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1

Low dose and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model Sally A. Amundson Columbia University Medical Center Abstract Significant structural abnormalities develop within several days of exposure of the 3-dimensional normal human skin tissue model EPI-200 (MatTek) to high or low doses of low LET radiation. Disruption of the basal layer occurs following high radiation doses, and premature cornification is evident after both high and low dose exposures. In bystander tissue that is near irradiated portions of the tissue, but is not itself irradiated, we also observe premature cornification, increased apoptosis and micronucleus formation. Changes in global gene expression also occur in both directly irradiated and bystander EPI-200 tissue. Although the unfolding over time

2

Low dose and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model. and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model. Sally A. Amundson and Alexandre Mezentsev Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Radiological Research, New York, NY 10032 Significant structural abnormalities develop within several days of exposure of the 3-dimensional normal human skin tissue model EPI-200 (MatTek) to high or low doses of low LET radiation. Disruption of the basal layer occurs following high radiation doses, and premature cornification is evident after both high and low dose exposures. In bystander tissue that is near irradiated portions of the tissue, but is not itself irradiated, we also observe premature cornification, increased apoptosis and micronucleus formation. Changes in global gene expression also occur

3

The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-?, IL-2, MIP-1?, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-?, MIP-1?, TNF ?, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1?, IL-8, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

Light interaction with human skin: from believable images to predictable models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research efforts in image synthesis have been directed toward the rendering of believable and predictable images of biological materials. This course addresses an important topic in this area, namely the predictive simulation of skin's appearance. ...

Gladimir V. G. Baranoski; Aravind Krishnaswamy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Appearance of Human Skin: A Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin is the outer-most tissue of the human body. As a result, people are very aware of, and very sensitive to, the appearance of their skin. Consequently, skin appearance has been a subject of great interest in various fields of science and technology. ...

Takanori Igarashi; Ko Nishino; Shree K. Nayar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

10

Generic-model based human-body modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a generic-model based human-body modeling method which take the anatomical structure of the human body into account. The generic model contains anatomical structure of bones and muscles of the human body. For a given target skin mesh, ... Keywords: anatomically-based modeling, generic model, human body modeling

Xiaomao Wu; Lizhuang Ma; Ke-Sen Huang; Yan Gao; Zhihua Chen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin  

SciTech Connect

Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flow-through diffusion cells, and radiolabeled bifenthrin, deltamethrin or cis-permethrin was applied in acetone to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid were collected every 4 h. At 24 h, the skins were washed with soap and water to remove unabsorbed chemical. The skin was then solubilized. Two additional experiments were performed after washing the skin; the first was tape-stripping the skin and the second was the collection of receptor fluid for an additional 24 h. Receptor fluid, skin washes, tape strips and skin were analyzed for radioactivity. For rat skin, the wash removed 53-71% of the dose and 26-43% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid ranged from 1 to 5%. For human skin, the wash removed 71-83% of the dose and 14-25% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid was 1-2%. Tape-stripping removed 50-56% and 79-95% of the dose in rat and human skin, respectively, after the wash. From 24-48 h, 1-3% and about 1% of the dose diffused into the receptor fluid of rat and human skin, respectively. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin penetrated rat and human skin following dermal application in vitro. However, a skin wash removed 50% or more of the dose from rat and human skin. Rat skin was more permeable to the pyrethroids than human skin. Of the dose in skin, 50% or more was removed by tape-stripping, suggesting that permeation of pyrethroids into viable tissue could be impeded. The percentage of the dose absorbed into the receptor fluid was considerably less than the dose in rat and human skin. Therefore, consideration of the skin type used and fractions analyzed are important when using in vitro dermal absorption data for risk assessment.

Hughes, Michael F., E-mail: hughes.michaelf@epa.go [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Edwards, Brenda C. [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model John Miller Washington State University Tri-Cities Abstract Monte Carlo simulations of electrons stopping in liquid water are being used to model electronbeam irradiation of the full-thickness (FT) EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes from a dermal layer of fibroblasts embedded in collagen. The simulations have shown the feasibility of exposing the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer (Miller et al. 2011). The variableenergy electron microbeam at PNNL (Sowa et al. 2005) was used as a model of device characteristics and

13

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model John Miller 1 , Seema Varma 1 , William Chrisler 2 , Xihai Wang 2 and Marianne Sowa 2 1 Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, WA 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA Monte Carlo simulations of electrons stopping in liquid water are being used to model electron- beam irradiation of the full-thickness (FT) EpiDerm TM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes from a dermal layer of fibroblasts embedded in collagen. The simulations have shown the feasibility of exposing the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer (Miller et al. 2011). The variable-

14

Regulation of Annexin A2 by Ionizing Radiation in Human Skin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annexin A2 by Ionizing Radiation in Human Skin Equivalent Culture: Does A Nuclear Annexin A2-Protein Kinase C Epsilon Complex Contribute To Reduced Cancer Risks At Low Dose...

15

Regulation of Annexin A2 by Ionizing Radiation in Human Skin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Annexin A2 by Ionizing Radiation in Human Skin Equivalent Culture: Does A Nuclear Annexin A2-Protein Kinase C Epsilon Complex Contribute To Reduced Cancer Risks At Low...

16

Metabolomic Response of Human Skin Tissue to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding how human organs respond to ionizing radiation (IR) at a systems biology level and identifying biomarkers for IR exposure at low doses can help provide a scientific basis for establishing radiation protection standards. Little is known regarding the physiological responses to low dose IR at the metabolite level, which represents the end-point of biochemical processes inside cells. Using a full thickness human skin tissue model and GC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we examined the metabolic perturbations at three time points (3, 24 and 48 hr) after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. PLS-DA score plots revealed dose- and time-dependent clustering between sham and irradiated groups. Importantly, a comparable number of metabolites were detected to have significant change 48 hr after exposure to 3 and 10 cGy of irradiation, when compared with the high dose of 200 cGy. Biochemical pathway analysis showed perturbations to DNA/RNA damage and repair, lipid and energy metabolisms, even at low doses of IR.

Hu, Zeping; Kim, Young-Mo; Sowa, Marianne B.; Robinson, Robert J.; Gao, Xiaoli; Metz, Thomas O.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

17

Identification of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin Feng Yang, Katrina M. Waters, Bobbie-Jo Webb-Robertson, Lye-Meng Markillie, Rachel M. Wirgau, Shawna M. Hengel, Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, and David L. Stenoien. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Our focus has been on identifying the early events that occur after low dose ionizing radiation exposure that precede and often regulate downstream events such as altered transcription, protein secretion and epigenetic regulation. Phosphorylation is one of the earliest detectible events that occurs following radiation exposure and plays important roles in multiple biological pathways including DNA damage repair, transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. Very robust

18

Computational aspects in numerical simulation of skin tissues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present some computational aspects in numerical simulation of the human skin tissue. A multi-layered model is considered for the skin tissue with emphasis on the mathematical modelling and numerical models in space 2D and ... Keywords: biothermomechanics, coupled problems, finite element method, numerical methods, skin tissue, thermal systems

Iulia Maria Cârstea; Ion Cârstea

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Assimilation of Satellite-Derived Skin Temperature Observations into Land Surface Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface (or “skin”) temperature (LST) lies at the heart of the surface energy balance and is a key variable in weather and climate models. In this research LST retrievals from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are ...

Rolf H. Reichle; Sujay V. Kumar; Sarith P. P. Mahanama; Randal D. Koster; Q. Liu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modelling postures of human movements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to present a novel modelling of postures of human activities such us walk, run... Effectively, human action is, in general, characterized by a sequence of specific body postures. So, from an incoming sequence video, we determine ... Keywords: human activities, modelling, shape matching, skeleton, thinning

Djamila Medjahed Gamaz; Houssem Eddine Gueziri; Nazim Haouchine

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Skin Evolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin Evolution Skin Evolution Name: Olga Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do you think it is possible that our ancestors were actually black, and that a gene mutation for an enzyme in the metabollic pathway of melanin meant that not enough melanin was produced some of us ended up with white skin. Primitive apes have black skin, and we evolved from them, so doesn't this mean that humans orginally had black skin??? Replies: Most likely, yes, humans probably evolved from dark-skinned ancestors. I will take issue, however, with your statement that "primitive apes have black skin;" we can't say that for absolute certain, because we have no primitive apes to compare to. All we have now are modern apes. All modern apes - homo sapiens, pan troglodytes, gorilla gorilla - are highly, probably equally, evolved. (One could make an argument that homo sapiens is in many ways more generalized - note the generalized dentition, fragile skeleton, etc. - than other modern apes, and thus could be said to be more primitive.) As far as that goes, the only modern apes with white skin I know of are a color variant of homo sapiens.

22

Articular human joint modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work reported in this paper encapsulates the theories and algorithms developed to drive the core analysis modules of the software which has been developed to model a musculoskeletal structure of anatomic joints. Due to local bone surface and contact ... Keywords: 6DOF, Joint Modelling, Software, Tissue wrapping, bilateral, constraints, forced contact based articulation, unilateral

Ibrahim i. Esat; Neviman Ozada

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Deformable human body model development  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Human mobility modeling at metropolitan scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of human mobility have broad applicability in fields such as mobile computing, urban planning, and ecology. This paper proposes and evaluates WHERE, a novel approach to modeling how large populations move within different metropolitan areas. ... Keywords: call detail records, human mobility patterns

Sibren Isaacman; Richard Becker; Ramón Cáceres; Margaret Martonosi; James Rowland; Alexander Varshavsky; Walter Willinger

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Anatomy-based modeling of the human musculature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: articulated models, bones, deformations, human figure animation, muscles, procedural modeling, tendons

Ferdi Scheepers; Richard E. Parent; Wayne E. Carlson; Stephen F. May

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Skin flicks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The written and artistic part of this thesis are both separated into the two categories of "SKIN" and "FLICKS". The Artistic part of my thesis consists of five artificial skins made on my body, and a series of video tapes ...

Orth, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann), 1964-

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Skin melanin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin melanin Skin melanin Name: Janae Lepir Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How does the skin produce melanin? Replies: There are special cells in the skin called melanocytes. They synthesize melanin from an amino acid, tyrosine. (Amino acids make up proteins; there are about 20 different ones). Melanocytes can be stimulated by a hormone in the pituitary gland called melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH). I don't know how much biology you've had, but melanocytes are derived from an interesting embryonic tissue called the neural crest, which also gives rise to a lot of different types of neurons, so embryologically melanocytes are related to neurons. If melanocytes become malignant, it becomes a very bad form of cancer, called melanoma (often called "skin cancer", although there are other forms of skin cancer).

28

Action Spectra for Human Skin Cells: Estimates of the Relative Cytotoxicity of the Middle Ultraviolet, Near Ultraviolet, and Violet Regions of Sunlight on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Action spectra for the cytotoxic action of electromagnetic radiation in the solar range 280-434 nm have been determined for human fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes derived from the same foreskin biopsy. The spectra for the two cell types are close to identical and coincide with our previously published data for a human lymphoblastoid line indicating that the mechanism of inactivation of the three human cell types is similar at any given wavelength. Using published data for ultraviolet transmission of human skin and sample spectral irradiarÃa'data, we have estimated the relative biological effectiveness of the middle ultraviolet (UVB) (290-320 nm), near ultraviolet (UVA) (320-380 nm), and violet (380-434 nm) regions of sunlight for cytotoxicity at the basal layer of the epidermis. We conclude that the UVB component in noon summer sunlight (the most UVB rich spectral conditions tested) may contribute only about 40 % of the total cytotoxic effectiveness of sunlight at 290-

Rex M. Tyrrell; Mireille Pidoux; Cancer Res; Contact The Aacr Publications; Epidermal Keratinocytes; Rex M. Tyrrell; Mireille Pidoux

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Halin, Cornelia [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: cornelia.halin@pharma.ethz.ch

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013  

SciTech Connect

During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

Rocke, David M. [University of California Davis

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

31

Critical Evaluation of Current Skin Thermal Property Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burn treatment is an area of major importance in medicine, however, there is not currently an analytic method to determine the depth and magnitude of burns. Complications, such as a relative lack of knowledge of the specific thermal properties of skin and the relation between heat transfer and biological processes, have prevented a comprehensive model to explain the field of bioheat transfer. Research was conducted to estimate the relevant thermal and material properties in the field of bioheat transfer. Subsequently, an experiment was proposed, and a mathematical model was developed for the experiment, to allow for detection of burns through the use of heat transfer analysis. Burned skin and healthy skin differ in that there is no blood flow and thus no directionality to the heat transfer in burned skin. Thus, the experiment was designed to determine if there was a directionality was present in the heat transfer in the skin. Using the estimated skin properties, calculations were done to determine the viability of the proposed experiment. The experiment was refined to account for the findings and modified to more accurately detect burns in human skin. 1

Anand Mani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Human walking model predicts joint mechanics, electromyography and mechanical economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an under-actuated model of human walking, comprising only a soleus muscle and flexion/extension monoarticular hip muscles. The remaining muscle groups of the human leg are modeled using quasi-passive, ...

