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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model John Miller 1 , Seema Varma 1 , William Chrisler 2 , Xihai Wang 2 and Marianne Sowa 2 1 Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, WA 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA Monte Carlo simulations of electrons stopping in liquid water are being used to model electron- beam irradiation of the full-thickness (FT) EpiDerm TM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes from a dermal layer of fibroblasts embedded in collagen. The simulations have shown the feasibility of exposing the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer (Miller et al. 2011). The variable-

2

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model John Miller Washington State University Tri-Cities Abstract Monte Carlo simulations of electrons stopping in liquid water are being used to model electronbeam irradiation of the full-thickness (FT) EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes from a dermal layer of fibroblasts embedded in collagen. The simulations have shown the feasibility of exposing the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer (Miller et al. 2011). The variableenergy electron microbeam at PNNL (Sowa et al. 2005) was used as a model of device characteristics and

3

The Efficacy of a Broad-spectrum Sunscreen to Protect Engineered Human Skin from Tissue and DNA Damage Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...responses of the skin to solar UVR, 3 whereas photoaging...are diagnosed in Canada (2) . It has been...that a child born in Canada today has a 1 in...Skin exposure to solar UVR induces significant...Sunscreen Treatment and Solar UVR Irradiation...Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Canada, were applied at...

Vickram Bissonauth; Régen Drouin; David L. Mitchell; Marc Rhainds; Joël Claveau; and Mahmoud Rouabhia

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Low dose and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model Sally A. Amundson Columbia University Medical Center Abstract Significant structural abnormalities develop within several days of exposure of the 3-dimensional normal human skin tissue model EPI-200 (MatTek) to high or low doses of low LET radiation. Disruption of the basal layer occurs following high radiation doses, and premature cornification is evident after both high and low dose exposures. In bystander tissue that is near irradiated portions of the tissue, but is not itself irradiated, we also observe premature cornification, increased apoptosis and micronucleus formation. Changes in global gene expression also occur in both directly irradiated and bystander EPI-200 tissue. Although the unfolding over time

5

Low dose and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model. and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model. Sally A. Amundson and Alexandre Mezentsev Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Radiological Research, New York, NY 10032 Significant structural abnormalities develop within several days of exposure of the 3-dimensional normal human skin tissue model EPI-200 (MatTek) to high or low doses of low LET radiation. Disruption of the basal layer occurs following high radiation doses, and premature cornification is evident after both high and low dose exposures. In bystander tissue that is near irradiated portions of the tissue, but is not itself irradiated, we also observe premature cornification, increased apoptosis and micronucleus formation. Changes in global gene expression also occur

6

DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged human skin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skin-color to track human body. In this paper, we discuss... on human faces. Using skin color as a feature ... Source: Yang, Jie - Human Computer Interaction Institute & School...

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging human skin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skin-color to track human body. In this paper, we discuss... on human faces. Using skin color as a feature ... Source: Yang, Jie - Human Computer Interaction Institute & School...

9

Assessment of penetration of quantum dots through in vitro and in vivo human skin using the human skin equivalent model and the tape stripping method  

SciTech Connect

Quantum dots (QDs) are rapidly emerging as an important class of nanoparticles (NPs) with potential applications in medicine. However, little is known about penetration of QDs through human skin. This study investigated skin penetration of QDs in both in vivo and in vitro human skin. Using the tape stripping method, this study demonstrates for the first time that QDs can actually penetrate through the stratum corneum (SC) of human skin. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy diverse X-ray (EDX) analysis showed accumulation of QDs in the SC of a human skin equivalent model (HSEM) after dermal exposure to QDs. These findings suggest possible transdermal absorption of QDs after dermal exposure over a relatively long period of time.

Jeong, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwan; Yi, Sang Min [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Jin Ho; Sohn, Kyung Hee; Park, Kui Lea [National Institute of Toxicological Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [National Institute of Toxicological Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Meyoung-Kon [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Sang Wook, E-mail: skin4u@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human skin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and push-ups respiration, sweating, changes in skin... ;Future of PETMAN usage in enviroment dangerousto humans transformation into a free standing, self Source: Takac,...

11

Skin strain analysis software for the study of human skin deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skin strain studies have never been conducted in a precise and automated fashion. Previous in vivo strain investigations have been labor intensive and the data resolution was extremely limited such that their results were ...

Marecki, Andrew T. (Andrew Thomas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI Tolga Tasdizen, David for classifying multispectral MR scans of the human head into nine tissue classes. User initialization is adopted. #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Classification of head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data

Utah, University of

13

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

14

Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome  

SciTech Connect

Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Infrared mapping resolves soft tissue preservation in 50 million year-old reptile skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...serve to inhibit microbial degradation and solvent attack (hydrolysis) of the organic compounds...the fossilized skin. Calcite peaks (green box) and silicate stretch region (grey...organic peaks are distinguishable. (d) Green River fossil leaf (BHI-7032) point...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function of human skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function...Stanford, CA 94305 The ubiquitous presence of solar UV radiation in human life is essential for...defense against environmental exposures like solar UV radiation, and its effects on UV targets...

Krysta Biniek; Kemal Levi; Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Interaction of Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons with Tissues VII. Fractionation of Mouse Skin Proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Inferaction of Hydrocarbons with Tissues. VII...separation of the water- soluble proteins...in Chart 1, and water-soluble proteins...Interaction of Hydrocarbons with Tissues. VII...noncarcinogenic hydrocarbons could be detected...electrophoretic separation of water-soluble proteins...

G. Rodman Davenport; C. W. Abell; and Charles Heidelberger

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Identification of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin Feng Yang, Katrina M. Waters, Bobbie-Jo Webb-Robertson, Lye-Meng Markillie, Rachel M. Wirgau, Shawna M. Hengel, Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, and David L. Stenoien. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Our focus has been on identifying the early events that occur after low dose ionizing radiation exposure that precede and often regulate downstream events such as altered transcription, protein secretion and epigenetic regulation. Phosphorylation is one of the earliest detectible events that occurs following radiation exposure and plays important roles in multiple biological pathways including DNA damage repair, transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. Very robust

19

Skin melanin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin melanin Skin melanin Name: Janae Lepir Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How does the skin produce melanin? Replies: There are special cells in the skin called melanocytes. They synthesize melanin from an amino acid, tyrosine. (Amino acids make up proteins; there are about 20 different ones). Melanocytes can be stimulated by a hormone in the pituitary gland called melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH). I don't know how much biology you've had, but melanocytes are derived from an interesting embryonic tissue called the neural crest, which also gives rise to a lot of different types of neurons, so embryologically melanocytes are related to neurons. If melanocytes become malignant, it becomes a very bad form of cancer, called melanoma (often called "skin cancer", although there are other forms of skin cancer).

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous human tissue Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Materials Science 6 Autologous Heart Valve Tissue Engineering CIP-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Summary: , the human umbilical cord is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Skin Evolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin Evolution Skin Evolution Name: Olga Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do you think it is possible that our ancestors were actually black, and that a gene mutation for an enzyme in the metabollic pathway of melanin meant that not enough melanin was produced some of us ended up with white skin. Primitive apes have black skin, and we evolved from them, so doesn't this mean that humans orginally had black skin??? Replies: Most likely, yes, humans probably evolved from dark-skinned ancestors. I will take issue, however, with your statement that "primitive apes have black skin;" we can't say that for absolute certain, because we have no primitive apes to compare to. All we have now are modern apes. All modern apes - homo sapiens, pan troglodytes, gorilla gorilla - are highly, probably equally, evolved. (One could make an argument that homo sapiens is in many ways more generalized - note the generalized dentition, fragile skeleton, etc. - than other modern apes, and thus could be said to be more primitive.) As far as that goes, the only modern apes with white skin I know of are a color variant of homo sapiens.

22

Mechanical and biochemical properties of human cervical tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanical integrity of cervical tissue is crucial for maintaining a healthy gestation. Altered tissue biochemistry can cause drastic changes in the mechanical properties of the cervix and contribute to premature ...

Myers, Kristin M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Digital RNA allelotyping reveals tissue-specific and allele-specific gene expression in human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterized four cell lines established from two human subjects in the Personal Genome Project. Approximately the comprehensive mapping of linkage disequilibrium in the human genome. The block-like distribution of linkageDigital RNA allelotyping reveals tissue-specific and allele-specific gene expression in human Kun

Cai, Long

24

Digital RNA allelotyping reveals tissue-specific and allele-specific gene expression in human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterized four cell lines established from two human subjects in the Personal Genome Project. Approximately the comprehensive mapping of linkage disequilibrium in the human genome. The block like distribution of linkageDigital RNA allelotyping reveals tissue-specific and allele-specific gene expression in human Kun

Church, George M.

25

r Human Brain Mapping 32:382396 (2011) r CENTS: Cortical Enhanced Neonatal Tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r Human Brain Mapping 32:382­396 (2011) r CENTS: Cortical Enhanced Neonatal Tissue Segmentation-quality magnetic resonance (MR) images of neonatal brains is largely ham- pered by their characteristically small head size and insufficient tissue contrast. As a result, subsequent image processing and analysis

Utah, University of

26

A compendium of gene expression in normal human tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gene Expression Index, the HuGE In- dex, http://www.hugeindex.org) for future studies of patho completion of the human genome project (8, 37a), greater attention is now focused on defining the biological

Weng, Zhiping

27

Tissue-specific classification of alternatively spliced human exons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative splicing is involved in numerous cellular functions and is often disrupted and involved in disease. Previous research has identified methods to distinguish alternative conserved exons (ACEs) in human and mouse. ...

Rothman, Craig Jeremy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Thermal Modeling and Experimental Validation of Human Hair and Skin Heated by Broadband Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution within the hair follicle is highly non-uniform: the minimum temperature occurs at the follicle Sun, PhD,1 Alex Chaney,1 Robert Anderson, PhD,2 and Guillermo Aguilar, PhD 1 * 1 Department:(a)determinetheoveralleffectofPPxonskinhumidi- tyandassociatedskinopticalproperties,and;(b)developaPT numerical model to study the spatial and temporal hair and skin temperature

Aguilar, Guillermo

29

Photochemical tissue bonding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

Redmond, Robert W. (Brookline, MA); Kochevar, Irene E. (Charlestown, MA)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X?Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent technological improvements allow the method of in vivo XRF to provide useful sensibility for diagnostics or monitoring in biomedical applications. In cases of hereditary sanguine disorders as the ??thalassaemia or a genetic disorder like Haemochromatosis there is a high concentration of elements as Fe Zn and Cu in the skin and internal organs due to the treatment of those abnormalities or due to the own dysfunction caused by the disease. The levels of Fe related to the patient bearers of the ??thalassaemia are determined at the moment measuring a protein in the sanguine current called ferritin. The monitoring of the protein is ineffective in several situations such as when the patient suffers any disturbance of health. Nowadays the main forms of measuring the levels of those metals through hepatic storage are the biopsy of the liver that is invasive and potentially dangerous presenting a rate of mortality of 0.1% and by means of magnetic susceptibilities that employs a quantum superconductor which is highly expensive and there are only three main world centers with this equipment This work investigates the use of a Si PIN?diode detector and a 238Pu source (13 and 17keV; 13%; 95.2mCi; 86y) for the measurement of Fe skin levels compatible with those associated to the disease ??thalassaemia. XRF spectra were analyzed using a set of AXIL?WinQXAS programs elaborated and disseminated by the IAEA. The determination coefficient of the calibration model (sensitivity curve) was 0.97. Measurements on skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range from 10 to 150 parts per million (ppm) indicate that we are able to detect Fe at levels of the order of 15ppm using monitoring periods of 50 seconds and skin entrance dose less than 10 mSv The literature reports skin Fe levels from 15.0 to 60.0 ppm in normal persons and from 70 to 150 ppm in thalassaemics patients. So the employed methodology allows the measurement of the skin Fe concentration.

M. Estevam; C. R. Appoloni

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Biological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in extrapolating radiation risk estimates from epidemi- ologically accessible doses down to very low doses where) and for assessing the risk from a low-dose exposure to a carcinogen such as ionizing radiation, where only a smallBiological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away Oleg V

32

Abortive HIV Infection Mediates CD4 T-Cell Depletion and Inflammation in Human Lymphoid Tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors like HIV-1 Tat, Vpr, and Nef released from infected cells (Schindler et al., 2006; Westendorp etAbortive HIV Infection Mediates CD4 T-Cell Depletion and Inflammation in Human Lymphoid Tissue 94143 Summary The mechanism by which CD4 T-cells are depleted in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly

Levin, Judith G.

33

Use of human cell lines The use of human cell lines and tissues in the laboratory presents potential hazards. These potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of human cell lines The use of human cell lines and tissues in the laboratory presents a well characterized human cell line that the user believes is void of any bloodborne pathogen or any the cell line has been used and/or will be used. Any work with human cell lines in animals requires ABSL-2

Arnold, Jonathan

34

Steady-state directional diffuse reflectance and fluorescence of human skin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or tissue of interest to excitation light (typically UV) and measuring the flu- orescence emission spectrum or diffuse according to whether a laser or a diffuse light source is used. These measurements can be carried by a high- speed detection system. The advantage of time- resolved over steady-state measurements

Pilon, Laurent

35

Gaussian-function-based deconvolution method to determine the penetration ability of petrolatum oil into in vivo human skin using confocal Raman microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human skin pre-treated with petrolatum was analyzed in vivo using confocal Raman microscopy in order to determine the penetration depth of the oil into the skin. The broad Raman peak (2820–3030?cm?1) measured in vivo on human skin in the high wavenumber region exhibits two prominent main Raman peaks at 2880?cm?1 and 2935?cm?1 that originated from cutaneous lipids and keratin and two main peak shoulders at 2850?cm?1 and 2980?cm?1 that originated from lipids and keratin, respectively. Topical application of petrolatum oil onto the skin gives rise to an increase of the intensity of the broad lipid–keratin Raman peak (2820–3030?cm?1). Herewith, not only the intensity of the lipid part but also of the keratin part is increased, making the normalization to keratin and the determination of the petrolatum penetration profile erroneous. To solve this problem, the Gaussian-function-based deconvolution method is introduced in analyzing the Raman spectrum of the lipid–keratin peak and the least square method is applied for analyzing the petrolatum penetration profile. Results obtained in vivo show that the petrolatum oil does not penetrate deeper than 10?µm into intact human skin.

Chun-Sik Choe; Jürgen Lademann; Maxim E Darvin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A hybrid approach to advancing quantitative prediction of tissue distribution of basic drugs in human  

SciTech Connect

A general toxicity of basic drugs is related to phospholipidosis in tissues. Therefore, it is essential to predict the tissue distribution of basic drugs to facilitate an initial estimate of that toxicity. The objective of the present study was to further assess the original prediction method that consisted of using the binding to red blood cells measured in vitro for the unbound drug (RBCu) as a surrogate for tissue distribution, by correlating it to unbound tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kpu) of several tissues, and finally to predict volume of distribution at steady-state (V{sub ss}) in humans under in vivo conditions. This correlation method demonstrated inaccurate predictions of V{sub ss} for particular basic drugs that did not follow the original correlation principle. Therefore, the novelty of this study is to provide clarity on the actual hypotheses to identify i) the impact of pharmacological mode of action on the generic correlation of RBCu-Kpu, ii) additional mechanisms of tissue distribution for the outlier drugs, iii) molecular features and properties that differentiate compounds as outliers in the original correlation analysis in order to facilitate its applicability domain alongside the properties already used so far, and finally iv) to present a novel and refined correlation method that is superior to what has been previously published for the prediction of human V{sub ss} of basic drugs. Applying a refined correlation method after identifying outliers would facilitate the prediction of more accurate distribution parameters as key inputs used in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and phospholipidosis models.

Poulin, Patrick, E-mail: patrick-poulin@videotron.ca [Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Ekins, Sean [Collaborations in Chemistry, 601 Runnymede Avenue, Jenkintown, PA 19046 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 20 Penn Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Theil, Frank-Peter [Genentech, South San Francisco (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield important insights into the underlying association between hypoxia and inflammation in the human ischemic heart disease.

Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Asp, Julia [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Synnergren, Jane [Systems Biology Research Center, School of Life Sciences, University of Skoevde, Skoevde (Sweden)] [Systems Biology Research Center, School of Life Sciences, University of Skoevde, Skoevde (Sweden); Johansson, Cecilia Thalen [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Palmqvist, Lars [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jeppsson, Anders [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Hulten, Lillemor Mattsson, E-mail: Lillemor.Mattsson@wlab.gu.se [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Proteogenomic Analysis of Human Chromosome 9-Encoded Genes from Human Samples and Lung Cancer Tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sugasawa, K.; Ng, J. M.; Masutani, C.; Maekawa, T.; Uchida, A.; van der Spek, P. J.; Eker, A. P.; Rademakers, S.; Visser, C.; Aboussekhra, A.; Wood, R. D.; Hanaoka, F.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J. H.Two human homologs of Rad23 are functionally interchangeable in complex formation and stimulation of XPC repair activity Mol. ... Sugasawa, Kaoru; Ng, Jessica M. Y.; Masutani, Chikahide; Maekawa, Takafumi; Uchida, Akio; van der Spek, Peter J.; Eker, Andre P. M.; Rademakers, Suzanne; Visser, Cecile; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah; Wood, Richard D.; Hanaoka, Fumio; Bootsma, Dirk; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J. ...

Jung-Mo Ahn; Min-Sik Kim; Yong-In Kim; Seul-Ki Jeong; Hyoung-Joo Lee; Sun Hee Lee; Young-Ki Paik; Akhilesh Pandey; Je-Yoel Cho

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

Skin flicks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The written and artistic part of this thesis are both separated into the two categories of "SKIN" and "FLICKS". The Artistic part of my thesis consists of five artificial skins made on my body, and a series of video tapes ...

Orth, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann), 1964-

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Correlations of trace elements in breast human tissues: Evaluation of spatial distribution using {mu}-XRF  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work is to investigate microscopic correlations between trace elements in breast human tissues. A synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system ({mu}-XRF) was used to obtain two-dimensional distribution of trace element Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in normal (6 samples) and malignant (14 samples) breast tissues. The experiment was performed in X-ray Fluorescence beam line at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The white microbeam was generated with a fine conical capillary with a 20 {mu}m output diameter. The samples were supported on a XYZ table. An optical microscope with motorized zoom was used for sample positioning and choice the area to be scanned. Automatic two-dimensional scans were programmed and performed with steps of 30 {mu}m in each direction (x, y) on the selected area. The fluorescence signals were recorded using a Si(Li) detector, positioned at 90 degrees with respect to the incident beam, with a collection time of 10 s per point. The elemental maps obtained from each sample were overlap to observe correlation between trace elements. Qualitative results showed that the pairs of elements Ca-Zn and Fe-Cu could to be correlated in malignant breast tissues. Quantitative results, achieved by Spearman correlation tests, indicate that there is a spatial correlation between these pairs of elements (p < 0.001) suggesting the importance of these elements in metabolic processes associated with the development of the tumor.

Piacenti da Silva, Marina; Silva, Deisy Mara da; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Poletti, Martin Eduardo [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil); Departamento de Patologia, HCFM/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Developmental patterns of chimpanzee cerebral tissues provide important clues for understanding the remarkable enlargement of the human brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the remarkable enlargement of the human brain Tomoko Sakai 1 Mie Matsui 2 Akichika Mikami...thought to contribute to the remarkable brain enlargement observed in modern humans...reorganization of cerebral tissues of the brain during early infancy, driven mainly by...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A Muscular Rig for Smooth Skinning in Autodesk Maya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The limitations of the default skinning methods in Autodesk Maya can be compensated for when seeking realistic skin deformations of a human being. The… (more)

Björkman, Pontus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comparative 32P-Analysis of Cigarette Smoke-induced DNA Damage in Human Tissues and Mouse Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...5 Murea.pH3.64.2 M lithium formate, 7.5 Murea.pH3.80.8 M lithium chloride, 0.5 MTrisMCI, 8.5 M urea, pH8.00.6 M lithium chloride, 0.5 MTrisHCI...labeled quantitatively with excess ATP, and was calculated according...

Erika Randerath; Tommie A. Avitts; M. Vijayaraj Reddy; Robert H. Miller; Richard B. Everson; and Kurt Randerath

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

UV-induced DNA Damage and Mutations in Hupki (Human p53 Knock-in) Mice Recapitulate p53 Hotspot Alterations in Sun-exposed Human Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development of severely sun-damaged skin and...year (6 , 7) . Chronic sun exposure causes cumulative...spatial and statistical distribution of chromatin) and that...histologically normal, sun-damaged skin. Materials...and stored at room temperature. Vitamin A Clinical...

Jun-Li Luo; Wei-Min Tong; Jung-Hoon Yoon; Manfred Hergenhahn; Riita Koomagi; Qin Yang; Dominique Galendo; Gerd P. Pfeifer; Zhao-Qi Wang; and Monica Hollstein

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Development of a membrane impregnated with a poly(dimethylsiloxane)/poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer for a high-throughput screening of the permeability of drugs, cosmetics, and other chemicals across the human skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We aimed to develop a high-throughput screening (HTS) system for preliminary predictions of human skin permeability by using an artificial membrane that can mimic the permeation behaviour of lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds across the human skin. In this study, we synthesized a copolymer containing poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 6000 and impregnated it onto a supportive membrane filter to prepare a PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer-impregnated membrane. In addition, we synthesized another polymer without PEG units and used it to prepare an impregnated membrane for determining the role of PEG 6000 units in the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer-impregnated membrane. The permeation characteristics of the impregnated membranes were evaluated on the basis of the permeability coefficients of 12 model compounds with different lipophilicities, by using a 2-chamber diffusion cell, and these permeability coefficients were compared with those across the human skin. We obtained a good correlation between the permeability coefficients across the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer-impregnated membrane and human skin. Further, we evaluated the permeation characteristics of a 96-well plate model of the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer by using 6 model compounds. We obtained an ideal correlation between the permeability coefficients across the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer using a 96-well plate and those across the human skin. Thus, the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer would be a good candidate for preliminary evaluation of the permeability of lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds across the human skin.

Ryotaro Miki; Yasuna Ichitsuka; Takumi Yamada; Soichiro Kimura; Yuya Egawa; Toshinobu Seki; Kazuhiko Juni; Hideo Ueda; Yasunori Morimoto

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Design of a thermal diffusion sensor for noninvasive assessment of skin surface perfusion and endothelial dysfunction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The skin microcirculation performs a range of vital functions, such as maintaining nutritional perfusion to the tissues and overall thermoregulation. Not only does impairment to the skin blood supply lead to tissue necrosis ...

Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Modeling of Human Brain Tissues and Head Injuries Induced by Blast and Ballistic Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can result from direct impact on the skull, leading to skull fracture and subsequent damage to the brain tissue. Such injuries are penetrating TBIs, which are mainly caused by motor vehicle accidents, sports and work related accidents, and falls...

Kulkarni, Sahil G

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

An investigation of the structure-function relationship in human cervical tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cervix plays a crucial role in maintaining a healthy pregnancy, acting as a mechanical barrier to hold the fetus inside the uterus during gestation. Altered biochemical and mechanical properties of the cervical tissue ...

Myers, Kristin M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Recommendation of short tandem repeat profiling for authenticating human cell lines, stem cells, and tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standard for human cell lines. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.of cross-contaminated cell lines: a call for action. Cellstatus in human cancer cell lines. Cancer Biol. Ther. 7:

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effect of Transplantation of Human Fetal Tissues on Prooxidant-Antioxidant Equilibrium in the Liver and Blood Rats after Partial Hepatectomy in Rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the effect of transplantation of fetal liver cells and postnuclear cytoplasmic fraction from human fetal soft tissues on the prooxidant-antioxidant equilibrium in the liver and blood of rats after part...

V. I. Grishchenko; Yu. V. Nikitchenko…

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Wild-Type and Vector-Mediated Genomic Integration Profiles of Human Diploid Fibroblasts Analyzed by Third-Generation PacBio DNA Sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with variant hot spot preferences. DNase-Seq patterns of these sites in human tissues, including liver, muscle, heart, brain, skin, and embryonic stem cells further underline variant chromatin accessibility. In summary, AAV integration is dependent...

Daniela Hüser; Andreas Gogol-Döring; Wei Chen; Regine Heilbronn

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Skinlike Electronic Patch Takes Pulse, Promises New Human-Machine Integration: Scientific American http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=skin-electronic-patch[8/14/2011 6:02:32 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skinlike Electronic Patch Takes Pulse, Promises New Human-Machine Integration: Scientific American http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=skin-electronic-patch[8/14/2011 6:02:32 AM] You might Show Most Commented Latest Posts by SA Editors Home » News » Skinlike Electronic Patch Takes Pulse

Rogers, John A.

53

Lack of human tissue-specific correlations for rodent pancreatic and colorectal carcinogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To better understand the relationships between chemical exposures and human cancer causation, incidence data for human cancer types were identified and pancreatic and colorectal cancers were studied in-depth to assess whether data supporting the causation of pancreatic or colorectal tumors by chemicals in rodents is predictive of causation by the same chemicals of the same tumors in humans. A search of the Carcinogenic Potency Database, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) technical report database, and the published literature identified 38 and 39 chemicals reported to cause pancreatic and colorectal tumors, respectively, in mice or rats. For each of these chemicals, searches were conducted of the International Agency for Research on Cancer monographs, the NTP Report on Carcinogens, and the published literature for evidence of induction of the same tumors in humans. Based on this evaluation, no conclusive evidence was identified to suggest that chemicals reported to cause pancreatic or colorectal tumors in rodents also cause these tumors in humans. These findings suggest that pancreatic tumor data from mouse and rat bioassays are of limited utility with regard to predicting similar tumor induction in humans. For colorectal cancer, a lack of correlation was noted for the vast majority of chemicals.

Jeffrey W. Card; Hana Fikree; Lois A. Haighton; Valentia Lee-Brotherton; Joanne Wan; Bart Sangster

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

National Human Radiobiological Tissue Repository (NHRTR) at the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The NHRTR, one component of the USTUR, contains frozen tissues, tissue solutions, microscope slides, and paraffin blocks that were collected by the USTUR at the autopsy of workers with documented intakes of plutonium, americium, uranium, and thorium. The samples are available to qualified scientists for further research. Thousands of frozen, ashed, dried, and plastic embedded bone samples from the radium studies carried out by Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the New Jersey Radium Research Project are available and linked by case number to de-identified, published case data. These data include the person's source of exposure (dial painter, therapeutic injection, etc.), estimated body burden, radiochemical results, and medical history. Other samples, including organs and whole body donations, have come from volunteer donors who were impacted by elements such as plutonium, throium, etc. See the USTUR website for information on how to apply for research samples or how to become a volunteer donor. [Information taken from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/NHRTR/index.html#

55

Friction Induced Skin Tags  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duplantis KL, Jones BH. Friction blisters. Pathophysiology,Friction Induced Skin Tags Francisco Allegue MD 1 , Carmenetiopathogenic role for friction. Introduction Skin tags (

Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Efficacy of a Broad-spectrum Sunscreen to Protect Engineered Human Skin from Tissue and DNA Damage Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Specifically, the capacity of sunscreens to prevent...and DNA damage after solar UV radiation. Engineered...DNA damage induced by solar ultraviolet exposure...Specifically, the capacity of sunscreens to prevent...and DNA damage after solar UV radiation. Engineered...

Vickram Bissonauth; Régen Drouin; David L. Mitchell; Marc Rhainds; Joël Claveau; and Mahmoud Rouabhia

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Depth-resolved monitoring of diffusion of hyperosmotic agents in normal and malignant human esophagus tissues using optical coherence tomography in-vitro  

SciTech Connect

Depth-resolved monitoring with differentiation and quantification of glucose diffusion in healthy and abnormal esophagus tissues has been studied in vitro. Experiments have been performed using human normal esophagus and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues by the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The images have been continuously acquired for 120 min in the experiments, and the depth-resolved and average permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution have been calculated by the OCT amplitude (OCTA) method. We demonstrate the capability of the OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring, differentiation, and quantifying of glucose diffusion in normal esophagus and ESCC tissues. It is found that the permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution are not uniform throughout the normal esophagus and ESCC tissues and increase from (3.30 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and (1.57 {+-} 0.05) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the mucous membrane of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues to (1.82 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} and (3.53 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the submucous layer approximately 742 {mu}m away from the epithelial surface of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues, respectively. (optical coherence tomography)

Zhao Qingliang; Guo Zhouyi; Wei Huajiang; Yang Hongqin; Xie Shusen

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Multilayered Organization of Engineered Human Skin Does Not Influence the Formation of Sunlight-induced Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers in Cellular DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Laval University, Quebec, Canada G1K 7P4; Unite de Recherche en...Recherche, CHUQ, Quebec, Quebec, Canada G1L 3L5; and Faculty of Medicine...Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 2M4 E. A. D. Solar UVB initiates skin cancer mainly...

