative regulator of autophagy, was downregulated in cadmium-exposed cells. In addition, cadmium generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) at relatively low levels, and caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) activation and ATP depletion. Inhibition of PARP by pharmacological inhibitors or its siRNA transfection suppressed ATP reduction and autophagy in cadmium-exposed cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced autophagy signaling was attenuated by either exogenous addition of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or by overexpression of these enzymes. Consequently, these results suggest that cadmium-mediated ROS generation causes PARP activation and energy depletion, and eventually induces autophagy through the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling and the down-regulation of mTOR in skin epidermal cells. - Highlights: > Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, induces autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling. > Cadmium generates intracellular ROS at low levels and this leads to severe DNA damage and PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, which are the upstream events of LKB1-AMPK-mediated autophagy. > This novel finding may contribute to further understanding of cadmium-mediated diseases.

Son, Young-Ok; Wang Xin; Hitron, John Andrew [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Zhang Zhuo [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Cheng Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Ding Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Endocrine manipulation of growth and tissue development of broiler chickens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the potential use of in ovo administration of exogenous endocrine compounds to enhance growth and reduce fat content of posthatch broiler chickens. Effects of in ovo administration of growth hormone (GH) plus triiodothyronine (T3)on growth and adiposity of broiler chickens were investigated in experiment 1. Vehicle or vehicle containing .1 ng T3 plus .25 mg GH, . 1 ng T, plus 2.5 mg GH or .1 ng T3 plus 25 mg GH were injected into the albumen of fertile eggs on day 11 of incubation. Female broilers from eggs injected with .1 ng T3 plus 25 mg GH had significantly greater body weights as compared to controls from 5 weeks to 7 weeks of age. Administration of .1 ng T3 plus 2.5 mg G H resulted in a significant (P <. 05) 20.5 % reduction in fat pad weight in males. The effect of manipulating estrogen status in ovo on posthatch growth rate and skeletal development was examined by two trials in experiment 2. Effects of in ovo administration of tamoxifen citrate (T) or 17f3-estradiol (E) on growth and fattening of broiler chickens were assessed in trial 1. At day one of incubation, either vehicle, vehicle containing 20 Mg of E or 200 Mg of T was injected into the albumen of fertile eggs. Neither sex ratios, body weight, fat pad weight nor adipose cellularity parameters were altered by the concentrations of T or E administered in trial 1. In trial 2, eggs from a commercially selected broiler line and from a population of Athens-Canadian Randombreds (AC) were injected with either vehicle or vehicle containing 500 mg of T. At three weeks of age, chicks were sampled for fat pad weight and gonadal sex. The higher concentrations of T administered in trial 2 resulted in significant modifications in phenotypic sex ratios at hatch in both genotypes. However, these phenotypic changes in sex ratios did not yield significant alterations in body weight, fat pad weight or skeletal development. In conclusion, in ovo endocrine administration resulted in modifications of growth and tissue development in broilers. However, the alterations were dependent on the type and concentration of hormone.

Borbolla Sosa, Arturo German

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Report: EM Human Capital Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN CAPITAL September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Human Capital Subcommittee Background: The enhancement of the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) human capital has been a central tenet of the Assistant Secretary's tenure, reflecting the critical nature of this resource to the achievement of EM's mission. Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB or Board) has reviewed the program's human capital issues and the plans EM has developed to address them. This review produced a number of recommendations that were presented in the Board's FY 2006 report to the Assistant Secretary and were later approved and implemented to varying degrees. * Recommendation 2006-01: Develop accountability for the Human Capital Plan

367

Quantum physics and human values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following concepts: the quantum conception of nature; the quantum conception of man; and the impact upon human values. (LSP).

Stapp, H.P.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A quantum mechanical derivation of the Schwarzschild radius and its quantum correction using a model density distribution: Skin of a black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a single particle density distribution for a system of self-gravitating particles which ultimately forms a black hole, we from a condensed matter point of view derive the Schwarzschild radius and by including the quantum mechanical exchange energy we find a small correction to the Schwarzschild radius, which we designate as the skin of the black hole.

Subodha Mishra

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency  

SciTech Connect

A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period.

Athas, W.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.  

SciTech Connect

This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

Noyes, William R., E-mail: noyes@cancercenternd.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Hosford, Charles C. [Department of Medical Statistics, University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Schultz, Steven E. [Department of Urology, RiverView Health, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays  

SciTech Connect

Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

Human Error in Airway Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report examines human errors in Airway Facilities (AF) with the intent of preventing these errors from being passed on to the new Operations Control Centers. To effectively manage errors, they first have to be identified. Human factors engineers researched human error literature, analyzed human errors recorded in AF databases, and conducted structured interviews with AF representatives. This study enabled them to categorize the types of human errors, identify potential causal factors, and recommend strategies for their mitigation. The results provide preventative measures that designers, developers, and users can take to reduce human error. 17. Key Words Human Error Error Mitigation Operations Control Centers Error Mitigation Strategies 18. Distribution Statement This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia, 22161. 19. Security Classif. (of this report) 20. Security Classif. (of this page) 21. No. of Pages 23 22. Price Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was accomplished under the sponsorship of the Office of Chief Scientist for Human Factors, AAR-100. The research team greatly appreciates the support supplied by Beverly Clark of AOP-30 and our subject matter expert, Kermit Grayson of Grayson Consulting. We also wish to extend our thanks to the people interviewed at the facilities who gave their valuable time in helping us to achieve the goals of our project. iv v Table of Contents Page Acknowledgments..........................................................................................................................iii Executive Summary......................................................................................

Vicki Ahlstrom; Vicki Ahlstrom Act; Donald G. Hartman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

375

Proteomic comparison of biomaterial implants for regeneration of peripheral nerve tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue regenerates resulting from the healing of transected peripheral nerve differ in morphological and electrophysiological properties based on the biomaterial implant used to bridge the interneural wound gap. At gap ...