Endo, Ken

33

Experiences with collaborative, distributed predictive human performance modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although predictive human performance modeling has been researched for 30 years in HCI, to our knowledge modeling has been conducted as a solitary task of one modeler or, occasionally, two modelers working in tight face-to-face collaboration. In contrast, ... Keywords: cogtool, efficiency, klm, predictive human performance modeling, usability evaluation

Bonnie John; Sonal Starr; Brian Utesch

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Human factors engineering program review model  

SciTech Connect

The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Human error modeling predictions: increasing occupational safety using human performance modeling tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The use of computer-aided job analysis tools has been increasing in the recent past as a result of decreases in computational costs, augmentations in the reality of the computer-aided job analysis tools, and usefulness of the output generated from these tools. One tool set known as integrated Human Performance Modeling (HPM) is a humanout-of-the-loop (HOOTL) computational methodology used to generate predictions of complex human-automation integration and system flow patterns. These tools provide computational representations of humans incorporating physical, cognitive, perceptual, and environmental characteristics. Increasingly complex automation leads to a new class of errors and error vulnerabilities. Hollnagel’s (1993) Contextual Control Model (CoCoM) will be used as the human error theory behind a HOOTL simulation using Air Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (Air MIDAS) to evaluate complex humanautomation integration considerations currently underway at NASA Ames Research Center. This paper will highlight the importance of the physical and cognitive link of a specific task and will outline attempts being made to understand the factors underlying human error, a critical consideration of human-complex system performance.

Edited B. Das; Brian F. Gore; Kevin M. Corker

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Perception modeling for human-like artificial sensor systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we present an approach to the design of human-like artificial systems. It uses a perception model to describe how sensory information is processed for a particular task and to correlate human and artificial perception. Since human-like ... Keywords: Active perception, Artificial hand, Artificial perceptual systems, Dexterous manipulation, Electronic tongue, Human-based sensors, Passive perception

Linn Robertsson; Boyko Iliev; Rainer Palm; Peter Wide

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A photon accurate model of the human eye  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A photon accurate model of individual cones in the human eye perceiving images on digital display devices is presented. Playback of streams of pixel video data is modeled as individual photon emission events from within the physical substructure of each ... Keywords: display devices, eye models, human eye cone models, schematic eyes, synthesized retina

Michael F. Deering

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Evaluation of Various CFD Modelling Strategies in Predicting Airflow and Temperature in a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

insulation, to shade solar radiation and to provide suitabledouble skin is shown. The solar radiation was not directlyas different values of solar radiation. Nomenclature u i,j,k

Pasut, Wilmer; De Carli, Michele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Spatiotemporal and spatial threshold models for relating UV exposures and skin cancer in the central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exact mechanisms relating exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and elevated risk of skin cancer remain the subject of debate. For example, there is disagreement on whether the main risk factor is duration of the exposure, its intensity, or some ...

Laura A. Hatfield; Richard W. Hoffbeck; Bruce H. Alexander; Bradley P. Carlin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results Title Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Redding, Laurel E., Michael D. Sohn, Thomas E. McKone, Shu-Li Wang, Dennis P. H. Hsieh, and Raymond S. H. Yang Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 116 Issue 12 Pagination 1629-1634 Keywords bayesian inference, body burden, environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, human milk biomonitoring, indoor environment department, lactational transfer, pcb 153, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling, pollutant fate and transport modeling, poly-chlorinated biphenyls, reverse dosimetry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geometric skinning with approximate dual quaternion blending  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skinning of skeletally deformable models is extensively used for real-time animation of characters, creatures and similar objects. The standard solution, linear blend skinning, has some serious drawbacks that require artist intervention. Therefore, a ... Keywords: Skinning, dual quaternions, linear combinations, rigid transformations, transformation blending

Ladislav Kavan; Steven Collins; Ji?í Žára; Carol O'Sullivan

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Generic Error Model of Human-Robot Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wrong human-robot interactions are at the origin of severe damages. Safety requirements ask the analysis of these interactions. At first, erroneous interactions have to be identified. In this paper, we propose to use UML (Unified Modeling Language) to specify human robot interaction. Then, generic error models, associated with the message feature provided by UML, are presented. These error models allow interaction errors to be automatically deduced from the modeling of the human-robot interactions. The use of these generic error models is illustrated on a medical robot for teleechography.

J. Guiochet; et al.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Mathematical Model for a Vibrating Human Head  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a mathematical model has been formulated to study the vibration of the human head. In the mathematical analysis of the model, the skull is considered as an anisotropic spherical shell and brain matter is represented as an inviscid compressible ... Keywords: Anisotropic, Human Head, Laplace Transformation, Skull Vibration, Stress Distribution

J. C. Misra; S. Dandapat; S. Adhikary

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was initiated in 2005 to investigate Human Performance Modeling in a System of Systems analytic environment. SAND2006-6569 and SAND2006-7911 document interim results from this effort; this report documents the final results. The problem is difficult because of the number of humans involved in a System of Systems environment and the generally poorly defined nature of the tasks that each human must perform. A two-pronged strategy was followed: one prong was to develop human models using a probability-based method similar to that first developed for relatively well-understood probability based performance modeling; another prong was to investigate more state-of-art human cognition models. The probability-based modeling resulted in a comprehensive addition of human-modeling capability to the existing SoSAT computer program. The cognitive modeling resulted in an increased understanding of what is necessary to incorporate cognition-based models to a System of Systems analytic environment.

Dixon, Kevin R.; Lawton, Craig R.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Longsine, Dennis E. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX); Forsythe, James Chris; Gauthier, John Henry; Le, Hai D.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Virtual People: Capturing Human Models to Populate Virtual Worlds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a new technique is introduced for automatically building recognisable moving 3D models of individual people Realistic modelling of people is essential for advanced multimedia, augmented reality and immersive virtual reality. Current systems ... Keywords: Avatar, Virtual Human, Whole-body Modelling, Humanoid Animation, Virtual Reality, VRML, Vision Techniques, 3D Reconstruction

Adrian Hilton; Daniel Beresford; Thomas Gentils; Raymond Smith; Wei Sun

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A 2D human body model dressed in eigen clothing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection, tracking, segmentation and pose estimation of people in monocular images are widely studied. Two-dimensional models of the human body are extensively used, however, they are typically fairly crude, representing the body either as a rough outline ...

Peng Guan; Oren Freifeld; Michael J. Black

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico); Watson, Patrick (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); McDaniel, Mark A. (Washington University); Eichenbaum, Howard B. (Boston University); Cohen, Neal J. (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Meeting Human Reliability Requirements through Human Factors Design, Testing, and Modeling  

SciTech Connect

In the design of novel systems, it is important for the human factors engineer to work in parallel with the human reliability analyst to arrive at the safest achievable design that meets design team safety goals and certification or regulatory requirements. This paper introduces the System Development Safety Triptych, a checklist of considerations for the interplay of human factors and human reliability through design, testing, and modeling in product development. This paper also explores three phases of safe system development, corresponding to the conception, design, and implementation of a system.

R. L. Boring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Application of the Aqueous Porous Pathway Model to Quantify the Effect of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate on Ultrasound-Induced Skin Structural Perturbation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigated the effect of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) on skin structural perturbation when utilized simultaneously with low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS). Pig full-thickness skin (FTS) and pig split-thickness ...

Polat, Baris E.

50

Human Behavior and Energy Use: Modeling the Relationships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Behavior and Energy Use: Modeling the Relationships Human Behavior and Energy Use: Modeling the Relationships Speaker(s): Bin Shui Thomas Sanquist Date: July 29, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This presentation summarizes the conceptual framework and some initial data analyses for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop models of the relationships between human behavior, energy use, climate change and national/international security. A brief history of social science in energy research is provided, followed by methods and data from an approach involving Consumer Lifestyle Analysis. Growth patterns in energy usage in the residential and personal travel sectors are illustrated, along with the indirect energy requirements to support that usage. General research needs in the area of behavior are discussed, some

51

Sensitivity analysis techniques for models of human behavior.  

SciTech Connect

Human and social modeling has emerged as an important research area at Sandia National Laboratories due to its potential to improve national defense-related decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. To learn about which sensitivity analysis techniques are most suitable for models of human behavior, different promising methods were applied to an example model, tested, and compared. The example model simulates cognitive, behavioral, and social processes and interactions, and involves substantial nonlinearity, uncertainty, and variability. Results showed that some sensitivity analysis methods create similar results, and can thus be considered redundant. However, other methods, such as global methods that consider interactions between inputs, can generate insight not gained from traditional methods.

Bier, Asmeret Brooke

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Science-Based Simulation Model of Human Performance for Human Reliability Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human reliability analysis (HRA), a component of an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), is the means by which the human contribution to risk is assessed, both qualitatively and quantitatively. However, among the literally dozens of HRA methods that have been developed, most cannot fully model and quantify the types of errors that occurred at Three Mile Island. Furthermore, all of the methods lack a solid empirical basis, relying heavily on expert judgment or empirical results derived in non-reactor domains. Finally, all of the methods are essentially static, and are thus unable to capture the dynamics of an accident in progress. The objective of this work is to begin exploring a dynamic simulation approach to HRA, one whose models have a basis in psychological theories of human performance, and whose quantitative estimates have an empirical basis. This paper highlights a plan to formalize collaboration among the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Maryland, and The Ohio State University (OSU) to continue development of a simulation model initially formulated at the University of Maryland. Initial work will focus on enhancing the underlying human performance models with the most recent psychological research, and on planning follow-on studies to establish an empirical basis for the model, based on simulator experiments to be carried out at the INL and at the OSU.

Dana L. Kelly; Ronald L. Boring; Ali Mosleh; Carol Smidts

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Tumors of the skin and soft tissues  

SciTech Connect

The majority of the body surface is covered by the skin. Many internal disorders are reflected in the condition of the skin. One of the major functions of the skin is protection of the other organ systems from a variety of environmental insults. In this role, the skin itself is exposed to factors that can ultimately cause chronic diseases and cancer. Since it is relatively easy to recognize skin abnormalities, most skin cancers are brought to professional attention sooner than other types of cancer. However, due to the close resemblance between many skin neoplasms and noncancerous dermatologic disorders, these neoplasms may be mistreated for months or even years. In veterinary oncology, as in human medicine, most cancers can be effectively treated or cured following an accurate diagnosis. Once diagnosed, skin neoplasms should be aggressively treated. If causal factors are known, exposure to these factors should be limited through removal of the agent (for chemical carcinogens) or limiting exposure to the agent (for other carcinogens such as sunlight). 10 tabs. (MHB)

Weller, R.E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Human equivalent antenna model for HF exposures: analytical versus numerical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the human exposure to HF radiation is analyzed using the simplified human equivalent antenna model featuring analytical and numerical approach, respectively. Namely, the human body is represented by an equivalent receiving straight thin ...

Dragan Poljak; Silvestar Sesnic; Ivana Zulim

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Evaluating the applicability of current models of workload to peer-based human-robot teams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human-Robot peer-based teams are evolving from a far-off possibility into a reality. Human Performance Moderator Functions (HPMFs) can be used to predict human behavior by incorporating the effects of internal and external influences such as fatigue ... Keywords: human performance modeling, human-robot peer-based teams

Caroline E. Harriott; Tao Zhang; Julie A. Adams

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Skin supersolidity slipperizing ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consistency between theory predictions and measurements and calculations revealed that the skin of ice, containing water molecules with fewer than four neighbours, forms a supersolid phase that is highly polarized, elastic, hydrophobic, with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice.

Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators’ alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

Jacques Hugo

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Numerical simulation of thermal response of the skin tissues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to develop a numerical model for the simulation the heat transfer process and the heat-induced mechanical response of the skin tissues. We present some models using the finite element method in 2D space. A multilayer model is ... Keywords: biothermomechanics, coupled problems, finite element method, numerical methods, skin tissue, thermal systems

Iulia Maria Cârstea; Ion Cârstea

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ideas and methods for modeling 3D human figures: the principal algorithms used by MakeHuman and their implementation in a new approach to parametric modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly presents the basic algorithms used by MakeHuman and their application in a new context from the point of view of the relationship between artist and computer. The problem we posed is the development of a valid tool specifically designed ... Keywords: 3D human, 3d model, 3d modelling, ACM proceedings

Manuel Bastioni; Simone Re; Shakti Misra

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Designing building skins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis involves framing criteria and discerning issues to be considered in the design of building skins in an urban environment. The 'information age' has paradoxically seen the demise of the facade as an important ...

Desai, Arjun

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Parametrical Regulation of Economic Growth Based on the Lucas Endogenous Model with Human Capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of application of the parametrical regulation theory for economic growth of Kazakhstan national economy on the basis of the Lucas endogenous model with a personalized human capital. The parameters of the considered model ... Keywords: Human capital, growth, identification, parametrical regulation, endogenous model

Abdykappar A. Ashimov; Bahyt T. Sultanov; Zheksenbek M. Adilov; Yuriy V. Borovskiy; Aliya S. Azhibekova

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound PAHs and binary mixtures of PAHs in order to bridge the gap between component assessment and mixture assessment. Seven pure parent compound PAHs and four binary mixtures of PAHs were examined in the Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity Assay, a Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) assay and the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assay (EROD). These assays were chosen for their ability to measure specific toxic endpoints related to the carcinogenic process (i.e. initiation, promotion, progression). Data from these assays was used in further studies to build Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) to estimate toxic endpoints and to test the additive assumption in PAH mixtures. These QSAR models will allow for the development of bioassay based potential potencies (PPB) or toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) that are derived not only from bioassay data, but also from structure, activity, and physical/chemical properties. These models can be extended to any environmental media to evaluate risk to human health from exposures to PAHs.