Jean-Philippe Therrien; Mahmoud Rouabhia; Elliot A. Drobetsky; and Régen Drouin

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: A human tissue research program. USTUR annual report for October 1, 1997 through January 31, 1999  

SciTech Connect

The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) are a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This annual report covers October 1, 1997, through January 31, 1999; the reporting period has been extended so that future annual reports will coincide with the period covered by the grant itself.

Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cells of the airways due to internal exposure to alpha-particle emitters, e.g. radon. Inhalation of radon, a colorless and odorless gas, one of the products of the decay of uranium which occurs naturally in the earth?s crust, is the second major cause... epithelial tissue plays an important role in normal lung physiology. square4 lung epithelia are target tissues for occupational internal exposures and for radon exposure (26); square4 the epithelium of bronchioles appears to be the origin...

Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Double-Skin Façades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The double-skin façade is a system that consists of two building skins separated by a ventilated cavity (Fig. 9.1). The main aim of the cavity is to vary the physical properties of the façade throughout the ye...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Based Molecular Histology of Human Spinal Cord Tissue and Motor Neurons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Secondary ion mass spectrometry is a powerful method for imaging biological samples with high spatial resolution. Whole section time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) scans and multivariate data analysis have been performed on the human ...

Jörg Hanrieder; Per Malmberg; Olle R. Lindberg; John S. Fletcher; Andrew G. Ewing

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Marianne B. Sowa, Claere von Neubeck, R. Joe Robinson, Paula M. Koehler, Norman J. Karin, Xihai Wang, Katrina M. Waters and Harish Shankaran Ionizing radiation exposure triggers a cell signaling program which includes proliferation, the DNA damage response, and tissue remodeling. The activated signaling pathways lead to the induction of both protective effects as well as adverse consequences. A fundamental question is whether signaling cascades initiated by low doses are fundamentally different than those initiated by high doses. To address this question we have applied a systems biology approach to examine the radiation induced temporal responses of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model. Using microarray-

65

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs  

SciTech Connect

Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

Michael Cornforth

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

Human skin pigmentation, migration and disease susceptibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dixon, K. M. , Sequeira, V. B., Camp, A. J., Mason, R. S. 2010 Vitamin...and pollution levels in 18th and 19th century Birmingham, England. Am. J. Phys...2007 Malignant melanoma in the 21st century. I. Epidemiology, risk factors, screening...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A review of tissue-engineered skin bioconstructs available for skin reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vivo, this technology was rapidly...sheet then applied to the wound...Material handling and basement...application procedures. There is...sealant, applied to full-thickness...improved handling, cell attachment...keratinocytes. This technology is based...patented technology. It is used...results when applied simultaneously...operative procedure (van Zuijlen...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development and Investigation of Synthetic Skin Simulant Platform (3SP) in Friction Blister Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significant opportunity to take a similar approach of applying an engineering viewpoint to repeatably model the onset and formation of blisters on human skin. The authors have developed the Synthetic Skin Simulant Platform (3SP) to fulfill this role. The 3SP...

Guerra, Carlos

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alzheimer's disease skin fibroblasts selectively express a bradykinin signaling pathway mediating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, is generated under conditions known as risk factors for AD, including stroke and traumatic head injury. BK B2 increases I/L B2 BK receptors in AD skin fibroblasts In established human fetal lung fibroblast models of protein kinase C (PKC). We now show that skin fibro- blasts of patients with AD developing around age 35

Steinbach, Joe Henry

71

Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) protects skin cells from ionizing radiation via heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cancer [19]. However, along with the destruction of tumors, surrounding normal tissues may also be injured, including brain, lung, intestine and skin. Skin covers the largest area of the body and functions to protect the body from all types of noxious......

Wei Zhu; Jing Xu; Yangyang Ge; Han Cao; Xin Ge; Judong Luo; Jiao Xue; Hongying Yang; Shuyu Zhang; Jianping Cao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Neutron skins and neutron stars  

SciTech Connect

The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

32 July/August2010 PublishedbytheIEEEComputerSociety 0272-1716/10/$26.002010IEEE DigitalHumanFaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- able in skin than in, say, a wax candle. Correctly depicting human skin is important in fields that it integrates well with existing pipelines. Several real-time algorithms for simulating skin exist (for more

Gutierrez, Diego

74

ARM - Measurement - Surface skin temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skin temperature skin temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface skin temperature The radiative surface skin temperature, from an IR thermometer measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface in its field of view. Categories Radiometric, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments IRT : Infrared Thermometer MFRIRT : Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer External Instruments

75

Emerging Nanomedicine for Skin Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Skin cancer is a common cancer and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Topical treatment is an attractive option compared with systemic route due to the reduced association with systemic to...

Puiyan Lee; Adnan Nasir; Kenneth K. Y. Wong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mesh Resolution Augmentation using 3D Skin Bank Won-Sook Lee*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a 100-micron resolution scan of plaster cast molds of the actors' faces. Human skin was modeled using, as shown in Figure 1. Each individual is presented with closed eyes and mouth due to the use of plaster

Lee, WonSook

77

Sensitive skins and somatic processing for affective and sociable robots based upon a somatic alphabet approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sense of touch is one of the most important senses of the human body. This thesis describes the biologically inspired design of "sensitive skins" for two different robotic platforms: Leonardo, a high degree-of-freedom, ...

Stiehl, Walter Daniel, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Detecting pornographic images by localizing skin Sotiris Karavarsamisa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" / "porn" and "skin" / "non-skin", respectively. The extracted

Blekas, Konstantinos

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human dermis Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 Developing a predictive model of human skin colouring Symon D'Oyly Cotton Summary: Developing a predictive model of human skin colouring Symon D'Oyly Cotton Ela...

80

Virtual deformation of soft tissue using bulk variables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present an alternative online simulation model for human tissue. Online simulation of human tissue deformation during surgical training or surgical assistance is becoming increasingly important within the medical community. Unfortunately, even classical ... Keywords: soft tissue simulation, surgical simulators, virtual reality

K. Sundaraj

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Neutron skins and neutron stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: The neutron skin of a heavy nucleus as well as many neutron-star properties are highly sensitive to the poorly constrained density dependence of the symmetry energy.Purpose: To provide for the first time meaningful theoretical errors and to assess the degree of correlation between the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb and several neutron-star properties.Methods: A proper covariance analysis based on the predictions of an accurately calibrated relativistic functional “FSUGold” is used to quantify theoretical errors and correlation coefficients.Results: We find correlation coefficients of nearly 1 (or ?1) between the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb and a host of observables of relevance to the structure, dynamics, and composition of neutron stars.Conclusions: We suggest that a follow-up Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) measurement, ideally with a 0.5% accuracy, could significantly constrain the equation of state of neutron-star matter.

F. J. Fattoyev and J. Piekarewicz

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

"Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Skin Cancer- What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf May 20, 2010 #12;Supporters for the Deaf ("REAP") #12;Overview Skin Overview What is skin cancer? Who is at risk? How common is skin cancer? Signs of skin cancer Prevention Treatments #12;Skin Overview Skin is the largest organ in your body

Goldman, Steven A.

83

Solar radiation and human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

Asta Juzeniene; Pål Brekke; Arne Dahlback; Stefan Andersson-Engels; Jörg Reichrath; Kristin Moan; Michael F Holick; William B Grant; Johan Moan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

WISP genes are members of the connective tissue growth factor family that are up-regulated in Wnt-1-transformed cells and aberrantly expressed in human colon tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...c-myc (28). Preliminary fine mapping indicates that WISP-1 is located near D8S1712 STS. WISP-2 is linked to the marker SHGC-33922 (lod = 1,000) on chromosome 20q12–20q13.1. Human WISP-3 mapped to chromosome 6q22–6q23 and is linked...

Diane Pennica; Todd A. Swanson; James W. Welsh; Margaret A. Roy; David A. Lawrence; James Lee; Jennifer Brush; Lisa A. Taneyhill; Bethanne Deuel; Michael Lew; Colin Watanabe; Robert L. Cohen; Mona F. Melhem; Gene G. Finley; Phil Quirke; Audrey D. Goddard; Kenneth J. Hillan; Austin L. Gurney; David Botstein; Arnold J. Levine

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Help:Skins | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skins Skins Jump to: navigation, search Clicking on the my preferences link in the upper right while logged in then click on the Skin button to change your skin. You can also preview the skin by clicking the (preview) links next to each skin. You can make changes to the current skin's stylesheet file (CSS) by creating a subpage of your userpage, "User:Yourname/monobook.css" for example. This requires your site admin to have enabled this feature -- if it is, you will see advice text at the top of your custom CSS page about clearing your browser's cache. Tools.png Tip for wiki admins: To enable this feature, you have to set $wgAllowUserCss to your LocalSettings.php. See also Help:Preferences Manual:Gallery of user styles (no official skins) Retrieved from

86

Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Apparatus for testing skin samples or the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing the permeability of living skin samples has a flat base with a plurality of sample-holding cavities formed in its upper surface, the samples being placed in counterbores in the cavities with the epidermis uppermost. O-rings of Teflon washers are respectively placed on the samples and a flat cover is connected to the base to press the rings against the upper surfaces of the samples. Media to maintain tissue viability and recovery of metabolites is introduced into the lower portion of the sample-holding cavities through passages in the base. Test materials are introduced through holes in the cover plate after assembly of the chamber.

Holland, J.M.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Name: Richard Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A student in my anatomy and physiology class asked me, "When it's very cold outside in the winter, why does your skin hurt MORE than usual when you bang your finger or someone slaps you on the arm?" Replies: Wow! This is one outstanding question. Mammals respond to cold weather with the hypothalamus releasing thyrotropin releasing factor. This production increases with the severity of the cold weather and the length of the exposure to cold over a long period of time (at least three to four weeks). The thyroid responds by slowly increasing in size and releases thyroxine at higher quantities. Thyroxine increases the sensitivity of the entire nervous system. As a matter of fact, as you probably know, it increases the metabolism wholesale! within the body. This gets complicated so I'm keeping it simple. So, the bottom line is thyroxine. It just heightens our sensitivity not only to cold but our entire nervous system is enhanced.

89

Interpretation of the modality of touch on an artificial arm covered with an EIT-based sensitive skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During social interaction humans extract important information from tactile stimuli that can improve their understanding of the interaction. The development of a similar capability in a robot will contribute to the future success of intuitive human-robot ... Keywords: LogitBoost, Physical human-robot interaction, artificial sensitive skin, electrical impedance tomography, force and tactile sensing, recognition, sensing and perception, supervised machine learning

David Silvera Tawil; David Rye; Mari Velonaki

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

91

Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

92

Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles With a modest effort, many of the energy-efficient technologies developed for buildings can be transferred to the transportation sector. The goal of vehicle thermal management research at LBL is to save the energy equivalent of one to two billion gallons of gasoline per year, and improve the marketability of next-generation vehicles using advanced solar control glazings and insulating shell components to reduce accessory loads. Spectrally selective and electrochromic window glass and lightweight insulating materials improve the fuel efficiency of conventional and hybrid vehicles and extend the range of electric vehicles by reducing the need for air conditioning and heating, and by allowing the downsizing of equipment.

93

A noninvasive skin imaging system Symon Cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A noninvasive skin imaging system Symon Cotton School of Computer Science, University Of Birmingham arriving at a diagnosis. A previous paper [Cotton and Claridge 1996] presented a model of colour formation­dimensional colour space, is limited to a curved surface [Cotton and Claridge 1996]. As abnormal skin often has a di

Claridge, Ela

94

Tissue Issue Adekunle Raji  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Disease-Driven Program BIOREPOSITORIES #12;What Are Tissue ? SPECIMENS: Blood, urine, lavage, aspirate. Initiate then Implement - #12;Pathology Department Institutional Review Board Study require tissue submission. Must engage pathologists and pathology departments. Information exchange, QA Must understand

Contractor, Anis

95

New imaging technique gets under the skin...deep  

SciTech Connect

Using a combination of simple optical techniques, plain old white light, and image processing, two Lawrence Livermore researchers and a colleague from the City College of New York (CCNY) have developed a technique for imaging tissue structures--tendons, veins, tumors--deep beneath the skin. The ultimate goal of this research is to dramatically improve the ability to perform minimally invasive cancer detection. ''With a technique called spectral polarization difference imaging [SPDI], we use different wavelengths of light to reach different depths. We also use the polarization properties of the light to help us select the light that penetrates into the tissue and is reflected back out of the tissue as opposed to the light that bounces off the tissue surface,'' says Livermore physicist Harry Radousky, acting Director of University Relations. ''We then image the tissue structures at the different depths, based on how these structures absorb, scatter, and depolarize light. This technique, combined with fiber optics, charge-coupled-device cameras, and image enhancement calculations, allows us to image up to 1.5 centimeters inside tissue, far deeper than the millimeter depths managed by other existing optical techniques.'' The basic research to develop this technique was funded by the Department of Energy through one of its centers of excellence in laser medicine--the DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics directed by Robert Alfano, M.D., at CCNY. A branch of this center is hosted at the Laboratory within the Materials Research Institute. wavelengths in the visible spectrum are scattered and absorbed within the tissue. For even longer wavelengths--those in the near-infrared spectral region--scattering and absorption of the photons is even further reduced.'' The light that passes through the filter then passes through a polarizer. The light that finally hits the tissue sample is thus not only of a given wavelength but also of a selected polarization. As photons penetrate the tissue, they interact with various tissue structures that may have optical properties different from those of the host tissue. Finally, some of the injected photons emerge from the tissue in the backscattering direction. The intensity of the backscattered light depends on the optical characteristics of the tissue at the sample's surface as well as below its surface at a particular location. Light that reflects from the surface (known as a spectral reflection) is polarized and can be removed with a second polarizer set to reject this light. This phenomenon is similar to the way sunglasses work to remove the polarized glare from surfaces, such as the water surface in a swimming pool. The light that backscatters from somewhere below the surface of the tissue is depolarized and consequently can pass through this second polarizer. This remaining light passes through a 50-millimeter camera lens, which is coupled to a CCD detector that captures the image in an exposure of a few milliseconds.

Radousky, H; Demos, S

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Thermal comfort, skin temperature distribution, and sensible heat loss distribution in the sitting posture in various asymmetric radiant fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aimed at investigating the thermal comfort for the whole body as well as for certain local areas, skin temperatures, and sensible heat losses in various asymmetric radiant fields. Human subject experiments were conducted to assess the overall comfort sensation and local discomfort, and local skin temperatures were measured. Through thermal manikin experiments, we discovered a new method for the precise measurement of the local sensible heat loss in nonuniform thermal environments. The local sensible heat losses were measured by the use of a thermal manikin that had the same local skin temperatures as the human subjects. The experimental conditions consisted of the anterior–posterior, right–left, and up–down asymmetric thermal environments created by radiation panels. A total of 35 thermal environmental conditions were created ranging from 25.5 to 30.5 °C for air temperature, from 11.5 to 44.5 °C for surface temperature of radiation panels, from 40% RH to 50% RH for humidity, and less than 0.05 m/s for inlet air velocity to the climatic chamber. The local skin temperature changed depending on the environmental thermal nonuniformity, even if the mean skin temperature remained almost the same. It is essential to use the skin temperature distribution as well as mean skin temperature for expressing thermal comfort in nonuniform environments. The local sensible heat loss changed depending on the environmental thermal nonuniformity, even if the mean sensible heat loss remained almost the same. The relationship between the local skin temperature and local sensible heat loss cannot be depicted by a simple line; instead, it varies depending on the environmental thermal nonuniformity. The local heat discomfort in the head area was dependent on both the local skin temperature and local sensible heat loss. However, the local cold discomfort in the foot area was related only to the local skin temperature.

Tomonori Sakoi; Kazuyo Tsuzuki; Shinsuke Kato; Ryozo Ooka; Doosam Song; Shengwei Zhu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Procter & Gamble and Temple University scientists model skin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry. For example, a better understanding of skin permeation could enable the pharmaceutical industry to advance drugs that are administered through the skin. P&G,...

98

Skin-Like Prosthetic Polymer Surfaces - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mimic skin. ORNL scientists combined superhydrophobic polymer inventions with carbon nanotubes to create a self-cleaning skin-like surface material with the ability to transmit...

99

Repair of UV Dimers in Skin DNA of Patients with Basal Cell Carcinoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carcinoma have a reduced capacity to repair UV-induced...after a brief exposure to solar-simulated UV radiation...Therefore, a reduced capacity to repair photolesions...induced in human skin by solar-simulating UV radiation...Grossman L. DNA repair capacity for ultraviolet light-induced...

Dan Segerbäck; Malgorzata Strozyk; Erna Snellman; and Kari Hemminki

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

earth skin temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

earth skin temperature earth skin temperature Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords climate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Active skin for turbulent drag reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evidence that spanwise traveling waves of the right amplitude, wavelength and frequency can result in significant turbulent drag reduction. Such traveling waves can be induced in the smart skin via active-material actuation. The flow control technique...

Mani, Raghavendran

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'.

Cornforth, Michael N. [The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX (United States)

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

The skin's role in human thermoregulation and comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interactions and phase change in fibrous material B. Jmaterials Sources of further information and advice References Phase change

Arens, Edward A; Zhang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Uneven distribution of aerobic mesophilic bacteria on human skin.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fig. 1) consists ofa clock electric motor, an electric impulse counter...60 times per min by the clock electric motor. After the first 1 ml was removed...7) on/offswitch; (8) electric motor; (9) support stand; (10...

W A Keith Jr; R J Smiljanic; W A Akers; L W Keith

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Trichophyton eboreum sp. nov. Isolated from Human Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Krajden, and G. Land. 1997. Laboratory handbook of dermatophytes. Star Publishing Company...and G. Land (ed.), Laboratory handbook of dermatophytes. Star Publishing Company...and G. Land (ed.), Laboratory handbook of dermatophytes. Star Publishing Company...

Jochen Brasch; Yvonne Gräser

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Detection of DNA Adducts in Human Oral Tissue: Correlation of Adduct Levels with Tobacco Smoking and Differential Enhancement of Adducts Using the Butanol Extraction and Nuclease P1 Versions of 32P Postlabeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nilration of PAHs or within diesel engine exhaust for example...tissue or whelher it is a general phenomenon that occurs...treated with petrol- and diesel-engine lubricating oils and...adducts arising from diesel particle extracts. Carcinogenesis...

Nigel J. Jones; Alan D. McGregor; and Raymond Waters

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The gentle touch receptors of mammalian skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...musical symphony of neural impulses that the brain translates as a touch. Each LTMR end...neural dialogue between the skin and the brain. The challenge for future research is...represented and processed in the spinal cord and brain and enables the richness of touch perceptions...

Amanda Zimmerman; Ling Bai; David D. Ginty

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); Ivanov, Ilia N. (Knoxville, TN); Shibata, Jason (Manhattan Beach, CA)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

Light & Skin Interactions: Simulations for Computer Graphics Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light & Skin Interactions immerses you in one of the most fascinating application areas of computer graphics: appearance simulation. The book first illuminates the fundamental biophysical processes that affect skin appearance, and reviews seminal ...

Gladimir V. G. Baranoski; Aravind Krishnaswamy

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Studies in the U.S.S.R. on the Distribution, Circulation, and Fate of Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons in the Human Environment and the Role of Their Deposition in Tissues in Carcinogenesis: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...necessity for collaborative work between engineers and oncologists on creating devices...the overall ]x)llution of the human environment with carcinogenic hydrocarbons and may...both in animal orga nism and in human environment. In the environment of man we can see...

L. M. Shabad

1967-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Clinafloxacin versus Piperacillin-Tazobactam in Treatment of Patients with Severe Skin and Soft Tissue Infections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...infections, or diabetic foot infections. Staphylococcus...significant. Within the power of this study, the overall...infections or diabetic foot ulcers, often require...infections, or diabetic foot infections. Staphylococcus...significant. Within the power of this study, the overall...

G. Siami; N. Christou; I. Eiseman; K. J. Tack; the Clinafloxacin Severe Skin And Soft Tissue Infections Study Group

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Space radiation-induced bystander signaling in 2D and 3D skin tissue models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space radiation poses a significant hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions, and the low fluences of charged particles characteristic of this field suggest that bystander effects, the phenomenon in which a greater ...

Lumpkins, Sarah B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a Common Cause of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in the Community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...report. APMIS 101: 802-804. 30 Sotutu, V., J. Carapetis, J. Wilkinson, A. Davis, and N. Curtis. 2002. The surreptitious staphylococcus: Staphylococcus lugdunensis endocarditis in a child. Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J. 21: 984-986. 31 Stoakes...

Sidsel Böcher; Birgitte Tønning; Robert L. Skov; Jørgen Prag

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

Distinct promoters regulate tissue-specific and differential expression of kallikrein 6 in CNS demyelinating disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and therein is regulated by injury. In the case of CNS demyelinating disease, K6 expression in CNS occurs in a tissue- specific fashion and are differentially regulated in response to CNS injury. While the human peripheral tissue. In a murine model of human CNS demyelinating inflammatory disease induced by Theiler's pi

Blaber, Michael

115

Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of the human microbiome have revealed that even healthy individuals differ remarkably in the microbes that occupy habitats such as the gut, skin and vagina. Much of this diversity remains unexplained, although diet, ...

Alm, Eric J.

116

Cryogenic homogenization of biological tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic homogenization of biological tissues ... Thermal (roasting and heating in a microwave oven), mechanical (milling and cryogenic grinding), and enzymatic ... ...

Rolf Zeisler; John K. Langland; Sally H. Harrison

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Risk Group, Skin Lesion History, and Sun Sensitivity Reliability in Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Progression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Skin tanning characteristics 0.207 Always burns, no tan 11 (14.1) 7 (21.2) 5 (15.6) 23 (16.1) Always burns, tans minimally 16 (20.5) 11 (33.3) 9 (28.1) 36 (25.2) Burns moderately 28 (35.9) 7 (21.2) 13...

Mary C. Clouser; Robin B. Harris; Denise J. Roe; Kathylynn Saboda; James Ranger-Moore; Laura Duckett; and David S. Alberts

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (?-N) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between ?-N and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

D. Q. Fang (???); Y. G. Ma (???); X. Z. Cai (???); W. D. Tian (???); H. W. Wang (???)

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

119

Profiles of Prostaglandin Biosynthesis in Normal Lung and Tumor Tissue from Lung Cancer Patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lung Biopsy Fragments Capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry...Fischer, S. M. Arachidonatc cascade and skin tumor promotion. In...H. T. Inhibition of murine natural killer cell activity by prostaglandins...normal human lung by capillary gas chromatography-negative ion...

Theodore L. McLemore; Walter C. Hubbard; Charles L. Litterst; Mark C. Liu; Stephan Miller; Noreen A. McMahon; Joseph C. Eggleston; and Michael R. Boyd

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with neutron star observations K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro as varying the neutron radius of 208Pb. The neutron skin thickness Sn is determined in the comparison with the astronomical observations of massive neutron stars (NSs), the standard scenario of NS cooling

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoidable skin cancers Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: avoidable skin cancers Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 "Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Summary: "Skin Cancer- What to Look For"...

123

Mechanistic investigation of skin barrier perturbation induced by surfactants in the presence of humectants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stratum corneum (SC) of the skin functions as a barrier between the body and the environment. Surfactants such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) are used in skin cleansers and in skin-care formulations because of their ...

Ghosh, Saswata

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Patch-based Segmentation of Brain Tissues Nicolas Cordier1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patch-based Segmentation of Brain Tissues Nicolas Cordier1 , Bjoern Menze1,2 , Herv´e Delingette1-channel patches. After patches are extracted from several MR channels for a test case, similar patches are found to these developed for human brain labelling in [1]. A database of multi-channel patches is first built from a set

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

125

Gender differences in skin: A review of the literature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: There has been increasing interest in studying gender differences in skin to learn more about disease pathogenesis and to discover more effective treatments. Recent advances have been made in our understanding of these differences in skin histology, physiology, and immunology, and they have implications for diseases such as acne, eczema, alopecia, skin cancer, wound healing, and rheumatologic diseases with skin manifestations. Objective: This article reviews advances in our understanding of gender differences in skin. Methods: Using the PubMed database, broad searches for topics, with search terms such as gender differences in skin and sex differences in skin, as well as targeted searches for gender differences in specific dermatologic diseases, such as gender differences in melanoma, were performed. Additional articles were identified from cited references. Articles reporting gender differences in the following areas were reviewed: acne, skin cancer, wound healing, immunology, hair/alopecia, histology and skin physiology, disease-specific gender differences, and psychological responses to disease burden. Results: A recurring theme encountered in many of the articles reviewed referred to a delicate balance between normal and pathogenic conditions. This theme is highlighted by the complex interplay between estrogens and androgens in men and women, and how changes and adaptations with aging affect the disease process. Sex steroids modulate epidermal and dermal thickness as well as immune system function, and changes in these hormonal levels with aging and/or disease processes alter skin surface pH, quality of wound healing, and propensity to develop autoimmune disease, thereby significantly influencing potential for infection and other disease states. Gender differences in alopecia, acne, and skin cancers also distinguish hormonal interactions as a major target for which more research is needed to translate current findings to clinically significant diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Conclusions: The published findings on gender differences in skin yielded many advances in our understanding of cancer, immunology, psychology, skin histology, and specific dermatologic diseases. These advances will enable us to learn more about disease pathogenesis, with the goal of offering better treatments. Although gender differences can help us to individually tailor clinical management of disease processes, it is important to remember that a patient's sex should not radically alter diagnostic or therapeutic efforts until clinically significant differences between males and females arise from these findings. Because many of the results reviewed did not originate from randomized controlled clinical trials, it is difficult to generalize the data to the general population. However, the pressing need for additional research in these areas becomes exceedingly clear, and there is already a strong foundation on which to base future investigations.

Harry Dao Jr.; Rebecca A. Kazin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Immunoassay for mercury in seafood and animal tissues  

SciTech Connect

Methylmercury accumulates to high levels in the tissues of fish and other animals through biomagnification. Since methylmercury is extremely toxic, it is important to identify fish or animal tissues with mercury levels too high for human consumption. Current methods for the analysis of mercury are expensive and time- consuming, and they must be performed in a laboratory setting. In this study, a rapid and inexpensive mercury-specific immunoassay developed by BioNebraska was used to measure total mercury in tissue following acid digestion and methylmercury decomposition. A good correlation was obtained between the immunoassay and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CVAAS). Use of the mercury immunoassay will facilitate the rapid screening of large numbers of tissue samples.

Carlson, L.; Holmquist, B.; Ladd, R.; Riddell, M. [BioNebraska, Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Skin Disease In Dermatomyositis -- What Patients And Their Families Often Want To Know  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the upper eyelids (heliotrope erythema), the cheeks ofcharacteristic violet (heliotrope) skin color seen in whitecharacteristic violet (heliotrope) skin color seen in white

Sontheimer, Richard D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous skin effect Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skin detector. Row 2(a) illustrates the effect of occlusion and rotational... Skin Patch Detection in Real-World Images Hannes Kruppa, Martin A. Bauer and Bernt Schiele... :...

129

3D Tissue Scaffolds BIOMATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D Tissue Scaffolds BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to develop measurement tools and reference materials for assessing the impact of the physical and chemical properties of 3D tissue scaffolds on cellular response. These tools will be used to explore the relationship between cellular response on 2D surfaces to that in 3D

130

Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with coherence microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex ...

Fujimoto, James G.

131

Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components.  