Miu, Kathy K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Non-invasive shock wave stimulated periosteum for bone tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cambium cells of the periosteum, which are known osteoprogenitor cells, have limited suitability for clinical applications of bone tissue engineering due to their low cell number (2-5 cells thick). Extracorporeal shock ...

Kearney, Cathal (Cathal John)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Synthesis and microfabrication of elastomeric biomaterials for advanced tissue engineering scaffolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The subject of this thesis lies at the interface of microfabrication technology and advanced biomaterials synthesis and processing for use in designing and fabricating novel tissue engineered constructs. The unifying theme ...

Bettinger, Christopher John, 1981-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Early tissue patterning recreated by mouse embryonic fibroblasts in a three-dimensional environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular self-organization studies have been mainly focused on models such as Volvox, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and animal (metazoan) embryos. Moreover, animal tissues undergoing regeneration also exhibit ...

Quintana, Lluis

379

Three-dimensional near-field microwave holography for tissue imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the progress toward a fast and reliable microwave imaging setup for tissue imaging exploiting near-field holographic reconstruction. The setup consists of two wideband TEM horn antennas aligned along each other's boresight and performing ...

Reza K. Amineh; Ali Khalatpour; Haohan Xu; Yona Baskharoun; Natalia K. Nikolova

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues using projected Magic Angle Spinning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues using486-5744 pines@berkeley.edu NMR spectroscopy of biologicalAbstract: High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject

Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Detection and quantitation of HPV in genital and oral tissues and fluids by real time PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oral tissues and fluids by real time PCR. Virology Journalsamples by a real-time PCR- based system. J Virol MethodsMolecular beacon-based real-time PCR method for detection of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Training and organizational analysis. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of system-user interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present work focuses solely on training and qualifications of personnel (e.g., training received before and during employment), and the potential impact of organizational factors on the performance of teletherapy. Organizational factors include such topics as adequacy of staffing, performance evaluations, commonly occurring errors, implementation of quality assurance programs, and organizational climate.

Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Implementation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Methylmercury Criterion for Fish Tissue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental exposures to mercury, especially methylmercury, have received increased attention over the past decade. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends a fish tissue-based criterion to protect people from exposure to methylmercury through consumption of self-caught fish in the United States. This approach is appropriate because there are no significant sources of exposure to methylmercury other than from fish consumption. Furthermore, a fish tissue criterion provides a more direct calc...

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

Demonstration of the economic feasibility of plant tissue culture for jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic feasibility of plant tissue culture was demonstrated as applied to two plants: jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp. The gopher weed (Euphorbia lathyris) was selected as the species of Euphorbia to research due to the interest in this plant as a potential source of hydrocarbon-like compounds. High yield female selections of jojoba were chosen from native stands and were researched to determine the economic feasibility of mass producing these plants via a tissue culture micropropagation program. The female jojoba selection was successfully mass produced through tissue culture. Modifications in initiation techniques, as well as in multiplication media and rooting parameters, were necessary to apply the tissue culture system, which had been developed for juvenile seedling tissue, to mature jojobas. Since prior attempts at transfer of tissue cultured plantlets were unsuccessful, transfer research was a major part of the project and has resulted in a system for transfer of rooted jojoba plantlets to soil. Euphorbia lathyris was successfully cultured using shoot tip cultures. Media and procedures were established for culture initiation, multiplication of shoots, callus induction and growth, and root initiation. Well-developed root systems were not attained and root initiation percentages should be increased if the system is to become commercially feasible.

Sluis, C.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A framework for human microbiome research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

Friedman, Jonathan

386

Human genome. 1993 Program report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Strategic Use of Human Capital | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

use of human capital. Strategic Use of Human Capital More Documents & Publications DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2011 - 2015) Inspection Report: DOEIG-0888 Human Capital...

388

Obtaining oblique technique source-to-skin distances for irregular field (Clarkson) calculations: The Mayo Off-axis Distance Indicator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant dose inhomogeneities may exist between the supraclavicular fossa (SCF) and the internal mammary chain (IMC) regions in the irregular L-shaped (hockey stick) field associated with breast cancer treatments. This dose inhomogeneity exists, in part, because of a positive air gap in the SCF and a negative air gap in the IMC locations. Independent of treatment technique, (i.e., whether anterior-posterior (AP) or oblique fields are used), accurate source-to-skin distance (SSD) values for the SCF, IMC, and axilla are necessary when doing an irregular field (Clarkson) dose calculation. However, when an oblique technique is used to treat the hockey stick field, obtaining non-central-axis SSDs is not as straightforward as when an AP technique is employed. The Mayo Off-axis Distance Indicator was constructed to slide into the blocking tray slot of the simulator or treatment machine. This mechanical measuring device provides quick and accurate SSD measurements for non-central-axis points under either AP or, more importantly, oblique treatment conditions.

Lajoie, W.N. (Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, MN (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

HVAC Sensors, Controls, and Human Feedback Interfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Sensors, HVAC Sensors, Controls, and Human Controls, and Human Feedback Interfaces Feedback Interfaces April 26, 2010 Dr. Amr Gado Emerson Climate Technologies Heating And...

390

Homeland Security/Forensics/Human Identity News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Humans spend greater than 90 percent of their time indoors, but we ... Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis ...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

ORISE: Human Subjects Research Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Research Database Section 10, Part 745 of the Code of Federal Regulations and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 443.1 and 481.1 require the maintenance of...

392

Human Errors in Information Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the paper is to target audience and stakeholder individuals whom are in charge of securing the assets of their organisations and institutions. This paper starts by providing a brief overview of information security, outlining the main goals and techniques of the discipline. The paper also discusses the role of human factors and how the information security research community has recognised the increasingly crucial role of human behaviour in many security failures. This is followed by a literature review of human errors in information security. Finally, this paper discusses Reason's Generic Error Modelling System (GEMS) as a potential model for explaining human errors in information security [18]. The terms computer security, network security and information security are used interchangeably in this paper.

Munir Ahmed; Lukman Sharif; Muhammad Kabir; Maha Al-maimani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Coördinating human-robot communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As robots begin to emerge from the cloisters of industrial and military applications and enter the realms of coöperative partners for people, one of the most important facets of human-robot interaction (HRI) will be ...