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A quantum mechanical derivation of the Schwarzschild radius and its quantum correction using a model density distribution: Skin of a black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a single particle density distribution for a system of self-gravitating particles which ultimately forms a black hole, we from a condensed matter point of view derive the Schwarzschild radius and by including the quantum mechanical exchange energy we find a small correction to the Schwarzschild radius, which we designate as the skin of the black hole.

Subodha Mishra

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

Emerging M&S challenges for human, social, cultural, and behavioral modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discipline of Modeling and Simulation (M&S) is ubiquitous in many domains, such as training and education, support of decision-making, or analysis of potential developments. In particular the armed forces apply M&S extensively and enable pioneering ... Keywords: behavioral modeling, cultural modeling, human modeling, social modeling

Dr. Andreas Tolk

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context  

SciTech Connect

It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Synthetic skins with humanlike warmth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic skins with humanlike characteristics, such as a warm touch, may be able to ease the social stigma associated with the use of prosthetic hands by enabling the user to conceal its usage during social touching situations. Similarly for social ... Keywords: prosthetics, rehabilitation robotics, social robotics, synthetic skin, warm skin

John-John Cabibihan; Rangarajan Jegadeesan; Saba Salehi; Shuzhi Sam Ge

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Skin contamination dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR); Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Cazalas, Edward (Corvallis, OR)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Predictive models of procedural human supervisory control behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human supervisory control systems are characterized by the computer-mediated nature of the interactions between one or more operators and a given task. Nuclear power plants, air traffic management and unmanned vehicles ...

Boussemart, Yves, 1980-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Modifying the MIT Sensorimotor Control Lab model of human balance and gait control for the addition of running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research continues the work begun by Sungho Jo and Steve G. Massaquoi on modeling human walking and upright balance. The model of human neurological control of balance and gait generation put forward by Jo and Massaquoi ...

Cappo, Ellen (Ellen Angeline)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Lighting and Human Performance II: Beyond Visibility Models Toward a Unified Human Factors Approach to Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the relationship between lighting conditions and human performance, it is first necessary to identify the routes by which lighting conditions can affect human performance. There are three such routes: the visual system, the circadian photobiological system, and the perceptual system. This report updates and replaces an earlier work and explores the relationship between lighting conditions and the ability to carry out tasks in interiors.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analysis of Land Skin Temperature Using AVHRR Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using satellite remote sensing techniques to take quantitative observations of the climate system will advance our knowledge and ability to model the climate system and its changes. Polar-orbiting satellite records of global land surface skin ...

Menglin Jin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Air humidity requirements for human comfort  

SciTech Connect

Upper humidity limits for the comfort zone determined from two recently presented models for predicting discomfort due to skin humidity and insufficient respiratory cooling are proposed. The proposed limits are compared with the maximum permissible humidity level prescribed in existing standards for the thermal indoor environment. The skin humidity model predicts discomfort as a function of the relative humidity of the skin, which is determined by existing models for human heat and moisture transfer based on environmental parameters, clothing characteristics, and activity level. The respiratory model predicts discomfort as a function of the driving forces for heat loss from the respiratory tract, namely, the temperature and humidity of the surrounding air. An upper humidity limit based on a relative skin humidity of 0.54, corresponding to 20% dissatisfied, results in a maximum permissible humidity level near 100% RH. The requirements for respiratory comfort are much more stringent and result in lower permissible indoor air humidities. Compared with the upper humidity limit specified in existing thermal comfort standards, e.g., ASHRAE Addendum 55a, the humidity limit based on skin humidity was less restrictive and the humidity limit based on respiratory comfort was far more restrictive.

Toftum, J.; Fanger, P.O.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modeling of EOG and electrode position optimization for human-computer interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to model electro-oculogram (EOG) to find optimal electrode positions for wearable human-computer interface system. The system is a head cap developed in our institute and with it we can measure EOG and facial electromyography ... Keywords: EOG, electrode positions, modeling, volume conductor model

Niina Nöjd; Jari Hyttinen

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Agent-based modelling of human education data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agent-based simulation is increasingly used to analyze the performance of complex systems. There are two main ways agentbased models are built — from equation-based models and directly from data. We are building models in both ways, investigating approaches for creating them and for validating them. In this paper we describe results of our work on one specific agent-based model, showing how it can be validated against the equation-based model from which it was derived, and the extent to which it can be used to derive additional results over and above those that the equationbased model can provide.

Yuqing Tang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Surveillance and human-computer interaction applications of self-growing models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the work is to build self-growing based architectures to support visual surveillance and human-computer interaction systems. The objectives include: identifying and tracking persons or objects in the scene or the interpretation of user gestures ... Keywords: Growing Neural Gas, Human-computer interaction, Self-growing models, Surveillance systems, Topology preservation

José García-Rodríguez; Juan Manuel García-Chamizo

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Modeling Human Behavior in the Aftermath of a Hypothetical Improvised Nuclear Detonation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Human Behavior in the Aftermath of a Hypothetical Improvised Nuclear Detonation Nidhi, human-initiated crisis in the center of Washington D.C. Prior studies of this scenario have focused on the agent design and multiagent interaction, and present initial results on how rapid restoration

Swarup, Samarth

77

Human-Machine Collaborative Knowledge Modeling in Railway Location Intelligent Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfill intelligent railway location", "Human-machine collaboration and modeling railway location knowledge unified is indispensable. Knowledge that man or computer can use are in different representation forms. Furthermore, when man and computer ... Keywords: Railway Location, Human-machine collaboration, Knowledge Representation, Domain-concerned Person Oriented Knowledge, Computer Oriented knowledge

Chunhua Han; Wei Cheng; Xiaofeng Ji; Yuan Xu

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Formal modeling and analysis of human body exposure to extreme heat in HI-Maude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we use HI-Maude to model and analyze the human thermoregulatory system and the effect of extreme heat exposure on the human body. This work is motivated by the 2010 Sauna World Championships, which ended in a tragedy when the last two finalists ...

Muhammad Fadlisyah; Peter Csaba Ölveczky; Erika Ábrahám

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Airflow structures and nano-particle deposition in a human upper airway model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering a human upper airway model, or equivalently complex internal flow conduits, the transport and deposition of nano-particles in the 1-150 nm diameter range are simulated and analyzed for cyclic and steady flow conditions. Specifically, using ... Keywords: computational fluid-particle dynamics simulation, human airways, inspiratory flow, nano-size particle deposition

Z. Zhang; C. Kleinstreuer

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Model of medical supply demand and astronaut health for long-duration human space flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The medical care of space crews is the primary limiting factor in the achievement of long-duration space missions. (Nicogossian 2003) The goal of this thesis was to develop a model of long-duration human space flight ...

Assad, Albert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Modelling Human Error with a Cognitive Theoretical Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Busse,D.K Johnson,C.W. The Second European Conference on Cognitive Modelling pp 90-97 Nottingham University Press

Busse, D.K Johnson, C.W.

82

Reasoning about human error by modeling cognition and interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we focus on system resilience from the perspective of understanding human error. In particular, we consider systematic cognitive slips, including postcompletion errors, which are persistent, though infrequent. We outline the findings from empirical studies that have identified various factors that provoke or mitigate against such errors. We then describe approaches we are pursuing to encapsulate these insights in ways that can be re-used within system design. More broadly, we argue that an understanding of the factors that influence the likelihood of such errors can support organizations in designing systems and processes to minimize the likelihood of such errors.

Ann Blandford; Jonathan Back; Paul Curzon; Simon Y. W. Li; Rimvydas Ruksenas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Video Human Motion Recognition Using a Knowledge-Based Hybrid Method Based on a Hidden Markov Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human motion recognition in video data has several interesting applications in fields such as gaming, senior/assisted-living environments, and surveillance. In these scenarios, we may have to consider adding new motion classes (i.e., new types of human ... Keywords: 3D motion capture, hidden Markov model, human-computer interaction, video human motion recognition

Myunghoon Suk; Ashok Ramadass; Yohan Jin; B. Prabhakaran

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modeling hematologic malignancies and their treatment in humanized mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximately 10% of all cancer deaths in the United States are due to neoplasms of the hematopoietic system, such as leukemias and lymphomas. Genetically engineered mouse models of these diseases have yielded invaluable ...

Leskov, Ilya, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Review: Receptor-oriented approaches in wildlife and human exposure modelling: A comparative study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five human and five wildlife receptor-oriented exposure models were compared with the aim to identify similarities, differences and areas where both fields can learn from each other. Similarities were revealed in exposure endpoints, chemical stressors ... Keywords: Chemical stressors, Contaminant exposure, Environmental risk assessment, Model comparison, Multiple stressors

Mark Loos; Aafke M. Schipper; Uwe Schlink; Kathrin Strebel; Ad M. J. Ragas

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Modeling Human Error For Experimentation, Training, And Error-Tolerant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human error in computer systems has been blamed for many military and civilian catastrophes resulting in mission failure and loss of money and lives. However, the root cause of such failures often lies in the system’s design. A central theme in designing for human-error tolerance is to build a multi-layered defense. Creating such a robust system requires that designers effectively manage several aspects of erroneous system usage: prevention, reduction, detection, identification, recovery, and mitigation. These also correspond to discrete stages before and after error occurrence where different defensive measures can be taken. Human error models can be used to better understand these stages, the underlying cognitive mechanisms responsible for errors, and ultimately how to design systems and training to reduce the effects of inherent human limitations. This paper presents a general framework for human error recovery based on five key stages of erroneous performance: the commission of an error, its detection, identification, and correction, and resumption of the original task. These stages constitute the main components of a state model that characterizes human performance, and allows designers and trainers comprehensively address the most important aspects of error-tolerant design. Furthermore, these performance stages can be modeled computationally, to varying degrees, using standard information processing architectures. This work also demonstrates the effectiveness of a technique using GOMS models to design systems to

Scott D. Wood; David E. Kieras

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Surety of human elements of high consequence systems: An organic model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite extensive safety analysis and application of safety measures, there is a frequent lament, ``Why do we continue to have accidents?'' Two breakdowns are prevalent in risk management and prevention. First, accidents result from human actions that engineers, analysts and management never envisioned and second, controls, intended to preclude/mitigate accident sequences, prove inadequate. This paper addresses the first breakdown, the inability to anticipate scenarios involving human action/inaction. The failure of controls has been addressed in a previous publication (Forsythe and Grose, 1998). Specifically, this paper presents an approach referred to as surety. The objective of this approach is to provide high levels of assurance in situations where potential system failure paths cannot be fully characterized. With regard to human elements of complex systems, traditional approaches to human reliability are not sufficient to attain surety. Consequently, an Organic Model has been developed to account for the organic properties exhibited by engineered systems that result from human involvement in those systems.

FORSYTHE,JAMES C.; WENNER,CAREN A.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Samco Model UV-1 UV-Ozone Stripper/Cleaner Operating Procedures LINK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Simultaneously, organic materials such as photoresist, solvent residues, human skin oil and pump oil are excited

Evans, Paul G.

89

The skin prick test ¿ European standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. : The skin prick test – European standards. Clinicalof results and thus make test Heinzerling et al. Clinical1: Table S3. Skin prick test panel – inhalant allergens.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Integrated Experimental and Computational Approach to Understand the Effects of Heavy Ion Radiation on Skin Homeostasis.  

SciTech Connect

The effects of low dose high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on human health are of concern for both space and clinical exposures. As epidemiological data for such radiation exposures are scarce for making relevant predictions, we need to understand the mechanism of response especially in normal tissues. Our objective here is to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on tissue homeostasis in a realistic model system. Towards this end, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional skin equivalent to low fluences of Neon (Ne) ions (300 MeV/u), and determined the differentiation profile as a function of time following exposure using immunohistochemistry. We found that Ne ion exposures resulted in transient increases in the tissue regions expressing the differentiation markers keratin 10, and filaggrin, and more subtle time-dependent effects on the number of basal cells in the epidermis. We analyzed the data using a mathematical model of the skin equivalent, to quantify the effect of radiation on cell proliferation and differentiation. The agent-based mathematical model for the epidermal layer treats the epidermis as a collection of heterogeneous cell types with different proliferation/differentiation properties. We obtained model parameters from the literature where available, and calibrated the unknown parameters to match the observed properties in unirradiated skin. We then used the model to rigorously examine alternate hypotheses regarding the effects of high LET radiation on the tissue. Our analysis indicates that Ne ion exposures induce rapid, but transient, changes in cell division, differentiation and proliferation. We have validated the modeling results by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The integrated approach presented here can be used as a general framework to understand the responses of multicellular systems, and can be adapted to other epithelial tissues.

von Neubeck, Claere; Shankaran, Harish; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Robert J.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

ARM - Measurement - Surface skin temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skin temperature skin temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface skin temperature The radiative surface skin temperature, from an IR thermometer measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface in its field of view. Categories Radiometric, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments IRT : Infrared Thermometer MFRIRT : Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer External Instruments

92

Sensitive skins and somatic processing for affective and sociable robots based upon a somatic alphabet approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sense of touch is one of the most important senses of the human body. This thesis describes the biologically inspired design of "sensitive skins" for two different robotic platforms: Leonardo, a high degree-of-freedom, ...