SciTech Connect

There is national interest in the development of sophisticated materials that can automatically detect and respond to chemical and biological threats without the need for human intervention. In living systems, cell membranes perform such functions on a routine basis, detecting threats, communicating with the cell, and triggering automatic responses such as the opening and closing of ion channels. The purpose of this project was to learn how to replicate simple threat detection and response functions within artificial membrane systems. The original goals toward developing 'smart skin' assemblies included: (1) synthesizing functionalized nanoparticles to produce electrochemically responsive systems within a lipid bilayer host matrices, (2) calculating the energetics of nanoparticle-lipid interactions and pore formation, and (3) determining the mechanism of insertion of nanoparticles in lipid bilayers via imaging and electrochemistry. There are a few reports of the use of programmable materials to open and close pores in rigid hosts such as mesoporous materials using either heat or light activation. However, none of these materials can regulate themselves in response to the detection of threats. The strategies we investigated in this project involve learning how to use programmable nanomaterials to automatically eliminate open channels within a lipid bilayer host when 'threats' are detected. We generated and characterized functionalized nanoparticles that can be used to create synthetic pores through the membrane and investigated methods of eliminating the pores either through electrochemistry, change in pH, etc. We also focused on characterizing the behavior of functionalized gold NPs in different lipid membranes and lipid vesicles and coupled these results to modeling efforts designed to gain an understanding of the interaction of nanoparticles within lipid assemblies.

Montano, Gabriel A.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Allen, Amy; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Wheeler, David Roger

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nuclear skin emergence in Skyrme deformed Hartree-Fock calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the charge and matter densities and the corresponding rms radii for even-even isotopes of Ni, Kr, and Sn has been performed in the framework of deformed self-consistent mean field Skyrme HF+BCS method. The resulting charge radii and neutron skin thicknesses of these nuclei are compared with available experimental data, as well as with other theoretical predictions. The formation of a neutron skin, which manifests itself in an excess of neutrons at distances greater than the radius of the proton distribution, is analyzed in terms of various definitions. Formation of a proton skin is shown to be unlikely. The effects of deformation on the neutron skins in even-even deformed nuclei far from the stability line are discussed.

Sarriguren, P; de Guerra, E Moya; Antonov, A N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Neutron skin of nuclei near the neutron drip line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performing Skyrme-type deformed Hartree-Fock calculations, the possible presence of neutron skin in nuclei towards neutron drip line is studied. The thickness of the neutron skin is found to be nearly constant in all directions if it is measured perpendicular to the surface, and in a given nucleus the number of neutrons being inside of the neutron skin is almost independent of the deformation (namely, spherical shape or normal deformation or superdeformation). In the region of medium-heavy nuclei our calculation shows the presence of a series of neutron-rich nuclei, in which a neutron skin is present and yet the neutron one-particle spectra are far from those in a harmonic oscillator (plus spin-orbit) potential.

I. Hamamoto and X. Z. Zhang

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Numerical modeling of a wing skin peen forming process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years shot peering has been used to provide fatigue resistance and form to airplane wing skins at the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company. In this process, ... to replicate the shot peening process used a...

R. D. VanLuchene; E. J. Cramer

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Mpemba paradox: Hydrogen bond memory and water-skin supersolidity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical reproduction of measurements, experimental evidence for skin super-solidity and hydrogen-bond memory clarified that Mpemba paradox integrates the heat emission-conduction-dissipation dynamics in the source-path-drain cycle system.

Chang Q Sun

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep Stephen W. Carmichael Mayo Clinic. Coming Events 2011 EMAS 2011 May 15­19, 2011 Angers, France www.emas-web.net IUMAS-V May 22­27, 2011

Heller, Eric

137

Evidence for a role of calmodulin in serum stimulation of Na+ influx in human fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...modulin-dependent phosphodiesterase activity (16). Other workers have shown that these agents also inhibit other cal...from human fore- skin were obtained from James Regan (Oak Ridge National Lab- oratory). The cells were cultured in...

N E Owen; M L Villereal

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mechanisms of mesothelial tissue lubrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the pleural space, sliding between the lung and chest wall induces shear stress that could damage the delicate mesothelial cells covering the tissue surfaces. Normally, the pleural space, which is filled with fluid, is ...

Lin, Judy Li-Wen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fluorescent silica colloids for study and visualization of skin care products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to long exposures to cold and dry air (7). Different skin care products are used to hy- drate dryFluorescent silica colloids for study and visualization of skin care products Swaminathan Iyer: The efficacy of skin care products depends on the time and dynamics of their absorbance by the skin, and its

Sokolov, Igor

142

Influence of Tissue Conductivity Inhomogeneity and Anisotropy on EEG/MEG based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source in the brain using a volume-conduction model of the head. The associated differential equations in the Human Brain #12;Die Deutsche Bibliothek - CIP-Einheitsaufnahme Wolters, Carsten Hermann: Influence of Tissue Conductivity Inhomogeneity and Anisotropy on EEG/MEG based Source Localization in the Human Brain

Utah, University of

143

Human Tissue Kallikreins: Physiologic Roles and Applications in Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...catalyze peptide bond hydrolysis, perform fundamental functions in all living organisms...Clinical Applications Cancer biomarkers are fundamental tools that aid in evaluating cancer...Barrett AJ, Rawlings ND, Woessner JF. Handbook of proteolytic enzymes. London: Academic...

Carla A. Borgoño; Iacovos P. Michael; and Eleftherios P. Diamandis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Identification of a Human Pancreatic Duct Tissue-specific Antigen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ind.) by the periodate oxidation-borohydride reduction...gave a single precipitin arc with the isolated RDM...2). No precipitin arcs were observed when a rabbit...Scheidegger, J. J. Une micro-m thode de l'immunoelectrophorese...single extended precipitin arc in the o region for both...

David V. Gold; Paula Hollingsworth; Theresa Kremer; and Diane Nelson

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Quantitating tissue specificity of human genes to facilitate biomarker discovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......28 health states (Wheeler et al., 2003...other methods. This study describes a novel...Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA...Sequence Detection System. Expression levels...reported a new system, GEPIS, which determines...270:484-487. Wheeler DL , et al. Database......

George Vasmatzis; Eric W. Klee; Dagmar M. Kube; Terry M. Therneau; Farhad Kosari

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Human Tissue Kallikreins: Physiologic Roles and Applications in Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Center for Biological Sequence Analysis website ( http://www.cbs.dtu.dk ) indicate...sensitivity and specificity and, thus, the search for more informative markers continues...Anisowicz A, Sotiropoulou G, Stenman G, Mok SC, Sager R. A novel protease homolog differentially...

Carla A. Borgoño; Iacovos P. Michael; and Eleftherios P. Diamandis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Lead-210 and Polonium-210 in Human Tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Table 1. RADON DECAY PKODUCTS Nuclide Half-life (ref. 2) Decay ... DECAY PKODUCTS Nuclide Half-life (ref. 2) DecayRadon Short-lived daughters

R. V. OSBORNE

1963-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

Engineering human hepatic tissue for modeling liver-stage malaria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Plcsmodium liver stage is an attractive target for the development of antimalarial drugs and vaccines, as it provides an opportunity to interrupt the life cycle of the parasite at a critical early stage. However, ...

Ng, Shengyong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Optical anisotropy of fibrous biological tissues: analysis of the influence of structural properties  

SciTech Connect

The results of theoretical analysis of the optical anisotropy of multiply scattering fibrillar biological tissues based on the model of an effective anisotropic medium are compared with the experimental in vivo birefringence data for the rat derma obtained earlier in spectral polarisation measurements of rat skin samples in the visible region. The disordered system of parallel dielectric cylinders embedded into an isotropic dielectric medium was considered as a model medium. Simulations were performed taking into account the influence of a partial mutual disordering of the bundles of collagen and elastin fibres in derma on birefringence in samples. The theoretical optical anisotropy averaged over the spectral interval 550-650 nm for the model medium with parameters corresponding to the structural parameters of derma is in good agreement with the results of spectral polarisation measurements of skin samples in the corresponding wavelength range. (laser methods in biology)

Zimnyakov, D A; Sinichkin, Yu P [N.G. Chernyshevskii Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation); Ushakova, O V [Saratov State Technical University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Viability of adult rat skin following 13 Mev proton irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

then removed from suspension by centrifugation and washed twice in Smith's chick heart growth media. 33 All cells removed from the biopsy by this enzyme dissection were placed in culture to check viability. Two Rose chambers con- taining the first scraping... Dissipation . Diagram ? Proton Energy Dissipation 17 17 Cell Suspension Filter Tube. Exploded View of Rose Chamber 24 Rat 822, Gross Appearance 37 SB. Rat 822, Skin Section. 38 Rat 771, Gross Appearance 37 Rat 771, Skin Section. 38 7A. 7B. Rat 835...

Caraway, Bobby Lamar

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The use of polarized light for skin cancer detecton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cancer will bc diagnosed in the United States each year, making it the 7'" most common form of cancer in the United States. In addition, because of current trends in sun exposure and artificial tanning, the rate of skin This Thesis follows 1he style.... 3 million new cases of skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year In 2000 alone, there were about 47, 700 new cases of melanoma and 7, 700 deaths attributed to the disease' . Because of current trends in sun exposure and artificial...

DeLaughter, Aimee Hill

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

Tissue architecture: the ultimate regulator of breast epithelial function  

SciTech Connect

A problem in developmental biology that continues to take center stage is how higher organisms generate diverse tissues and organs given the same cellular genotype. In cell and tumor biology, the key question is not the production of form, but its preservation: how do tissues and organs maintain homeostasis, and how do cells within tissues lose or overcome these controls in cancer? Undoubtedly, mechanisms that maintain tissue specificity should share features with those employed to drive formation of the tissues. However, they are unlikely to be identical. At a simplistic level, developmental pathways may be thought of as a series of extremely rapid short-term events. Each new step depends on what came before, and the outcome is the organism itself at birth. All organs, with a few notable exceptions, such as the mammary gland and the brain, 'arrive' together and are complete when the organism is born. In mice and humans, these events occur in a mere 21 days and 9 months respectively. The stability of the differentiated state and the homeostasis of the organism, on the other hand, will last 40-110 times longer. How does the organism achieve this feat? How are tissues maintained? These questions also relate fundamentally to how tissues become malignant and, although not discussed here, to aging. While there is much literature on differentiation - loosely defined as the gain of a single or a series of functions - we know much less about the forces and the pathways that maintain organ morphology and function as a unit. This may be partly because it is difficult to study a tissue as a unit in vivo and there are few techniques that allow maintenance of organs in vitro long enough and in such a way as to make cell and molecular biology experiments possible. Techniques for culturing cells in three-dimensional gels (3D) as a surrogate for tissues, however, have been steadily improving and the method is now used by several laboratories. In this commentary we discuss the following: first, how our laboratory came to develop a model of the mammary gland acinus; second, what this model has told us about mechanisms that govern tissue specificity and malignancy; and third, possible directions for future studies. We summarize the evidence for the central role of ECM signaling in the maintenance of mammary function in culture and (more briefly) its role in tumorigenesis. This is followed by a discussion of the role that tissue architecture and tissue polarity (as opposed to cell polarity) may play in these processes. In an elegantly written and reasoned essay, Kirschner et al. coined the new science of developmental biology 'molecular vitalism'. They framed new concepts for self-organization as well as schemes for information flow in biological organization. Rao et al. reviewed and elaborated on differential-equation-based models of biochemical reaction networks and intracellular noise, with emphasis on bacteria and phage. Similarly, Hartwell et al. discussed the synergy between experiment and theory in elucidating 'modules' - collections of interacting molecules - and in unraveling how these modules collaborate to perform cellular functions such as signal transduction. We believe that many of these ideas will also be applicable to the maintenance of tissue specificity. As much as we agree with Kirschner et al. regarding the limitations of the machine analogy to biological systems, we conclude with thoughts on how we may proceed to model the complex tissue networks that govern breast tissue architecture. We suggest that our understanding of the structure and function of breast tissue would benefit from examining recent techniques for modeling large complex networks such as the World Wide Web and the Internet backbone among others.

Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Mian, Saira

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding  

SciTech Connect

Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack oil both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub-surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of tile probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced In the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring tile concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and characterizing the Fourier-Transform infrared (FTIR) spectra before and after the laser exposure.

Small, W., IV

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Growing tissue in the lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tissue in the lab tissue in the lab Name: mike s Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do Scientists grow new tissue cells in the lab? Replies: I'm not quite sure what you mean by "new" cells. Several kinds of cell growing are done. One way is to break an organ or tissue apart into its individual cells and grow them in a medium of nutrients, controlled temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide/oxygen. This is called "primary culture" because the cells come right out of an organism. Another method is to create an "immortal cell line". This is a type of cell isolated from a cancerous tumor, or a non-tumor cell which is infected with a cancer gene after it's isolated. Being cancerous, these cells grow forever in a dish, with the appropriate nutrients etc as long as you remove cells from time to time to prevent overcrowding. These cells can be frozen at about -100F forever and rethawed when needed. There is a library of frozen cells, thousands of types, and a catalog. Scientists can order what they need any time! Finally, you can make specific mutant cell lines by starting as above with an immortal cell, and inserting a specific gene (or deleting one) permanently from the DNA of the cell to change almost any property you want. So there it is.

155

Subclonal variation and skin russeting in potato, (Solanum tuberosum L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of subclonal selection for putative russet skin mutations of 'Century Russet' was conducted in Texas and Colorado to improve the russeting character in 'Century Russet'. RAPD analysis of a segregating F I family derived from a russet x white cross and of three...

Oehlke, Leslie Lashaun

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE Melanoma The Most Lethal Form advances in nanotechnology to increase our understanding of melanoma and to develop new tools into controllable cells or target them for destruction. Investigators also are using nanotechnology to understand

Engman, David M.

157

Neutron skin of $^{208}$Pb from Coherent Pion Photoproduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information on the size and shape of the neutron skin on $^{208}$Pb has been extracted from coherent pion photoproduction cross sections measured using the Crystal Ball together with the Glasgow tagger at the MAMI electron beam facility. On exploitation of an interpolated fit of a theoretical model to the measured cross sections the half-height radius and diffuseness of the neutron distribution are found to be 6.70$\\pm 0.03(stat)$ fm and 0.55$\\pm 0.01(stat)$$^{+0.02}_{-0.03}(sys)$ fm respectively, corresponding to a neutron skin thickness $\\Delta r_{np}$=0.15$\\pm 0.03(stat)$$^{+0.01}_{-0.03}(sys)$ fm. The results give the first successful extraction of a neutron skin with an electromagnetic probe and indicate the skin of $^{208}$Pb has a halo character. The measurement provides valuable new constraints on both the structure of nuclei and the equation of state for neutron-rich matter.

C. M. Tarbert; D. P. Watts; D. I. Glazier; P. Aguar; J. Ahrens; J. R. M. Annand; H. J. Arends; R. Beck; V. Bekrenev; B. Boillat; A. Braghieri; D. Branford; W. J. Briscoe; J. Brudvik; S. Cherepnya; R. Codling; E. J. Downie; K. Foehl; P. Grabmayr; R. Gregor; E. Heid; D. Hornidge; O. Jahn; V. L. Kashevarov; A. Knezevic; R. Kondratiev; M. Korolija; M. Kotulla; D. Krambrich; B. Krusche; M. Lang; V. Lisin; K. Livingston; S. Lugert; I. J. D. MacGregor; D. M. Manley; M. Martinez; J. C. McGeorge; D. Mekterovic; V. Metag; B. M. K. Nefkens; A. Nikolaev; R. Novotny; R. O. Owens; P. Pedroni; A. Polonski; S. N. Prakhov; J. W. Price; G. Rosner; M. Rost; T. Rostomyan; S. Schadmand; S. Schumann; D. Sober; A. Starostin; I. Supek; A. Thomas; M. Unverzagt; Th. Walcher; F. Zehr

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Interaction of Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons with Tissues: VIII. Binding of Tritium-labeled Hydrocarbons to the Soluble Proteins of Mouse Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...treated as described in "Materials and Methods." A demonstration...of the unbound radio active hydrocarbon was removed...migrated toward the cathode, a neutral in dicator...pro teins toward the cathode was affected by electro...dermis as described in "Materials and Methods." The...

C. W. Abell and Charles Heidelberger

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Weight Loss via Exercise with Controlled Dietary Intake May Affect Phospholipid Profile for Cancer Prevention in Murine Skin Tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a major factor in energy expenditure has been...Community Health Survey showed that physical...between reduced dietary energy intake and decreased...12-h light/12-h dark cycle. They were...Community Health Survey. Cancer 2008;112...targets for dietary energy restriction prevention...

Ping Ouyang; Yu Jiang; Hieu M. Doan; Linglin Xie; David Vasquez; Ruth Welti; Xiaoyu Su; Nanyan Lu; Betty Herndon; Shie-Shien Yang; Richard Jeannotte; and Weiqun Wang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

RAZEGHI et al.: SKIN LESION IMAGE RECOGNITION 1 Skin Lesion Image Recognition with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a recognition rate of 20%, whilst with human in the loop the performance can be boosted to over 96%. We also diagnosis. Unlike the majority of publications in the area of computer vision for dermatology appli- cations of related work is an image analysis system presented in [1] that differentiates early melanoma from benign

Aickelin, Uwe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

An Improved Tissue Culture System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved Tissue Culture System for Embryogenic Callus Production and Plant Regeneration in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Jason N. Burris & David G. J. Mann & Blake L. Joyce & C. Neal Stewart Jr. Published online: 10 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract The increased emphasis on research of dedicated biomass and biofuel crops begs for biotechnology method improvements. For switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), one limitation is inefficient tissue culture and transformation systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate the utility of a new medium described here, LP9, for the production and maintenance of switchgrass callus and its regeneration, which also enables genetic transformation. LP9 medium is not based on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, the basal medium that all published switchgrass transformation has been

162

Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Zimmerman, George (Lafayette, CA); Jacques, Steven (Portland, OR)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or ``welded`` using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage. 8 figs.

Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Zimmerman, G.; Jacques, S.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Instrumentation and method for measuring NIR light absorbed in tissue during MR imaging in medical NIRS measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our goal is to provide a cost-effective method for examining human tissue, particularly the brain, by the simultaneous use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and...

Myllylä, Teemu S; Sorvoja, Hannu S S; Nikkinen, Juha; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Myllylä, Risto A

165

Percutaneous penetration of uranium in rats after a contamination on intact or wounded skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......hairless rats. Percutaneous penetration through wounded skin towards...1157-1165. Percutaneous penetration of uranium in rats after a...hairless rats. Percutaneous penetration through wounded skin towards...Kinetics Male Metabolic Clearance Rate Models, Biological Radiometry......

F. Petitot; C. Gautier; A. M. Moreels; S. Frelon; F. Paquet

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-induced skin lesions Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technique Summary: pigmented skin lesions M.MONCRIEFF,* S.COTTON, E.CLARIDGE AND P.HALL* *Department of Plastic... technique for imaging pigmented skin lesions and for...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggressive skin malignancy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford University Collection: Biology and Medicine 3 Publication Schedule Advertising Summary: aggressive form of skin cancer -- malignant melanoma -- stress, including...

168

Skin cancer is the most com-mon form of cancer in the United  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skin cancer is the most com- mon form of cancer in the United States. Excessive and unprotected exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation (UV light) is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. Howev- er, skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer! The damaging and cumulative effects

169

Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14 is that this behavior is extremely unhealthy and risky for their bodies, specifically their skin. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer found in young adults and second most common cancer found in adolescents

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

170

Rack Permitting Efficient Handling of Tissue Cultures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for Microbiology research-article Notes Rack Permitting Efficient Handling of Tissue...American Society for Microbiology NOTES Rack Permitting Efficient Handling of Tissue...of this communication is to describe a rack which permits the simultaneous handling...

Samuel Baron; Charles E. Buckler; Kenneth K. Takemoto

1966-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Brain Tissue: A Viable Postmortem Toxicological Specimen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Short Communication Brain Tissue: A Viable Postmortem Toxicological...Minneapolis, Wichita, KS 67214, USA Brain tissue may be a valuable specimen in interpretation...protected and isolated position of the brain eliminates or at least attenuates many......

Timothy P. Rohrig; Charity A. Hicks

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work describes the integration of novel microfabrication techniques for vascular tissue engineering applications in the context of a novel biodegradable elastomer. The field of tissue engineering and organ regeneration ...

Bettinger, Christopher John, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

World Holdings of Avian Tissues from Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The avifauna of Panama may be better documented than that of ... , the world holdings of avian tissue from Panama are grossly inadequate. A compilation of the world holdings of avian tissue from Panama is present...

Sievert Rohwer; Robert C. Faucett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Ecology Impact of Human ecology Research Bonus Issue FROM SCHOLARSHIP TO POLICY MAKING OF HUMAN ECOLOGY APRIL 2005/VOLUME 33, NUMBER 1 #12;Human Ecology Volume 33, Number 1 April 2005 The New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph.D. Rebecca Q

Wang, Z. Jane

175

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

176

Thermal simulation of buildings with double-skin façades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Highly glazed commercial buildings with double-skin façades may overheat during summertime due to a coincidence of high outside temperatures, solar gains and internal heat gains. To optimize thermal comfort and minimize cooling loads, the thermal behaviour of this type of building, therefore, requires careful investigation at the design stage. However, complex physical phenomena—notably optical, thermodynamic and fluid dynamic processes—are involved and as yet, no single simulation tool is able to handle all these processes while remaining an efficient design tool. This paper presents a method based on the coupling of three different types of simulation models that is economical in terms of computing time, and thereby, suitable for design purposes. These models are: spectral optical model, computational fluid dynamics model and building energy simulation model. Various tools are available at each modelling level. The method is demonstrated on a commercial building with double-skin façades and additionally, night-time ventilation.

H. Manz; Th. Frank

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma  

SciTech Connect

Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

Abbas, G., E-mail: gohar.abbas@gcu.edu.pk; Sarfraz, M. [Department of Physics, GC University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Forman Christian College University, Farozpur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evaluation of slug tests in wells containing a finite-thickness skin  

SciTech Connect

The effects of a finite-thickness skin (low-permeability zone surrounding the well bore face) on the response of slug tests is investigated by using a numerical model and a simple analytical solution. The results show that, for skins of finite thicknesses, estimates of hydraulic conductivity provided by slug tests can be more representative of the skin than of the surrounding formation. When a finite-thickness skin is present, the slug test response is shifted along the horizontal axis, making estimates of hydraulic conductivity unreliable. This result is different from that obtained by using an analytical solution for a skin of infinitesimal thickness.

Faust, C.R.; Mercer, J.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

InVERT molding for scalable control of tissue microarchitecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex tissues contain multiple cell types that are hierarchically organized within morphologically and functionally distinct compartments. Construction of engineered tissues with optimized tissue architecture has been ...

Ungrin, M. D.

180

Do metallic ports in tissue expanders affect postmastectomy radiation delivery?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is often delivered to patients with permanent breast implants. On occasion, patients are irradiated with a tissue expander (TE) in place before their permanent implant exchange. Because of concern of potential under-dosing in these patients, we examined the dosimetric effects of the Magna-Site (Santa Barbara, CA) metallic port that is present in certain TEs. Methods and Materials: We performed ex vivo film dosimetry with single 6-MV and 15-MV photon beams on a water phantom containing a Magna-Site disc in two orientations. Additionally, using in vivo films, we measured the exit dose from 1 patient's TE-reconstructed breast during chest wall treatment with 15-MV tangent beams. Finally, we placed thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) on 6 patients with TEs who received PMRT delivered with 15-MV tangent beams. Results: Phantom film dosimetry revealed decreased transmission in the region of the Magna-Site, particularly with the magnet in the parallel orientation (at 22 mm: 78% transmission with 6 MV, 84% transmission with 15 MV). The transmission measured by in vivo films during single beam treatment concurred with ex vivo results. TLD data showed acceptable variation in median dose to the skin (86-101% prescription dose). Conclusion: Because of potential dosimetric effects of the Magna-Site, it is preferable to treat PMRT patients with permanent implants. However, it is not unreasonable to treat with a TE because the volume of tissue affected by attenuation from the Magna-Site is small. In this scenario, we recommend using 15 MV photons with compensating bolus.

Damast, Shari [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)]. E-mail: bealk@mskcc.org; Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Losasso, Thomas J. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Disa, Joseph J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hong, Linda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

182

Chemical Agent Induced Reduction of Skin Light Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scattering with the potential to increase the efficacy of light based imaging and therapeutic applications. Three hypotheses have been suggested for the clearing mechanism: index of refraction matching between clearing agent and collagen, tissue dehydration...

Hirshburg, Jason M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

The structure and micromechanics of elastic tissue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...some attention is the effect of exposure to light and ionizing radiation. The specific effects of light, as distinct from age, on skin elastin...Physiol. 285, H1986-H2000. 15 Bell, JS , Christmas, J, Mansfield, JC, Everson, RM, Winlove...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Tumor Engineering: The Other Face of Tissue Engineering  

SciTech Connect

Advances in tissue engineering have been accomplished for years by employing biomimetic strategies to provide cells with aspects of their original microenvironment necessary to reconstitute a unit of both form and function for a given tissue.We believe that the most critical hallmark of cancer is loss of integration of architecture and function; thus, it stands to reason that similar strategies could be employed to understand tumor biology. In this commentary, we discuss work contributed by Fischbach-Teschl and colleagues to this special issue of Tissue Engineering in the context of 'tumor engineering', that is, the construction of complex cell culture models that recapitulate aspects of the in vivo tumor microenvironment to study the dynamics of tumor development, progression, and therapy on multiple scales. We provide examples of fundamental questions that could be answered by developing such models, and encourage the continued collaboration between physical scientists and life scientists not only for regenerative purposes, but also to unravel the complexity that is the tumor microenvironment. In 1993, Vacanti and Langer cast a spotlight on the growing gap between patients in need of organ transplants and the amount of available donor organs; they reaffirmed that tissue engineering could eventually address this problem by 'applying principles of engineering and the life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes. Mortality figures and direct health care costs for cancer patients rival those of patients who experience organ failure. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States (Source: American Cancer Society) and it is estimated that direct medical costs for cancer patients approach $100B yearly in the United States alone (Source: National Cancer Institute). In addition, any promising therapy that emerges from the laboratory costs roughly $1.7B to take from bench to bedside. Whereas we have indeed waged war on cancer, the training grounds have largely consisted of small rodents, despite marked differences between human and mouse physiology, or plastic dishes, even though just like our tissues and organs most tumors exist within three-dimensional proteinacious milieus. One could argue that this is comparable to training for a desert war in the arctic. In this special issue of tissue engineering, Fischbach-Teschl and colleagues build a strong case for engineering complex cultures analogous to normal organs to tractably model aspects of the human tumor microenvironment that simply cannot be reproduced with traditional two-dimensional cell culture techniques and that cannot be studied in a controlled fashion in vivo. This idea has gained considerable traction of late as concepts presented and convincingly shown years ago have only now begun to be appreciated. Perhaps, then, it is time to organize those who wish to build complex tumor models to study cancer biology under a common umbrella. Accordingly, we propose that tumor engineering be defined as the construction of complex culture models that recapitulate aspects of the in vivo tumor microenvironment to study the dynamics of tumor development, progression, and therapy on multiple scales. Inherent in this definition is the collaboration that must occur between physical and life scientists to guide the design of patterning techniques, materials, and imaging modalities for the study of cancer from the subcellular to tissue level in physiologically relevant contexts. To date, the most successful tissue engineering approaches have employed methods that recapitulate the composition, architecture, and/or chemical presentation of native tissue. For instance, induction of blood vessel growth for therapeutic purposes has been achieved with sequential release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet derived growth factor to induce and stabilize blood vessels. This approach imitates that which occurs during physiological angiogenesis as a result of heterotypic interactions between endothelium and stroma. Employing such biomimetic

Ghajar, Cyrus M; Bissell, Mina J

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

185

UV Radiation Inhibits 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Levels in Human Skin: Evidence of Transcriptional Suppression  

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...one-carbon metabolism that involves a constellation of genes including methylenetetrahydrofolate...48-50, 50-53, 53 years), and energy intake (902, 902-1147, 1147-1399...on the other hand, participate in energy production and are not directly involved...

Benjamin L. Judson; Akira Miyaki; Vikram D. Kekatpure; Baoheng Du; Patricia Gilleaudeau; Mary Sullivan-Whalen; Arash Mohebati; Sudhir Nair; Jay O. Boyle; Richard D. Granstein; Kotha Subbaramaiah; James G. Krueger; and Andrew J. Dannenberg

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Targeting Ornithine Decarboxylase for the Prevention of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in Humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...incidence between 1977_1978 and 1998-1999 in Northcentral New Mexico. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2003;12:1105-8. 3...732-6. 8 Thompson SC , Jolley D, Marks R. Reduction of solar keratoses by regular sunscreen use. N Engl J Med 1993;329...