Brööks, Andrëw G. (Brööks Zoz)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool  

A new software tool enables the easy and quick selection of applicable regulatory guidelines as a starting point for human factors engineering (HFE) analyses.  Once selected, each guideline can be viewed on screen.  The software tracks and reports the ...

395

Human Genome Education Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will contribute to the final revisions of each unit during the second-year of this grant.

Richard Myers; Lane Conn

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Method And Apparatus For Examining A Tissue Using The Spectral Wing Emission Therefrom Induced By Visible To Infrared Photoexcitation.  

SciTech Connect

Method and an apparatus for examining a tissue using the spectral wing emission therefrom induced by visible to infrared photoexcitation. In one aspect, the method is used to characterize the condition of a tissue sample and comprises the steps of (a) photoexciting the tissue sample with substantially monochromatic light having a wavelength of at least 600 nm; and (b) using the resultant far red and near infrared spectral wing emission (SW) emitted from the tissue sample to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In one embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a continuous beam of light, and the resultant steady-state far red and near infrared SW emission from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a light pulse, and the resultant time-resolved far red and near infrared SW emission emitted from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In still another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a polarized light pulse, and the parallel and perpendicular components of the resultant polarized time-resolved SW emission emitted from the tissue sample are used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample.

Alfano, Robert R. (3777 Independence Ave., Bronx, NY 10463); Demos, Stavros G. (3550 Pacific Ave., Apt. 304, Livermore, CA 94550); Zhang, Gang (3 Rieder Rd., Edison, NJ 08817)

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

A human gene (DDX10) encoding a putative DEAD-box RNA helicase at 11q22-q23  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A human gene encoding a putative RNA helicase, designated DDX10, was identified 400 kb telomeric to the ataxia-telangiectasia gene at chromosome 11q22-q23. The predicted amino acid sequence shows very high similarity to a subgroup of DEAD-box RNA helicases involved in ribosome biogenesis. This novel gene encodes a 3.2-kb transcript in a variety of human tissues. A processed pseudogene of DDX10 was detected at chromosome 9q21-q22. We observed a rare trinucleotide repeat length polymorphism within the coding sequence of DDX10. 39 refs., 5 figs.

Savitsky, K.; Ziv, Y.; Bar-Shira, A. [Tel Aviv Univ., Ramat Aviv (Israel)] [and others

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012 Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012 Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1950" Brian Catlos History University of Texas at Arlington 47th Annual Walter Prescott Webb Essay Competition. Guerrero Literature/Creative Writing Humanities Undergraduate Research Award "I Once Was Lost: The (Found

California at Santa Cruz, University of

399

Transient Analysis of Cold Winds on Exposed Skin: Reflections on the Assessment of Wind Chill Equivalent Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transient analysis of the human–environment thermal interaction in cold and windy environments is presented. The site selected to represent this interaction is the head–face, which is depicted as a hollow cylinder wherein heat is conducted in ...

Avraham Shitzer

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

FTCP Human Factors Engineering Supplemental Competencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Factors Engineering Functional Area Qualification Competencies Examples for DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Five design challenges for human computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human computation systems, which draw upon human competencies in order to solve hard computational problems, represent a growing interest within HCI. Despite the numerous technical demonstrations of human computation systems, however, there are few design ... Keywords: citizen science, crowdsourcing, design framework, games with a purpose, human computation

Stuart Reeves; Scott Sherwood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones  

SciTech Connect

The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Measurement of the Osmotic Properties of Thin Polymer Films and Biological Tissue Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of micro-osmometer is described in which water absorption of small tissue samples is measured by a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The swelling of the sample deposited on the surface of a quartz crystal is determined by monitoring the change in resonance frequency of the quartz sensor as a function of the vapor pressure in the surrounding environment. The measurement principle is verified by studying the water uptake of poly(vinyl alcohol) films. Reasonable agreement is found between the results obtained by the QCM-based osmometer and previous osmotic pressure measurements made on a similar poly(vinyl alcohol) sample. The feasibility of the new method is demonstrated by measuring the osmotic response of tissue-engineered cartilage samples. It is found that the osmotic pressure of cartilage substantially increases with culture time. The present result is consistent with cartilage models, suggesting that the proteoglycan content governs the compressive resistance of the tissue.

Ferenc Horkay; Iren Horkayne-szakaly; Peter J. Basser

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Imaging and differentiation of mouse embryo tissues by ToF-SIMS  

SciTech Connect

Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) equipped with a gold ion gun was used to image mouse embryos and differentiate tissue types (brain, spinal cord, skull, rib, heart and liver). Embryos were paraffin-embedded and then de-paraffinized. The robustness and repeatability of the method was determined by analyzing nine tissue slices from three different embryos over a period of several weeks. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to reduce the spectral data generated by ToF-SIMS, histopathologically identified tissue types of the mouse embryos can be differentiated based on the characteristic differences in their mass spectra. These results demonstrate the ability of ToF-SIMS to determine subtle chemical differences even in fixed histological specimens.

Wu, L; Lu, X; Kulp, K; Knize, M; Berman, E; Nelson, E; Felton, J; Wu, K J

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

405

Human Capital Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Capital Management Human Capital Management Human Capital Management The strategic management of human capital requires comprehensive planning and analysis in order to develop, implement, and evaluate programs that support every facet of employee work life. DOE human capital initiatives are designed to support continuous improvement and accountability in accordance with the DOE Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP), which is an internal DOE audit process of servicing human resources offices and addresses those documents that require coordination with the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer before being implemented; Human Resource Directors; the Department's 5-year Strategic Human Capital Management Plan; Departmental element workforce plans; the Department's personnel accountability program that is used

406

Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous, and ATM{sup +/+}wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating gammaH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID{sup -/-} and ATM{sup -/-}homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal tissue responses in clinical radiotherapy.