Stiehl, Walter Daniel, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Parameterization of the Cool Skin of the Ocean and of the Air-Ocean Gas Transfer on the Basis of Modeling Surface Renewal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat and gas transport in molecular sublayers at the air-sea interface is governed by similar laws. A model of renewal type based on the physics of molecular sublayers allows the derivation of a parameterization of the temperature difference ...

Alexander V. Soloviev; Peter Schlüssel

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Human-robot cross-training: Computational formulation, modeling and evaluation of a human team training strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We design and evaluate human-robot cross-training, a strategy widely used and validated for effective human team training. Cross-training is an interactive planning method in which a human and a robot iteratively switch ...

Nikolaidis, Stefanos

95

Analysis of enzymopathies in the human red blood cells by constraint-based stoichiometric modeling approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The human red blood cell (RBC) metabolism is investigated by calculating steady state fluxes using constraint-based stoichiometric modeling approaches. For the normal RBC metabolism, flux balance analysis (FBA) is performed via optimization of various ... Keywords: Enzymopathy, Flux balance analysis, Minimization of metabolic adjustment, Red blood cell, Regulatory on-off minimization

Saliha Durmu? Tekir; Tunahan Çak?r; Kutlu Ö. ílgen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data on an actual power plant transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Flawed Assumptions, Models and Decision Making: Misconceptions Concerning Human Elements in Complex System  

SciTech Connect

The history of high consequence accidents is rich with events wherein the actions, or inaction, of humans was critical to the sequence of events preceding the accident. Moreover, it has been reported that human error may contribute to 80% of accidents, if not more (dougherty and Fragola, 1988). Within the safety community, this reality is widely recognized and there is a substantially greater awareness of the human contribution to system safety today than has ever existed in the past. Despite these facts, and some measurable reduction in accident rates, when accidents do occur, there is a common lament. No matter how hard we try, we continue to have accidents. Accompanying this lament, there is often bewilderment expressed in statements such as, ''There's no explanation for why he/she did what they did''. It is believed that these statements are a symptom of inadequacies in how they think about humans and their role within technological systems. In particular, while there has never been a greater awareness of human factors, conceptual models of human involvement in engineered systems are often incomplete and in some cases, inaccurate.

FORSYTHE,JAMES C.; WENNER,CAREN A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Use Of Computational Human Performance Modeling As Task Analysis Tool  

SciTech Connect

During a review of the Advanced Test Reactor safety basis at the Idaho National Laboratory, human factors engineers identified ergonomic and human reliability risks involving the inadvertent exposure of a fuel element to the air during manual fuel movement and inspection in the canal. There were clear indications that these risks increased the probability of human error and possible severe physical outcomes to the operator. In response to this concern, a detailed study was conducted to determine the probability of the inadvertent exposure of a fuel element. Due to practical and safety constraints, the task network analysis technique was employed to study the work procedures at the canal. Discrete-event simulation software was used to model the entire procedure as well as the salient physical attributes of the task environment, such as distances walked, the effect of dropped tools, the effect of hazardous body postures, and physical exertion due to strenuous tool handling. The model also allowed analysis of the effect of cognitive processes such as visual perception demands, auditory information and verbal communication. The model made it possible to obtain reliable predictions of operator performance and workload estimates. It was also found that operator workload as well as the probability of human error in the fuel inspection and transfer task were influenced by the concurrent nature of certain phases of the task and the associated demand on cognitive and physical resources. More importantly, it was possible to determine with reasonable accuracy the stages as well as physical locations in the fuel handling task where operators would be most at risk of losing their balance and falling into the canal. The model also provided sufficient information for a human reliability analysis that indicated that the postulated fuel exposure accident was less than credible.

Jacuqes Hugo; David Gertman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Surface Skin Temperature and the Interplay between Sensible and Ground Heat Fluxes over Arid Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over arid regions, two community land models [Noah and Community Land Model (CLM)] still have difficulty in realistically simulating the diurnal cycle of surface skin temperature. Based on theoretical arguments and synthesis of previous ...

Xubin Zeng; Zhuo Wang; Aihui Wang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A critical comparison of human face rendering techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human skin exhibits complex light reflectance properties that make it difficult to render realistically. In recent years, many techniques have been introduced to render skin, with varying degrees of complexity and realism. ...

Arizpe, Arturo Andrew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modeling and Simulation for Exploring Human-Robot Team Interaction Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-sized and micro-robots will soon be available for deployment in large-scale forces. Consequently, the ability of a human operator to coordinate and interact with largescale robotic forces is of great interest. This paper describes the ways in which modeling and simulation have been used to explore new possibilities for human-robot interaction. The paper also discusses how these explorations have fed implementation of a unified set of command and control concepts for robotic force deployment. Modeling and simulation can play a major role in fielding robot teams in actual missions. While live testing is preferred, limitations in terms of technology, cost, and time often prohibit extensive experimentation with physical multi-robot systems. Simulation provides insight, focuses efforts, eliminates large areas of the possible solution space, and increases the quality of actual testing.

Dudenhoeffer, Donald Dean; Bruemmer, David Jonathon; Davis, Midge Lee

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Help:Skins | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skins Skins Jump to: navigation, search Clicking on the my preferences link in the upper right while logged in then click on the Skin button to change your skin. You can also preview the skin by clicking the (preview) links next to each skin. You can make changes to the current skin's stylesheet file (CSS) by creating a subpage of your userpage, "User:Yourname/monobook.css" for example. This requires your site admin to have enabled this feature -- if it is, you will see advice text at the top of your custom CSS page about clearing your browser's cache. Tools.png Tip for wiki admins: To enable this feature, you have to set $wgAllowUserCss to your LocalSettings.php. See also Help:Preferences Manual:Gallery of user styles (no official skins) Retrieved from

103

Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Oxide Skin Strength Measurements on Molten Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, OXIDE SKIN STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS ON MOLTEN ALUMINUM – MANGANESE ALLOYS WITH AND WITHOUT SALT ON SURFACE

105

Human-and-Humanoid Postures Under External Disturbances: Modeling, Simulation, and Robustness. Part 1: Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a well-known fact that the growth of technology has radically changed our approach to biosciences and medicine. What is interesting is that in the last decade we have witnessed a reverse influence--a trend towards "biologically inspired" solutions ... Keywords: Disturbance, Dynamic model, Posture, Robustness, Simulation

Veljko Potkonjak; Spyros Tzafestas; Miomir Vukobratovic; Milena Milojevic; Milos Jovanovic

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A Causal Model of Human Error for Safety Critical User Interface Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a method of assessing the implications for human error on user interface design of safety-critical software. In previous work we have proposed taxonomy of influencing factors that contribute to error. In this paper, components of the taxonomy are combined into a mathematical and causal model for error, represented as a Bayesian Belief Net (BBN). The BBN quantifies error influences arising from user knowledge, ability and the task environment, combined with factors describing the complexity of user action and user interface quality. The BBN model predicts probabilities of different types of error, slips and mistakes, for each component action of a task involving user-system interaction. We propose an Impact Analysis Method that involves running test scenarios against this causal model of error in order to determine those user actions that are prone to different types of error. Applying the proposed method will enable the designer to determine the combinations of inf...

Alistair G. Sutcliffe; Julia Galliers; Julia Galliers; Shailey Minocha; Shailey Minocha; Alistair Sutcliffe

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Name: Richard Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A student in my anatomy and physiology class asked me, "When it's very cold outside in the winter, why does your skin hurt MORE than usual when you bang your finger or someone slaps you on the arm?" Replies: Wow! This is one outstanding question. Mammals respond to cold weather with the hypothalamus releasing thyrotropin releasing factor. This production increases with the severity of the cold weather and the length of the exposure to cold over a long period of time (at least three to four weeks). The thyroid responds by slowly increasing in size and releases thyroxine at higher quantities. Thyroxine increases the sensitivity of the entire nervous system. As a matter of fact, as you probably know, it increases the metabolism wholesale! within the body. This gets complicated so I'm keeping it simple. So, the bottom line is thyroxine. It just heightens our sensitivity not only to cold but our entire nervous system is enhanced.

108

Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711)Revision 3: Update Methodology and Key Revisions  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. NUREG-0711 is the first document to be addressed. We present the methodology used to update NUREG-0711 and summarize the main changes made. Finally, we discuss the current status of the update program and the future plans.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; Fleger, S.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results  

SciTech Connect

We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Stationary turbine component with laminated skin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Physiological Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physiological Model Physiological Model The Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction team developed a three-dimensional model to simulate human internal thermal physiological systems (muscle, blood, etc.) and thermoregulatory responses such as metabolic heat generation. The model was developed with ANSYS, a finite element software which computes heat flow by conduction, convection, and mass transport of the blood. A human tissue system model represents the human body, including the physiological and thermal properties of the tissues. The arms and legs consist of bone, muscle, fat, and skin. There are additional lung, abdominal, and brain tissues in the torso and head zones. The model calculates the conduction heat transfer based on the temperature gradients between the tissue nodes. Blood flow is modeled with a network of supply

112

Skin-Like Prosthetic Polymer Surfaces  

transmit heat much more easily than untreated polymers. In addition, the material can be adjusted for color and skin smoothness, ... ••Thermal conduct ...

113

Development of a Rhesus Monkey Lung Geometry Model and Application to Particle Deposition in Comparison to Humans  

SciTech Connect

The exposure-dose-response characterization of an inhalation hazard established in an animal species needs to be translated to an equivalent characterization in humans relative to comparable doses or exposure scenarios. Here, the first geometry model of the conducting airways for rhesus monkeys is developed based upon CT images of the conducting airways of a 6-month-old male, rhesus monkey. An algorithm was developed for adding the alveolar region airways using published rhesus morphometric data. The resultant lung geometry model can be used in mechanistic particle or gaseous dosimetry models. Such dosimetry models require estimates of the upper respiratory tract volume of the animal and the functional residual capacity, as well as of the tidal volume and breathing frequency of the animal. The relationship of these variables to rhesus monkeys of differing body weights was established by synthesizing and modeling published data as well as modeling pulmonary function measurements on 121 rhesus control animals. Deposition patterns of particles up to 10 ?m in size were examined for endotracheal and and up to 5 ?m for spontaneous breathing in infant and young adult monkeys and compared to those for humans. Deposition fraction of respirable size particles was found to be higher in the conducting airways of infant and young adult rhesus monkeys compared to humans. Due to the filtering effect of the conducting airways, pulmonary deposition in rhesus monkeys was lower than that in humans. Future research areas are identified that would either allow replacing assumptions or improving the newly developed lung model.

Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; McClellan, Gene; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Harkema, Jack R.; Carey, Stephen A.; Schelegle, Edward; Hyde, D.; Kimbell, Julia; Miller, Frederick J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Neutron skin uncertainties of Skyrme energy density functionals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Neutron-skin thickness is an excellent indicator of isovector properties of atomic nuclei. As such, it correlates strongly with observables in finite nuclei that depend on neutron-to-proton imbalance and the nuclear symmetry energy that characterizes the equation of state of neutron-rich matter. A rich worldwide experimental program involving studies with rare isotopes, parity violating electron scattering, and astronomical observations is devoted to pinning down the isovector sector of nuclear models. Purpose: We assess the theoretical systematic and statistical uncertainties of neutron-skin thickness and relate them to the equation of state of nuclear matter, and in particular to nuclear symmetry energy parameters. Methods: We use the nuclear superfluid Density Functional Theory with several Skyrme energy density functionals and density dependent pairing. To evaluate statistical errors and their budget, we employ the statistical covariance technique. Results: We find that the errors on neutron skin increase with neutron excess. Statistical errors due to uncertain coupling constants of the density functional are found to be larger than systematic errors, the latter not exceeding 0.06 fm in most neutron-rich nuclei across the nuclear landscape. The single major source of uncertainty is the poorly determined slope L of the symmetry energy that parametrizes its density dependence. Conclusions: To provide essential constraints on the symmetry energy of the nuclear energy density functional, next-generation measurements of neutron skins are required to deliver precision better than 0.06 fm.