Craig A. Elmets and Mohammad Athar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ultraviolet B-induced DNA Damage in Human Skin and Its Modulation by a Sunscreen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract The UVB component of solar radiation is a risk factor for...defined as the ratio of the energy required to produce a MED...sunscreen compared with the energy required to produce the same...able to reduce many effects of solar radiation, it is unclear how...

Vladimir J. Bykov; Jan A. Marcusson; and Kari Hemminki

1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

High-resolution imaging of microvasculature in human skin in-vivo with optical coherence tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using swept-source optical coherence tomography,” Opt. Lett.J. G. Fujimoto, “Optical coherence tomography,” Science 254(volumes using optical coherence tomography,” Opt. Lett. 22(

Liu, Gangjun; Jia, Wangcun; Sun, Victor; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection Induces Autophagy in both Cultured Cells and Human Skin Vesicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Devenish, F. Di Sano, J. F. Dice, M. Difiglia, S. Dinesh-Kumar, C. W. Distelhorst, M. Djavaheri-Mergny, F...Czymmek, Z. Talloczy, B. Levine, and S. P. Dinesh-Kumar. 2005. Autophagy regulates programmed cell death...

Marie-Noëlle Takahashi; Wallen Jackson; Donna T. Laird; Timothy D. Culp; Charles Grose; John I. Haynes II; Luca Benetti

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

190

Human skin keratinocytes modified by a Friend-derived retroviral vector: A functional approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 %). Colony Forming Efficiency (CFE) assays were done withand negative controls. There was no difference in CFE (%CFE= 10.74±6.53 negative control vs % CFE= 9.22±5.45 with

Arango, M; Chamorro, C; Cohen-Haguenauer, O; Rojas, M; Restrepo, LM

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Thiothymidine plus low-dose UVA kills hyperproliferative human skin cells independently of their human papilloma virus status  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...further (1-3). Solar radiation is the major...development of the basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC...fraction of incident solar UVA (wavelengths...1:1,000) from Cell Signaling Technology, Inc. Secondary...

Olivier Reelfs; Yao-Zhong Xu; Andrew Massey; Peter Karran; and Alan Storey

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Antiviral activity of 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodocytosine against human cytomegalovirus in human skin fibroblasts.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...readily reversed with 10-fold excess thymidine, whereby the 50...readily reversed with 10-fold excess of deoxycytidine, whereby...thymidine (dThd), NaF, lithium chloride, creatine phosphate...or an equimolar or 10-fold excess concentration ofdCyd or dThd...

J M Colacino; C Lopez

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial skin construct Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center (CFADC) Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 17 Conjunctive Types and SKInT Jean GoubaultLarrecq ? Summary: Conjunctive Types...

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - atopic dermatitis skin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tacrolimus binds to an intracellular protein called the FK- 506 binding protein... the penetration rate through hairless mouse skin. Tacrolimus-loaded NLCs were found to have an...

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-related skin lesions Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 | July 2002 729 Family Correlations of Arsenic Methylation Patterns in Children and Parents Summary: various health effects, including can- cers of the bladder, skin, and...

196

Atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air : plasma characterisation for skin therapy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A pulsed atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device operating in air is investigated for medical applications such as for skin disinfection and promotion of wound… (more)

Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative skin model Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the limb, and a simpli- fied model of the anatomy under the skin. Users interactively paint weights... anatomic structures. Having modeled the contributions of passive ......

198

Predictors of occupational skin disease among seafood processing workers in the Western Cape.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Includes abstract. Occupational skin disease is common in seafood processing workers. While previous studies have reported an increased prevalence of symptoms (as high as 50%)… (more)

Burdzik, Amy.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - apso skin friction Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Three-Dimensional Flows Summary: Abstract Recent improvements in three techniques for measuring skin friction in two- and three- dimensional... that the oil- film...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute skin toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... skin Reproductive effects of not seen with glycols...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - amphibian skin epithelium Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ulcers & bloating are keySkin... AmphibiansInfections in Wild Amphibians D. Earl Green, DVMD. Earl Green, DVM Department of Interior... % of larvae -- Onset is sudden...

202

Heart valve tissue engineering Frank Baaijens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart valve tissue engineering Frank Baaijens Department of Biomedical Engineering Eindhoven University of Technology Netherlands Tissue engineered heart valves appear promising as autologous valvular functionality and durability of the heart valve relies on the strength and anisotropic properties of the valve

Stavroulakis, Georgios E.

203

COMPUTATIONAL DOSIMETRY FOR CHILD AND ADULT HUMAN MODELS DUE TO CONTACT CURRENT FROM 10 HZ TO 110 MHZ  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......effect was in the heart. With respect to brain and skin conductivities, one needs to...is discussed in (29). With respect to brain tissue, Peters and Stinstra(30) reported...in (22) was chosen as the estimate of brain conductivity. The value reported subsequently......

Kwok Hung Chan; Shunya Ohta; Ilkka Laakso; Akimasa Hirata; Yukihisa Suzuki; Robert Kavet

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

PASSAGE OF FISSION PRODUCTS THROUGH THE SKIN OF TUNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which varies in rate depending on a number of factors. The rate of penetration of sodium chloride is low · · 3 Cesium- 137 · · · . 3 Ruthenium - 106 3 Penetration of isotopes into muscle tissue Strontium-89 4 the penetration of radioactive strontium, cesium, and ruthenium common products of nuclear fission, through

205

Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients  

SciTech Connect

B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients.

Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B. (Univ. of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters

Boyer, Edmond

207

Asian Females in an Advertising Context: Exploring Skin Tone Tension Anjala S. Krishen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asian Females in an Advertising Context: Exploring Skin Tone Tension Anjala S. Krishen Department in the completion of this research. 1 #12;Asian Females in an Advertising Context: Exploring Skin Tone Tension Abstract While the explosive literature on the portrayal of women in advertising has established

Ahmad, Sajjad

208

Bored By Non-Glowing Skin? Ultra-Flexible, Waterproof LED Implants Are What You Seek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bored By Non-Glowing Skin? Ultra-Flexible, Waterproof LED Implants Are What You Seek By Alasdair Wilkins/io9 Posted 10.19.2010 at 12:15 pm LED Lights Could Be Implanted Under Skin Photo courtesy of iO9 LEDs are, on small scales, the cheapest, most reliable, and most technologically powerful light sources

Rogers, John A.

209

Caffeic Acid Directly Targets ERK1/2 to Attenuate Solar UV-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science by the Argonne National...Lachiewicz A, Pestak C, Thomas N.Solar UV exposure and mortality from skin tumors...117-24. 6. de Gruijl FR .Skin cancer and solar UV radiation.Eur J Cancer 1999;35...

Ge Yang; Yang Fu; Margarita Malakhova; Igor Kurinov; Feng Zhu; Ke Yao; Haitao Li; Hanyong Chen; Wei Li; Do Young Lim; Yuqiao Sheng; Ann M. Bode; Ziming Dong; and Zigang Dong

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Automatic Skin Enhancement with Visible and Near-Infrared Image Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic Skin Enhancement with Visible and Near-Infrared Image Fusion Sabine Süsstrunk School and hemo- globin, the key components of skin color, have little absorp- tion in the near-infrared (NIR to the incident light's wavelength, we show that near-infrared images provide information that can be used

Salvaggio, Carl

211

Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in Bangladesh Graziano, PhD The present study examined the associations between drinking water and urinary arsenic levels currently drinking water containing concentrations of arsenic 50 g/L. The risk for skin lesions in relation

van Geen, Alexander

212

Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India Reina Haque the dose-re- sponse relation between low arsenic concentrations in drinking water and arsenic-induced skin peak arsenic concentration in drinking water was 325 g/liter for cases and 180 g/liter for controls

California at Berkeley, University of

213

Modelling and simulation of skin-stretch-caused motion artefacts in single-channel ECG signal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling and simulation of skin-stretch-caused motion artefacts in single-channel ECG signal in better understanding of artefacts in ECG and in developing model-based techniques for cleaning or interpreting noisy ECG signals. This work com- bines existing experimental results from the field of skin

Hamburg,.Universität

214

Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities Noah Fierera,b,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities Noah Fierera,b,1 , Christian L. Lauberb are personalized, we hypothesized that we could use the residual skin bacteria left on objects for forensic approach, this series ofstudies introducesa forensics approach that could eventually be used

Fierer, Noah

215

Tissue oxymetry using magnetic resonance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A noninvasive method for in vivo measurement of tissue oxygen concentration has been developed. Several techniques currently used suffer limitations that prevent their practical clinical use. Our method is to use the ...

Liu, Lisa Chiawen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Predicted Solution Structure of Zymogen Human Coagulation FVII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the complete tissue factor-free calcium ion-bound human zymogen FVII (residues 1­406) (FVII) has been-ray crystallographic structure of human coagulation FVIIa/TF complex bound with calcium ions (Banner et al., Nature of interactions regulated by positive and negative feedback loops. In the "initiation stage" in the extrinsic

Perera, Lalith

217

Controlling the Porosity and Microarchitecture of Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue engineering holds great promise for regeneration and repair of diseased tissues, making the development of tissue engineering scaffolds a topic of great interest in biomedical research. Because of their biocompatibility ...

Annabi, Nasim

218

Deep Beams and Slabs The purpose of skin reinforcement in a deep beam is to limit the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep Beams and Slabs Deep Beams The purpose of skin reinforcement in a deep beam is to limit require different amounts of skin reinforcement. The purpose of our experiment is to compare beams designed with the different amounts of skin reinforcement required by these codes. 3 deep beams following

Barthelat, Francois

219

Combining visible and near-infrared images for realistic skin Clement Fredembach, Nathalie Barbuscia and Sabine Susstrunk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining visible and near-infrared images for realistic skin smoothing Cl´ement Fredembach components of skin colour, have little absorption in the near-infrared part of the spectrum propose that near-infrared images provide information that can be used to automatically smooth skin tones

Salvaggio, Carl

220

Comparative analysis of energy allocation to tissue and skeletal ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here, we provide the first comparative analysis of energy investment into tissue ... growth model based on colony geometry, tissue mass and quality (enthalpy), ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Study of freshly excised brain tissues using terahertz imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrated that tumors in freshly excised whole brain tissue could be differentiated clearly from normal brain tissue using a reflection-type terahertz (THz) imaging system. THz...

Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Ji, Young Bin; Jeong, Kiyoung; Park, Yeonji; Yang, Jaemoon; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Kang, Seok-Gu; Huh, Yong-Min; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Suh, Jin-Suck

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

THE EFFECTS OF HIV INFECTION ON THE EXPRESSION OF THE DRUG EFFLUX PROTEINS P-GLYCOPROTEIN AND BREAST CANCER RESISTANCE PROTEIN IN A HUMAN INTESTINE MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Emerging evidence suggests poor antiretroviral penetration within human gastrointestinal (GI) tissues may contribute to HIV persistence within reservoirs despite effective therapy. We hypothesize that HIV ...

Ellis, Kelstan Lynch

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Determining the density content of symmetry energy and neutron skin: an empirical approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly constrained. Starting from precise empirical values of the nuclear volume and surface symmetry energy coefficients and the nuclear saturation density, we show how in the ambit of microscopic calculations with different energy density functionals, the value of the symmetry energy slope parameter $L$ alongwith that for neutron skin can be put in tighter bounds. The value of $L$ is found to be $L$= 64$\\pm $5 MeV. For $^{208}$Pb, the neutron skin thickness comes out to be 0.188 $\\pm $0.014 fm. Knowing $L$, the method can be applied to predict neutron skins of other nuclei.

Agrawal, B K; Samaddar, S K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Determining the Density Content of Symmetry Energy and Neutron Skin: An Empirical Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly constrained. Starting from precise empirical values of the nuclear volume and surface symmetry energy coefficients and the nuclear saturation density, we show how in the ambit of microscopic calculations with different energy density functionals, the value of the symmetry energy slope parameter L along with that for neutron skin can be put in tighter bounds. The value of L is found to be L=64±5??MeV. For Pb208, the neutron skin thickness comes out to be 0.188±0.014??fm. Knowing L, the method can be applied to predict neutron skin thicknesses of other nuclei.

B. K. Agrawal; J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Determining the density content of symmetry energy and neutron skin: an empirical approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly constrained. Starting from precise empirical values of the nuclear volume and surface symmetry energy coefficients and the nuclear saturation density, we show how in the ambit of microscopic calculations with different energy density functionals, the value of the symmetry energy slope parameter $L$ alongwith that for neutron skin can be put in tighter bounds. The value of $L$ is found to be $L$= 64$\\pm $5 MeV. For $^{208}$Pb, the neutron skin thickness comes out to be 0.188 $\\pm $0.014 fm. Knowing $L$, the method can be applied to predict neutron skins of other nuclei.

B. K. Agrawal; J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

226

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanisms of Tissue Response to Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project? In the past, the effects of ionizing radiation on humans has been attributed in great part to its ability to damage DNA, which transmits information from cell to cell, and generation to generation. Damaged DNA can lead to cell death or perpetuate the damage to daughter cells and to future generations. In addition to the information contained with the genome (i.e., DNA sequence), information directing cell behavior and tissue function is also stored outside the DNA. The success in cloning sheep from the DNA contained in the nucleus of an adult cell shows how important signals from the outside are in defining how the genome is expressed. This

227

Distribution of phospholipase C isozymes in various rat tissues and cultured cells  

SciTech Connect

Monoclonal antibodies prepared against PLC-I or PLC-II enzyme did not cross-react with the other. Using a pair of antibodies which recognizes 2 different antigenic sites on the same molecule, radioimmunoassays were developed for the quantitation of PLC-I and PLC-II in homogenates of various tissues and cultured cells, prepared by homogenization in a 2 M KCl buffer. The contents of PLC enzymes were measured in 19 rat tissues, in human platelets and in 17 cultured cells. Results indicate that the concentration of PLC-I and PLC-II is very high in brain, PLC-I is localized mainly in brain and partly in seminal vesicles, PLC-II is found in most tissues and cells. PLC-I is highly localized even in brain: 5 different neuroblastoma did not contain PLC-I while 2 glioma and 1 astrocytoma contained significant amounts.

Suh, P.G.; Ryu, S.H.; Choi, W.C.; Lee, K.Y.; Rhee, S.G.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Distribution patterns of \\{PAHs\\} in different tissues of annulated sea snake (Hydrophis cyanocinctus) and short sea snake (Lapemis curtus) from the Hara Protected Area on the North Coast of the Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The levels of 22 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in the skin, liver, kidney and muscle tissues of annulated sea snake (Hydrophis cyanocinctus), and short sea snake (Lapemis curtus) collected from the Hara Protected Area, Persian Gulf during October 2010. Low molecular weight (?3-rings) had the highest levels in skin, while high molecular weight (?4-rings) was highest in the kidney. The lowest levels of analyzed \\{PAHs\\} were found in muscle in the both species. H. cyanocinctus (59.37 ng g?1 dw) revealed to be significantly more contaminated than L. curtus (50.51 ng g?1 dw). Naphtalene was the PAH most frequently detected and at the highest level in the different tissues both species. Di- and tri-cyclic \\{PAHs\\} were predominant in both species suggesting petrogenic origin rather than pyrogenic sources of PAHs. The present study represents the first data of contamination by \\{PAHs\\} in sea snake from the Persian Gulf.

Zahra Heydari Sereshk; Alireza Riyahi Bakhtiari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Human Nature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the human enhancement debate, both parties advocate a partial truth. On the one hand, the bioconservatives argue that, if transhumanism is unleashed without some kind of bioethical...have (A+) is itself a prod...

Prof.; Dr. Hub Zwart

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Human Enhancement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Categorizing different human enhancements into personal, social, or species enhancements, as well as considering whether a particular enhancement technique generates asymmetric or network benefits, brings clarity to discussions about the ethical issues pertaining to any individual technique. The four aspects of principlism can help to assess the ethical implications of different human enhancements, revealing complexities in their aspirational claims for personally directed self-development. At a practical level, this article examines important questions about real expectations, scientific hubris, and hype.

P. Moore

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue edema when electrically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue edema when electrically stimulating-electrode resistance and thus require a different approach to using non-invasive electrical stimulation of nerves region. These fluid accumulations affect segmental and total body resistance [6, 7]. Electrical therapy

Durfee, William K.

232

Whole-body imaging of the distribution of mercury released from dental fillings into monkey tissues  

SciTech Connect

The fate of mercury (Hg) released from dental silver amalgam tooth fillings into human mouth air is uncertain. A previous report about sheep revealed uptake routes and distribution of amalgam Hg among body tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the bodily distribution of amalgam Hg in a monkey whose dentition, diet, feeding regimen, and chewing pattern closely resemble those of humans. When amalgam fillings, which normally contain 50% Hg, are made with a tracer of radioactive {sup 203}Hg and then placed into monkey teeth, the isotope appears in high concentration in various organs and tissues within 4 wk. Whole-body images of the monkey revealed that the highest levels of Hg were located in the kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and jaw. The dental profession's advocacy of silver amalgam as a stable tooth restorative material is not supported by these findings.

Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Leininger, R.W.; Vimy, M.J.; Lorscheider, F.L. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Ablation of p21waf1cip1 Expression Enhances the Capacity of p53-deficient Human Tumor Cells to Repair UVB-induced DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an early initiating event in solar UVB-induced skin cell transformation...restore much of the DNA repair capacity lost in these precancerous...p21waf1cip1 expression enhances the capacity of p53-deficient human tumor...can significantly enhance the capacity of p53-deficient human tumor...

Jean-Philippe Therrien; Martin Loignon; Régen Drouin; and Elliot A. Drobetsky

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Optical measurement of drug concentrations in tissue  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The aim of this project was to develop noninvasive fiber-optic methods for measuring drug concentrations in tissue. Such a system would make possible the study of chemotherapy drug kinetics at specific, targeted locations in the body after the drug is administered. The major result of this project is the development of techniques for measuring changes in absorption of a medium with unknown scattering properties. The developed method was verified by testing on several media with scattering properties in the range typically found for tissue.

Mourant, J.R.; Bigio, I.J.; Jack, D.A.; Johnson, T.M.; Miller, H.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Chemical Sciences and Technology Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Enzocide - a chemical dip for the reduction of Salmonella on chicken breast skin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A chemical dip, Enzocide TM, was tested to determine its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella (ST) choleraesuis subsp. typhimurium and Salmonella (SA) choleraesuis subsp. arizonae from breast skin surfaces of broilers. One hundred square...

Bianchi, Aldo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Systematic Study of Matrix Acidizing Treatments Using Skin Monitoring Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this work was to evaluate matrix acidizing treatments of vertical and horizontal wells in carbonate reservoirs. Twenty field cases for acidizing treatments were analyzed by evaluating the skin factor evolution from on-site rate...

Pandya, Nimish

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

237

Symmetry energy, neutron skin, and neutron star radius from chiral effective field theory interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss neutron matter calculations based on chiral effective field theory interactions and their predictions for the symmetry energy, the neutron skin of 208 Pb, and for the radius of neutron stars.

K. Hebeler; A. Schwenk

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - atopic dermatitis-like skin Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soc. 2011, Vol. 32, No. 3 So Hee Nam et al. DOI 10.5012bkcs.2011.32.3.956 Summary: the penetration rate through hairless mouse skin. Tacrolimus-loaded NLCs were found to have an...

239

Extended Range Near-Infrared Imaging of Water and Oil in Facial Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, near-infrared (NIR) imaging has been applied to detecting changes in skin hydration using the water OH band centered near 1460 nm. However, assigning changes in the...

Egawa, Mariko; Yanai, Motohiro; Kikuchi, Kumiko; Masuda, Yuji

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Skin doses to patients undergoing coronary angiography in a Greek hospital  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......undergoing coronary angiography in a Greek hospital Miltiadis G. Delichas 1 Kyriakos Psarrakos...Medical Physics Department, Papageorgiou Hospital, N. Efkarpia, Thessaloniki 56403...skin during 93 CA procedures in a Greek hospital. The dose-area product (DAP) for......

Miltiadis G. Delichas; Kyriakos Psarrakos; Georgios Giannoglou; Elisabeth Molyvda-Athanasopoulou; Konstantinos Hatziioannou; Emmanouil Papanastassiou

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic skin inflammation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tetrakis(dimethylamino)hafnium P-6280-B Date: February 2005 Copyright 2002, 2004-2005, Praxair Technology, Inc. Page 1 of 8 Summary: dermatitis (inflammation of the skin). With...

242

Design Considerations for Double-Skin Facades in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal building simulations (TRNSYS) were linked to nodal airflow network simulations (COMIS) for a ventilated double-skin facade performance calculation and overall energy consumption for office building facades. Simulation results show good...

Haase, M.; Amato, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic skin test Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: allergic skin test Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Figure 1. Steps involved in immediate...

244

Design and fabrication of an optical pressure micro sensor for skin mechanics studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanics of skin is as central to touch as optics is to vision and acoustics is to hearing. With the advent of novel imaging technologies such as the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), we are now able to view structures ...

Kumar, Siddarth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development and Construction of Bioclimatic Double Skin Active Facade for Hot and Humid Climate of UAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tracking venetian blinds, LED (light emitting diodes) lighting and Building Management system. 1.01 Modeling And Simulation Of Double Skin Active Facade The modeling and simulation of the Double Skin Fa?ade Cavity is a complicated task, since... sweating/condensation on the water coil. 3.06 LED (Light Emitting Diode) Lighting The building is illuminated using extremely energy efficient LED?s which last 5 times as long as fluorescents and 50 times longer than typical incandescent. So...

Karbor, R. G.; Mohamed, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

An ultrasound technique for wireless power transmission through tissue to implanted medical devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An ultrasound electrical recharging system (USERTM) is developed and tested which wirelessly transmits significant amount of energy through animal tissue to charge implantable devices batteries or capacitors. The goal of this approach is wireless power transmission to active human implant devices. Experiments with transducers with resonant frequencies between 0.5 and 3.5 MHz led us to adopt 0.75 to 1.25 MHz as the range of optimum efficiency. In vitro experiments demonstrated significant charging of 4.1 V medically qualified Li-ion batteries across tissue depths of up to 5 cm. Charging currents close to 300 mA were achieved in vitro. Several in vivo tests confirmed the power delivery in a porcine model. In an in vivo survival test tissue was exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound at an average intensity of 0.4 W/cm2 for 11.5 h. Histology of the exposed tissue showed tissue changes primarily attributable only to surgical implantation of the prototype device. Many traditional and developing implanted medical devices are targets for the introduction of this method of power delivery to reduce the number of battery replacement operations and improve performance compared to the existing electromagnetic method of wireless power delivery. [Work supported by the NIH/NIBIB R44EB007421.

Leon Radziemski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Percutaneous characterization of the insect repellent DEET and the sunscreen oxybenzone from topical skin application  

SciTech Connect

The synergistic percutaneous enhancement between insect repellent DEET and sunscreen oxybenzone has been proven in our laboratory using a series of in vitro diffusion studies. In this study, we carried out an in vivo study to characterize skin permeation profiles from topical skin application of three commercially available repellent and sunscreen preparations. The correlation between skin disposition and drug metabolism was attempted by using data collected. Both DEET and oxybenzone permeated across the skin after the application and achieved substantial systemic absorption. Combined use of DEET and oxybenzone significantly enhanced the percutaneous penetration percentages (ranging 36-108%) due to mutual enhancement effects. Skin disposition indicated that DEET produced a faster transdermal permeation rate and higher systemic absorption extent, but oxybenzone formed a concentrated depot within the skin and delivered the content slowly over the time. In vivo AUC{sub P}/MRT of DEET and oxybenzone was increased by 37%/17% and 63%/10% when the two compounds were used together. No DEET was detected from the urine samples 48 h after the application. Tape stripping seemed to be a satisfactory approach for quantitative assessment of DEET and oxybenzone penetration into the stratum corneum. It was also concluded that pharmacological and toxicological perspectives from concurrent application of insect repellent and sunscreen products require further evaluation to ensure use efficacy and safety of these common consumer healthcare products.

Kasichayanula, Sreeneeranj [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); House, James D. [Department of Animal Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Wang Tao [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Gu Xiaochen [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)], E-mail: xgu@cc.umanitoba.ca

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Intra-ocular Transplantation of Heterologous Tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...intra-ocular trans plantation of heterologous tissues. A few investi gators have recently reopened the question and have submitted reports...Was successful. It might not he amiss to suggest that investi gators might re-examine their material in view of the results of...

Donald S. Morris; John R. McDonald; Frank C. Mann

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

250

ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"  

SciTech Connect

Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

Tissue distribution of the dystrophin-related gene product and expression in the mdx and dy mouse  

SciTech Connect

The authors have previously reported a dystrophin-related locus (DMDL for Duchenne muscular dystrophy-like) on human chromosome 6 that maps close to the dy mutation on mouse chromosome 10. Here they show that this gene is expressed in a wide range of tissues at varying levels. The transcript is particularly abundant in several human fetal tissues, including heart, placenta, and intestine. Studies with antisera raised against a DMDL fusion protein identify a 400,000 M{sub r} protein in all mouse tissues tested, including those of mdx and dy mice. Unlike the dystrophin gene, the DMDL gene transcript is not differentially spliced at the 3{prime} end in either fetal muscle or brain.

Love, D.R.; Marsden, R.F.; Bloomfield, J.F.; Davies, K.E. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (England)); Morris, G.E.; Ellis, J.M. (North East Wales Inst., Deeside, Wales (England)); Fairbrother, U.; Edwards, Y.H. (Univ. College London (England)); Slater, C.P. (Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (England)); Parry, D.J. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1991-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Dental silver tooth fillings: A source of mercury exposure revealed by whole-body image scan and tissue analysis  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) vapor is released from dental silver tooth fillings into human mouth air after chewing, but its possible uptake routes and distribution among body tissues are unknown. This investigation demonstrates that when radioactive 203Hg is mixed with dental Hg/silver fillings (amalgam) and placed in teeth of adult sheep, the isotope will appear in various organs and tissues within 29 days. Evidence of Hg uptake, as determined by whole-body scanning and measurement of isotope in specific tissues, revealed three uptake sites: lung, gastrointestinal, and jaw tissue absorption. Once absorbed, high concentrations of dental amalgam Hg rapidly localize in kidneys and liver. Results are discussed in view of potential health consequences from long-term exposure to Hg from this dental material.

Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy J. Tyson McDonald Steward St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center Abstract Primary tissue represents a better model for studies than immortalized cell lines that are adapted to culture conditions and may no longer reflect a realistic biological state. In this study, normal tissues from clinically indicated robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were grossly identified, sectioned into frozen or formalin fixed samples, and processed as primary cultures. Normal epithelial and fibroblast primary cell cultures were derived from regions of normal tissue, as confirmed by analysis on adjacent tissue by hematoxylin and eosin staining, were exposed to acute

255

Mechanical properties of collagen-based scaffolds for tissue regeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds for the regeneration of skin and nerve have previously been fabricated by freeze-drying a slurry containing a co-precipitate of collagen and glycosaminoglycan. Recently, mineralized ...

Kanungo, Biraja Prasad, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i.e. cerebellum versus heart for differential variation at the gene, isoform, and transcription start site (TSS), and promoter level showed that several of the genes differed at all four levels. Interestingly, these genes were mainly annotated to the “electron transport chain” and neuronal differentiation, emphasizing that “tissue important” genes are regulated at several levels. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the “across tissue approach” has a promising potential when screening for possible explanations for variations, such as those observed at the gene expression levels.

Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn, E-mail: LoneB.Madsen@agrsci.dk

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

Method and apparatus for determining fat content of tissue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining characteristics of tissue is disclosed. The method comprises supplying optical energy to a tissue and detecting at a plurality of locations consequent energy scattered by the tissue. Analysis of the scattered energy as taught herein provides information concerning the properties of the tissue, specifically information related to the fat and lean content and thickness of the tissue. The apparatus comprises a light source adapted to deliver optical energy to a tissue. A plurality of detectors can be mounted at different positions relative to the source to detect energy scattered by the tissue. A signal processor as taught herein can determine characteristics of the tissue from the signals from the detectors and locations of the detectors, specifically information related to the fat and lean content and thickness of the tissue.