Ruebe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.e [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Fricke, Andreas; Wendorf, Juliane; Stuetzel, Annika; Kuehne, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ong, Mei Fang [Institute of Medical Biometrics, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Lipp, Peter [Institute for Molecular Cell Biology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Changes in dose with segmentation of breast tissues in Monte Carlo calculations for low-energy brachytherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the use of various breast tissue segmentation models in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low-energy brachytherapy. Methods: The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of a breast brachytherapy treatment using TheraSeed Pd-103 seeds with various breast tissue segmentation models. Models used include a phantom where voxels are randomly assigned to be gland or adipose (randomly segmented), a phantom where a single tissue of averaged gland and adipose is present (averaged tissue), and a realistically segmented phantom created from previously published numerical phantoms. Radiation transport in averaged tissue while scoring in gland along with other combinations is investigated. The inclusion of calcifications in the breast is also studied in averaged tissue and randomly segmented phantoms. Results: In randomly segmented and averaged tissue phantoms, the photon energy fluence is approximately the same; however, differences occur in the dose volume histograms (DVHs) as a result of scoring in the different tissues (gland and adipose versus averaged tissue), whose mass energy absorption coefficients differ by 30%. A realistically segmented phantom is shown to significantly change the photon energy fluence compared to that in averaged tissue or randomly segmented phantoms. Despite this, resulting DVHs for the entire treatment volume agree reasonably because fluence differences are compensated by dose scoring differences. DVHs for the dose to only the gland voxels in a realistically segmented phantom do not agree with those for dose to gland in an averaged tissue phantom. Calcifications affect photon energy fluence to such a degree that the differences in fluence are not compensated for (as they are in the no calcification case) by dose scoring in averaged tissue phantoms. Conclusions: For low-energy brachytherapy, if photon transport and dose scoring both occur in an averaged tissue, the resulting DVH for the entire treatment volume is reasonably accurate because inaccuracies in photon energy fluence are compensated for by inaccuracies in localized dose scoring. If dose to fibroglandular tissue in the breast is of interest, then the inaccurate photon energy fluence calculated in an averaged tissue phantom will result in inaccurate DVHs and average doses for those tissues. Including calcifications necessitates the use of proper tissue segmentation.

Sutherland, J. G. H.; Thomson, R. M.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Human gene sequencing makes advances  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project is a federal project that is on the scale of the Manhattan Project of the 1940s. The focus of this project is to map and sequence the 100,000 plus genes and 3 billion base pairs that comprise the human genome. This effort has made two recent advances. First, two of the major companies involved in this project formed a strategic alliance that will pump up to 125 million dollars into this project. Second, researchers at Argonne National Lab. have tested a new sequencing technique that could identify 100 million base pairs a day when fully implemented.

Alper, J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Friction Induced Skin Tags  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Cutaneous lesions in occult spinal dysraphism-correlationin different forms of occult spinal dysraphism [ 12 ]. An

Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

TiBor Skin  

• Compressor turbine blades • Food processor blades • Chain saw chains • Cutting tools PATENTS AND AWARDS The Y-12 National Security Complex has ...

411

A METHOD OF EFFECTIVELY WIDENING THE BRAGG PEAK IN DEPTH IN THE PATH OF CHARGED HEAVY PARTICLES IN TISSUE  

SciTech Connect

A device is described for the filtration of charged energetic heavy particles resulting in the production of adjacent or separated Bragg peaks within the range of the particles in tissue. Two or more layers of intense ionization at different depths separated by layers of less ionlzation in tissue can be produced. A cylinder of uniform ionization which cuts off sharply in depth in tissue can also be produced. (auth)

Jansen, C.R.; Baker, C.; Calvo, W.; Rai, K.R.; Lippincott, S.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21  

SciTech Connect

Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Tissue Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... The focus of this study is to evaluate woven cellulose based structures as ... Unmodified cellulose and cellulose scaffolds modified with a mixed ...

414

Non-invasive, MRI-compatible fibreoptic device for functional near-IR reflectometry of human brain  

SciTech Connect

A non-invasive device for measuring blood oxygen variations in human brain is designed, implemented, and tested for MRI compatibility. The device is based on principles of near-IR reflectometry; power LEDs serve as sources of probing radiation delivered to patient skin surface through optical fibres. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations of probing radiation propagation in a multilayer brain model are performed to evaluate signal levels at different source - detector separations at three operation wavelengths and an additional wavelength of 915 nm. It is shown that the device can be applied for brain activity studies using power LEDs operating at 830 and 915 nm, while employment of wavelength of 660 nm requires an increased probing power. Employment of the wavelength of 592 nm in the current configuration is unreasonable. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

Sorvoja, H.S.S.; Myllylae, T S; Myllylae, Risto A [University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurements Techniques Laboratory (Finland); Kirillin, M Yu; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Elseoud, A A; Nikkinen, J; Tervonen, O; Kiviniemi, V [MRI Research Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

415

Bio-Inspired Computing Tissues: Towards Machines that Evolve, Grow, and Learn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological inspiration in the design of computing machines could allow the creation of new machines with promising characteristics such as fault-tolerance, self-replication or cloning, reproduction, evolution, adaptation and learning, and growth. The aim of this paper is to introduce bio-inspired computing tissues that might constitute a key concept for the implementation of "living" machines. We first present a general overview of bio-inspired systems and the POE model that classifies bio-inspired machines along three axes. The Embryonics project---inspired by some of the basic processes of molecular biology---is described by means of the BioWatch application, a fault-tolerant and self-repairable watch. The main characteristics of the Embryonics project are the multicellular organization, the cellular di#erentiation, and the self-repair capabilities. The BioWall is intended as a reconfigurable computing tissue capable of interacting with its environment by means of a large number of touch-sensitive elements coupled with a color displays. For illustrative purposes, a large-scale implementation of the BioWatch on the BioWall's computational tissue is presented. We conclude the paper with a description of bio-inspired computing tissues and POEtic machines. 1