M. Kortelainen; J. Erler; W. Nazarewicz; N. Birge; Y. Gao; E. Olsen

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

115

Locust skin: a thesis in creative nonfiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This creative thesis includes a critical introduction that discusses a brief history and definition of the creative nonfiction genre, the ethical dilemmas faced by the writer when telling a true story, and contextualizes my work within contemporary creative nonfiction. Locust Skin contains twenty-eight original pieces describing my experience adjusting to life as a single mother. Narrative segments alternate with short prose poems that add depth of feeling and a sense of wonder and beauty to contrast with the struggles voiced in the narrative. Through research and the study of works by authors such as Mary Karr, Terry Tempest Williams and Norma Cantú, I was able to establish a framework for the creative portion of the thesis. In writing the stories, I discovered the difficulty in negotiating an effective balance between telling a true story while maintaining privacy for the real people included in the narrative. Objectivity, avoiding sentimentality, and writing about myself without producing an overly self-absorbed collection was also a struggle. Overall, the collection contains short prose pieces that strive to reflect the precise poetic prose of Karr's The Liar's Club, while combining human suffering with detailed descriptions of nature illustrated by Williams' Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place in an unconventional form reminiscent of Norma Cantú's Canícula: Snapshots of a Girlhood en la Frontera.

Poff, Terri Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is national interest in the development of sophisticated materials that can automatically detect and respond to chemical and biological threats without the need for human intervention. In living systems, cell membranes perform such functions on a routine basis, detecting threats, communicating with the cell, and triggering automatic responses such as the opening and closing of ion channels. The purpose of this project was to learn how to replicate simple threat detection and response functions within artificial membrane systems. The original goals toward developing 'smart skin' assemblies included: (1) synthesizing functionalized nanoparticles to produce electrochemically responsive systems within a lipid bilayer host matrices, (2) calculating the energetics of nanoparticle-lipid interactions and pore formation, and (3) determining the mechanism of insertion of nanoparticles in lipid bilayers via imaging and electrochemistry. There are a few reports of the use of programmable materials to open and close pores in rigid hosts such as mesoporous materials using either heat or light activation. However, none of these materials can regulate themselves in response to the detection of threats. The strategies we investigated in this project involve learning how to use programmable nanomaterials to automatically eliminate open channels within a lipid bilayer host when 'threats' are detected. We generated and characterized functionalized nanoparticles that can be used to create synthetic pores through the membrane and investigated methods of eliminating the pores either through electrochemistry, change in pH, etc. We also focused on characterizing the behavior of functionalized gold NPs in different lipid membranes and lipid vesicles and coupled these results to modeling efforts designed to gain an understanding of the interaction of nanoparticles within lipid assemblies.

Montano, Gabriel A.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Allen, Amy; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Wheeler, David Roger

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Human Resources, Human Resource Management, and the Competitive Advantage of Firms: Toward a More Comprehensive Model of Causal Linkages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We maintain that human resources are strategically significant in at least three cases, when these resources (1) help create traditional Ricardian rents; (2) function as components of organizational capabilities that generate nontraditional Ricardian ... Keywords: dynamic capabilities, entrepreneurship, rent theories, resource-based view, strategic HRM

Clint Chadwick; Adina Dabu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles With a modest effort, many of the energy-efficient technologies developed for buildings can be transferred to the transportation sector. The goal of vehicle thermal management research at LBL is to save the energy equivalent of one to two billion gallons of gasoline per year, and improve the marketability of next-generation vehicles using advanced solar control glazings and insulating shell components to reduce accessory loads. Spectrally selective and electrochromic window glass and lightweight insulating materials improve the fuel efficiency of conventional and hybrid vehicles and extend the range of electric vehicles by reducing the need for air conditioning and heating, and by allowing the downsizing of equipment.

119

Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens.

Ratliff, C.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modeling and analysis of affective influences on human experience, prediction, decision making, and behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subjective and affective elements are well-known to influence human decision making. This dissertation presents a theoretical and empirical framework on how human decision makers' subjective experience and affective ...

Ahn, Hyungil, 1976-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A fuzzy set-based approach for modeling dependence among human errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of dependence among human errors is an important aspect of human reliability analysis. When dependence between two tasks exists, the probability of the operators' failure on one task is higher if they have failed on the preceding task, ... Keywords: ADS, AI, ATWS, BHEP, BWR, CB, CHEP, COA, CSS, Dependence, FES, FFTA, FL, FRB, FS, Fuzzy expert system, Fuzzy rules elicitation, HEP, HRA, Human error, Human reliability analysis, MF, NPP, PSA, PSF, SLCS, TAF, THERP, TSC, UOD

E. Zio; P. Baraldi; M. Librizzi; L. Podofillini; V. N. Dang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Multi-Methods Approach to HRA and Human Performance Modeling: A Field Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a research reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory is primarily designed and used to test materials to be used in other, larger-scale and prototype reactors. The reactor offers various specialized systems and allows certain experiments to be run at their own temperature and pressure. The ATR Canal temporarily stores completed experiments and used fuel. It also has facilities to conduct underwater operations such as experiment examination or removal. In reviewing the ATR safety basis, a number of concerns were identified involving the ATR canal. A brief study identified ergonomic issues involving the manual handling of fuel elements in the canal that may increase the probability of human error and possible unwanted acute physical outcomes to the operator. In response to this concern, that refined the previous HRA scoping analysis by determining the probability of the inadvertent exposure of a fuel element to the air during fuel movement and inspection was conducted. The HRA analysis employed the SPAR-H method and was supplemented by information gained from a detailed analysis of the fuel inspection and transfer tasks. This latter analysis included ergonomics, work cycles, task duration, and workload imposed by tool and workplace characteristics, personal protective clothing, and operational practices that have the potential to increase physical and mental workload. Part of this analysis consisted of NASA-TLX analyses, combined with operational sequence analysis, computational human performance analysis (CHPA), and 3D graphical modeling to determine task failures and precursors to such failures that have safety implications. Experience in applying multiple analysis techniques in support of HRA methods is discussed.

Jacques Hugo; David I Gertman

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Three alternatives to measure the human-likeness of a handshake model in a turing-like test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Turing test, a computer model is deemed to think intelligently if it can generate answers indistinguishable from those of a human. We proposed a Turing-like handshake test for testing motor aspects of machine intelligence. The test is administered ...

Ilana Nisky; Guy Avraham; Amir Karniel

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Skin Bleaching in Jamaica: A Colonial Legacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light skin color sits within a space of privilege. While this has global significance and relevance, it is particularly true in Jamaica, a former British colony. The majority of the population is of African descent, yet there is an elevation of Eurocentric values and a denigration of Afrocentric values in many facets of life, specifically in the promotion of light skin as an indicator of beauty and social status. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological and socio-cultural factors that influence the practice of skin bleaching in the postcolonial society of Jamaica. Additionally, the study outlined the nation's efforts to combat the skin-bleaching phenomenon. The naturalistic paradigm of inquiry was used to frame the study and to collect and analyze data. The sample consisted of fifteen participants—twelve participants (six males and six females) with a history of skin bleaching; a retailer of skin lightening products; a local dermatologist who has written and published in local newspapers on the practice; and a representative from the Ministry of Health who was integrally involved in the national educational efforts to ban the practice. Data came from three sources: in-depth interviews with respondents; observation of participant's skin-bleaching practices; and a review of local cultural artifacts from popular culture and the media. Data from the audio recorded and transcribed interviews were analyzed using a thematic analysis. Some of the findings reveal that there are multiple and inconsistent definitions of bleaching; skin bleaching enjoys mixed reviews—much attributed to economic and social class distinctions; bleachers demonstrate and boast of their expertise in managing the bleaching process suggesting, that because of this expertise, they are immune to any negative side-effects of the practice; the bleaching practice was found to be intermittent, time consuming and laborious, costly and addictive; there are several motivations for the skin-bleaching practice, and these are primarily connected to issues of fashion, beauty, popularity, self-image and acceptability; there is a certain level of defiance towards the government‘s efforts to ban bleaching yet an expressed sense of responsibility among bleachers. The overall findings show that there is a bias in Jamaica for light skin over dark skin and these values are taught in non-formal and informal ways from very early in life. The practice of skin bleaching is of social and public health concern, and this study has implications for national policy, practice and theory.

Robinson, Petra Alaine

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

earth skin temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

earth skin temperature earth skin temperature Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords climate

127

Unconventional human computer interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This course focuses on how we can use the potential of the human body in experimental or unconventional interface techniques. It explores the biological or physiological characteristics of the separate parts of the body, from head to toe, and from skin ...

Steffi Beckhaus; Ernst Kruijff

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Background Error Correlation between Surface Skin and Air Temperatures: Estimation and Impact on the Assimilation of Infrared Window Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper makes use of ensemble forecasts to infer the correlation between surface skin temperature Ts and air temperature Ta model errors. The impact of this correlation in data assimilation is then investigated. In the process of assimilating ...

Louis Garand; Mark Buehner; Nicolas Wagneur

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The skin's role in human thermoregulation and comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is 3.8 met (ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, 2005). Swimmingcomfort. The ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals provides theEngineers) (2005), Handbook of Fundamentals, Atlanta,

Arens, Edward A; Zhang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has designated May as National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month. In 1996, an estimated 1 million cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed, of which approximately 95 % will be squamous cell or basal cell carcinomas (1). Although the incidence of melanoma is lower than those of squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas, the case-fatality rate is highest for persons with melanoma. During 1973–1992, mortality from melanoma increased 34%—the third highest increase of all cancers (2). CDC, in collaboration with the AAD, has initiated the National Skin Cancer Prevention Education Program (NSCPEP) to increase public awareness about skin cancer and to help reduce the occurrence of and deaths associated with skin cancer. Goals of this program are to develop and disseminate educational messages for children, their parents, and other caregivers; develop guidelines for school curricula; evaluate the utility and value of the ultraviolet (UV) index; and develop educational messages for health-care providers. Additional information about this month and the NSCPEP is available from

Among Children; Young Adults

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Trajectory-Based modeling of human actions with motion reference points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human action recognition in videos is a challenging problem with wide applications. State-of-the-art approaches often adopt the popular bag-of-features representation based on isolated local patches or temporal patch trajectories, where motion patterns ...

Yu-Gang Jiang; Qi Dai; Xiangyang Xue; Wei Liu; Chong-Wah Ngo

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Simulation of human episodic memory by using a computational model of the hippocampus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The episodic memory, the memory of personal events and history, is essential for understanding the mechanism of human intelligence. Neuroscience evidence has shown that the hippocampus, a part of the limbic system, plays an important role in the encoding ...

Naoyuki Sato; Yoko Yamaguchi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans  

SciTech Connect

The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A revised model for radiation dosimetry in the human gastrointestinal tract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents. Each wall was divided into many small regions so that the histologic and radiosensitive variations of the tissues across the wall could be distinguished. The characteristic parameters were determined based on the newest information available in the literature. Each of these sections except the stomach was subdivided into multiple subsections to include the spatiotemporal variations in the shape and characteristic parameters. This new GIT was integrated into an anthropomorphic phantom representing both an adult male and a larger-than-average adult female. The current phantom contains 14 different types of tissue. This phantom was coupled with the MCNP 4C Monte Carlo simulation package. The initial design and coding of the phantom and the Monte Carlo treatment employed in this study were validated using the results obtained by Cristy and Eckerman (1987). The code was used for calculating specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) in various organs and radiosensitive tissues from uniformly distributed sources of fifteen monoenergetic photons and electrons, 10 keV - 4 MeV, in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. The present studies showed that the average photon SAFs to the walls were significantly different from that to the radiosensitive cells (stem cells) for the energies below 50 keV. Above 50 keV, the photon SAFs were found to be almost constant across the walls. The electron SAF at the depth of the stem cells was a small fraction of the SAF routinely estimated at the contents-mucus interface. Electron studies showed that the “self-dose” for the energies below 300 keV and the “cross-dose” below 2 MeV were only from bremsstrahlung and fluorescent radiations at the depth of the stem cells and were not important.

Bhuiyan, Md. Nasir Uddin

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Metabolic Rate Constants for Hydroquinone in F344 Rat and Human Liver Isolated Hepatocytes: Application to a PBPK model.  

SciTech Connect

Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important industrial chemical that also occurs naturally in foods and in the leaves and bark of a number of plant species. Exposure of laboratory animals to HQ may result in a species-, sex-, and strain-specific nephrotoxicity. The sensitivity of male F344 vs. female F344 and Sprague-Dawley rats or B6C3F1 mice appears to be related to differences in the rates of formation and further metabolism of key nephrotoxic metabolites. Metabolic rate constants for the conversion of HQ through several metabolic steps to the mono-glutathione conjugate and subsequent detoxification via mercapturic acid were measured in suspension cultures of hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats and humans. An in vitro mathematic kinetic model was used to analyze each metabolic step by simultaneously fitting the disappearance of each substrate and the appearance of subsequent metabolites. An iterative, nested approach was used whereby downstream metabolites were considered first and the model was constrained by the requirement that rate constants determined during analysis of individual metabolic steps must also satisfy the complete, integrated metabolism scheme, including competitive pathways. The results from this study indicated that the overall capacity for metabolism of HQ and its mono-glutathione conjugate is greater in hepatocytes from humans than those isolated from rats, suggesting a greater capacity for detoxification of the glutathione conjugates. Metabolic rate constants were applied to an existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the model was used to predict total glutathione metabolites produced in the liver. The results showed that body burdens of these metabolites will be much higher in rats than humans.