Weber, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Jon R. (Edgewood, NM); Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Shagam, Richard N. (Albuquerque, NM); Gooris, Luc (Rancho Santa Margarita, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Mutational analysis of tissue-tissue interaction required for otic placode induction in zebrafish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that prospective otic ectoderm of amphibians is already partially specified to form otic tissue by the late gastrula stage, as shown by its ability to form rudimentary otic vesicles when transplanted to ectopic sites of host embryos (Zwilling, 1941). To explain... that prospective otic ectoderm of amphibians is already partially specified to form otic tissue by the late gastrula stage, as shown by its ability to form rudimentary otic vesicles when transplanted to ectopic sites of host embryos (Zwilling, 1941). To explain...

Mendonsa, Emidio Savio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

p27{sup Kip1} inhibits tissue factor expression  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: •p27{sup Kip1}regulates the expression of tissue factor at the transcriptional level. •This inhibitory effect of p27{sup Kip1} is independently of its cell regulatory action. •The current study provides new insights into a pleiotrophic function of p27{sup Kip1}. -- Abstract: Background: The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) p27{sup Kip1} regulates cell proliferation and thus inhibits atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. Expression of tissue factor (TF), the key initator of the coagulation cascade, is associated with atherosclerosis. Yet, it has not been studied whether p27{sup Kip1} influences the expression of TF. Methods and results: p27{sup Kip1} overexpression in human aortic endothelial cells was achieved by adenoviral transfection. Cells were rendered quiescent for 24 h in 0.5% fetal-calf serum. After stimulation with TNF-? (5 ng/ml), TF protein expression and activity was significantly reduced (n = 4; P < 0.001) in cells transfected with p27{sup Kip1}. In line with this, p27{sup Kip1} overexpression reduced cytokine-induced TF mRNA expression (n = 4; P < 0.01) and TF promotor activity (n = 4; P < 0.05). In contrast, activation of the MAP kinases p38, ERK and JNK was not affected by p27{sup Kip1} overexpression. Conclusion: This in vitro study suggests that p27{sup Kip1} inhibits TF expression at the transcriptional level. These data indicate an interaction between p27{sup Kip1} and TF in important pathological alterations such as atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

Breitenstein, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.breitenstein@usz.ch [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland) [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland); Akhmedov, Alexander; Camici, Giovanni G.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Tanner, Felix C. [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland) [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland)

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

260

Real and Theoretical Threats to Human Health Posed by the Epidemic of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses the question of whether or not food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics derived from animal tissues may pose a danger to human health. More specifically, can any of these products transmit C...

Richard T. Johnson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Precursors to radiopharmaceutical agents for tissue imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A class of radiolabeled compounds to be used in tissue imaging that exhibits rapid brain uptake, good brain:blood radioactivity ratios, and long retention times. The imaging agents are more specifically radioiodinated aromatic amines attached to dihydropyridine carriers, that exhibit heart as well as brain specificity. In addition to the radiolabeled compounds, classes of compounds are also described that are used as precursors and intermediates in the preparation of the imaging agents.

Srivastava, Prem C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Oral tissue changes of radiation-oncology and their management  

SciTech Connect

The cytologic effects of radiation therapy involve all tissues and most significantly bone within the treated area. Of greatest concern is the permanence of the compromised healing and resistance to infection of the irradiated tissues. Those dental procedures that do not cause tissue trauma are considered nonrisk. Any procedure that traumatizes previously irradiated tissues can exceed the healing potential of the compromised tissue and frequently results in an uncontrollable necrosis. The adequate utilization of hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been shown to be 95% effective in preventing osteoradionecrosis in postirradiated tissues. 9 references.

Fleming, T.J. (Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body Speaker(s): Miriam Byrne Date: April 14, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Miriam Byrne is a participating guest in the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group at LBL. She is an academic member of staff in the Physics Department at the National University of Galway, Ireland. Her research interests, primarily funded by European Commission radiation protection programs, focus on the mechanisms of aerosol transport to and from human body surfaces. Over the last ten years, she has been involved in tracer aerosol experiments to determine rates of particle deposition and resuspension from skin, hair and clothing, as well as studying particle transport into skin pores and hair follicles, and contact transfer from

264

Relation Between Tolerance Dose of Skin and Boron-10 Concentration in Neutron Capture Therapy for Cutaneous Melanoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In boron neutron capture therapy of cutaneous melanoma1, damage to scalp, facial skin and eyes must be strictly avoided. Two basic irradiation conditions follow: (1) ...

Tooru Kobayashi; Keiji Kanda; Yowri Ujeno…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A tissue engineering strategy for integrative cartilage repair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue engineering for cartilage repair is a promising approach for improving the healing of articular defects, as biomaterials and growth factors can be supplied directly to a focal lesion. However, integrating neo-tissue ...

Mroszczyk, Keri A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

ChIP-seq Accurately Predicts Tissue-Specific Activity of Enhancers  

SciTech Connect

A major yet unresolved quest in decoding the human genome is the identification of the regulatory sequences that control the spatial and temporal expression of genes. Distant-acting transcriptional enhancers are particularly challenging to uncover since they are scattered amongst the vast non-coding portion of the genome. Evolutionary sequence constraint can facilitate the discovery of enhancers, but fails to predict when and where they are active in vivo. Here, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation with the enhancer-associated protein p300, followed by massively-parallel sequencing, to map several thousand in vivo binding sites of p300 in mouse embryonic forebrain, midbrain, and limb tissue. We tested 86 of these sequences in a transgenic mouse assay, which in nearly all cases revealed reproducible enhancer activity in those tissues predicted by p300 binding. Our results indicate that in vivo mapping of p300 binding is a highly accurate means for identifying enhancers and their associated activities and suggest that such datasets will be useful to study the role of tissue-specific enhancers in human biology and disease on a genome-wide scale.

Visel, Axel; Blow, Matthew J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Effect of Altered Plasma on Tissue Proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection The Effect of Altered Plasma on Tissue Proliferation 1913 by Robert Lee Hoffman This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU... of Altered Plasma on Tissue Proliferation Thesis prepared and presented for a Masters Degree by Robert Lee Hoffmann Fellow in Anatomy. Kansas State University* I9JI3. The Effect of Altered Plasma on Tissue Proliferations. Tissue proliferation...

Hoffman, Robert Lee

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Interaction of Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons with Tissue Constituents: IV. A Quantitative Study of the Binding to Skin Proteins of Several C14-labeled Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of inhibitors of car cinogenesis on hydrocarbon...by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. We are greatly...a Sun beam Shavemaster electric shaver. The connective...work on the inhibition of car cinogenesis by cantharidin...epidermal proteins of the car cinogens, benzpyrene...

Charles Heidelberger and Marjorie G. Moldenhauer

1956-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies Program What does this mean for me? Investments by major companies like the Redskins show the growing market demand for solar technology, as the SunShot Initiative works to accelerate this growth to make solar energy cheaper. If solar power could score a touchdown, then this week's news would definitely count. On Wednesday, the Washington Redskins announced they are working with NRG Energy, one of America's largest energy companies, to bring renewable energy to the football franchise. This means more than just a few panels on the roof. Through the partnership, NRG will install 8,000 translucent solar panels to

270

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies Program What does this mean for me? Investments by major companies like the Redskins show the growing market demand for solar technology, as the SunShot Initiative works to accelerate this growth to make solar energy cheaper. If solar power could score a touchdown, then this week's news would definitely count. On Wednesday, the Washington Redskins announced they are working with NRG Energy, one of America's largest energy companies, to bring renewable energy to the football franchise. This means more than just a few panels on the roof. Through the partnership, NRG will install 8,000 translucent solar panels to

271

Hypoxia-mimicking mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable cobalt ion release for bone tissue engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low oxygen pressure (hypoxia) plays an important role in stimulating angiogenesis; there are, however, few studies to prepare hypoxia-mimicking tissue engineering scaffolds. Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) has been developed as scaffolds with excellent osteogenic properties for bone regeneration. Ionic cobalt (Co) is established as a chemical inducer of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1?, which induces hypoxia-like response. The aim of this study was to develop hypoxia-mimicking MBG scaffolds by incorporating ionic Co2+ into MBG scaffolds and investigate if the addition of Co2+ ions would induce a cellular hypoxic response in such a tissue engineering scaffold system. The composition, microstructure and mesopore properties (specific surface area, nano-pore volume and nano-pore distribution) of Co-containing MBG (Co-MBG) scaffolds were characterized and the cellular effects of Co on the proliferation, differentiation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion, HIF-1? expression and bone-related gene expression of human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in MBG scaffolds were systematically investigated. The results showed that low amounts of Co (ions into MBG scaffolds is a viable option for preparing hypoxia-mimicking tissue engineering scaffolds and significantly enhanced hypoxia function. The hypoxia-mimicking MBG scaffolds have great potential for bone tissue engineering applications by combining enhanced angiogenesis with already existing osteogenic properties.

Chengtie Wu; Yinghong Zhou; Wei Fan; Pingping Han; Jiang Chang; Jones Yuen; Meili Zhang; Yin Xiao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Quantitative Analysis of Developing Tissues Stanislav Y. Shvartsman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, they can be used to guide the design of man-made tissues. Epithelial Patterning: a "unit operation and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 DOI 10 ago, and its aim was defined as design and repair of tissues and organs.1 Tissues are hierarchically

Shvartsman, Stanislav "Stas"

273

Publish by Abstract RNA Extraction From Different Apple Tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publish by Abstract RNA Extraction From Different Apple Tissues Rich in Polyphenols. An efficient procedure for isolating RNA from bud, internodal shoot, flower, and fruit tissues of apple has in apple fruit and flower tissues. Isolated RNA is of high qual- ity and is undegraded as assessed

Korban, Schuyler S.

274

Estimating cancer risk from dental cone-beam CT exposures based on skin dosimetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to measure entrance skin doses on patients undergoing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations, to establish conversion factors between skin and organ doses, and to estimate cancer risk from CBCT exposures. 266 patients (age 8–83) were included, involving three imaging centres. CBCT scans were acquired using the SCANORA 3D (Soredex, Tuusula, Finland) and NewTom 9000 (QR, Verona, Italy). Eight thermoluminescent dosimeters were attached to the patient's skin at standardized locations. Using previously published organ dose estimations on various CBCTs with an anthropomorphic phantom, correlation factors to convert skin dose to organ doses were calculated and applied to estimate patient organ doses. The BEIR VII age- and gender-dependent dose-risk model was applied to estimate the lifetime attributable cancer risk. For the SCANORA 3D, average skin doses over the eight locations varied between 484 and 1788 µGy. For the NewTom 9000 the range was between 821 and 1686 µGy for Centre 1 and between 292 and 2325 µGy for Centre 2. Entrance skin dose measurements demonstrated the combined effect of exposure and patient factors on the dose. The lifetime attributable cancer risk, expressed as the probability to develop a radiation-induced cancer, varied between 2.7 per million (age >60) and 9.8 per million (age 8–11) with an average of 6.0 per million. On average, the risk for female patients was 40% higher. The estimated radiation risk was primarily influenced by the age at exposure and the gender, pointing out the continuing need for justification and optimization of CBCT exposures, with a specific focus on children.

Ruben Pauwels; Lesley Cockmartin; Deimante Ivanauskaité; Ausra Urbonien?; Sophia Gavala; Catherine Donta; Kostas Tsiklakis; Reinhilde Jacobs; Hilde Bosmans; Ria Bogaerts; Keith Horner; The SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Chronic cellular responses of rat skin to 13 Mev proton irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AErM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject: Laboratory Animal Medicine CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial...

Hinkle, Donald King

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin -Heart Rate Monitors -Popular Mechanics http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/breakthroughs/new-electronic-sensors-stick-to-your-skin?click=pm_latest[8/14/2011 5:59:45 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin - Heart Rate Monitors - Popular Mechanics http://www Electronic Sensors That Stick to Your Skin Like Temporary Tattoos Nice tattoo. Or is it a heart-rate monitor to measure the electrical activity of the heart, muscles and brain. And using the same principles behind

Rogers, John A.

277

Repair Capacity for UV Light–Induced DNA Damage Associated with Risk of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer and Tumor Progression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactivation|DNA repair capacity|epidemiology|skin...increasing levels of solar UV radiation (2-4...studying the DNA repair capacity (DRC) as a marker for...keratosis with cumulative solar ultraviolet exposure...influence the DNA repair capacity of normal and skin cancer-affected...

Li-E Wang; Chunying Li; Sara S. Strom; Leonard H. Goldberg; Abenaa Brewster; Zhaozheng Guo; Yawei Qiao; Gary L. Clayman; J. Jack Lee; Adel K. El-Naggar; Victor G. Prieto; Madeleine Duvic; Scott M. Lippman; Randal S. Weber; Margaret L. Kripke; and Qingyi Wei

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Prediction and Visualization of Temperature Histories in Optically-Irradiated Cryogenic Tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Optically-Irradiated Cryogenic Tissues A Dissertationin Optically-Irradiated Cryogenic Tissues by Adam B. Sladeregions of tissue from cryogenic damage through gentle laser

Slade, Adam Broadbent

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Generation of a suite of 3D computer-generated breast phantoms from a limited set of human subject data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The authors previously reported on a three-dimensional computer-generated breast phantom, based on empirical human image data, including a realistic finite-element based compression model that was capable of simulating multimodality imaging data. The computerized breast phantoms are a hybrid of two phantom generation techniques, combining empirical breast CT (bCT) data with flexible computer graphics techniques. However, to date, these phantoms have been based on single human subjects. In this paper, the authors report on a new method to generate multiple phantoms, simulating additional subjects from the limited set of original dedicated breast CT data. The authors developed an image morphing technique to construct new phantoms by gradually transitioning between two human subject datasets, with the potential to generate hundreds of additional pseudoindependent phantoms from the limited bCT cases. The authors conducted a preliminary subjective assessment with a limited number of observers (n= 4) to illustrate how realistic the simulated images generated with the pseudoindependent phantoms appeared. Methods: Several mesh-based geometric transformations were developed to generate distorted breast datasets from the original human subject data. Segmented bCT data from two different human subjects were used as the 'base' and 'target' for morphing. Several combinations of transformations were applied to morph between the 'base' and 'target' datasets such as changing the breast shape, rotating the glandular data, and changing the distribution of the glandular tissue. Following the morphing, regions of skin and fat were assigned to the morphed dataset in order to appropriately assign mechanical properties during the compression simulation. The resulting morphed breast was compressed using a finite element algorithm and simulated mammograms were generated using techniques described previously. Sixty-two simulated mammograms, generated from morphing three human subject datasets, were used in a preliminary observer evaluation where four board certified breast radiologists with varying amounts of experience ranked the level of realism (from 1 ='fake' to 10 ='real') of the simulated images. Results: The morphing technique was able to successfully generate new and unique morphed datasets from the original human subject data. The radiologists evaluated the realism of simulated mammograms generated from the morphed and unmorphed human subject datasets and scored the realism with an average ranking of 5.87 {+-} 1.99, confirming that overall the phantom image datasets appeared more 'real' than 'fake.' Moreover, there was not a significant difference (p > 0.1) between the realism of the unmorphed datasets (6.0 {+-} 1.95) compared to the morphed datasets (5.86 {+-} 1.99). Three of the four observers had overall average rankings of 6.89 {+-} 0.89, 6.9 {+-} 1.24, 6.76 {+-} 1.22, whereas the fourth observer ranked them noticeably lower at 2.94 {+-} 0.7. Conclusions: This work presents a technique that can be used to generate a suite of realistic computerized breast phantoms from a limited number of human subjects. This suite of flexible breast phantoms can be used for multimodality imaging research to provide a known truth while concurrently producing realistic simulated imaging data.

Hsu, Christina M. L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Palmeri, Mark L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Veress, Alexander I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Dobbins, James T. III [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Climate: monthly and annual average Earth skin temperature GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth skin temperature GIS data at Earth skin temperature GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of the region is +0.5 added to the the Lat/Lon value. These data are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A generalized algorithm for retrieving cloudy sky skin temperature from satellite thermal infrared radiances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized algorithm for retrieving cloudy sky skin temperature from satellite thermal infrared Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Abstract. A physical algorithm that of Jin [2000]. Two neighboring pixels over the same land cover have a difference in temperature largely

Jin, Menglin

282

Was skin cancer a selective force for black pigmentation in early hominin evolution?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...year-round UVB exposures, including Tanzania [97,109-111], Cameroon...albinos with skin cancer in Tanzania recorded in 1985, 50% of...Europeans and Africans against solar ultraviolet radiation. J...teaching hospital in northwestern Tanzania: a retrospective review of...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Inhibitory Effect of Green Tea on the Growth of Established Skin Papillomas in Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Preparation and Composition of Green Tea Polyphenol Fraction. One hundred g of green tea leaves were extracted 3...filtered after each extraction. Solvent was removed from the combined...ml 6657 INHIBITORY EFFECT OF GREEN TEA ON THE GROWTH OF SKIN PAPILLOMAS...

Zhi Y. Wang; Mou-Tuan Huang; Chi-Tang Ho; Richard Chang; Wei Ma; Thomas Ferraro; Kenneth R. Reuhl; Chung S. Yang; and Allan H. Conney

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Brown algae polyphenols prevent UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Assoc Cancer Res, Volume 47, 2006 Brown algae polyphenols prevent UVB-induced skin...showed that polyphenols extracted from brown algae have potent antioxidant activities. In...feeding and topical application of brown algae polyphenols on UVB radiation-induced...

Hyejeong Hwang; Tong Chen; Ronard G. Nines; Sarah M. Peschke; Hyeon-Cheol Shin; Gary D. Stoner

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Exact volume preserving skinning with shape control Damien Rohmer1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

skinning, perfectly fits into the usual production pipeline. It can be used whatever the desired locality the way rubber-like materials and organic shapes respectively deform can be modeled. An improved algorithm is a complex process, which needs to fit into the standard production pipe-line for efficient use by artists

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

286

The average person sheds 40 pounds of skin during his or her lifetime. That's the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Q: MSU N 19 o. The average person sheds 40 pounds of skin during his or her lifetime. That whether they are facts or opinions. Fact or opinion? A fact is something that can be tested. An opinion is something that someone thinks or believes. 1. Wooly mammoths are extinct. fact opinion 2. Ear wax can

287

Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...UVB (5% of the total solar UV radiation) is mainly...norathyriol strongly suppresses solar UVinduced mouse skin...structure was subjected to energy minimization using the...hairless mice exposed to solar UV. The inhibition by...U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy...

Jixia Li; Margarita Malakhova; Madhusoodanan Mottamal; Kanamata Reddy; Igor Kurinov; Andria Carper; Alyssa Langfald; Naomi Oi; Myoung Ok Kim; Feng Zhu; Carlos P. Sosa; Keyuan Zhou; Ann M. Bode; and Zigang Dong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Sunlight UV-Induced Skin Cancer Relies upon Activation of the p38? Signaling Pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lachiewicz A, Pestak C Thomas N.Solar UV exposure and mortality from...phosphorylation of MKP1 protein prevents solar ultraviolet light-induced...suppresses skin cancers induced by solar ultraviolet radiation by targeting...Gasparro FP Uitto J.UVA-340 as energy source, mimicking natural sunlight...

Kangdong Liu; Donghoon Yu; Yong-Yeon Cho; Ann M. Bode; Weiya Ma; Ke Yao; Shengqing Li; Jixia Li; G. Tim Bowden; Ziming Dong; and Zigang Dong

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Vibrio furnissii: an Unusual Cause of Bacteremia and Skin Lesions after Ingestion of Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacteremia and Skin Lesions after Ingestion of Seafood Catherine Derber 1 * Philip Coudron 2...underlying comorbidities who are exposed to seafood. CASE REPORT A 62-year-old man from...ingesting contaminated raw or undercooked seafood or after contact with warm marine environments...

Catherine Derber; Philip Coudron; Cheryl Tarr; Lori Gladney; Maryann Turnsek; Shivanjali Shankaran; Edward Wong

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE, ERWAN FAOU, VICTOR P´ERON ABSTRACT. We consider the equations of electromagnetism set on a domain made in electromagnetism. This effect describes the rapid decay of electromagnetic fields with depth inside a metallic

Dauge, Monique

291

CancerTherapy Skin Cooling Anthony Alleman, Duane Bywaters, David Chadburn, Drew Sparks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

printed cooling pad with 9 ports, the final cooling pad is ABS 3D printed with a curved surface and 11 ports. ABS 3D printed CP with inner channel and 9 ports, vertical flow. 11 ports angled towards membrane ultrasound procedure to concentrate acoustic energy beneath the skin's Required heat transfer coefficients

Provancher, William

292

Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions, 2006. Millions of persons around the world are exposed to low doses of arsenic through drinking water from drinking water over a significant period of time. The authors evaluated dose-response relations

van Geen, Alexander

293

Footprints of nonsentient design inside the human genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mutations disproportionately involve high-energy tissues and organs (46, 47): brain...Considering the critical role of cellular energy production in human health and metabolic...Genet 90 : 41 – 54 . 35 Lopez-Bigas N Audit B Ouzounis C Parra G Guigo R ( 2005...

John C. Avise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Neutron interactions with biological tissue. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This program was aimed at creating a quantitative physical description, at the micrometer and nanometer levels, of the physical interactions of neutrons with tissue through the ejected secondary charged particles. The authors used theoretical calculations whose input includes neutron cross section data; range, stopping power, ion yield, and straggling information; and geometrical properties. Outputs are initial and slowing-down spectra of charged particles, kerma factors, average values of quality factors, microdosimetric spectra, and integral microdosimetric parameters such as {bar y}{sub F}, {bar y}{sub D}, y{sup *}. Since it has become apparent that nanometer site sizes are also relevant to radiobiological effects, the calculations of event size spectra and their parameters were extended to these smaller diameters. This information is basic to radiological physics, radiation biology, radiation protection of workers, and standards for neutron dose measurement.

NONE

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

295

Does Low Penetration of Human Skin by the Normal Mode Ruby Laser Account for Poor Permanent Depilatory Success Rates?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Studies reported to date have shown a good depilatory response from patients treated with the normal mode ruby laser (NMRL) over 12 weeks, but a low response over a time period greater than this. Previous publ...

A. Topping; D. Gault; A. Grobbelaar; R. Sanders; C. Green…

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 38:137141 (2006) Thermal Responses of Ex Vivo Human Skin During Multiple  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Departamento de Optica, Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Puebla, Mexico 3 Department

Aguilar, Guillermo

297

The environmental protection agency's research program on total human exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) research program on total human exposure to environmental pollution seeks to develop a newly emerging concept in the environmental sciences. Instead of focusing purely on the sources of pollution or their transport and movement through the environment, this research focuses on human beings as the receptors of these pollutants. People and daily activities become the center of attention. The methodology measures and models the pollutant concentrations found at the physical boundaries of people, regardless of whether the pollutants arrive through the air, water, food, or skin. It seeks to characterize quantitatively the impact of pollution on people by determining if an environmental problem exists at the human interface and, if so, by determining the sources, nature, extent, and severity of this environmental problem. By exploiting an emerging new arsenal of miniaturized instruments and by developing statistically representative survey designs for sampling the population of cities, significant progress has been made in recent years in providing previously unavailable human exposure field data needed for making valid risk assessments. The U.S. EPA total human exposure research program includes: development of measurement methods and instruments, development of exposure models and statistical protocols, microenvironmental field studies, total human exposure studies, validation of human exposure models with empirical data, and dosage research investigations.

Wayne Ott; Lance Wallace; David Mage; Gerald Akland; Robert Lewis; Harold Sauls; Charles Rodes; David Kleffman; Donna Kuroda; Karen Morehouse

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Tissue-to-blood distribution coefficients in the rat: Utility for estimation of the volume of distribution in man  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A compilation of rat tissue-to-blood partition coefficient data obtained both in vitro and in vivo in thirteen different tissues for a total of 309 different drugs is presented. An evaluation of the relationship between several fundamental physicochemical molecular descriptors and these distribution parameters was made. In addition, the ability to predict the Human Volume of distribution by regression analysis and by a Physiologically-based approach was also tested. Results have shown different trends between the drug classes and tissues, consistent with earlier described relationships between physicochemical properties and pharmacokinetic behavior. It was also possible to conclude for the acceptable ability to predict the volume of distribution in Humans by both regression and mechanistic approaches, which suggests that this type of data represents a convenient tool to describe the drug distribution on a new drug development context. These observations and analyses, along with the large database of rat tissue distribution data, should enable future efforts aimed toward developing a full in silico quantitative structure–pharmacokinetic relationships and improving our understanding of the correlations between fundamental chemical characteristics and drug distribution.

Paulo Paixão; Natália Aniceto; Luís F. Gouveia; José A.G. Morais

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quantitative differences in tissue surface tension influence zebrafish germ layer positioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative differences in tissue surface tension influence zebrafish germ layer positioning Eva surface tension, influences spatial positioning between zebrafish germ layer tissues. We show correlates with differences in tissue surface tension. We also show that germ layer tissues from untreated

Jülicher, Frank

300

Introduction Uniform Estimates for Transmission Problems 3D Multiscaled Asymptotic Expansion Numerical Simulations Skin-Effect Description in Electromagnetism with a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Simulations Skin-Effect Description in Electromagnetism with a Scaled Asymptotic Expansion Gabriel.08.2009 V. P´eron Skin-Effect Description in Electromagnetism with a Scaled Asymptotic Expansion 1 / 32 and Electromagnetism MONIQUE DAUGE, ERWAN FAOU, VICTOR P ´ERON (2009) Asymptotic Behavior at High Conductivity of Skin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Three-dimensional printing of tissue phantoms for biophotonic imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the potential of tissue phantoms fabricated with thermosoftening- and photopolymerization-based three-dimensional (3D) printers for use in evaluation of...

Wang, Jianting; Coburn, James; Liang, Chia-Pin; Woolsey, Nicholas; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Chen, Yu; Pfefer, T Joshua

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

On the microscopic origin of light scattering in tissue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding the nature of light scattering within tissue is a crucial issue for development of medical imaging techniques. Microscopic measurements of static light-scattering...

Kaplan, Peter; Weissman, Jesse; Hancewicz, Tom; Popp, Alois; Weitz, David

303

ACES: Evaluation of Tissue Response to Inhaled 2007-Compliant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Tissue Response to Inhaled 2007-Compliant Diesel Exhaust Results of health effects testing on rodents during Phase 3 of the ACES study produced minimal...

304

Oxygen Delivery Strategies in Tissue-Engineering Constructs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The supply of nutrients and the removal of waste products play a major role in tissue engineering. From all the nutrients necessary for cells seeded… (more)

Seifu, Dawit Gezahegn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the iron associated with fossil tissues, which occurred primarily as the mineral goethite. They then employed experiments to show that iron, derived from hemoglobin lysate,...

306

Cancer field effects in normal tissues revealed by Raman spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that the presence of cancer results in detectable changes to uninvolved tissues, collectively termed cancer field effects (CFE). In this study, we directly...

Lieber, Chad A; Nethercott, Hubert E; Kabeer, Mustafa H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Human-machine interactions  

SciTech Connect

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

Pigments in Avocado Tissue and Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Institute of Food, Nutrition & Human Health, Massey University, Private Bag 102-904, Auckland, The Horticulture and Food Research Institute of New Zealand, Fitzherbert Science Centre, Private Bag 11 030, Palmerston North, and The Horticulture and Food Research Institute of New Zealand, Mt. ... A Minolta Chromameter (CR300, Minolta, Osaka, light source D65; white calibration plate) was used to measure lightness, chroma, and hue angles at three points around the equator of the whole fruit. ... Extraction of carotenoids was carried out under yellow lighting to minimize degradation. ...