C. Teuscher; D. Mange; A. Stauffer; G. Tempesti

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reply: Lithium and Increased Cortical Gray Matter--More Tissue or More Water?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reply: Lithium and Increased Cortical Gray Matter--More Tissue or More Water? To the Editor: W e cortices, in lithium-treated patients with bipolar disorder, relative to healthy control subjects (1). Dr patients. Although lithium's effects on body water homeostasis (2) are important to consider, the absence

Thompson, Paul

417

Does proximity to coal-fired power plants influence fish tissue mercury?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does proximity to coal-fired power plants influence fish tissue mercury? Dana K. Sackett · D. Derek+Business Media, LLC 2010 Abstract Much of the mercury contamination in aquatic biota originates from coal of contaminated fish. In this study, we quantified the relative importance of proximity to coal-fired power plants

418

An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Recovery of Soft Tissue Object Deformation from 3D Image Sequences Using Biomechanical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of soft tissue deformation from 3D image sequences is an important problem in a number of fields such as diagnosis of heart disease and image guided surgery. In this paper we describe a methodology for using biomechanical material models, ...

Xenophon Papademetris; Pengcheng Shi; Donald P. Dione; Albert J. Sinusas; R. Todd Constable; James S. Duncan

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A system for combined three-dimensional morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue specimens  

SciTech Connect

We present a new system for simultaneous morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue samples. The system is composed of a computer assisted microscope and a JAVA-based image display, analysis and visualization program that allows acquisition, annotation, meaningful storage, three-dimensional reconstruction and analysis of structures of interest in thick sectioned tissue specimens. We describe the system in detail and illustrate its use by imaging, reconstructing and analyzing two complete tissue blocks which were differently processed and stained. One block was obtained from a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lumpectomy specimen and stained alternatively with Hematoxilyn and Eosin (H&E), and with a counterstain and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ERB-B2 gene. The second block contained a fully sectioned mammary gland of a mouse, stained for Histology with H&E. We show how the system greatly reduces the amount of interaction required for the acquisition and analysis and is therefore suitable for studies that require morphologically driven, wide scale (e.g., whole gland) analysis of complex tissue samples or cultures.

Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Jones, Arthur; Garcia-Rodriguez, Enrique; Yuan Chen, Ping; Idica, Adam; Lockett, Stephen J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

422

Tissue architecture and function: dynamic reciprocity via extra- and intra-cellular matrices  

SciTech Connect

Mammary gland development, functional differentiation, and homeostasis are orchestrated and sustained by a balance of biochemical and biophysical cues from the organ's microenvironment. The three-dimensional microenvironment of the mammary gland, predominantly 'encoded' by a collaboration between the extracellular matrix (ECM), hormones, and growth factors, sends signals from ECM receptors through the cytoskeletal intracellular matrix to nuclear and chromatin structures resulting in gene expression; the ECM in turn is regulated and remodeled by signals from the nucleus. In this chapter, we discuss how coordinated ECM deposition and remodeling is necessary for mammary gland development, how the ECM provides structural and biochemical cues necessary for tissue-specific function, and the role of the cytoskeleton in mediating the extra - to intracellular dialogue occurring between the nucleus and the microenvironment. When operating normally, the cytoskeletal-mediated dynamic and reciprocal integration of tissue architecture and function directs mammary gland development, tissue polarity, and ultimately, tissue-specific gene expression. Cancer occurs when these dynamic interactions go awry for an extended time.

Xu, Ren; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Performance evaluation of fiber optic probes for tissue lifetime fluorescence spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflected light. Our findings can be applied towards optimization of fiber-optic probe designs Angeles, CA 90028. ABSTRACT The design of fiber-optic probes plays an important role in optical spectroscopic studies, including fluorescence spectroscopy of biological tissues. It can affect the light

Jones, Linda R.

424

Formation of ortho-tyrosine by radiation and organic solvents in chicken tissue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fresh chicken breast and beef incubated in water were found to contain no o-Tyr at the current levels of detection (0.1 ppm) by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and selective ion monitoring. In contrast, samples incubated at 37{degrees}C in the presence of ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride (used in fat extraction) contained large quantities (2.5-5.1 ppm) of o-Tyr. No o-Tyr was detected in the water-insoluble fraction of meat treated with carbon tetrachloride after triple extraction by water. However, reaction of radiation generated .OH in gamma-irradiated fresh chicken tissue with endogenous phenylalanine yields o-Tyr with a linear yield-dose response in both water-soluble and -insoluble tissue fractions. Nonradiolytically generated .OH is suggested to be formed through a mitochondrion-mediated Haber-Weiss reaction in association with water-soluble proteins since the yields of o-Tyr in beef, a tissue with a higher mitochondrial content, are four times greater than in the chicken breast tissue.

Karam, L.R.; Simic, M.G. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

POEtic-cubes: acquisition of new qualia through apperception using a bio-inspired electronic tissue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we shall present the research process towards an artistic installation, called POEtic-Cubes, that is constituted by nine autonomous robots monitored by the POEtic electronic tissue (bio-inspired hardware with adaptive features). The main ... Keywords: adaptation, apperceptiona, bio-inspired systems, epigenesis, multi-sensory artistic installations, ontogenesis, phylogenesis

Raquel Paricio; J. Manuel Moreno

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

THE MOVEMENT OF ELECTROLYTES AND OF WATER IN SURVIVING TISSUE OF THE LIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liver tissue and kidney cortex when immersed in solutions of sodium chloride immediately after their removal from the body have been found to be isotonic with solutions that have approximately twice the concentration of the sodium chloride in physiological salt solution or in blood plasma (1, 2) but the conditions that determine this relation have received widely varied explanations. Most of those who have studied the water exchange of tissue slices immersed in various media have attached little significance to the progress of the changes which occur in tissues immediately after their removal from the body. Liver immersed in an approximately 0.34 molar solution of sodium chloride remains in water equilibrium with the medium during 15 to 20 minutes and then gradually increasing water intake (1, 2) follows. When slices are immersed in a Krebs-Ringer (3) solution made isotonic with liver by addition of sodium chloride, the period of water equilibrium may be prolonged to 1 or 2 hours because, as it appears, the tissue has undergone less injury in this medium than in a solution of sodium chloride (3) with the same molar concentration.