Poet, Torka S.; Wu, Hong; English, J C.; Corley, Rick A.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Toward Dynamic, Longitudinal, Agent-Based Microsimulation Models of Human Activity in Urban Settings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for theory. FOCUSING ON INTERACTION USING AGENT-BASED MODELSBackground Agent-based models are characterized by theirEnvironment The dynamic agent-based model seeks to produce,

Rindt, Craig R.; Marca, James E.; McNally, Michael G.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Regional Climatography of West Nile, Uganda, to Support Human Plague Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The West Nile region in northwestern Uganda is a focal point for human plague, which peaks in boreal autumn and is spread by fleas that travel on rodent hosts. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is collaborating with the National ...

Andrew J. Monaghan; Katherine MacMillan; Sean M. Moore; Paul S. Mead; Mary H. Hayden; Rebecca J. Eisen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

USING EXPERT MODELS IN HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS A DEPENDENCE ASSESSMENT METHOD BASED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) scenario in a nuclear Boiling Water Reactor (BWR the computerized diagnostic aids used in nuclear p ower plants, e.g. Chang et al. (1995), and clinical decision for nuclear power plants applications, human failure dependence assessment is an important part of the HRA

139

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant Using a Revised Arsenic Bioconcentratio n Factor for Edible Fish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data from an actual power plant that have been transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state. Values of arsenic concentrations in similar ecosystem settings were applied to calculate its contributions to risk.BackgroundThere is increased scientific and regulatory interest in the suite of risks to human health and ecosystems ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); Ivanov, Ilia N. (Knoxville, TN); Shibata, Jason (Manhattan Beach, CA)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Light & Skin Interactions: Simulations for Computer Graphics Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light and Skin Interactions immerses you in one of the most fascinating application areas of computer graphics: appearance simulation. The book first illuminates the fundamental biophysical processes that affect skin appearance, and reviews seminal related ...

Gladimir V. G. Baranoski; Aravind Krishnaswamy

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Measurements of the Skin Temperature on Small Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus to measure the skin temperature and related variables on inland lakes is described. The apparatus is a transparent frame with sensors to measure the skin and bulk water temperature, the wind velocity, and the air temperature and ...

Robert Kurzeja; Malcolm Pendergast; Eliel Villa-Aleman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Physics of Supercooling of Thin Water Skins Covering Gyrating Hailstones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid water skins on spongy deposits of hailstones that grow while gyrating in a wind tunnel environment, have been routinely observed to be supercooled at the water skin–air interface to as low as ?5°C and more. The average water skin thickness ...

Roland List

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Thermal Comfort Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comfort Model Comfort Model Photo of human testing to determine thermal comfort perception data. Photo of human testing to determine thermal comfort perception data. Working with researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, our team at NREL developed an empirical model of people's temperature sensation (hot/cold) as well as perceptions (comfortable/uncomfortable) in a transient non-homogeneous environment. The model predicts sensation and comfort locally (at specific points on the body) as well as globally (overall). The university performed more than 100 tests on human test subjects in a controlled environmental chamber under a range of steady state and transient thermal conditions. Participants subjectively recorded their thermal comfort on a simple form. Core and local skin temperature data was

145

Human-machine interactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hypercontraction and Drosophila : a model system for the study of human myopathies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, there are no therapeutic interventions which fully alleviate the defects associated with muscular dystrophies and cardiomyopathies. Development of model systems in which to utilize high-throughput screens for ...

Montana, Enrico Sakai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Human Energy Budget Modeling in Urban Parks in Toronto and Applications to Emergency Heat Stress Preparedness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current study tests applications of the Comfort Formula (COMFA) energy budget model by assessing the moderating effects of urban parks in contrast to streets, and it also looks at the influence of park types (“open” or “treed”). Exploration ...

Jennifer K. Vanos; Jon S. Warland; Terry J. Gillespie; Graham A. Slater; Robert D. Brown; Natasha A. Kenny

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Advanced material appearance modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many years, appearance models in computer graphics focused on general models for reflectance functions coupled with texture maps. Recently, it has been recognized that even very common materials such as hair, skin, fabric, and rusting metal require ...

Julie Dorsey; Holly Rushmeier

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Computer Vision and Human-Computer Interaction: artificial vision techniques and use cases with creating interfaces and interaction models.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Here is described how Computer Vision could give improvements to Human-Computer Interaction. Starting from a brief description of computers and human beings, follows a description… (more)

Comite, Marco

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

RFID-based human behavior modeling and anomaly detection for elderly care  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research aimed at building an intelligent system that can detect abnormal behavior for the elderly at home. Active RFID tags can be deployed at home to help collect daily movement data of the elderly who carries an RFID reader. When the reader detects ... Keywords: RFID, anomaly detection, behavior modeling, clustering, elderly care

Hui-Huang Hsu; Chien-Chen Chen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of the human microbiome have revealed that even healthy individuals differ remarkably in the microbes that occupy habitats such as the gut, skin and vagina. Much of this diversity remains unexplained, although diet, ...

Alm, Eric J.

152

Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin  

SciTech Connect

A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

Marra, John J; McNamee, Sara

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Skin-Like Prosthetic Polymer Surfaces - Energy Innovation Portal  

ORNL scientists combined superhydrophobic polymer inventions with carbon nanotubes to create a self-cleaning skin-like surface material with the ...

154

She, With a Warm Palm, the Skin Over My Spine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??She, with a Warm Palm, the Skin over My Spine is a collection of sixnonfiction essays and three vignettes divided into two parts. The first… (more)

Cambardella, Cara Maria Michele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model was constructed for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included. 25 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

Filipy, R.E.; Borst, F.J.; Cross, F.T.; Park, J.F.; Moss, O.R.; Roswell, R.L.; Stevens, D.L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear matter symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei RID A-2398-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlations between the thickness of the neutron skin in finite nuclei and the nuclear matter symmetry energy are studied in the Skyrme Hartree-Fock model. From the most recent analysis of the isospin diffusion data in heavy-ion collisions based on an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model with in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, a value of L = 88 +/- 25 MeV for the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density is extracted, and this imposes stringent constraints on both the parameters in the Skyrme effective interactions and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei. Predicted thickness of the neutron skin is 0.22 +/- 0.04 fm for (208)Pb, 0.29 +/- 0.04 fm for (132)Sn, and 0.22 +/- 0.04 fm for (124)Sn.

Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Prevalence of skin neoplasma amont the atomic bomb survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 7,000 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki who participate in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Adult Health Study (AHS) were examined to define the relationship between skin neoplasms and exposure to ionizing radiation. Careful clinical inspection of the skin was undertaken to detect not only skin cancer but precancerous lesions such as senile keratosis. Five cases of basal cell carcinoma, five cases of senile keratosis and one case of Bowen`s disease were confirmed histologically among 5955 A-bomb survivors for whom Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) dose estimates are available. The relationship between the combined prevalence of skin cancer and precancerous lesions and DS86 dose was examined together with other factors that might affect skin neoplasms including occupational exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, age, sex and city. The prevalence of basal cell carcinoma and senile keratosis increased as the DS86 dose increased. The prevalent of skin cancer and senile keratosis among persons engaged in work involving frequent exposure to UV rays was higher than among those who were not engaged in such work. Sex and city were not significantly related to those skin diseases. Odds ratios of skin neoplasm for a 1-Gy dose, occupational exposure to UV rays and age at time of examination exposure to UV rays and age at time of examination (in 10-year increments) are 1.7, 5.9 and 1.9, respectively. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

Yamada, Michiko; Kodama, Kazunori; Akahoshi, Masazumi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Tube skin temperature prediction of catalytic reforming unit (CRU) heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum duty of reformer heaters is governed by the occurance of maximum tube skin temperature of the heaters. The value of maximum tube skin temperatures of the heaters must not exceed theirs' maximum allowable design temperature. The paper highlights ... Keywords: coke formation, finite element, simulations, tube furnance

Suzana Yusup; Nguyen Duy Vinh; Nurhayati Mellon; Abdullah Hassan

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

SPH Model Approach Used to Predict Skin Inclusions into Semisolid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an Solidifying Crystalline Interface.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluation and design of double-skin facades for office buildings in hot climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this research are (a) to investigate the thermal effect of double skin facades in office buildings in hot climates and (b) to propose guidelines for their efficient design based on this evaluation. The study involves the energy performance analysis of two buildings in India. A base case with the existing building skin was simulated for both the cities. The main source for the high cooling loads was found to be heat gain through windows and walls. This led to the evolution of a series of facade strategies with the goals of reducing heat gain, providing ventilation and day-lighting. The buildings were then simulated for their energy performance with the proposed double-skin strategies. Each of these strategies was varied according to the layers constituting the facade, the transparency of the facade and the orientation of the facade to which it is applied. Final comparisons of energy consumption were made between the proposed options and the base case to find the most efficient strategy and also the factors that affected this efficiency. The simulations were done using the building simulation software, Ener-Win. The double skin was simulated as per an approximate and simplistic calculation of the u-value, solar heat gain coefficient and transmissivity properties of the layers constituting the facade. The model relied on logically arrived at assumptions about the facade properties that were approximately within 10% range of measured values. Based on inferences drawn from these simulations, a set of design guidelines comprised of goals and parameters was generated for design of double-skin facades in hot climates typical to most of the Indian subcontinent. It was realized that the double-skin defined typically as a 'pair of glass skins separated by an air corridor' may not be an entirely energy efficient design strategy for hot climates. However, when used appropriately in combination with other materials, in the right orientation and with the right transparency, a double-layered facade turns out to be an energy efficient solution.

Yellamraju, Vijaya

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Mechanistic investigation of skin barrier perturbation induced by surfactants in the presence of humectants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stratum corneum (SC) of the skin functions as a barrier between the body and the environment. Surfactants such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) are used in skin cleansers and in skin-care formulations because of their ...

Ghosh, Saswata

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Spatial Averaging of Fields from Half-wave Dipole Antennas and Corresponding SAR Calculations in the NORMAN Human Voxel Model Betwee n 65 MHz and 2 GHz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Findlay, RP; and Dimbylow, PJ. 2009. Spatial Averaging of Fields from Half-wave Dipole Antennas and Corresponding SAR Calculations in the NORMAN Human Voxel Model Between 65 MHz and 2 GHz. In Physics in Medicine and Biology, Volume 54, Number 8, 2009, pp. 2437-2447. This RF exposure research is the second part of SAR modelling work by the Health Protection Agency in the UK. The paper addresses SAR modelling for non-uniform RF exposure conditions. When an antenna is located clo...

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

U.S. Department of Energy Human Subjects Research Database (HSRD) A model for internal oversight and external transparency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster introduces the Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Database (HSRD), which contains information on all Department of Energy research projects involving human subjects that: are funded by DOE; are conducted in DOE facilities; are performed by DOE personnel; include current or former DOE or contract personnel.

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ozone, skin cancer, and the SST  

SciTech Connect

In 1971, the U.S. Congress cut off funding for development of supersonic transport aircraft prototypes when it was argued that the pollution created by SSTs could reduce the stratospheric ozone content and increase the incidence of skin cancer. At present, the theory of ozone depletion is in a rather uncertain state. Two examples of this are cited. First, ozone depletion may depend more on the availability of surfaces of aerosols and particles than on the content of chlorine. Second, it has been discovered that NO(x) can tie up active chlorine and thus reduce depletion from that source. We are therefore left with the paradoxical result that under certain circumstances SSTs flying in the lower stratospheric can actually counteract, at least partially, any ozone-depleting effects of CFCs. A recent study by scientists at the Brookhaven National Laboratory showed that melanoma rates would not be affected by changes in the ozone layer. If these results are confirmed, then much of the fear associated with ozone depletion disappears. It is difficult to tell how all this will affect a future supersonic transport program, since it is not clear whether a fleet of SSTs will increase or offset ozone depletion.

Singer, S.F.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Anisotropy of Land Surface Skin Temperature Derived from Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land skin temperature, an important feature for agricultural monitoring, convective processes, and the earth’s radiation budget, is monitored from limited-view satellite imagers. The angular dependence of this parameter is examined using ...

Patrick Minnis; Mandana M. Khaiyer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Second Skin : motion capture with actuated feedback for motor learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Second Skin aims to combine three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking with tactile feedback for the purpose of improving users' motor-learning ability. Such a system would track a user's body and limb movements as he or she ...

Miaw, Dennis (Dennis R.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Solid-State Radiometer Measurements of Sea Surface Skin Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite sea surface skin temperature (SSST) maps are readily available from precisely calibrated radiometer systems such as the ERS along-track scanning radiometer and, in the near future, from the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer. ...

C. J. Donlon; S. J. Keogh; D. J. Baldwin; I. S. Robinson; I. Ridley; T. Sheasby; I. J. Barton; E. F. Bradley; T. J. Nightingale; W. Emery

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

An analysis of rate-sensitive skin in oil wells  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the results of the perforating program for the first forty wells in the Kuparuk River Field in Alaska. Several different types of perforating guns were used to perforate the wells at varying shot densities. Pressure transient tests were conducted on each well to measure skin damage and flow efficiency. A correlation of average flow efficiency with perforating gun type and shot density is presented. This shows that shot densities above 4 shots/ft result in less skin damage, and wells completed with 12 shots/ft have little or no damage. The effect of perforation penetration is also shown to be a factor in reducing damage, but with all other factors being equal, 12 shots/ft is shown to result in the least amount of damage. The above results are explained by a detailed analysis of multiple buildup tests at varying rates which were performed on some of the highly damaged wells completed during the early development of the field. These tests indicated skin damage to be rate sensitive with some true formation damage also present. Non-Darcy flow and gas saturation near the wellbore are shown to contribute to the rate-sensitive skin factors. A method of analysis is presented which allows non-Darcy flow skin factors to be calculated when gas saturation is also causing a skin effect. This can be accomplished without fluid property and relative permeability data, which is necessary to calculate saturation effects using standard analysis methods.