Ofelia B. O. Ashton; Marie Wong; Tony K. McGhie; Rosheila Vather; Yan Wang; Cecilia Requejo-Jackman; Padmaja Ramankutty; Allan B. Woolf

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

309

Quantification of total mercury in liver and heart tissue of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) from Alaska USA  

SciTech Connect

This study quantified the Hg levels in the liver (n=98) and heart (n=43) tissues of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) (n=102) harvested from Prince William Sound and Kodiak Island Alaska. Mercury tissue dry weight (dw) concentrations in the liver ranged from 1.7 to 393 ppm dw, and in the heart from 0.19 to 4.99 ppm dw. Results of this study indicate liver and heart tissues' Hg ppm dw concentrations significantly increase with age. Male Harbor Seals bioaccumulated Hg in both their liver and heart tissues at a significantly faster rate than females. The liver Hg bioaccumulation rates between the harvest locations Kodiak Island and Prince William Sound were not found to be significantly different. On adsorption Hg is transported throughout the Harbor Seal's body with the partition coefficient higher for the liver than the heart. No significant differences in the bio-distribution (liver:heart Hg ppm dw ratios (n=38)) values were found with respect to either age, sex or geographic harvest location. In this study the age at which Hg liver and heart bioaccumulation levels become significantly distinct in male and female Harbor Seals were identified through a Tukey's analysis. Of notably concern to human health was a male Harbor Seal's liver tissue harvested from Kodiak Island region. Mercury accumulation in this sample tissue was determined through a Q-test to be an outlier, having far higher Hg concentrarion (liver 392 Hg ppm dw) than the general population sampled. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury accumulation in the liver and heart of seals exceed food safety guidelines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accumulation rate is greater in males than females with age. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Liver mercury accumulation is greater than in the heart tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury determination by USA EPA Method 7473 using thermal decomposition.

Marino, Kady B. [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Hoover-Miller, Anne; Conlon, Suzanne; Prewitt, Jill [Alaska SeaLife Center, City of Seward, AK (United States)] [Alaska SeaLife Center, City of Seward, AK (United States); O'Shea, Stephen K., E-mail: soshea@rwu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy-dependence of skin-mode fraction in $E1$ excitations of neutron-rich nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have extensively investigated characters of the low-energy $E1$ strengths in $N>Z$ nuclei, by analyzing the transition densities obtained by the HF+RPA calculations with several effective interactions. Crossover behavior has been confirmed, from the skin mode at low energy to the $pn$ mode at higher energy. Decomposing the $E1$ strengths into the skin-mode, $pn$-mode and interference fractions, we show that the ratio of the skin-mode strength to the full strength may be regarded as a generic function of the excitation energy, insensitive to nuclides and effective interactions, particularly beyond Ni.

Nakada, H; Sawai, H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins in Human Breast Cancer Tissue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Finnish Cancer Association, Nordiska Insulinfonden, Finsk-Norsk Stiftelse and Livoch Halsa. Fredrika Pekonen 2 Tuulikki Nyman...Fin nish Cancer Association, Nordiska Insulinfonden. Finsk-Norsk Stiftelse and Liv och Halsa. 2To whom requests for reprints...

Fredrika Pekonen; Tuulikki Nyman; Vesa Ilvesmäki; Seppo Partanen

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Magnetic iron compounds in the human brain: a comparison of tumour and hippocampal tissue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) with a sensitivity level of 10Am2. The IRM was acquired in an ASC Scientific Pulse Magnetizer Model IM-10-30, in which the sample was exposed to a pulsed DC field, as follows. First, a pulse of 1T was applied...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigations of Human Neoplastic and Abnormal Nonneoplastic Tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Tumor Detection by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Science. ///: 1151 1153, 1971...Potassium (39K) Nuclear Magnetic Reso nance: Spin Signatures...Cancer in Vivo by Nuclear Magnetic- Resonance. Science. 178: 1288 1290. 1972...

Joseph C. Eggleston; Leon A. Saryan; and Donald P. Hollis

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cold but not sympathomimetics activates human brown adipose tissue in vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high density of both nerves and blood vessels (6), providing two general approaches to activate...system, metabolic parameters, and oxygen consumption (27, 31). We now demonstrate...glucose. Any active BAT using a different fuel, or inactive BAT, would not be measured...

Aaron M. Cypess; Yih-Chieh Chen; Cathy Sze; Ke Wang; Jeffrey English; Onyee Chan; Ashley R. Holman; Ilan Tal; Matthew R. Palmer; Gerald M. Kolodny; C. Ronald Kahn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Reactivity of atropaldehyde, a felbamate metabolite in human liver tissue in vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

( 0 2 ) 0 0 0 5 8 - 3 #12;of this class of compounds, acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), are known

Crawford, T. Daniel

316

SciTech Connect: Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Publication Date: 2013-09-09 OSTI Identifier: 1092072 Report Number(s): DOEER64341-4 DOE Contract Number: FG02-07ER64341 Resource Type: Technical Report Data Type: Research...

317

Beyond differential expression : methods and tools for mining the transcriptomic landscape of human tissue and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although there are a variety of high-throughput technologies used to perform biological experiments, DNA microarrays have become a standard tool in the modern biologist's arsenal. Microarray experiments provide measurements ...

Schmid, Patrick R. (Patrick Raphael)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Regulation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase from human lung tissue by nucleosides and nucleotides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, was thawed, cut into small pieces and rinsed with buffer containing 10mN MgC12, 4mM g-mercaptoethanol and 50mN Tris/HC1, pH 7. 5. It was then homogenized in 3 volumes oi' the same buffer for 2 min in a Haring blender. The homogenate was centrifuged for 30... were collected in 1. 3 ml volumes. All purification steps were performed at 4 C. Protein Determination ? Protein concentrations were approximated by determining the ab"orbance at 280 nm and assuming that a lmg/ml solution has an sbsorbance of 1...

Glass, William Fredrick

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Artificial neural networks for processing fluorescence spectroscopy data in skin cancer diagnostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the years various optical spectroscopic techniques have been widely used as diagnostic tools in the discrimination of many types of malignant diseases. Recently, synchronous fluorescent spectroscopy (SFS) coupled with chemometrics has been applied in cancer diagnostics. The SFS method involves simultaneous scanning of both emission and excitation wavelengths while keeping the interval of wavelengths (constant-wavelength mode) or frequencies (constant-energy mode) between them constant. This method is fast, relatively inexpensive, sensitive and non-invasive. Total synchronous fluorescence spectra of normal skin, nevus and melanoma samples were used as input for training of artificial neural networks. Two different types of artificial neural networks were trained, the self-organizing map and the feed-forward neural network. Histopathology results of investigated skin samples were used as the gold standard for network output. Based on the obtained classification success rate of neural networks, we concluded that both networks provided high sensitivity with classification errors between 2 and 4%.

L Lenhardt; I Zekovi?; T Drami?anin; M D Drami?anin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Influence of the single-particle structure on the nuclear surface and the neutron skin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the influence of the single-particle structure on the neutron density distribution and the neutron skin in Ca, Ni, Zr, Sn, and Pb isotopes. The nucleon density distributions are calculated in the Hartree-Fock+BCS approach with the SLy4 Skyrme force. A close correlation is found between the quantum numbers of the valence neutrons and the changes in the position and the diffuseness of the nuclear surface, which in turn affect the neutron skin thickness. Neutrons in the valence orbitals with low principal quantum number and high angular momentum mainly displace the position of the neutron surface outwards, while neutrons with high principal quantum number and low angular momentum basically increase the diffuseness of the neutron surface. The impact of the valence shell neutrons on the tail of the neutron density distribution is discussed.

M. Warda; M. Centelles; X. Vinas; X. Roca-Maza

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of Ion Skin Depth on Relaxation of Merging Spheromaks to a Field-Reversed Configuration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of ion skin depth on the relaxation of merging spheromaks to a field-reversed configuration (FRC) is studied experimentally for a wide range of size parameter S* (ratio of minor radius to ion skin depth) from 1 to 7. The two merging spheromaks are observed to relax to an FRC or a new spheromak depending on whether the initial poloidal eigenvalue is smaller or larger than a threshold value. The bifurcation value is found to increase with decreasing size parameter S*, indicating that the low-S* condition provides a wide bifurcated range of relaxation to an FRC. The FRC-style relaxation under the low-S* conditions was accompanied by the suppression of the low-n modes (n is the toroidal mode number) activity. The fast rotations of the modes were followed by suppression of the low-n modes.

Eiichirou Kawamori and Yasushi Ono

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

THERMAL SKIN DAMAGE AND MOBILE PHONE USE Elmountacer Billah Elabbassi(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL SKIN DAMAGE AND MOBILE PHONE USE Elmountacer Billah Elabbassi(1) , René de Sèze(2) (1 sensation of thé cheek. Thèse symptoms may be due to thermal insulation, conduction of thé heat produced in thé phone by thé battery currents and running of thé radiofrequency (RF) electronic circuits

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

323

Dose profiles through the dermis for on and off-skin hot particle exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reports measurements of depth-dose profiles for on- and off-skin hot particle exposures using radiochromic dye film. Dose profiles from both a "Co hot particle, and activated depleted uranium oxide microspheres were measured with the film. Exposures.... The thickness of the hot particle was approximately 250 ym. The other type of hot particle used in this project was fabricated at the Nuclear Science Center INSC) at Texas AIIrM University. For these sources, depleted uranium oxide microspheres were activated...

Shaw, Kimberly Rochelle

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mobilization of Circulating Vascular Progenitors in Cancer Patients Receiving External Beam Radiation in Response to Tissue Injury  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Endothelial-like vascular progenitor cells (VPCs) are associated with the repair of ischemic tissue injury in several clinical settings. Because the endothelium is a principal target of radiation injury, VPCs may be important in limiting toxicity associated with radiotherapy (RT) in patients with cancer. Methods and Materials: We studied 30 patients undergoing RT for skin cancer (n = 5), head-and-neck cancer (n = 15), and prostate cancer (n = 10) prospectively, representing a wide range of irradiated mucosal volumes. Vascular progenitor cell levels were enumerated from peripheral blood at baseline, midway through RT, at the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after radiation. Acute toxicity was graded at each time point by use of the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: Significant increases in the proportion of CD34{sup +}/CD133{sup +} VPCs were observed after completion of RT, from 0.012% at baseline to 0.048% (p = 0.029), and the increase in this subpopulation was most marked in patients with Grade 2 peak toxicity or greater after RT (p = 0.034). Similarly, CD34{sup +}/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-positive VPCs were increased after the completion of radiation therapy in comparison to baseline (from 0.014% to 0.027%, p = 0.043), and there was a trend toward greater mobilization in patients with more significant toxicity (p = 0.08). The mobilization of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem cells did not increase after treatment (p = 0.58), and there was no relationship with toxicity. Conclusions: We suggest that VPCs may play an important role in reducing radiation-induced tissue damage. Interventions that increase baseline VPC levels or enhance their mobilization and recruitment in response to RT may prove useful in facilitating more rapid and complete tissue healing.

Allan, David S. [Ottawa Health Research Institute, Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: daallan@ohri.ca; Morgan, Scott C. [Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Birch, Paul E.; Yang, Lin; Halpenny, Michael J. [Stem Cell Processing Laboratory, Canadian Blood Services, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Gunanayagam, Angelo; Li Yuhua [Ottawa Health Research Institute, Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Eapen, Libni [Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Simulation Modeling of Growing Tissues Colin Smith and Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation Modeling of Growing Tissues Colin Smith and Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz University from new viewpoints by Giavitto and Michel (the MGS system), and Smith et al. (the vv system). Here we. Reference Colin Smith and Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz. Simulation Modeling of Growing Tissues. In Proceedings

Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

326

Molecular Cell Tissue-Specific Splicing of Disordered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Cell Article Tissue-Specific Splicing of Disordered Segments that Embed Binding Motifs Rewires Protein Interaction Networks Marija Buljan,1,2,* Guilhem Chalancon,1 Sebastian Eustermann,1 Gunter diversity of proteins. Among alternatively spliced exons, tissue-specific exons play a critical role

Babu, M. Madan

327

Williams Syndrome Tissue Donor Information and Registration Packet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for by The Salk Institute for Biological Studies and University of Maryland Brain and Tissue Bank. All major are donating the key to that treasure to future generations. Dr. Rodriguez , NICHD Brain Bank, Miami We would and families to make precious brain tissue available to scientists in order to advance Williams syndrome

Bellugi, Ursula

328

DISTRIBUTED, WEB-BASED MICROSTRUCTURE DATABASE FOR BRAIN TISSUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTED, WEB-BASED MICROSTRUCTURE DATABASE FOR BRAIN TISSUE A Thesis by WONRYULL KOH Submitted-BASED MICROSTRUCTURE DATABASE FOR BRAIN TISSUE A Thesis by WONRYULL KOH Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial) __________________________ Ian S. Russell (Member) __________________________ Wei Zhao (Head of Department

329

3D printing facilitated scaffold-free tissue unit fabrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing microdroplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit microdroplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell–cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation.

Yu Tan; Dylan J Richards; Thomas C Trusk; Richard P Visconti; Michael J Yost; Mark S Kindy; Christopher J Drake; William Scott Argraves; Roger R Markwald; Ying Mei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

you sneeze or cough; cough or sneeze into a tissue and dispose of used tissues. Wash your hands after sneezing or coughing. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Avoid others with respiratory illnesses/or cough stuffy nose and /or chills headache, body aches, and /or fatigue Some people with H1N1 flu also

Salama, Khaled

331

A density-independent glass transition in biological tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cells must move through tissues in many important biological processes, including embryonic development, cancer metastasis, and wound healing. In these tissues, a cell's motion is often strongly constrained by its neighbors, leading to glassy dynamics. Recent work has demonstrated the existence of a non-equilibrium glass transition in self-propelled particle models for active matter, where the transition is driven by changes in density. However, this may not explain liquid-to-solid transitions in confluent tissues, where there are no gaps between cells and the packing fraction remains fixed and equal to unity. Here we demonstrate the existence of a different type of glass transition that occurs in the well-studied vertex model for confluent tissue monolayers. In this model, the onset of rigidity is governed by changes to single-cell properties such as cell-cell adhesion, cortical tension, and volume compressibility, providing an explanation for a liquid-to-solid transitions in confluent tissues.

Bi, Dapeng; Schwarz, J M; Manning, M Lisa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Cognitive Science (Humanities)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive Science (Humanities) The University of Edinburgh College of Humanities and Social Science: Cognitive Science (Humanities) BSc Honours in: Cognitive Science Please see separate information sheets the disciplines that contribute to the study of human cognition. The Cognitive Science programme at Edinburgh

Schnaufer, Achim

333

Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid and related nutrients on plasma lipids, and skin and hair coat condition in canines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phospholipid fatty acids were determined at each collection period. Serum zinc concentrations were analyzed on wk 12, 14, and 24. The hypothesis was that a diet containing increased LA, ALA, and zinc concentrations (diet C) would show improvements of skin...

Hester, Shaleah Lynnae

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Identifying Latent Classes of Adults at Risk for Skin Cancer Based on Constitutional Risk and Sun Protection Behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these habits were greater for those with higher...skin cancer. The classes seemed to represent...numbers indicating greater risk in the class (Tables 1 and 2...higher risk reported greater sun protection practices. Latent Class Validation The LCA...

Alana D. Steffen; Karen Glanz; and Lynne R. Wilkens

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Low-temperature atmospheric plasma increases the expression of anti-aging genes of skin cells without causing cellular damages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to employ various types of plasma in the field of skin care have increased consistently because it can regulate many biochemical reactions that are normally unaffected by light-based therapy. One metho...

Jeong-Hae Choi; Hyun-Wook Lee; Jae-Koo Lee…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A soil moisture assimilation scheme using satellite-retrieved skin temperature in meso-scale weather forecast model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermodynamically consistent soil moisture assimilation scheme for clear sky and snow free conditions has been developed for the meso-scale modeling system in the Arctic region by using satellite-derived skin temperatures. Parallel control and sensitivity modeling experiments were designed and their results demonstrated that the assimilation scheme successfully improves the soil moistures that were deliberately perturbed initially, indicating capability of the scheme to correct bias in the soil moisture initialization. Moreover, the resultant benefit of this assimilation scheme does not only lie in the improvement of soil moisture; the skin temperature also consequently exhibits improvements in a thermodynamic consistency. A real application of the assimilation scheme with satellite-retrieved skin temperature exhibited noticeable positive impacts on the modeling simulation and weather forecast; the model obviously captured meso-scale features of soil moistures as well as the skin temperatures. The warming tendency bias in original model simulations was removed to a considerable extent by this assimilation scheme.

Jing Zhang; Xiangdong Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Quantitative studies of rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox: venom, venom fractions, and rabbit antivenom: Lethality, skin sensitivity, and antibody characterization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF RATTLESNAKE (CROTALUS ATROX) VENOM, VENOM FRACTIONS, AND RABBIT ANTIVENOM: LETHALITY, SKIN SENSITIVITY, AND ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION A Thesis By RICHARD PATTON BRADBURY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas...: LETHALITY, SKIN SENSITIVITY, AND ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION A Thesis By RICHARD PATTON BRADBURY Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Q(cf f. 4&a (Member) (Coordinator, Space Medicine (Member) Program and Member) August 1967...

Bradbury, Richard Patton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Microfluidics for Tissue and Cell Applications JST CREST, "Cell and Tissue Showcasing by Micro-Nano Integrated Devices" Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidics for Tissue and Cell Applications JST CREST, "Cell and Tissue Showcasing by Micro-Nano Integrated Devices" Project JST-VINNOVA/SSF SICP, "Microfluidic Cancer Diagnosis Platform" Project JST ERATO 2 : Prof. Shuichi Takayama (University of Michigan) "Microfluidic Tools to Model and Analyze

Tokyo, University of

339

CT volumetry of the skeletal tissues  

SciTech Connect

Computed tomography (CT) is an important and widely used modality in the diagnosis and treatment of various cancers. In the field of molecular radiotherapy, the use of spongiosa volume (combined tissues of the bone marrow and bone trabeculae) has been suggested as a means to improve the patient-specificity of bone marrow dose estimates. The noninvasive estimation of an organ volume comes with some degree of error or variation from the true organ volume. The present study explores the ability to obtain estimates of spongiosa volume or its surrogate via manual image segmentation. The variation among different segmentation raters was explored and found not to be statistically significant (p value >0.05). Accuracy was assessed by having several raters manually segment a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe with known volumes. Segmentation of the outer region of the PVC pipe resulted in mean percent errors as great as 15% while segmentation of the pipe's inner region resulted in mean percent errors within {approx}5%. Differences between volumes estimated with the high-resolution CT data set (typical of ex vivo skeletal scans) and the low-resolution CT data set (typical of in vivo skeletal scans) were also explored using both patient CT images and a PVC pipe phantom. While a statistically significant difference (p value <0.002) between the high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was observed with excised femoral heads obtained following total hip arthroplasty, the mean difference between high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was found to be only 1.24 and 2.18 cm{sup 3} for spongiosa and cortical bone, respectively. With respect to differences observed with the PVC pipe, the variation between the high-resolution and low-resolution mean percent errors was a high as {approx}20% for the outer region volume estimates and only as high as {approx}6% for the inner region volume estimates. The findings from this study suggest that manual segmentation is a reasonably accurate and reliable means for the in vivo estimation of spongiosa volume. This work also provides a foundation for future studies where spongiosa volumes are estimated by various raters in more comprehensive CT data sets.

Brindle, James M.; Alexandre Trindade, A.; Pichardo, Jose C.; Myers, Scott L.; Shah, Amish P.; Bolch, Wesley E. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Statistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

How ticks get under your skin: insertion mechanics of the feeding apparatus of Ixodes ricinus ticks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ratchet actions by itself, penetration, deformation and anchoring...porcupine quill enable easy tissue penetration and difficult removal. Proc...and D Po-Chedley. 1949 Rate of penetration of a porcupine spine. J. Mammal...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Regeneration of Tissues and Organs Using Autologous Cells  

SciTech Connect

The proposed work aims to address three major challenges to the field of regenerative medicine: 1) the growth and expansion of regenerative cells outside the body in controlled in vitro environments, 2) supportive vascular supply for large tissue engineered constructs, and 3) interactive biomaterials that can orchestrate tissue development in vivo. Toward this goal, we have engaged a team of scientists with expertise in cell and molecular biology, physiology, biomaterials, controlled release, nanomaterials, tissue engineering, bioengineering, and clinical medicine to address all three challenges. This combination of resources, combined with the vast infrastructure of the WFIRM, have brought to bear on projects to discover and test new sources of autologous cells that can be used therapeutically, novel methods to improve vascular support for engineered tissues in vivo, and to develop intelligent biomaterials and bioreactor systems that interact favorably with stem and progenitor cells to drive tissue maturation. The Instituteâ??s ongoing programs are aimed at developing regenerative medicine technologies that employ a patientâ??s own cells to help restore or replace tissue and organ function. This DOE program has provided a means to solve some of the vexing problems that are germane to many tissue engineering applications, regardless of tissue type or target disease. By providing new methods that are the underpinning of tissue engineering, this program facilitated advances that can be applied to conditions including heart disease, diabetes, renal failure, nerve damage, vascular disease, and cancer, to name a few. These types of conditions affect millions of Americans at a cost of more than $400 billion annually. Regenerative medicine holds the promise of harnessing the bodyâ??s own power to heal itself. By addressing the fundamental challenges of this field in a comprehensive and focused fashion, this DOE program has opened new opportunities to treat conditions where other approaches have failed.

Anthony Atala, M.D.

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

Humanity’s unsustainable environmental footprint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biodiversity loss or effects on human health or...billion m 3 /year (average for 1996 to 2005...billion m 3 /year (average for 1996 to...emissions from fossil fuels—part of humanity...products in their price—for example, by...The EF of the average global citizen...so-called rebound effect (44). Profound...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Thomas O. Wiedmann

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development of computational and experimental tools to study mechanotransduction in C.elegans and primates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When an object comes into contact with the human fingertip, surface loads imposed on the fingerpad are transmitted to thousands of specialized nerve endings embedded in the skin tissue. These nerve endings, called ...

Kumar, Siddarth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein ...

Spector, Myron

345

Decellularized cartilage as a chondroinductive material for cartilage tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials as scaffold components could potentially bridge the gap between scaffolds and signals in the traditional tissue engineering triad, suggesting that the two are not modulated as separate components, but rather as integrated factors that contribute...

Renth, Amanda

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Perfused multiwell plate for 3D liver tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In vitro models that capture the complexity of in vivo tissue and organ behaviors in a scalable and easy-to-use format are desirable for drug discovery. To address this, we have developed a bioreactor that fosters maintenance ...

Domansky, Karel

347

Automation of single-cell techniques in neural tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The highly heterogeneous nature of cells in the context of native tissue environments necessitates the development of tools and techniques that can manipulate and analyze samples with single-cell resolution. While the past ...

Steinmeyer, Joseph D. (Joseph Daly)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Distribution and metabolism of antibodies and macromolecules in tumor tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tumor targeting drugs that selectively treat cancerous tissue are promising agents for lowering the morbidity and mortality of cancer. Within this field, antibody treatments for cancer are currently being developed for ...

Thurber, Greg M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Novel polypyrrole derivatives to enhance conductive polymer-tissue interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing materials that interact effectively with surrounding tissue is a major obstacle in sensor and drug delivery research. The body's natural immune response prevents foreign objects from easily integrating with an ...

George, Paul M. (Paul Matthew)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Collagen scaffolds and injectable biopolymer gels for cardiac tissue engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds have begun to shown promise for cell delivery for cardiac tissue engineering. Although various polymers and material forms have been explored, there is a need for: injectable gels ...

Ng, Karen Kailin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

BE.410J Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include: structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic ...

Kamm, Roger D.

352

Driving tissue morphogenetic cascades using tunable nanolayered surface coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harnessing the synergy between materials at the nanoscale can be a valuable tool in understanding and probing cellular phenomena and in driving specific processes that lead to tissue and organ regeneration and repair. ...

Shah, Nisarg Jaydeep

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sequence motifs predictive of tissue-specific skipping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative splicing plays a major role in protein diversity and regulating gene expression. Motifs that regulate tissue-specific alternative splicing have been identified by groups studying small sets of genes. We introduce ...

Soni, Neha

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Photocrosslinkable Kappa-Carrageenan Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kappa carrageenan (?-CA) is a natural-origin polymer that closely mimics the glycosaminoglycan structure, one of the most important constituents of native tissues extracellular matrix. Previously, it has been shown that ...

Mihaila, Silvia M.

355

Performance Assessment of Bi-Directional Knotless Tissue-Closure Devices in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters, 2009 - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to assess the performance of bi-directional knotless tissue-closure devices for use in tagging juvenile salmon. This study is part of an ongoing effort at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to reduce unwanted effects of tags and tagging procedures on the survival and behavior of juvenile salmonids, by assessing and refining suturing techniques, suture materials, and tag burdens. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of the knotless (barbed) suture, using three different suture patterns (treatments: 6-point, Wide “N”, Wide “N” Knot), to the current method of suturing (MonocrylTM monofilament, discontinuous sutures with a 2×2×2×2 knot) used in monitoring and research programs with a novel antiseptic barrier on the wound (“Second Skin”).

Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Bryson, Amanda J.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Osteochondral Interface Tissue Engineering using Macroscopic Gradients of Physicochemical Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tissue interfaces. Yet, just because tissues are separated from one another by type, function, location, or anatomical prevalence, does not necessarily mean that the interfaces are as easily distinguishable, as the interfaces themselves are highly complex... not yield a “true” continuous gradient, it can have many discrete advantages over continuous gradients. Because of the inherent discontinuous fabrication methods (developing sections separately and fusing together), however, design effort must be placed...

Dormer, Nathan Henry

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modification of the fatty acid composition of bovine tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODIFICATION OF THE FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF BOVINE TISSUES A Thesis by JOYCE CHANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1990 Major Subject: Nutrition MODIFICATION OF THE FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF BOVINE TISSUES A Thesis by JOYCE CHANG Approved as to style and content by: Stephen B. Smith (Chair of Committee) Barbara O' Brien (Member) aren S. Kubena (Member...

Chang, Joyce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Programming with human computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amazon's Mechanical Turk provides a programmatically accessible micro-task market, allowing a program to hire human workers. This has opened the door to a rich field of research in human computation where programs orchestrate ...

Little, Greg (Danny Greg)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Measurement of photodynamic therapy drug concentrations in a tissue  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an experimental treatment modality for cancer in which a photoactive molecule with an affinity for tumors in administered to the patient, then excited by light. Photoactivation creates singlet oxygen consequently killing the tissue. Knowledge of the concentration of the photoactive compound in the tissue is necessary for proper light dosimetry during PDT. Presently, the control of light application is problematic. If too much light is applied, damage to the surrounding tissue will occur. If insufficient light is applied, the targeted tissue volume will remain viable. The ideal implementation of PDT would use a feedback system for light delivery that incorporates the optical properties of the tissue and knowledge of the concentration of the photoactive compound. This project sought to develop a method for measuring photosensitizer concentrations in tissue phantoms that will lead to a noninvasive, endoscopically compatible, in vivo method of measuring PST drug concentrations.

Mourant, J.; Biglo, I.; Johnson, T.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Is humanity sustainable?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...size, CO2 production, energy use, biomass consumption...Humans| Is humanity sustainable? | The principles and...CO(2) production, energy use, biomass consumption...Resources Ecosystem Energy-Generating Resources...November 2003 Is humanity sustainable? Charles W. Fowler1...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

Rambaut, Andrew

362

Biomedical Ethics & Medical Humanities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

List Sample Elective Courses Arts & Humanities Medical Scholars: Student Projects #12;2 What is BEMHBEMH Biomedical Ethics & Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration Stanford University School? The Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration is part of the new initiative at Stanford

Ford, James

363

Human Genetics Portfolio Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in providing the assessments of the Wellcome Trust's role in supporting human genetics and have informed `our to maximise the health benefits of research into the human genome remains a core component of the WellcomeHuman Genetics 1990­2009 June 2010 Portfolio Review #12;The Wellcome Trust is a charity registered

Rambaut, Andrew

364

Enhanced Electroporation in Plant Tissues via Low Frequency Pulsed Electric Fields: Influence of Cytoplasmic Streaming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced Electroporation in Plant Tissues via Low Frequency Pulsed Electric Fields: Influence (wileyonlinelibrary.com). Pulsed electric fields (PEF) are known to be effective at permeabilizing plant tissues: cytoplasmic streaming, molecular motor proteins, plant tissue integrity, viability staining, conductivity

Ristenpart, William

365

Development of a high throughput 3D perfused liver tissue bioreactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development of a device designed for culturing liver tissue in a 3D perfused environment. Cells form tissue inside miniature channels of a scaffold, and the tissue is perfused with culture medium ...