D. Broome; Am Eugene; L. Opie

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Method of freezing living cells and tissues with improved subsequent survival  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved method for freezing red blood cells, ther living cells, or tissues with improved subsequent survival, wherein constant-volume freezing is utilized that results in significantly improved survival compared with constant-pressure freezing; optimization is attainable through the use of different vessel geometries, cooling baths and warming baths, and sample concentrations.

Senkan, Selim M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hirsch, Gerald P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus is disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment.

Neev, Joseph (Laguna Beach, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Glinsky, Michael E. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Feit, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Rubenchik, Alexander M. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Human and unhuman commonsense reasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ford has introduced a non-monotonic logic, System LS, inspired by an empirical study of human non-monotonic reasoning. We define here a defeasible logic FDL based on Fordh's logic, and in doing so identify some similarities and differences between Ford's ...

Michael J. Maher

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A Literary Human Exinction Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly's (MWS) novel, The Last Man, published in 1826, is an epic narrative about the destruction of the human race. This paper provides a synopsis of this book and assesses its relationships to contemporary future studies. The paper also delves into the history of apocalyptic writing and thinking, using this book an entry point to past literature.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The human agent virtual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe a multi-agent simulation called the Human Agent Virtual Environment (or HAVE). HAVE is a test bed to explore agent-environment interaction in multi-agent simulation for defence applications. The primary research driver in the ... Keywords: agents and cognitive models, defence, multi-agent simulation and modeling

Michael Papasimeon; Adrian R. Pearce; Simon Goss

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Human retroviruses and AIDS 1994  

SciTech Connect

This compendium, including accompanying floppy diskettes, is the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts it comprises: (I) Nucleic Acid Alignments and Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Alignments; (III) Analysis; (IV) Related Sequences; (V) Database communications.

Myers, G.; Korber, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S.; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Henderson, L.E.; Pavlakis, G.N. [eds.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Human-Machine Function Allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Human-machine function comparison...ability Comparatively slow and poor computers. Excellent and very rapid computers. Memory storage Poor short-term storage. Excellent long-term storage. Excellent short-term storage. Long-term storage very

436

Contractor Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contractor Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Contractor Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Contractor Human Resources Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Contractor Human Resources Contractor Human Resources Welcome The Contractor Human Resources mission is to provide expert advice and

437

High and Low LET Radiation Differentially Induce Normal Tissue Damage Signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy using high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is aimed at efficiently killing tumor cells while minimizing dose (biological effective) to normal tissues to prevent toxicity. It is well established that high LET radiation results in lower cell survival per absorbed dose than low LET radiation. However, whether various mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be regulated differentially is not known. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether two actions related to normal tissue toxicity, p53-induced apoptosis and expression of the profibrotic gene PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1), are differentially induced by high and low LET radiation. Methods and Materials: Cells were irradiated with high LET carbon ions or low LET photons. Cell survival assays were performed, profibrotic PAI-1 expression was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and apoptosis was assayed by annexin V staining. Activation of p53 by phosphorylation at serine 315 and serine 37 was monitored by Western blotting. Transfections of plasmids expressing p53 mutated at serines 315 and 37 were used to test the requirement of these residues for apoptosis and expression of PAI-1. Results: As expected, cell survival was lower and induction of apoptosis was higher in high -LET irradiated cells. Interestingly, induction of the profibrotic PAI-1 gene was similar with high and low LET radiation. In agreement with this finding, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 315 involved in PAI-1 expression was similar with high and low LET radiation, whereas phosphorylation of p53 at serine 37, involved in apoptosis induction, was much higher after high LET irradiation. Conclusions: Our results indicate that diverse mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be differentially affected by high and low LET radiation. This may have consequences for the development and manifestation of normal tissue damage.

Niemantsverdriet, Maarten [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Goethem, Marc-Jan van [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bron, Reinier; Hogewerf, Wytse [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A.; Luijk, Peter van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P., E-mail: r.p.coppes@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Online Image-based Monitoring of Soft-tissue Displacements for Radiation Therapy of the Prostate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Emerging prolonged, hypofractionated radiotherapy regimens rely on high-dose conformality to minimize toxicity and thus can benefit from image guidance systems that continuously monitor target position during beam delivery. To address this need we previously developed, as a potential add-on device for existing linear accelerators, a novel telerobotic ultrasound system capable of real-time, soft-tissue imaging. Expanding on this capability, the aim of this work was to develop and characterize an image-based technique for real-time detection of prostate displacements. Methods and Materials: Image processing techniques were implemented on spatially localized ultrasound images to generate two parameters representing prostate displacements in real time. In a phantom and five volunteers, soft-tissue targets were continuously imaged with a customized robotic manipulator while recording the two tissue displacement parameters (TDPs). Variations of the TDPs in the absence of tissue displacements were evaluated, as was the sensitivity of the TDPs to prostate translations and rotations. Robustness of the approach to probe force was also investigated. Results: With 95% confidence, the proposed method detected in vivo prostate displacements before they exceeded 2.3, 2.5, and 2.8 mm in anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mediolateral directions. Prostate pitch was detected before exceeding 4.7 Degree-Sign at 95% confidence. Total system time lag averaged 173 ms, mostly limited by ultrasound acquisition rate. False positives (FPs) (FP) in the absence of displacements did not exceed 1.5 FP events per 10 min of continuous in vivo imaging time. Conclusions: The feasibility of using telerobotic ultrasound for real-time, soft-tissue-based monitoring of target displacements was confirmed in vivo. Such monitoring has the potential to detect small clinically relevant intrafractional variations of the prostate position during beam delivery.