Blacker, L.K.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Human cloning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it will ever be possible. The reason is that most specialized cell (ie. skin, hair, heart . . .) may not have all the genetic information necessary to form a complete person....

171

A Revised Force–Restore Model for Land Surface Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To clarify the definition of the equation for the temperature toward which the soil skin temperature is restored, the prediction equations in the commonly used force–restore model for soil temperature are rederived from the heat conduction ...

Diandong Ren; Ming Xue

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A system dynamics model for the screening-level long-term assessment of human health risks at contaminated sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the design of sustainable and cost-effective management strategies for contaminated sites, decision makers need appropriate tools, i.e. environmental decision support systems to assist them in the planning, assessment, selection and optimisation ... Keywords: Contaminated sites, EDSS, Human health risk assessment, Monitored natural attenuation, Risk-based land management, System dynamics, Uncertainty, Vensim

Ursula S. Mcknight; Michael Finkel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development of an in vitro model of contraction by fibroblasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dermal scars in adult humans are mechanically and functionally inferior to normal skin and can be physically disfiguring. The contraction of the wound by fibroblasts has been linked to the formation of scar. The mechanical ...

Freyman, Toby M., 1974-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Flow dynamics in a double-skin façade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamical study of the flow in an asymmetrically heated vertical plane channel was carried out experimentally and numerically. The experiments are carried out in water for modified Rayleigh numbers (Ra*) in a range corresponding to the boundary layer ... Keywords: double skin, laminar flow, natural convection, numerical simulation, recirculation zone, vertical channel, visualization technique, wall flux

Dan Ospir; Cristian Chereches; Catalin Popa; Stéphane Fohanno; Catalin Popovici

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Computational intelligence techniques: a study of scleroderma skin disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of microarray gene expression data from patients with and without scleroderma skin disease using computational intelligence and visual data mining techniques. Virtual reality spaces are used for providing unsupervised ... Keywords: Scleroderma disease, clustering, differential evolution, genetic programming, genomics, grid computing, hybrid evolutionary-classical optimization, particle swarm optimization, rough sets, similarity structure preservation, virtual reality spaces, visual data mining

Julio J. Valdes; Alan J. Barton

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Skin carcinogenicity of synthetic and natural petroleums. [Mice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a series of three separate experiments mice were exposed to various concentrations of fossil liquids obtained from coal, oil shale or natural petroleum. All materials were capable of inducing squamous cell carcinoma, but potency differed substantially. Skin carcinogenicity was markedly greater for both coal or oil shale liquids than for natural petroleums. None of the syncrudes approached the skin carcinogenicity of a pure reference carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene (BP). It is unlikely that determination of the concentration of an active compound in material applied to the test animal will allow meaningful comparison among the diverse agents of interest to the synthetic fuels industry. To better establish the relationship between actual tissue dose and surface concentration the authors are investigating various in vitro and biochemical measures of hydrocarbon-skin interaction to determine which, if any, could serve as a more definitive measure of surface dose. Results, using BP as a marker carcinogenic hydrocarbon, suggest that carcinogenic crudes inhibit both BP metabolism in skin organ culture and the interaction of BP adducts with epidermal DNA, in vivo.

Holland, J.M.; Rahn, R.O.; Smith, L.H.; Clark, B.R.; Chang, S.S.; Stephens, T.J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

REGULAR ARTICLE Malleable skin coloration in cephalopods: selective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a fiber optic spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA; spectra recorded on PC, using OOIBase 32 software fiber-optic microscope-light source. The spectral range of measure- ments was limited from 400 nm to 800 spectrum, this study provides an insight into the optical mechanisms employed by the elaborate skin

Hanlon, Roger T.

178

Mouse skin tumor initiation-promotion and complete carcinogenesis bioassays: mechanisms and biological activities of emission samples. Environ. Health Perspect. 47  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil shale soot, and gasoline vehicle exhaust materials have been examined by this method. The studies reported here have been constructed to compare the carcinogenic and tumorigenic potency of extracts from various particulate emissions: coke ovens, diesel and gasoline vehicles and a roofing tar pot. Automobile emission samples were obtained by collecting the diluted and cooled exhaust on Teflon-coated glass fiber filters. Coke oven and roofing tar samples were particulate emission samples collected by impaction and filtration. The organic components associated with each of the particles were extracted with dichloromethane and dermally applied to SENCAR mice. All agents were applied as tumor initiators by using a five-dose protocol. Selected extracts were also applied as complete carcinogens and as tumor promotors. Statistical analyses of the resulting tumor data were performed by using nonlinear Poisson and probit models. The results from these experiments provide a suitable data base for comparative potency estimation of complex mixtures.

S. Nesnow; L. L. Triplettt; T. J. Slagat

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Design of a thermal diffusion sensor for noninvasive assessment of skin surface perfusion and endothelial dysfunction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The skin microcirculation performs a range of vital functions, such as maintaining nutritional perfusion to the tissues and overall thermoregulation. Not only does impairment to the skin blood supply lead to tissue necrosis ...

Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

SkinDeEP: A Profiling Instrument for Upper-Decameter Sea Surface Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin Depth Experimental Profiler (SkinDeEP) is an autonomous, self-contained, hydrodynamic instrument capable of making repeated, high-resolution profiles of temperature and conductivity within the ocean's upper decameter. Autonomous ...

Brian Ward; Rik Wanninkhof; Peter J. Minnett; Michael J. Head

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 8 Skin Care Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 8 Skin Care Products Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 8 Skin Care Products from ...

182

Design and optimization of actuation mechanisms for rapid skin closure device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovative mechanism designs were explored for the actuation of critical components in a novel rapid skin closure device used to close long surgical incisions. The rapid skin closure device is designed to speed up the wound ...

Erickson, Andrew T. (Andrew Thomas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Management of Pediatric Skin Abscesses in Pediatric, General Academic and Community Emergency Departments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oral rather than skin flora. The study was approved by each participating site’s institutional review board.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Threshold Levels for Nonstochastic Skin Effects From Low Energy Discrete Radioactive Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessment of risk from skin contamination by low-energy discrete radioactive particles (DRPs) is difficult because the particles produce nonuniform external radiation exposures. This study, which provides data on the relationship between DRP dose to the skin and biological skin response, can form the technical basis for developing regulations for controlling exposures.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Virtual Human Problem Solving Environments  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Interest in complex integrated digital or virtual human modeling has seen a significant increase over the last decade. Coincident with that increased interest, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated the development of a human simulation tool, the Virtual Human. The Virtual Human includes a problem-solving environment (PSE) for implementing the integration of physiological models in different programming languages and connecting physiological function to anatomy. The Virtual Human PSE (VHPSE) provides the computational framework with which to develop the concept of a "Virtual Human." Supporting the framework is a data definition for modeling parameters, PhysioML, a Virtual Human Database (VHDB), and a Web-based graphical user interface (GUI) developed using Java. Following description of the VHPSE, we discuss four example implementations of models within the framework. Further expansion of a human modeling environment was carried out in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Virtual Soldier Project. SCIRun served as the Virtual Soldier problem solving environment (VSPSE). We review and compare specific developments in these projects that have significant potential for the future of Virtual Human modeling and simulation. We conclude with an evaluation of areas of future work that will provide important extensions to the VHPSE and VSPSE and make possible a fully-integrated environment for human anatomical and physiological modeling: the Virtual Human.

Ward, Richard C [ORNL; Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Munro, Nancy B [ORNL; Fischer, Sarah Kathleen [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Interacting with human physiology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel system that incorporates physiological monitoring as part of the human-computer interface. The sensing element is a thermal camera that is employed as a computer peripheral. Through bioheat modeling of facial imagery almost the full ... Keywords: Blood flow, Breath rate, Cardiac pulse, Facial tracking, Human-computer interaction, Sleep apnea, Stress, Thermal imaging

I. Pavlidis; J. Dowdall; N. Sun; C. Puri; J. Fei; M. Garbey

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Merging Models and Biomonitoring Data to Characterize Sources andPathways of Human Exposure to Organophosphorous Pesticides in the SalinasValley of California  

SciTech Connect

By drawing on human biomonitoring data and limited environmental samples together with outputs from the CalTOX multimedia, multipathway source-to-dose model, we characterize cumulative intake of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides in an agricultural region of California. We assemble regional OP pesticide use, environmental sampling, and biological tissue monitoring data for a large and geographically dispersed population cohort of 592 pregnant Latina women in California (the CHAMACOS cohort). We then use CalTOX with regional pesticide usage data to estimate the magnitude and uncertainty of exposure and intake from local sources. We combine model estimates of intake from local sources with food intake based on national residue data to estimate for the CHAMACOS cohort cumulative median OP intake, which corresponds to expected levels of urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolite excretion for this cohort. From these results we develop premises about relative contributions from different sources and pathways of exposure. We evaluate these premises by comparing the magnitude and variation of DAPs in the CHAMACOS cohort with the whole U.S. population using data from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey (NHANES). This comparison supports the premise that in both populations diet is the common and dominant exposure pathway. Both the model results and biomarker comparison supports the observation that the CHAMACOS population has a statistically significant higher intake of OP pesticides that appears as an almost constant additional dose among all participants. We attribute the magnitude and small variance of this intake to non-dietary exposure in residences from local sources.

McKone, Thomas E.; Castorina, Rosemary; Kuwabara, Yu; Harnly,Martha E.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Bradman, Asa

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

189

The use of polarized light for skin cancer detecton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 50,000 people per year will be diagnosed with skin cancer in one of its various forms, making it the seventh most common form of cancer in the United States. Currently the only method to diagnose suspicious lesions is visual inspection and subsequent biopsy of suspicious lesions. Many cancerous lesions are missed and many benign lesions are biopsied using these techniques. This process is painful and expensive. The proposed research is driven by the need for a non-invasive skin cancer detection system. Presented here is a method for the optical determination of cancerous tissue using polarized light. This thesis describes the development of a polarimetric imaging system including its calibration and testing. In addition, experiments are performed to simulate changes in tissue, such as increased size of scatterers and increased scattering and absorption coefficients that often accompany tissue changes as it becomes cancerous. The effects of these simulated changes are tested on the Polarimetric imaging system in order to quantify changes in the Mueller matrix caused by the perturbations, and ultimately to relate them to observed changes in the Mueller matrices of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue. Finally, the Polarimetric imaging system is used to determine the Mueller matrix of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue to assess the system's capabilities for skin cancer diagnosis.

DeLaughter, Aimee Hill

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

• A very typical statistical/econometric model assumes something like yt ? i.i.d. f (y, x, ?) (1) where f (·) is a parametric family known up to parameters ?. • Parameter estimation: maximum likelihood ˆ?n = arg max ? ln f (Yt, Xt, ?) (2) t • What if the basic model assumptions of (1) are violated? The parametric family may not contain the true model f0(x, y) that generated the data; or the data may not be i.i.d.; etc. Misspecified

Stas Kolenikov; U Of Missouri; U Of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I of the project: early effects of inhaled radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents a mathematical model for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included.

Filipy, R.E.; Borst, F.J.; Cross, F.T.; Park, J.F.; Moss, O.R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

194

Apparatus for testing skin samples or the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing the permeability of living skin samples has a flat base with a plurality of sample-holding cavities formed in its upper surface, the samples being placed in counterbores in the cavities with the epidermis uppermost. O-rings of Teflon washers are respectively placed on the samples and a flat cover is connected to the base to press the rings against the upper surfaces of the samples. Media to maintain tissue viability and recovery of metabolites is introduced into the lower portion of the sample-holding cavities through passages in the base. Test materials are introduced through holes in the cover plate after assembly of the chamber.

Holland, J.M.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

196

Shape factor, C /SUB A/ , expressed as skin, S /SUB CA/  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the conversion of the shape factor, C /SUB A/ , to a pseudosteady-state skin term, S /SUB CA/ . When the shape factor is expressed as a skin term, it becomes easier to see the effect that a well placement in a given drainage area will have on the well's performance. Skin factors for published drainage shapes and well locations are given.

Fetkovich, M.J.; Vienot, M.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Soluble/Shed Factors Released from Skin Cells Following Low Dose...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SolubleShed Factors Released from Skin Cells Following Low Dose Irradiation Exposure David Springer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Abstract The purpose of this work is to...

198

Human Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Health Print E-mail Climate change can have a number of direct and indirect effects on human health. For example, rising temperatures can contribute to the number of deaths...

199

Characteristics of Radiation-Induced Basal Cell Skin Cancer in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in human hematopoietic cell transplant patients had shown that total body irradiation selectively induced basal cell carcinoma but not squamous cell carcinoma or...