Inman, Samuel Walker

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Human Research ProgramHuman Research Program Human System Risk in Exploration and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human System Risks in Exploration Missions 21SEP10 2HRP Risk Process ­ D.Grounds Presentation contentsHuman Research ProgramHuman Research Program Human System Risk in Exploration and the Human Research Program 21SEP10 1HRP Risk Process ­ D Grounds #12;Human Research ProgramHuman Research Program

Waliser, Duane E.

367

Early mucosal responses in blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) skin to Aeromonas hydrophila infection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bacterial pathogens are well-equipped to detect, adhere to, and initiate infection in their finfish hosts. The mucosal surfaces of fish, such as the skin, function as the front line of defense against such bacterial insults that are routinely encountered in the aquatic environment. While recent progress has been made, and despite the obvious importance of mucosal surfaces, the precise molecular events that occur soon after encountering bacterial pathogens remain unclear. Indeed, these early events are critical in mounting appropriate responses that ultimately determine host survival or death. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional consequences of a virulent Aeromonas hydrophila challenge in the skin of blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus. We utilized an 8×60K Agilent microarray to examine gene expression profiles at key early timepoints following challenge (2 h, 12 h, and 24 h). A total of 1155 unique genes were significantly altered during at least one timepoint. We observed dysregulation in a number of genes involved in diverse pathways including those involved in antioxidant responses, apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, immunity, and extracellular matrix protein diversity and regulation. Taken together, A. hydrophila coordinately modulates mucosal factors across numerous cellular pathways in a manner predicted to enhance its ability to adhere to and infect the blue catfish host.

Chao Li; Benjamin Beck; Baofeng Su; Jeffery Terhune; Eric Peatman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Dutch Human Geography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human geography in the Dutch academia distinguishes itself from human geography in other continental European countries. It has developed a strong applied focus and an orientation which forms a bridge between continental European approaches in human Geography and the Anglo-Saxon human geography. The motor of this development has been the rivalry between the Amsterdam School of Sociography and the more French oriented Utrecht School of human geography. In recent times Dutch academic geography has found her way back from the more applied modes of thought to more theoretically informed debates, to which she contributes substantially.

H. Ernste; L. Smith

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

An infrared thermographic and laser doppler flowmetric investigation of skin perfusion in the forearm and finger tip : following a short period of vascular stasis .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of Infrared Thermography to diagnose circulatory problems in the hands is based upon the assumption that a change in skin temperature can be… (more)

Stikbakke, Einar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - alters tissue differentiation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the stomach: differentiating dysplasia from normal tissue Summary: (Mahadevan-Jansen and Richards-Kortum, 1996). For differentiation of normal and precancerous tissues,...

371

Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption...

372

INVESTIGATION OF BUBBLE DYNAMICS AND HEATING DURING FOCUSED ULTRASOUND INSONATION IN TISSUE-MIMICKING MATERIALS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The deposition of ultrasonic energy in tissue can cause tissue damage due to local heating. For pressures above a critical threshold, cavitation will occur in… (more)

Yang, Xinmai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

ORISE: Human Subjects Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Protection Human Subjects Protection The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs technical assessments to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories involved in human subjects research projects. Under DOE Order and Policy 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, and 10 CFR 745, DOE employees and contractors are expected to protect the rights and welfare of human research subjects. In support of the DOE Office of Science and the Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP), ORISE has most recently assisted with the development and distribution of tools to address classified research and to track potential human social cultural behavior systems (HSCB) research conducted by DOE laboratories. Examples of products that ORISE has developed in support of the HSPP

374

Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Concentrations of Heavy Metals in Selected Tissues of Blue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Persian Gulf supports diverse ecosystems and biota in need of remediation and protection and metal data from this region is needed. The levels of heavy metals (Fe, Hg, Ni and Pb) in tissues (hepatopancreas, muscle and exoskeleton) of blue swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus and sediments in the Persian Gulf coasts, south Iran were investigated. Heavy metals analysis was performed by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The concentration of heavy metals in sediments at all sampling stations occurs in descending order of Fe> Ni> Hg> Pb during both seasons. The distribution pattern of heavy metals in the tissues of crab and sediments was as follows: sediment> hepatopancreasn> muscle> exoskeleton. Maximum concentration of the total heavy metals in sediments and all tissues of P. pelagicus observes in Bahrekan station (Pheavy metals in the tissues of the crab P. pelagicus. In present study recorded that there was negligible differences in heavy metals levels between different seasons. Differences in heavy metals concentrations among the species is likely to have resulted from metal bioavailability, hydrodynamics of the environment, changes in tissue composition, stations of collection and sources of pollution within Persian Gulf.

Mehdi Hosseini; Afshin Abdi Bastami; Javad Kazemzadeh Khoei; Maryam Esmailian; Elmira Janmohammadi Songhori; Mina Najafzadeh

376

Cell resolved, multiparticle model of plastic tissue deformations and morphogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a three dimensional mechanical model of embryonic tissue dynamics. Mechanically coupled adherent cells are represented as particles interconnected with elastic beams which can exert non-central forces and torques. Tissue plasticity is modeled by a stochastic process consisting of a connectivity change (addition or removal of a single link) followed by a complete relaxation to mechanical equilibrium. In particular, we assume that (i) two non-connected, but adjacent particles can form a new link; and (ii) the lifetime of links is reduced by tensile forces. We demonstrate that the proposed model yields a realistic macroscopic elasto-plastic behavior and we establish how microscopic model parameters affect the material properties at the macroscopic scale. Based on these results, microscopic parameter values can be inferred from tissue thickness, macroscopic elastic modulus and the magnitude and dynamics of intercellular adhesion forces. In addition to their mechanical role, model particles can also act...

Czirok, Andras

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Optoacoustic laser monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues  

SciTech Connect

Real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues, cells, and other biological objects with a high spatial and time resolution, which is necessary for selective destruction of cancer and benign tumours during cryotherapy, as well as for preventing any damage to the structure and functioning of biological objects in cryobiology, is considered. The optoacoustic method, based on the measurement and analysis of acoustic waves induced by short laser pulses, is proposed for monitoring the cooling and freezing of the tissue. The effect of cooling and freezing on the amplitude and time profile of acoustic signals generated in real tissues and in a model object is studied. The experimental results indicate that the optoacoustic laser technique can be used for real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of biological objects with a submillimeter spatial resolution and a high contrast. (laser biology and medicine)

Larin, Kirill V; Larina, I V; Motamedi, M; Esenaliev, R O [University of Texas, Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

ISSUE 1 | SPRING 2014 BRINGING CUTTING-EDGE SCIENCE INTO THE CLASSROOM UNDER YOUR SKIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more resources at www. wellcome.ac.uk/bigpicture/ proteins. inSide PROBING PROTEINS A numerical look to www.wellcome.ac.uk/bigpicture/ proteins for more teaching resources, including extra articles, useful. Mitochondrion Human egg Globular protein Uk argentina Bangladesh in human proteins are essential

Rambaut, Andrew

379

Contact List, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division Contact List Human Resources Guest, User, Visitor (GUV) Center Occupational Medicine Training and Qualifications Office Note: All listed phone extensions are in the format of (631) 344-xxxx. Human Resources Robert Lincoln, Chief Human Resources Officer x7435 rlincoln@bnl.gov Margaret Hughes x2108 hughes@bnl.gov Elizabeth Gilbert x2315 gilbert@bnl.gov Human Resources Generalists Christel Colon, HR Manager - BES, GARS & ELS x8469 ccolon@bnl.gov Joann Williams, HR Manager - Support Operations x8356 williamsj@bnl.gov Joanna Hall, HR Manager - Photon Sciences x4410 jhall@bnl.gov Donna Dowling, HR Manager - Nuclear & Particle Physics x2754 dowling@bnl.gov Terrence Buck x8715 tbuck@bnl.gov

380

Enrichment of selected fatty acids in broiler tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENRICHMENT OF SELECTED FATTY ACIDS IN BROILER TISSUES A Thesis by JIA-CHYI YAU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Study of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990... Major Subject: Food Science and Technology ENRICHMENT OF SELECTED FATTY ACIDS IN BROILER TISSUES A Thesis by JIA-CHYI YAU Approved as to style and content by A. R. Sams (Chair of Comittee) C. A. Bailey (Member) J. T Eeet n (M mber) R. Creg...

Yau, Jia-Chyi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or performed by DOE employees, addresses the protection of human subjects. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supports DOE in its efforts to protect...

382

EMSL - human health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

human-health en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and-labo...

383

The neutron skin in neutron-rich nuclei at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Jefferson Lab program to measure the symmetry energy of neutron-rich nuclear matter, using precision electroweak methods, is progressing well. The initial measurement by the PREX experiment, leading to a 2-sigma determination of the "neutron skin" in {sup 208}Pb , has been published. Design and preparation for a further, more-precise measurement on {sup 208}Pb is progressing well and there is general acceptance of the great advantage to a further measurement on {sup 48}Ca . The surprising ancillary result that the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry for {sup 208}Pb is consistent with zero is also now in the literature. This paper will discuss the current experimental situation of the program.

Dalton, Mark M. [JLAB

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

Dennis, J A

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Analysis of Conductor Impedances Accounting for Skin Effect and Nonlinear Permeability  

SciTech Connect

It is often necessary to protect sensitive electrical equipment from pulsed electric and magnetic fields. To accomplish this electromagnetic shielding structures similar to Faraday Cages are often implemented. If the equipment is inside a facility that has been reinforced with rebar, the rebar can be used as part of a lighting protection system. Unfortunately, such shields are not perfect and allow electromagnetic fields to be created inside due to discontinuities in the structure, penetrations, and finite conductivity of the shield. In order to perform an analysis of such a structure it is important to first determine the effect of the finite impedance of the conductors used in the shield. In this paper we will discuss the impedances of different cylindrical conductors in the time domain. For a time varying pulse the currents created in the conductor will have different spectral components, which will affect the current density due to skin effects. Many construction materials use iron and different types of steels that have a nonlinear permeability. The nonlinear material can have an effect on the impedance of the conductor depending on the B-H curve. Although closed form solutions exist for the impedances of cylindrical conductors made of linear materials, computational techniques are needed for nonlinear materials. Simulations of such impedances are often technically challenging due to the need for a computational mesh to be able to resolve the skin depths for the different spectral components in the pulse. The results of such simulations in the time domain will be shown and used to determine the impedances of cylindrical conductors for lightning current pulses that have low frequency content.

Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Speer, R D

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

Azzam, Edouard I

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

Beagle Dog Tissue Archive (previously part of National Radiobiology Archives): from the Janus Tissue Archive at Northwestern University  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Following the advent of the atomic age, many nations have investigated the effects of radioactive exposure in animal models. Some of these investigations involved costly and unique experiments that produced tissue and data archives which are unlikely to be reproduced. In an effort to extract the value from these collections, programs have started in Japan, Europe, and America to preserve and make public the data and tissues from these studies for further investigation. The Beagle Dog Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1952 to 1991 by Thomas Fritz, William Norris, and Tom Seed and supported by grants from the Atomic Energy Commission, investigated the effects of Cobalt-60 radiation on beagle dogs. Documentation from these studies is availible in pdf form. This web portal seeks to make accessible the animal tissues and study data from the Beagle Dog Experiments using data organized by Charles Watson. Use the search form to the left to look for dog data from particular experimental conditions. Click a dog number to return the full dog record. Use the dog record to find tissues of interest and make a sample tissue request. These tissue samples and the data were known until recently as the the U.S. National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) and were maintained as the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) at Washington State University. Life-span studies using beagle dogs were done at the Argonne National Laboratory, University of California at Davis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and the University of Utah. The results and many microscope slides from these life-span studies, totaling some 6000 dogs, are now available to researchers. A seminal work included in the Archive is The Atlas of Experimentally-Induced Neoplasia in the Beagle Dog (Watson et al, 1997).

Watson, Charles R.

388

Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog  

SciTech Connect

Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ? Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ? Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ? Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ? The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

Abel, E.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Boulware, S. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, M.C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and related nutrients on sebum lipids, and skin and hair coat condition in canines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed to investigate the effect of diets rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and other related nutrients, in the effort to improve skin and hair coat conditions in canines. The study included 24 dogs fed a baseline diet (Ol...

Kirby, Naomi Anne

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Safety and Efficacy of Dose-Intensive Oral Vitamin A in Subjects with Sun-Damaged Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...question When out in the sun for two hours or more...protect your skin from sun with clothes or sunscreen...were assigned to 0. The distribution of this score was then...where indicates greater sun exposure (12). Vitamin...allowed to clot at room temperature, and then were centrifuged...

David Alberts; James Ranger-Moore; Janine Einspahr; Kathylynn Saboda; Paul Bozzo; Yun Liu; Xiao-chun Xu; Reuben Lotan; James Warneke; Stuart Salasche; Suzanne Stratton; Norman Levine; Rayna Goldman; Marcy Islas; Laura Duckett; Deborah Thompson; and Peter Bartels

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Surface Zwitterionization of Expanded Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) Membranes via Atmospheric Plasma-Induced Polymerization for Enhanced Skin Wound Healing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface Zwitterionization of Expanded Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) Membranes via Atmospheric Plasma-Induced Polymerization for Enhanced Skin Wound Healing ... Incubation of cell suspension with the samples was performed at 37 °C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and for 24 h. ...

Jheng-Fong Jhong; Antoine Venault; Chun-Chung Hou; Sheng-Han Chen; Ta-Chin Wei; Jie Zheng; James Huang; Yung Chang

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Landau damping and anomalous skin effect in low-pressure gas discharges: Self-consistent treatment of collisionless heatinga...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. This system was applied to the calculation of collisionless heating electric field anomalous skin effect . Also for inhomogeneous electric fields another mechanism of heating density profile and a Maxwellian EEDF. In the present study a self-consistent system of equations

Kaganovich, Igor

393

Inhibition of 9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene Skin Carcinogenesis in Mice by Polycyclic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tested for their power to de lay or to...Milling Co.) and water ad libitum. Twenty...2-benzanthracene Skin Car cinogenesis in...the inhibitory power of other substances, including potent car cinogens, are...of its promoting power. If this is true...capacities of the car cinogen, while...

Willard T. Hill; D. Warren Stanger; Anthony Pizzo; Byron Riegel; Philippe Shubik; and William B. Wartman

1951-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Ultraviolet B Radiation on DNA Damage and Repair in Mouse Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of mammalian skin to solar UVB. We analyzed DNA...significantly less repair capacity than rapidly dividing...the loss of this repair capacity could partially contribute...in excision-repair capacity, and potentiation of...low-dose exposure to solar UVB may result in a significant...

David L. Mitchell; Rüdiger Greinert; Frank R. de Gruijl; Kees L. H. Guikers; Eckhard W. Breitbart; Michelle Byrom; Michelle M. Gallmeier; Megan G. Lowery; and Beate Volkmer

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Improvement of the equivalent sphere model for better estimates of skin or eye dose in space radiation environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sphere Radiation transport a b s t r a c t It is often useful to get a quick estimate of the dose or dose drastically improves the accuracy of the estimates of dose and dose equivalent in space radiation environmentsImprovement of the equivalent sphere model for better estimates of skin or eye dose in space

Lin, Zi-wei

396

Proper Setup of HVAC System in Conjunction with Sound Building 'Skin' Design for Alleviation of IAQ and Energy Performance Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climates, not only because of the loss of energy, but also because of damage that can result to insulation, drywall, and structure in addition to promotion of mold and mildew growth. Proper setup of the HVAC system, in conjunction with sound building “skin...

Rosenberg, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Chapter 10 - The Use of Natural Compounds and Botanicals in the Development of Anti-Aging Skin Care Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the evidence for the application of botanicals and natural products to modulate several of these targets, namely, oxidation, inflammation, the skin barrier, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and DNA repair. Cosmetic formulations have been based on botanical ingredients since ancient times, and botanical and natural extracts maintain a major role in contemporary cosmetics. Present means of treating aging skin have become more technological and more invasive; however, natural products including botanicals are still relevant and can be highly efficacious. Scientific research continues to corroborate traditional uses of many plants for skin benefits, and to elucidate biochemical mechanisms of action for a growing number of phytochemicals. Additional clinical trials are necessary to optimize the application of natural ingredients for cosmetics, but scientific substantiation for the safety and efficacy of a host of botanical extracts and compounds for treating aging skin is evident, with the continued potential of many more. It is highly unlikely that science will ever identify all of the active compounds in a given plant, but it is equally unlikely that one will stop finding new activities in plants that have relevance to healthier aging. The main barrier to continued discovery might indeed be the accelerating loss of biodiversity on the planet.

Cindy K. Angerhofer; Daniel Maes; Paolo U. Giacomoni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Viscoelastic Analysis of Sandwich Beams Having Aluminum and Fiber-reinforced Polymer Skins with a Polystyrene Foam Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandwich beams are composite systems having high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios and are used as light weight load bearing components. The use of thin, strong skin sheets adhered to thicker, lightweight core materials has allowed...

Roberts-Tompkins, Altramese L.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Diffusion MRI of Complex Tissue Structure David Solomon Tuch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffusion MRI of Complex Tissue Structure by David Solomon Tuch B.A., Physics, University Solomon Tuch Submitted to the Division of Health Sciences and Technology on January 11, 2002, in partial to be beyond the scope of diffusion imaging methodology. Thesis Supervisor: Van Jay Wedeen Title: Associate

Duncan, James S.

400

Building off-the-shelf tissue-engineered composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...form within the gel are multi-layered, unlike the...micro-encapsulated multi-cellular tumour spheroids...technical considerations in building functional tissues or...The thermal inkjet family of printers, in contrast...We have focused on building a toolbox of techniques...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ORIGINAL PAPER Regeneration and plantlet development from somatic tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

family Aristolochiaceae. The family contains diverse floral forms ranging from radial to monosymmetric, rooting, and acclimation of tissue culture- derived plants. Two varieties of Aristolochia were multi University, 201 Life Sciences Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA S. N. Maximova (&) The Department

dePamphilis, Claude

402

Glassy dynamics in three-dimensional embryonic tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biological processes. Now that...extracellular matrix or chemotaxis...built-in MATLAB (MathWorks...results from simulations. To non-dimensionalize...overdamped the equation of motion...tissue fusion simulations, we initialize...according to equation (3.2...compared to simulations. We believe...material, equation S2, by a...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Modelling host tissue degradation by extracellular bacterial pathogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......practice since it determines the rate of penetration into the tissue. We look for...at 7%. After nine days the rate of penetration can be seen to slow for both...ET AL. The values for the penetration rate (about 1 . 5m mper day) that......

J. R. King; A. J. Koerber; J. M. Croft; J. P. Ward; P. Williams; R. E. Sockett

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Intraoperative Optical Breast Tissue Characterization Device for Tumor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intraoperative Optical Breast Tissue Characterization Device for Tumor Margin Assessment J. Quincy. Margin Classification & Feedback to Surgeon Margin Size (mm) MarginSize(mm) 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Path-confirmed positive area Study endpoint: In 150 patient study

Ramanujam, Nimmi

405

A Study of Cytoplasmic Lipid Granularity in Tissue Culture Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...al cohol and water, blotting...of air with nitrogen gas in the tissue...maintenance under nitrogen gas caused the...of different solubilities and comparing...metabolism by a water-soluble enzyme...gassed with pure nitrogen. The reduced...

John J. Biesele and Paul Goldhaber

1955-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Biomechanics of brain tissue Thibault P. Prevost a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, blast/shock wave prop- agation) leading to traumatic brain injury. Ã? 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published, viscoelastic constitutive model. Mixed gray and white matter samples excised from the superior cortex were model was developed to account for the essential features of the tissue response over the entire

Suresh, Subra

407

Computational modeling of biological cells and soft tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formulation .................................................................... 98 C. Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Transfer in Artery Wall .................. 100 1. Pathophysiology... on flow characteristics on LDL deposition in the artery wall, and c. distribution of nutrients in a controlled environment for tissue engineering application. This dissertation is organized as follows. The development of a mechanical formulation...

Unnikrishnan, Ginu U.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Photoacoustic tomography of foreign bodies in soft biological tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

body despite using low doses of radiation. Most importantly, x-ray contrast is not appropriate tissues. To achieve deep penetration, we use near-infrared light ranging from 750 to 800 nm and a 5-MHz and high cost. US imaging is widely used in clinics because of its real-time display, zero ionizing

Wang, Lihong

409

Neoplastic Response of Various Tissues to the Administration of Urethan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...given urethan in drinking water developed pulmonary adenomatosis...given urethan in drinking water (fl). Pulmonary adenomatosis...administration in drinking water was begun when they were...and concentration of the car cinogen in various tissues...THE LUNG FIG. 1. "Low power of a papillary adenoma...

Albert Tannenbaum and Cesare Maltoni

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Light transport in two-layer tissues Arnold D. Kim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theoretically light backscattered by tissues using the radiative transport equation. In particular we consider of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. [DOI: 10.1117/1.1925227] Keywords: radiative transport equation's functions and is exact. Hence, one needs only to solve the transport equation in a finite slab using

Kim, Arnold D.

411

Light propagation in biological tissues containing an absorbing plate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the forward direction, we replace the governing radiative transport equation with the Fokker­ Planck equation. Introduction Light propagation in biological tissue is governed by the radiative transport equation.1 approxima- tion to the transport equation.3­8 However, these results are limited by the fact

Kim, Arnold D.

412

A feasibility study of a gelatin-based tissue substitute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments was begun in the 1970's by Poston and colleagues at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). During the course of this research many types of detectors and tissue substitutes were used. Early investigations by Garry et al. (1975) used a...

Spence, Jody Lee

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Howland D. T. (Albuquerque, NM); Thomas, Edward V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

RESEARCH Open Access Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Compared with wild-type mice, TIMP-1 knockout mice were moreRESEARCH Open Access Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) deficiency exacerbates carbon tetrachloride- induced liver injury and fibrosis in mice: involvement of hepatocyte STAT3 in TIMP-1 production

Boyer, Edmond

415

A two level finite difference scheme for one dimensional Pennes bioheat equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tissues [2,4,9]. Furthermore, skin burns caused by exposing human body to heat in a flash fire or being unconditionally. Numerical experiments for a skin-heating model are conducted. Ã? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights, by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under grant DE-FG02-02ER45961, by the Japanese Research

Zhang, Jun

416

Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Tocopherols and Retinol in Human Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dyckhoff G., Haefeli W.E., Herold-Mende C., Burhenne J. Quantification of retinoid concentrations in human serum and brain tumor tissues. Analytica Chimica Acta (2012) 725:57-66. doi:10.1016/j.aca.2012.03.003 . 20 Lee B.L......

Edward C. Bell; Mathew John; Rodney J. Hughes; Thu Pham

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress-or strain-controlled?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- or strain-controlled? R. K. Nalla,1 J. H. Kinney,2 R information in archival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. In fact, although the fracture event in dentin, akin to other mineralized tissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally

Ritchie, Robert

418

Human SCO1 and SCO2 have independent, cooperative functions in copper delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human SCO1 and SCO2 have independent, cooperative functions in copper delivery to cytochrome c understood, roles in copper delivery to cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Mutations in these genes pro- duce tissue copper delivery pathway in SCO1 and SCO2 patient backgrounds. Immunoblot analysis of patient cell lines

Shoubridge, Eric

419

Cerebral autoregulation and gas exchange studied using a human cardiopulmonary model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cerebral autoregulation and gas exchange studied using a human cardiopulmonary model K. Lu,1 J. W autoregulation, brain gas ex- change, and their interaction by means of a mathematical model. We have previously of intracranial dynamics. However, their models did not include gas transport in brain tissue and thus can

420

Science and Human Values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE three essays on "Science and Human A Values" which Dr. J. Bronowski has contributed to recent issues ... Dr. Bronowski discusses the sense of human dignity and challenges widely held views of what science is and does. These views are highly relevant to the current task of developing- ...

1957-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

integration division Human Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vibration Test Facility incorporates state-of-the-art vibration generation and measurement hardwareintegration division Human Systems ISIS Vibration Test Facility Objective Approach Impact 1. Assess impact of flight-like whole-body vibration on human operational capabilities and ability to maintain

422

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE Human Resources | One Washington Square | San José, CA 95192-0046 | 408-924-2250 408-924-2284 (fax) SUBJECT: STUDENT EMPLOYMENT DATE: March 2007 I. PURPOSE / DESCRIPTION Student employees are defined as matriculated students that work part-time in any

Gleixner, Stacy

423

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

Rambaut, Andrew

424

Protection of Human Subjects  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Protection of Human Subjects  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Thermodynamics and Humanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... chapter, his intention appears to have been to write on the wider human aspects of thermodynamics, to contribute to scientific humanism, which he defines as the unification of the specialized ... body of the book is, however, a fairly straightforward explanation of the laws of thermodynamics, partly classical and partly statistical, which will undoubtedly be helpful to students of the ...

J. A. V. BUTLER

1947-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

Genomics of human longevity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the original work is properly cited. Genomics of human longevity P. E. Slagboom 1...progress. human longevity|longevity genomics|epigenetics and ageing| 1. Introduction...Innovation Oriented Research Programme on Genomics (SenterNovem; IGE01014 and IGE5007...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Humans and Gills  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Humans and Gills Humans and Gills Name: Shelley Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is it true that some babies are born with some sort of gills? How and when do humans adapt from breathing inside to breathing outside of the womb? Replies: Whoa! You have received a great deal of false information. First, babies are not born with gills! Get that out of your thinking! Babies do not "breath" for oxygen in the womb. They do "practice breathing" using the amniotic fluid of the womb, but it is not doing them any good otherwise. All of the embryo and fetal needs are received through the placenta. The mother provides everything that is needed. As for the gills, there is a stage in the early human embryo development whereby humans do show gill slits, but not functional gills. Slits are not gills!! As a matter of fact, all vertebrates show these same gill slits.

429

Continuous human cell lines and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Substantially genetically stable continuous human cell lines derived from normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and processes for making and using the same. In a preferred embodiment, the cell lines are derived by treating normal human mammary epithelial tissue with a chemical carcinogen such as benzo(a)pyrene. The novel cell lines serve as useful substrates for elucidating the potential effects of a number of toxins, carcinogens and mutagens as well as of the addition of exogenous genetic material. The autogenic parent cells from which the cell lines are derived serve as convenient control samples for testing. The cell lines are not neoplastically transformed, although they have acquired several properties which distinguish them from their normal progenitors. 2 tabs.

Stampfer, M.R.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Continuous human cell lines and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Substantially genetically stable continuous human cell lines derived from normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and processes for making and using the same. In a preferred embodiment, the cell lines are derived by treating normal human mammary epithelial tissue with a chemical carcinogen such as benzo[a]pyrene. The novel cell lines serve as useful substrates for elucidating the potential effects of a number of toxins, carcinogens and mutagens as well as of the addition of exogenous genetic material. The autogenic parent cells from which the cell lines are derived serve as convenient control samples for testing. The cell lines are not neoplastically transformed, although they have acquired several properties which distinguish them from their normal progenitors.

Stampfer, Martha R. (Oakland, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hand, regenerative medicine (RM) is a broader...strategies [18], nanotechnologies and several medical...engineering and regenerative medicine strategies to skin...technologies such as nanotechnology [17,20,33...engineering and regenerative medicine strategies to tendon...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The biological seal of the implant–soft tissue interface evaluated in a tissue-engineered oral mucosal model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...single cell, measuring approximately...only at the interface but also in...implant-soft tissue interface have been based...vitro three-dimensional OMM was used...the Ti-OME interface. Permeability...using a three-dimensional OMM. The four...constructed using a standard protocol, this...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Giant Tunneling Piezoresistance of Composite Elastomers with Interlocked Microdome Arrays for Ultrasensitive and Multimodal Electronic Skins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solid lines represent power-law fits to ACNT with an exponent of 0.7. ... This real-time monitoring capability can also be used to monitor human motion, for example, finger-bending motion (Figure 3d). ... Multifunctional capability, flexible design, rugged lightweight construction and self-powered operation are desired attributes for electronics that directly interface with the human body or with advanced robotic systems. ...

Jonghwa Park; Youngoh Lee; Jaehyung Hong; Minjeong Ha; Young-Do Jung; Hyuneui Lim; Sung Youb Kim; Hyunhyub Ko

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

The human regulator of G-protein signaling protein 6 gene (RGS6) maps between markers WI-5202 and D14S277 on chromosome 14q24.3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recently discovered regulators of G-protein signaling proteins, termed the ... chromosomal location and tissue expression of the human regulator of RGS6 gene. The messenger RNA was ubiquitously expressed in ...