Schlosser, Jeffrey [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States) [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Salisbury, Kenneth [Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States) [Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dhristov@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Low Dose Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Joe Gray Priscilla Cooper Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The radiation Adaptive Response (adaptation, or AR) is a well documented, although evidently highly variable, protective phenomenon in which exposures to low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation result in reduced deleterious effects of subsequent higher exposures. Protection has been reported against a variety of biologically important endpoints, but its variability as a function of cell and tissue type and its genetic control are not well understood. The adaptive response is predicted to result in a non-linear dose response for cancer risk in the low dose range. However, the molecular mechanism(s) remain unknown, and such information is

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441

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Julie Langham Grilly, February 3, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Julie Langham Grilly was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) being the widow of Dr. Wright Langham, an investigator of principal interest of the committee. Her extensive experience with research at LANL was also of interest to the committee. Following a brief biographical sketch, Ms. Grilly relates her early postwar experience and her knowledge of Wright Langham`s involvement in animal research at Los Alamos, radiolanthanum tests on monkeys, Eniwetok tissue examinations, research on tritium uptake in humans, plutonium injections, tritium injections, EDTA, and etc. In addition to illuminating her former husband as a researcher and as an individual, she also relates her remembrances of Louis Hempelman, Enrico Fermi, Oppenheimer, Edward Teller, and many others.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers in the human lung. Environ Health Perspect 102(Suppl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is now a substantial body of experimental data on the pulmonary biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers (MMVSF), but human data are seriously lacking. Our knowledge in this field is essentially limited to a few reports of measurements of fibers retained in lung tissue samples taken at autopsy from workers manufacturing these products. Three types of exposure were studied: fibrous glass, mineral wool, and refractory ceramic fibers. Overall, the available data do not provide evidence for substantial long-term retention of fibers in the human lung after occupational exposure to MMVSF dusts. A word of caution, however; the amount of data supporting the previous statement is much greater for fibrous glass than for either mineral wool or refractory ceramic fibers. There is no human data on the key question of the kinetics of pulmonary clearance of inhaled MMVSF.- Environ Health Perspect 102(Suppl 5):225-228 (1994)

R Sebastien

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cloning humans, increasing intelligence, and AIDS money  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloning humans, increasing intelligence, and AIDS money Name: Eric T Jenes Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How close are we to cloning humans?...

444

Bioscience & Health Homeland Security/Forensics/Human ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vehicle Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis. 13DO003_oles_fingerprintmap_CS ...

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning  

SciTech Connect

mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]|[Kingston General Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Human Errors: Disadvantages and Advantages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The traditional paradigm for learning and training of operators in complex systems is discussed and criticised to react on the strong influence (the doctrine of 'mental logic') coming from research carried out in artificial intelligence (AI). The most well known arguments against the AI-approach are presented and discussed in relation to expertise, intuition and implicit knowledge. The importance of faults and errors are discussed in the context of a new metaphor for cognitive structures to describe expertise, and how knowledge about unsuccessful behavior influences the actual decision making process of experts. Keywords: human error, meta learning, mental model, experience, expertise 1. INTRODUCTION Why is this type of statements "I learned more from my defeats than from my victories" (Napoleon, ca. 1819) sometimes (or always) true? To answer this question we need a new understanding of human errors, inefficient behavior, and expertise. In this paper we will discuss the importance of...

Matthias Rauterberg; Daniel Felix

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Quantification of tc-99m sestamibi distribution in normal breast tissue using dedicated breast SPECT-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of Tc-99m-Sestamibi in molecular breast imaging is common due to its preferential uptake in malignant tissue. However, quantification of the baseline uptake in normal, healthy breast tissue is not possible using planar-imaging devices. Using ... Keywords: CT, SPECT, breast cancer, breast imaging, quantification, sestamibi

Steve D. Mann; Kristy L. Perez; Emily K. E. McCracken; Jainil P. Shah; Kingshuk R. Choudhury; Terence Z. Wong; Martin P. Tornai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Computer (and Human) Perfection at Checkers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1989 the Chinook project began with the goal of winning the human World Checkers Championship. There was an imposing obstacle to success ?the human champion, Marion Tinsley. Tinsley was as close to perfection at the game as was humanly possible. To ...

Jonathan Schaeffer

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

From here to human-level AI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human-level AI will be achieved, but new ideas are almost certainly needed, so a date cannot be reliably predicted-maybe five years, maybe five hundred years. I'd be inclined to bet on this 21st century. It is not surprising that human-level AI has proved ... Keywords: Elaboration tolerance, Human-level AI

John McCarthy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Human activities recognition using depth images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new method to classify human activities by leveraging on the cues available from depth images alone. Towards this end, we propose a descriptor which couples depth and spatial information of the segmented body to describe a human pose. Unique ... Keywords: depth image segmentation, human activity detection

Raj Gupta; Alex Yong-Sang Chia; Deepu Rajan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Localization of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA and immunoreactivity in the rat heart and human atrial appendage  

SciTech Connect

The localization of mRNA encoding preproatrial natriuretic peptide was investigated in tissue sections and cultures of rat heart and in sections of human right atrial appendage using the technique of in situ hybridization with /sup 32/P- and /sup 35/S-labeled RNA probes. Rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) transcripts were demonstrated in numerous atrial myocytes and, to a lesser extent, in ventricular myocytes in both tissue sections and newborn rat heart cultures. These findings are consistent with those obtained by RNA blot analysis of rat heart total RNA, indicating that a single prepro-ANP transcript of approx. 900 nucleotides was present in the ventricles as well as the atria. Using a /sup 35/S-labeled RNA probe for human ANP mRNA, ANP transcripts were also localized to the majority of myocytes in the human right atrial appendage. Only background levels of autoradiographic labeling were obtained when RNA probes identical to the coding sequence of rat or human ANP mRNA were used. A close correlation was found between the distribution of ANP immunoreactivity and prepro-ANP mRNA in these preparations. These results provide unequivocal evidence for the expression of the ANP gene in the rat ventricles, as well as the atria, because myocytes in these tissues have been established as the sites of both ANP localization and precursor biosynthesis. The combined use of cardiac cultures and in situ hybridization may be of value in future studies investigating the regulation of ANP synthesis in cardiac myocytes.

Hamid, Q.; Wharton, J.; Terenghi, G.; Hassall, C.J.S.; Aimi, J.; Taylor, K.M.; Nakazato, H.; Dixon, J.E.; Burnstock, G.; Polak, J.M.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Integrating Human Performance and Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human error is a significant factor in the cause and/or complication of events that occur in the commercial nuclear industry. In recent years, great gains have been made using Human Performance (HU) tools focused on targeting individual behaviors. However, the cost of improving HU is growing and resistance to add yet another HU tool certainly exists, particularly for those tools that increase the paperwork for operations. Improvements in HU that are the result of leveraging existing technology, such as hand-held mobile technologies, have the potential to reduce human error in controlling system configurations, safety tag-outs, and other verifications. Operator rounds, valve line-up verifications, containment closure verifications, safety & equipment protection, and system tagging can be supported by field-deployable wireless technologies. These devices can also support the availability of critical component data in the main control room and other locations. This research pilot project reviewing wireless hand-held technology is part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRSP), a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The project is being performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing, and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRSP vision is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current nuclear reactor fleet.

Ronald K. Farris; Heather Medema

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Iontophoretic {beta}-adrenergic stimulation of human sweat glands: possible assay for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activity in vivo.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constant-bore glass capillaries between oil blocks. Rates ofa small glass capillary into the skin to block cholinergic

Shamsuddin, A K M; Reddy, M M; Quinton, P M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The germline- and tissue-specific effects of endogenous point-mutant p53  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p53 is frequently altered in human tumors through missense mutations that result in accumulation of mutant p53 protein. These mutations may confer dominant-negative or gain-of- function properties to p53. To ascertain the ...

Olive, Kenneth P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Concentration and distribution of 210 Po in the tissues of the scallop Chlamys varia and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is considered as an important source of internal radiation dose to marine organisms (Cherry and Shannon, 1974 of the radiation exposure of humans to background radiation, particularly through seafood consumption (CEC, 1989

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

456

Whole body retention and tissue distribution of (/sup 203/Hg)methylmercury in adult cats  

SciTech Connect

To assess the whole body retention and tissue distribution of methylmercury six adult female random-bred cats were given a single oral dose of 78 ..mu..g (55 ..mu..Ci) of (/sup 203/Hg)methylmercury chloride. /sup 203/Hg in the whole body of the cats and in feces and urine were monitored for 156 days. Samples of hair collected throughout the experiment were used to correct the whole body radioactivity measurements for the mercury contained in the hair and to adjust the whole body retention for the amount of mercury contained in the hair. Tissue distribution of /sup 203/Hg was measured 156 days postdosing. The ability of various tissues to concentrate methylmercury was expressed as a concentration factor (CF = (specific activity of a tissue at a time t)/(specific activity of the whole cat at time t)). The whole body half-period of methylmercury after a single oral dose of (/sup 203/Hg)methylmercury to cats was 117.7 +- (SE) 1.4 days including the hair and 76.2 +- 1.6 days excluding the hair. The half-period of appearance of methylmercury in hair, feces and urine were 69 +- 5, 68 +- 5, and 78 +- 4 days, respectively. The percentage of the total dose of methylmercury remaining in the cats after 156 days were 35.9 +- 3.3 percent. Hair showed the highest CF(30.2 +- 2.6) followed by liver (12.4 +- 1.0), gall-bladder (2.3 +- 0.5), and kidney (2.0 +- 0.1). Muscle, lymph nodes, hide, and adrenal gland had CF values of approximately 1. The CF for various brain areas ranged between 0.48 and 0.60.

Hollins, J.G.; Willes, R.F.; Bryce, F.R.; Charbonneau, S.M.; Munro, I.C.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is disclosed for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue. 1 fig.

Peurrung, A.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

458

Composition and decomposition of soybean and sorghum tissues grown under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that changes in both quantity and quality of plant residue inputs to soils as atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration increases may alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) turnover rates and pool sizes. We determined the effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plant tissue quality, and how modifications in tissue quality affect C and N mineralization. Soybean and sorghum were grown under elevated (704.96 {plus_minus} 0.33 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}) and ambient (357.44 {plus_minus} 0.12 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup {minus}1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} in open-top chambers. Leaf and stem tissues were separated form harvested plants and analyzed for C,N, lignin, and cellulose. Tissues were applied to Norfolk loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Kandiudult) and aerobically incubated for 70-d to determine C and N mineralization, C turnover, relative N mineralization, and C/N mineralized. Elevated CO{sub 2} had no effect on plant residue C concentration, but N concentration of soybean leaves and stems and sorghum stems was reduced; however, CO{sub 2} enrichment increased C/N ratio and lignin concentration for only sorghum stems and soybean leaves, respectively. Source of plant residue (i.e., produced under either elevated or ambient CO{sub 2}) had no impact on soil C turnover, relative N mineralization, cumulative C and N mineralization, and C/N mineralized. These data suggest that increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} will have little effect on composition or decomposition of field crop residues. Thus, since CO{sub 2} enrichment results in increased photosynthetic C fixation, the possibility exists for increased soil C storage under field crops in an elevated CO{sub 2} world. 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Henning, F.P. [Cooperative Ext. Serv., Dunwoody, GA (United States); Wood, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Rogers, H.H.; Runion, G.B.; Prior, S.A. [National Soil Dynamics Lab., Auburn, AL (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

ACCELERATED COMMUNICATION Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate Is a Highly Potent Agonist for the Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor Splice Variant CAR2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, CAR1) regulates the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism in the liver. The CAR gene uses multiple alternative splicing events during pre-mRNA processing, thereby enhancing the CAR transcriptome. Previous reports have identified two prominent human CAR variants, CAR2 and CAR3, that possess fourand five-amino acid insertions in their ligand binding domains, respectively. Unlike the constitutively active reference form of the receptor, we now demonstrate that CAR2 is a ligandactivated receptor and comprises approximately 30 % of the reference transcript level in human liver tissues in human hepatocytes. Furthermore, we identify the common plasticizer, di(2ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a highly potent and uniquely The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a

Joshua G. Dekeyser; Michael C. Stagliano; Scott S. Auerbach; Eep Pr