Naohiko Seki; Atsushi Hattori; Akiko Hayashi; Sumie Kozuma…

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Division of Human Resources Human Resources / Attendance and Leave Philosophy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division of Human Resources PHILOSOPHY Human Resources / Attendance and Leave Philosophy Form Leave Act (FMLA). USF augments these provisions with local processes and philosophies and, in some cases

Meyers, Steven D.

436

Final Report for completed IPP Project:"Development of Plasma Ablation for Soft Tissue and Bone Surgery"  

SciTech Connect

ArthroCare is a medical device company that develops, manufactures, and markets an advanced surgical tool, a plasma electro-surgical system for cutting and removing tissue. The hand-held electrical discharge device produces plasma in a biocompatible conductive fluid and tissue to which it is applied during surgery. Its products allow surgeons to operate with increased precision and accuracy, limiting damage to surrounding tissue thereby reducing pain and speeding recovery for the patient. In the past, the design of ArthfoCare's plasma wands has been an empirical undertaking. One goal of this R&D program was to put the phenomena involved on a sound scientific footing, allowing optimization of existing plasma based electro-surgery system technology, and the design and manufacture of new and improved kinds of scalpels, in particular for the surgical cutting of bone. Another important related goal of the program was to develop, through an experimental approach, new plasma wand approaches to the cutting ('shaving') of hard bone tissue. The goals of the CRADA were accomplished - computer models were used to predict important parameters of the plasma discharge and the bone environment, and several different approaches to bone-shaving were developed and demonstrated. The primary goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an atmospheric-pressure plasma tool that is suitable for surgical use for shaving bone in humans. This goal was accomplished, in fact with several different alternative plasma approaches. High bone ablation speeds were measured. The use of probes ('plasma wand' - the surgical tool) with moving active electrodes was also explored, and there are advantages to this method. Another important feature is that the newly-exposed bone surface have only a very thin necrosis layer; this feature was demonstrated. This CRADA has greatly advanced our understanding of bone removal by atmospheric pressure plasmas in liquid, and puts ArthroCare in a good position to develop the techniques for commercial (surgical) application.

Brown, Ian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Special Issue on Human Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

Nijholt, Anton

438

The human genome project  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

Bell, G.I.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation Munira Kadhim Oxford Brookes University Abstract Radiation-induced responses at the cellular and whole body levels are influenced by genetic predisposition, with implications for environmental and potentially, diagnostic exposures. Currently, the extent to which genetic background play a role in the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in radiation-induced delayed Genomic Instability (GI) is not fully understood. In previous studies, our results have shown that the CBA/H and C57BL/6 mouse strains, have differing sensitivities in the induction of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) in terms of chromosomal instability, following exposure to high dose-high LET and high dose-low LET

440

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction between Tissue and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of TGF-ß Depletion on Radiation-Induced p53 Response M.H. Barcellos-Hoff, S.A. Ravani, R.L. Henshall, K.B. Ewan, R.L. Warters,* B. Parvin Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *University of Utah One of the most widely studied cellular responses to radiation is the activation of the transcription factor, p53, whose abundance and action dictates individual cellular fate decisions regarding proliferation, differentiation and death. A cell's response to damage needs to be rapid. Thus, it is not surprising that the activation of the p53 stress response primarily involves post-translational changes in the p53 protein. Whereas intracellular radiation-induced mediators of p53 stability have been the subject of intense study, little is known about the extracellular factors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method of tissue repair using a composite material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

Hutchens, Stacy A; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R; O'Neill, Hugh M

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

442

10.09 - Tissue Engineering Applications of Additive Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tissue engineering (TE) aims to create biological substitutes to repair or replace failing organs or tissues due to trauma or aging. In TE, the scaffold serves as an important component that supports an inductive environment for cell attachment, proliferation, and growth. To fabricate TE scaffolds, additive manufacturing (AM) has been increasingly utilized in recent years. This is mainly because AM is especially useful in controlling the scaffold architecture including porosity, pore size, pore connectivity, and internal flow channels that are vital for good TE scaffold function. Despite all of the advantages, AM for TE application is still challenged with issues such as a limited range of available materials and low resolution. This article is thus intended to give a thorough overview on the TE application of a variety of current AM methods, and their respective advantages and challenges.

K.-F. Leong; D. Liu; C.-K. Chua

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Spontaneous Human Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spontaneous Human Combustion Spontaneous Human Combustion Name: S. Phillips. Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: One of our 8th grade students has tried to find information in our library about spontaneous human combustion, but to no avail. Could you tell us where we might locate a simple reference, or provide some in information about this subject for him. Replies: Sorry, but this is definitely "fringe science"...try asking in bookstores. I seem to recall one of those "believe it or not" type of TV shows did an episode on spontaneous human combustion a few years ago in which they reported on some British scientists who investigated this purported phenomenon. Remember that people (back in the Dark Ages, and before) used to believe in "spontaneous generation" of certain plants and animals because they were not aware of the reproduction methods used by those plants and animals.

444

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE Workforce Planning | One Washington Square | San José of the Request for Temporary Support, Workforce Planning will make a determination of the type of temporary

Su, Xiao

445

Human intelligible positioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use street addresses to refer to locations in a city. Street addresses are easy to remember and communicate because they follow a symbolic addressing scheme, containing human intelligible symbols. However, street addresses ...

Venugopalan, Vishwanath, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Human Reliability Program Overview  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

Bodin, Michael

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

448

Humans Need Biodiversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...economic, and environmental policies—the three pillars of sustainability practice—to manage natural resource...bright light on the tight connections between sustainability practices and human survival could make conservation...

David P. Mindell

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

Human Resource Management Delegation  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The notice is to clarifies and updates existing Human Resource Management Delegation Authorities and the levels to which they are delegated. Expired 6-28-97. Does not cancel any directives.

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

Human Resources & Rebecca Leinen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Resources & Training Rebecca Leinen SafetyInformation Systems Chris Smeds Work Management Mark Webb Energy & Utilities Cheryl Gomez Operations & Maintenance Cheryl Gomez, interim Systems Services Delta Force Recycling Sustainability Outreach Office for Sustainability Utility Systems Power

Acton, Scott

451

Protection of Human Subjects  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Protection of Human Subjects  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

Coaxial additive manufacture of biomaterial composite scaffolds for tissue engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An inherent difficulty associated with the application of suitable bioscaffolds for tissue engineering is the incorporation of adequate mechanical characteristics into the materials which recapitulate that of the native tissue, whilst maintaining cell proliferation and nutrient transfer qualities. Biomaterial composites fabricated using rapid prototyping techniques can potentially improve the functionality and patient-specific processing of tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work, a technique for the coaxial melt extrusion printing of core-shell scaffold structures was designed, implemented and assessed with respect to the repeatability, cell efficacy and scaffold porosity obtainable. Encapsulated alginate hydrogel/thermoplastic polycaprolactone (Alg-PCL) cofibre scaffolds were fabricated. Selective laser melting was used to produce a high resolution stainless steel 316 L coaxial extrusion nozzle, exhibiting diameters of 300 ?m/900 ?m for the inner and outer nozzles respectively. We present coaxial melt extrusion printed scaffolds of Alg-PCL cofibres with ~0.4 volume fraction alginate, with total fibre diameter as low as 600 ?m and core material offset as low as 10% of the total diameter. Furthermore the tuneability of scaffold porosity, pore size and interconnectivity, as well as the preliminary inclusion, compatibility and survival of an L-929 mouse fibroblast cell-line within the scaffolds were explored. This preliminary cell work highlighted the need for optimal material selection and further design reiteration in future research.

R Cornock; S Beirne; B Thompson; G G Wallace

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Asymmetric nuclear matter and neutron-skin in extended relativistic mean field model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density dependence of the symmetry energy, instrumental in understanding the behaviour of the asymmetric nuclear matter, is investigated within the extended relativistic mean field (ERMF) model which includes the contributions from the self and mixed interaction terms for the scalar-isoscalar ($\\sigma$), vector-isoscalar ($\\omega$) and vector-isovector ($\\rho$) mesons upto the quartic order. Each of the 26 different parameterizations of the ERMF model employed are compatible with the bulk properties of the finite nuclei. The behaviour of the symmetry energy for several parameter sets are found to be consistent with the empirical constraints on them as extracted from the analyses of the isospin diffusion data. The neutron-skin thickness in the $^{208}$Pb nucleus for these parameter sets of the ERMF model lie in the range of $\\sim 0.20 - 0.24$ fm which is in harmony with the ones predicted by the Skyrme Hartree-Fock model. We also investigate the role of various mixed interaction terms which are crucial for the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

B. K. Agrawal

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

456

Numerical investigation on photocatalytic CO2 reduction by solar energy in double-skin sheet reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Double-skin sheet reactor (DSSR) attracts attention in recent years due to the simple design and high mass transfer, but its application to photocatalytic CO2 reduction with immobilized catalyst is still a new trial. In this paper, the three-dimensional models describing the photocatalytic CO2 reduction in DSSR by means of solar energy were developed and numerically simulated, on the basis of the transient and continuous solar light distributions. A performance evaluation approach was proposed to guide the structural optimization of DSSR in photocatalytic CO2 reduction. The effects of operation parameters and reactor structures on CH3OH concentration were analyzed and discussed. The results show that the outlet CH3OH concentration of 2.68 × 10?4 mol m?3 in DSSR is much greater than that of 1.77 × 10?5 mol m?3 in optical fiber monolith reactor under the same conditions. It increases as both the inlet water vapor concentration ratio and day-average light flux increase, but decreases with increasing the inlet velocity, all of which are beneficial to the CH3OH productivity. The CH3OH concentration will decrease with the increase of the number of parallel-flow channels, but increase thanks to the rise in the width–height ratio and inserting flow guiding pieces, which are recommended for higher CH3OH concentration in the design of DSSR.

Tianchen Wang; Lijun Yang; Kai Yuan; Xiaoze Du; Yongping Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Human Genome From human genome to other  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genome to health Structural Genomics initiative #12;What is the Human Genome Project? · U.S. govtThe Human Genome Project From human genome to other genomes and to gene function June 2000 From that arise from genome research #12;The Human Genome Project Project began in 1990 as a $3 billion, 15-year

Linial, Michal

458

Coordination-resolved local bond contraction and electron binding-energy entrapment of Si atomic clusters and solid skins  

SciTech Connect

Consistency between x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and density-function theory calculations confirms our bond order-length-strength notation-incorporated tight-binding theory predictions on the quantum entrapment of Si solid skin and atomic clusters. It has been revealed that bond-order deficiency shortens and strengthens the Si-Si bond, which results in the local densification and quantum entrapment of the core and valence electrons. Unifying Si clusters and Si(001) and (111) skins, this mechanism has led to quantification of the 2p binding energy of 96.089?eV for an isolated Si atom, and their bulk shifts of 2.461?eV. Findings evidence the significance of atomic undercoordination that is of great importance to device performance.

Bo, Maolin; Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Zhang, Xi [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

459

Use of Axillary Deodorant and Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Noninferiority Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To prospectively determine the effect of deodorant use on acute skin toxicity and quality of life during breast radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Before breast RT, 84 patients were randomly assigned to the deodorant group (n = 40) or the no-deodorant group (n = 44). The patients were stratified by axillary RT and previous chemotherapy. Toxicity evaluations were always performed by the principal investigator, who was unaware of the group assignment, at the end of RT and 2 weeks after completion using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute skin toxicity criteria. Symptoms of acute skin toxicity (i.e., discomfort, pain, pruritus, sweating) and quality of life were self-evaluated. For each criterion, the point estimate of rate difference with the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit was computed. To claim noninferiority owing to deodorant use, the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit had to be lower than the noninferiority margin, fixed to 12.8%. Results: In the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, Grade 2 axillary radiodermatitis occurred in 23% vs. 30%, respectively, satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .019). Grade 2 breast radiodermatitis occurred in 30% vs. 34% of the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, respectively, also satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .049). Similar results were observed for the self-reported evaluations. The deodorant group reported less sweating (18% vs. 39%, p = .032). No Grade 3 or 4 radiodermatitis was observed. Conclusion: According to our noninferiority margin definition, the occurrence of skin toxicity and its related symptoms were statistically equivalent in both groups. No evidence was found to prohibit deodorant use (notwithstanding the use of an antiperspirant with aluminum) during RT for breast cancer.

Theberge, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.theberge.1@ulaval.c [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, QB (Canada); Harel, Francois [Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval, Quebec, QB (Canada); Dagnault, Anne [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, QB (Canada); Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval, Quebec, QB (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurately predicts tissue-specific Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Huizhi Zhao a,b,1,2,3 Summary: : MicroRNAs Recombination rate Tissue specificity Disease MicroRNA expression level a b s t r a c... RNAs that are expressed in several tissues...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Micropixe as a tool to search for uranium-bearing particles in lung tissues  

SciTech Connect

A proton microbeam is proposed as a tool to search for uranium-bearing particles in lung tissues. Preliminary experiments have been undertaken by irradiating with protons lung tissues of dogs previously exposed to uranium ore. 7 references.

Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, S.C.; Miller, M.E.; Jones, K.W.; Cholewa, M.; Hanson, A.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

In vitro evaluation of electrospun PCL/nanoclay composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a widely accepted synthetic biodegradable polymer for tissue engineering, however its use in hard tissue engineering is limited because of its inadequate mechanical strength and low bioa...

Ganesh Nitya; Greeshma T. Nair; Ullas Mony…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Polymer-tethered epidermal growth factor as an inductive biomaterial surface for connective tissue progenitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connective tissue progenitors (CTP) can act as a pluripotent source of reparative cells during injury and therefore have great potential in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, the response of CTP to most ...

Fan, Vivian H. (Vivian Hanbing)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

E-Print Network 3.0 - avian brain tissue Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

brain tissue Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: avian brain tissue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 60 Wader Study Group Bulletin 115 (1)...

465

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal brain tissues Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

brain tissues Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: animal brain tissues Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ALZHEIMER'S TAKES ITS TOLL Summary:...

466

E-Print Network 3.0 - adipose white tissue Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

white tissue Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adipose white tissue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 original article The new engl and...

467

E-Print Network 3.0 - adipose tissue heart Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heart Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adipose tissue heart Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Microlymphatic and tissue oxygen tension in...

468

T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging used to detect coagulative necrosis in tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to prevent unnecessary collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. This research focuses on using T2*-weighted FLASH magnetic resonance imaging to detect irreversible changes in i . n vitro bovine liver tissue and tissuesimulating polyacrylamide gel...

Van Hyfte, John Bruce

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Volume conservation principle involved in cell lengthening and nucleus movement during tissue morphogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue morphogenesis is the process in which coordinated movements and shape changes of large numbers of cells form tissues, organs, and the internal body structure. Understanding morphogenetic movements requires precise ...

Gelbart, Michael A.

470

Tissue spectroscopic characterization based on fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and reflected light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diagnosis of many diseases often requires a histological analysis of tissues. Histology analysis compares the microscopic structure of a tissue specimen with an image database containing known physiological and ...

Laiho, Lily H., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Elimination of influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in Pb+Pb collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model using as an input nucleon density profiles from Hartree-Fock calculations based on a modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we study how to eliminate the influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in probing the nuclear symmetry energy. Within the current experimental uncertainty range of neutron-skin size of $^{208}$Pb, the Pb+Pb collisions are performed in semicentral and peripheral collisions with impact parameters of 5 and 9fm and at beam energies from 50 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon, respectively. It is shown that combination of neutron and proton collective flows, i.e., neutron-proton differential elliptic flow, neutron-proton elliptic flow difference, neutron-proton differential transverse flow and neutron-proton transverse flow difference, can effectively eliminate the effects of neutron-skin size difference and thus can be as useful sensitive observables in probing nuclear matter symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions...

Wei, Gao-Feng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Locoregional Outcomes of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Standard Fractionation Radiation and Daily Skin Bolus in the Taxane Era  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess locoregional outcomes of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 107 patients diagnosed with IBC between January 1995 and March 2006 who presented to our department for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Results: All patients received chemotherapy (95% anthracycline and 95% taxane), modified radical mastectomy, and RT to the chest wall and regional lymphatics using standard fractionation to 50 Gy and daily skin bolus. The RT to the chest wall was delivered via electrons (55%) or photons (45%) in daily fractions of 180 cGy (73%) or 200 cGy (27%). Scar boost was performed in 11%. A majority (84%) of patients completed the prescribed treatment. Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 10-134 months). Locoregional control (LRC) at 3 years and 5 years was 90% and 87%, respectively. Distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) at 3 years and 5 years was 61% and 47%, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this population of IBC patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy. Distant metastases-free survival remains a significant therapeutic challenge.

Damast, Shari, E-mail: damasts@mskcc.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ho, Alice Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Montgomery, Leslie [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Fornier, Monica N. [Department of Breast Cancer Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ishill, Nicole; Elkin, Elena [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Time, Humans and Societal Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000 (human development) Since 1850 (industrial revolution Since 1950 (population explosion) Sustainable

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - adipose tissue status Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insulin Sensitivity... insulin resistance. Obese adipose tissue displays ... Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

475

Human hybrid hybridoma  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

1987-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Is the Donnan effect sufficient to explain swelling in brain tissue slices?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effect sufficient to explain swelling in brain tissue slices? Georgina E. Lang 1 Peter...University of Glasgow, , Glasgow, UK Brain tissue swelling is a dangerous consequence...mechanical effects that drive swelling of brain tissue slices in an ionic solution bath...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Nonuniform Alteration of cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) Tissue Distribution in Dogs with Whole Body Hyperthermia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and extent of tissue distribution seen in normothermia...pattern of CDDP tissue distribution, compared to normothermic...were 2075 CDDP TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND HYPERTHERMIA stored...inserted into the radiant heat device (Enthermics...blankets to reduce heat loss during the heating period...

J. E. Riviere; R. L. Page; R. A. Rogers; S. K. Chang; M. W. Dewhirst; and D. E. Thrall

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Tissue-aware data integration approach for the inference of pathway interactions in metazoan organisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of tissue and interaction-type specific gold standards (e.g. phosphorylation (kinase-substrate) interactions among brain expressed proteins) restricted to gene pairs coexpressed in any of 77 tissues based on curated pathway databases and gene-to-tissue......

Christopher Y. Park; Arjun Krishnan; Qian Zhu; Aaron K. Wong; Young-Suk Lee; Olga G. Troyanskaya

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Revisiting Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a highly effective treatment for mycosis fungoides (MF). The standard course consists of 30 to 36 Gy delivered over an 8- to 10-week period. This regimen is time intensive and associated with significant treatment-related toxicities including erythema, desquamation, anhydrosis, alopecia, and xerosis. The aim of this study was to identify a lower dose alternative while retaining a favorable efficacy profile. Methods and Materials: One hundred two MF patients were identified who had been treated with an initial course of low-dose TSEBT (5-<30 Gy) between 1958 and 1995. Patients had a T stage classification of T2 (generalized patch/plaque, n = 51), T3 (tumor, n = 29), and T4 (erythrodermic, n = 22). Those with extracutaneous disease were excluded. Results: Overall response (OR) rates (>50% improvement) were 90% among patients with T2 to T4 disease receiving 5 to <10 Gy (n = 19). In comparison, OR rates between the 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy subgroups were 98% and 97%, respectively. There was no significant difference in median progression free survival (PFS) in T2 and T3 patients when stratified by dose group, and PFS in each was comparable to that of the standard dose. Conclusions: OR rates associated with low-dose TSEBT in the ranges of 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy are comparable to that of the standard dose ({>=} 30 Gy). Efficacy measures including OS, PFS, and RFS are also favorable. Given that the efficacy profile is similar between 10 and <20 Gy and 20 and <30 Gy, the utility of TSEBT within the lower dose range of 10 to <20 Gy merits further investigation, especially in the context of combined modality treatment.

Harrison, Cameron, E-mail: cameronh@stanford.edu [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Young, James; Navi, Daniel [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Riaz, Nadeem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Lingala, Bharathi; Kim, Youn [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin tissue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Relocation Guide, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relocation Information Guide Relocation Information Guide The Human Resources Division is providing this Information Guide to you to help ease the transition of relocating to Long Island. Relocating to a new place can be an exciting as well as stressful time. We have compiled information that can be very helpful with the many issues you may face. You may also seek assistance from the recruiter you work with in Human Resources. Service Disclaimer - This web page contains links to other Internet sites. These links are not endorsements of any products or services and no information in such site has been endorsed or approved by Brookhaven National Laboratory or the Human Resources Division. Here are some of the issues: Cost of living Buying or renting a home Schools in the area

482

Turkey vs. human digestion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turkey vs. human digestion Turkey vs. human digestion Name: wallyb Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How is the digestive system of turkeys different from that of humans? Replies: Hmmm.. been a while since I had sophomore biology, so I can't completely answer this one, but I can say a few things. One, since turkeys are birds, and birds as a general rule have not had teeth for several million years at least, the turkey needs a way to mash up its food -- thus, the crop, which is essentially like another stomach: the turkey (and many other birds, for that matter) swallows small stones which serve in lieu of teeth, mashing up food via muscular action in the crop, from whence the "chewed" food moves on into the rest of the digestive tract. As for any other differences, I'll have to leave that to someone else with more ornithological experience...

483

High-Speed Coherent Raman Fingerprint Imaging of Biological Tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a coherent Raman imaging platform using broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) that provides an unprecedented combination of speed, sensitivity, and spectral breadth. The system utilizes a unique configuration of laser sources that probes the Raman spectrum over 3,000 cm$^{-1}$ and generates an especially strong response in the typically weak Raman "fingerprint" region through heterodyne amplification of the anti-Stokes photons with a large nonresonant background (NRB) while maintaining high spectral resolution of $chemical imaging in two- and three-dimensional views of healthy murine liver and pancreas tissues and interfaces between xenograft brain tumors and the surrounding healthy brain matter.

Camp, Charles H; Heddleston, John M; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Walker, Angela R Hight; Rich, Jeremy N; Lathia, Justin D; Cicerone, Marcus T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

The recognition of certain parasitic worms in tissue sections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4o be seen in tissue sections, The parts sms4 lihsly to be seen are Chs outicle, subcuticley muscles, body cavity, digestive tract, and genital organs, Therefore, emphasis is placed on these anatomioal perte, uith Che ezcsption of the genital... this terminology 2 ~ 10 6 and point out that "the outex most oellular layer is not in direct relation with Che environment bu4 is covered by a cuCiols and is there fore termed Chs hypodermis?u The suboutiole in most species, 'but not in all ~ has four...

Payne, Bobby Joe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

485

Physical characterization of ultrashort laser pulse drilling of biological tissue  

SciTech Connect

Ultrashort laser pulse ablation removes material with low energy fluence required and minimal collateral damage. The ultimate usefulness of this technology for biomedical applications depends, in part, on characterization of the physical conditions attained and determination of the zone of shockwave and heat affected material in particular tissues. Detailed numerical modeling of the relevant physics (deposition, plasma formation, shockwave generation and propagation, thermal conduction) are providing this information. A wide range of time scales is involved, ranging from picosecond for energy deposition and peak pressure and temperature, to nanosecond for development of shockwave, to microsecond for macroscopic thermophysical response.

Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Kim, B.M.; Da Silva, L.D.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.

1997-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

486

Nanofibrous hydrogel composites as mechanically robust tissue engineering scaffolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the aerospace and automotive industries due to the high strength 187 to weight ratios the fibers can provide when combined with conventional materials [54]. 188 Reviewed here are composites combining nano- or micro-fibers with hydrogels for tissue 189... laminate was 289 created using layers of electrospun poly(l-lactide) (PLA) fibers with a poly(lactide-co-290 ethylene oxide fumarate) (PLEOF) hydrogel, which was tested using DMA at 37 ºC. The 291 13 modulus of the composite when wet was 575 ± 14 MPa...

Butcher, Annabel L.; Offeddu, Giovanni S.; Oyen, Michelle L.

2014-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

487

Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo  

SciTech Connect

Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 ?M) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1?, Il-1?, IL-6 and TNF? in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol at similar concentrations in vitro.

Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States); Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

de la Chapelle, Albert (Helsingfors, FI); Vogelstein, Bert (Baltimore, MD); Kinzler, Kenneth W. (Baltimore, MD)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

490

Metallic ions as therapeutic agents in tissue engineering scaffolds: an overview of their biological applications and strategies for new developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...also highlighted. metallic ions|tissue engineering|scaffolds|bone|drug...promising applications in tissue engineering. ion functions and biological effects...biomaterials designed for tissue engineering. ion scaffold composition experimental...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Acousto-optic Bragg imaging of biological tissue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acousto-optic Bragg imaging is a technique that uses the interaction of light with ultrasound to optically image obstructions in acoustical fields. Existing reports of acousto-optic Bragg imaging based on transmission of acoustic fields through obstructions exhibit strong acoustic impedance mismatches manifested by poor image quality and missing details of physical structures of obstructions. In this work the image quality was improved to exhibit detailed physical structures of an object by using an improved Bragg imaging system described in Sec. III below. This paper investigates the possibility of extending an acoustic Bragg imaging technique in transmission mode to image animal or plant tissues; a small azalea leaf is used as an illustration in this case. The Bragg image produced clearly shows the veins of the vascular azalea leaf serving as a proof of concept for cost-effective potential application of acoustic Bragg imaging of biological objects in the medical field. Moreover acousto-optic Bragg imaging is potentially harmless to biological cells and is sensitive to density and elastic variations in the tissue.

Alem Teklu; Nico F. Declercq; Michael McPherson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Stanford University IRB Guidance On Data and Tissue Repositories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of outcomes information complied for quality assurance activities · A list of potential research subjects Page of these resources is governed by both the federal human subject protection regulations (Common Rule and DHHS regulations) at 45 CFR 46 and the federal privacy rule regulations (HIPAA) at 45 CRF 160 & 164. Specific

Puglisi, Joseph

493

Human Rights and Duties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... European convention. A draft European convention for the collective protection of individual rights and democratic liberties by member States of the Council of Europe, and for the establishment of a ... accompanied by a recommendation that the whole question of the maintenance of human rights and liberties should be placed upon the agenda of the first session of the European Consultative Assembly ...

1950-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

494

Ubiquitous human computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tomorrow's human one. The Internet faced down proprietary networks...organically the way that the Internet's byways are not owned in...that is in the way the current Internet and its protocols are unowned...significantly different vectors of abuse and control than the one run...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Ethics, humanity, and science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethics, humanity, and science ... In this issue of the magazine C&EN senior editor Wil Lepkowski, in effect, picks up on this theme with an examination of a debate that may be about to erupt over the methods and ethics of science and scientists, particularly as they apply to the central role of science and technology in the nuclear arms race. ...

MICHEAL HEYLIN

1981-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

496

THE SCIENCE OF HUMANITY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...one as silver and the other as gold, and have done doughty battle in defense of their one-sided vision; the biol-ogist...peoples, or of human curiosities and monstrosities exhibited in midway plaisances, if nlot in circuses and dime mu-seums. Even...

W J MCGEE

1897-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

497

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear Energy Transfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of low-dose low-linear energy transfer ionizing radiation (LDIR) in humans...direct evidence that doses in the range of 1 to 10 cGy...the intentional radiation of healthy tissue...the response to ionizing radiation. Attempts...

Zelanna Goldberg; David M. Rocke; Chad Schwietert; Susanne R. Berglund; Alison Santana; Angela Jones; Jörg Lehmann; Robin Stern; Ruixiao Lu; and Christine Hartmann Siantar

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Human sciences The human sciences database contains approximately 254 academic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human sciences The human sciences database contains approximately 254 academic journals and statistical reports on the following subjects: (comparative literature, theology, history and geography, education, psychology, arts, languages and Library Science) Social sciences The social sciences database

499

Human-elephant conflicts; Human-elephant conflicts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? It is widely recognized that human-wildlife conflicts can reduce farmers’ support for long-term species conservation. The subject of human-elephant conflicts is highly relevant in… (more)

Olsson, Linnea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Differential expression of RANK on Langerhans cells and CD45RA and CD45RO/CLA on T cells in developing human skin after birth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Die Haut, die Schnittstelle zwischen dem Körper und der Umgebung, ist das größte Organ des Körpers und hat zahlreiche Funktionen. Eine davon ist, dass die… (more)

Akguen, Johnnie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z