200

Sensing and modeling human networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of how groups of people interact is important in many disciplines, e.g. organizational behavior, social network analysis, knowledge management and ubiquitous computing. Existing studies of social network interactions ...

Choudhury, Tanzeem Khalid, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Computer-based systematic execution model on human resources management in maritime transportation industry: The case of master selection for embarking on board merchant ships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human resources management (HRM) have been increased its functionality and popularity in the shipping business, due to the expeditiously changes in technology, market strategies, risks and challenges in transportation industry. Despite the requirements ... Keywords: Analytic Network Process, Human resources management, Information technology, STCW requirements, Seafarers employment

Metin Celik; I. Deha Er; Y. Ilker Topcu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Human Reliability Analysis for Design: Using Reliability Methods for Human Factors Issues  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the application of human reliability analysis methods to human factors design issues. An application framework is sketched in which aspects of modeling typically found in human reliability analysis are used in a complementary fashion to the existing human factors phases of design and testing. The paper provides best achievable practices for design, testing, and modeling. Such best achievable practices may be used to evaluate and human system interface in the context of design safety certifications.

Ronald Laurids Boring

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (< 0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles as produced in the work environments of nuclear reactors. Hanford mini-pigs were exposed, both on a slightly off the skin, to localized replicate doses from 0.31 to 64 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70 {mu}m depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC{sub 2} isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs.

Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.  

SciTech Connect

This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Influence of skin effect on the series resistance of millimeter-wave IMPATT devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made in this paper to study the influence of skin depth on the parasitic series resistance of millimeter-wave IMPATT devices based on Silicon. The method is based on the concept of depletion width modulation of the device under large-signal ... Keywords: Large-signal simulation, Millimeter-wave IMPATTs, Series resistance, Skin effect

Aritra Acharyya, Suranjana Banerjee, J. P. Banerjee

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last decade, various brain imaging methods using radionuclides have become available. Due to the introduction of new techniques, a small-scale dosimetry study of the brain, and more specifically the organs of the head (brain, eyes thyroid, skull, skin) was needed. However, the brain and head models developed in the past were crude representations of the human. In this research, a new brain model has been developed which includes eight subregions. This head model was included in a revised head model developed by Posion et al. in 1984. Some corrections and improvements were added to this head model such as the development of a new spinal region and a new cranium region in order to incorporate the cerebrospinal fluid. This model was used with a Monte Carlo code, EGS4, to calculate absorbed fraction of energy and specific absorbed fraction of energy for photon and electron sources located in one of thirteen chosen source regions. These calculations were made for radiations in the energy range 10 keV to 4 MeV. All twenty-three regions included in the revised head and brain model were taken as target regions. S-values were also calculated for several radionuclides used in brain imaging, and also deposited in the thyroid, the skull or the spinal skeleton. The S-values were calculated using discrete energy points on the beta emission spectrum of the radionuclides.

Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Non-invasive, MRI-compatible fibreoptic device for functional near-IR reflectometry of human brain  

SciTech Connect

A non-invasive device for measuring blood oxygen variations in human brain is designed, implemented, and tested for MRI compatibility. The device is based on principles of near-IR reflectometry; power LEDs serve as sources of probing radiation delivered to patient skin surface through optical fibres. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations of probing radiation propagation in a multilayer brain model are performed to evaluate signal levels at different source - detector separations at three operation wavelengths and an additional wavelength of 915 nm. It is shown that the device can be applied for brain activity studies using power LEDs operating at 830 and 915 nm, while employment of wavelength of 660 nm requires an increased probing power. Employment of the wavelength of 592 nm in the current configuration is unreasonable. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

Sorvoja, H.S.S.; Myllylae, T S; Myllylae, Risto A [University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurements Techniques Laboratory (Finland); Kirillin, M Yu; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Elseoud, A A; Nikkinen, J; Tervonen, O; Kiviniemi, V [MRI Research Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

Modelling approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding and mitigating risks and threats to critical infrastructures relies heavily on the ability to construct and validate models often involving physical systems or even human intervention. This, together with the wide range of scales from critical ...

Nils Kalstad Svendsen; Stephen D. Wolthusen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiosensitivity of skin fibroblasts from atomic bomb survivors with and without breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

Fibroblasts were established in vitro from skin biopsies obtained from 55 women and 1 man with or without breast cancer and with or without exposure to radiation from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. The radiosensitivity of these cells was evaluated by clonogenic assays after exposure to X-rays or to fission neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf source. Data were fitted to a multitarget model, S/S0 = A (1 - (1 - ekD)N), for both X-ray and neutron dose-survival curves. A single hit model, S/S0 = AekD, fits the neutron dose-survival responses as well. There were no differences in the means or variances of radiosensitivity between exposed and nonexposed groups or between patients with or without breast cancer. Hence, although the sample is not large, it provides no support for the hypothesis that atomic bomb radiation preferentially induces breast cancer in women whose cells in vitro are sensitive to cell killing by radiation.

Ban, S.; Setlow, R.B.; Bender, M.A.; Ezaki, H.; Hiraoka, T.; Yamane, M.; Nishiki, M.; Dohi, K.; Awa, A.A.; Miller, R.C. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Response in 3D Skin to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biological response. At PNNL we are applying a system biology approach to identify molecular targets in complex human tissue exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation. Our goal is...

211

Improving The Representation Of Human Error In The Use Of The Flight Crew Human Factors Integration Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-15. Norman, D.A. (1983). Position paper on human error.Research Workshop on Human Error . Bellagio, Italy. O'Hare,M. (1996). Breakdown of human error models , Prepared for

Gosling, Geoffrey; Roberts, Karlene H.; Jayaswal, Arpana

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Toward a Dynamic-Thermodynamic Assimilation of Satellite Surface Temperature in Numerical Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assimilation technique is described in which satellite-observed surface skin temperature tendencies are used in a model surface energy budget so that the predicted rate of temperature change in the model more closely agrees with the satellite ...

Richard T. McNider; Aaron J. Song; Daniel M. Casey; Peter J. Wetzel; William L. Crosson; Robert M. Rabin

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The second skin approach : skin strain field analysis and mechanical counter pressure prototyping for advanced spacesuit design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the theory of advanced locomotion mechanical counter pressure (MCP) spacesuits by studying the changes in the human body shape during joint motion. Two experiments take advantage ...

Bethke, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Developing Human Performance Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [ENEA Laboratories, Rome (Italy); Dragani, Tommaso A. [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: tommaso.dragani@istitutotumori.mi.it

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Dosimeter for measuring skin dose and more deeply penetrating radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with netruon-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

Jones, Donald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parker, DeRay (Idaho Falls, ID); Boren, Paul R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Method for preparing dosimeter for measuring skin dose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with neutron-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

Jones, Donald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parker, DeRay (Idaho Falls, ID); Boren, Paul R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Uncovering land-use dynamics driven by human decision-making - A combined model approach using cellular automata and system dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an enhancement of a cellular automata (CA) model by integrating system dynamics (SD) to incorporate household dynamics and housing decisions as driving forces of residential development. CA macro-models used to simulate the quantitative ... Keywords: Berlin, Cellular automata, Residential choice, Shrinkage, System dynamics, Urban land use modeling

S. Lauf; D. Haase; P. Hostert; T. Lakes; B. Kleinschmit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

Explicit integration of identity information from skin regions to improve face recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the possibility of exploiting facial skin texture regions to further improve the performance of face recognition systems. Information extracted from the forehead region is combined with scores produced by a kernel-based face recognition ...

Garsah Farhan Al-Qarni; Farzin Deravi

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Colonial Faces: Beauty and Skin Color Hierarchy in the Philippines and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

76, no.4 (1971): 734-742. Herring, Cedric, Verna Keith, andof Illinois Press, 2004. Herring, Cedric. “Skin Deep: RaceEra, edited by Cedric Herring, Verna Keith, and Hayward

Rondilla, Joanne Laxamana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Variations in Ocean Surface Temperature due to Near-Surface Flow: Straining the Cool Skin Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aqueous thermal boundary layer near to the ocean surface, or skin layer, has thickness O(1 mm) and plays an important role in controlling the exchange of heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. Theoretical arguments and experimental ...

Andrew J. Wells; Claudia Cenedese; J. Thomas Farrar; Christopher J. Zappa

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part I: Design and Laboratory Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An untended instrument to measure ocean surface heat flux has been developed for use in support of field experiments and the investigation of heat flux parameterization techniques. The sensing component of the Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

EXPLORING THE POTENTIAL OF SHORT-TIME FOURIER TRANSFORMS FOR ANALYZING SKIN CONDUCTANCE AND PUPILLOMETRY IN REAL-TIME APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The development of real-time predictors of mental workload is critical for the practical application of augmented cognition to human-machine systems. This paper explores a novel method based on a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) for analyzing galvanic skin conductance (SC) and pupillometry time-series data to extract estimates of mental workload with temporal bandwidth high-enough to be useful for augmented cognition applications. We tested the method in the context of a process control task based on the DURESS simulation developed by Vincente and Pawlak (1994; ported to Java by Cosentino,& Ross, 1999). SC, pupil dilation, blink rate, and visual scanning patterns were measured for four participants actively engaged in controlling the simulation. Fault events were introduced that required participants to diagnose errors and make control adjustments to keep the simulator operating within a target range. We were interested in whether the STFT of these measures would produce visible effects of the increase in mental workload and stress associated with these events. Graphical exploratory data analysis of the STFT showed visible increases in the power spectrum across a range of frequencies directly following fault events. We believe this approach shows potential as a relatively unobtrusive, low-cost, high bandwidth measure of mental workload that could be particularly useful for the application of augmented cognition to human-machine systems.

Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Steffen Werner; Jeffrey C. Joe; Brian Wotring; Tuan Tran

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Percutaneous characterization of the insect repellent DEET and the sunscreen oxybenzone from topical skin application  

SciTech Connect

The synergistic percutaneous enhancement between insect repellent DEET and sunscreen oxybenzone has been proven in our laboratory using a series of in vitro diffusion studies. In this study, we carried out an in vivo study to characterize skin permeation profiles from topical skin application of three commercially available repellent and sunscreen preparations. The correlation between skin disposition and drug metabolism was attempted by using data collected. Both DEET and oxybenzone permeated across the skin after the application and achieved substantial systemic absorption. Combined use of DEET and oxybenzone significantly enhanced the percutaneous penetration percentages (ranging 36-108%) due to mutual enhancement effects. Skin disposition indicated that DEET produced a faster transdermal permeation rate and higher systemic absorption extent, but oxybenzone formed a concentrated depot within the skin and delivered the content slowly over the time. In vivo AUC{sub P}/MRT of DEET and oxybenzone was increased by 37%/17% and 63%/10% when the two compounds were used together. No DEET was detected from the urine samples 48 h after the application. Tape stripping seemed to be a satisfactory approach for quantitative assessment of DEET and oxybenzone penetration into the stratum corneum. It was also concluded that pharmacological and toxicological perspectives from concurrent application of insect repellent and sunscreen products require further evaluation to ensure use efficacy and safety of these common consumer healthcare products.

Kasichayanula, Sreeneeranj [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); House, James D. [Department of Animal Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Wang Tao [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Gu Xiaochen [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)], E-mail: xgu@cc.umanitoba.ca

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

CAirTOX: A compartment model for assessing the fate of and human exposure to toxic-chemical emissions to air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making a risk assessment of toxic air emissions. With CAirTOX, one can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a steady-state, but non-equilibrium model that can be used to assess concentrations of contaminants released continuously to air. In Part 1, the authors describe the multimedia transport and transformation model used to determine the fate of air emissions. In Part 2, they describe inputs and data needs for CAirTOX and the development of a set of landscape factors, which can be used to represent regional air basin/water-shed systems in California. In Part 3, they describe the multiple-pathway exposure scenarios and exposure algorithms. In Part 4, they compare the HRA approach and results and the CAirTOX exposure equations. In Part 5, they consider model sensitivity and uncertainty to determine how variability and uncertainty in model inputs affects the precision, accuracy, and credibility of the model output.

McKone, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Integrating scientific modeling and supporting dynamic hazard management with a GeoAgent-based representation of human-environment interactions: A drought example in Central Pennsylvania, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent natural disasters indicate that modern technologies for environmental monitoring, modeling, and forecasting are not well integrated with cross-level social responses in many hazard-management systems. This research addresses this problem through ... Keywords: Decision support, Drought, GeoAgent, Geographic information systems (GIS), Hazard management, Knowledge representation, Modeling

Chaoqing Yu; Alan M. MacEachren; Donna J. Peuquet; Brent Yarnal

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The human agent virtual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe a multi-agent simulation called the Human Agent Virtual Environment (or HAVE). HAVE is a test bed to explore agent-environment interaction in multi-agent simulation for defence applications. The primary research driver in the ... Keywords: agents and cognitive models, defence, multi-agent simulation and modeling

Michael Papasimeon; Adrian R. Pearce; Simon Goss

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hierarchical pose estimation for human gait analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Articulated structures like the human body have many degrees of freedom. This makes an evaluation of the configuration's likelihood very challenging. In this work we propose new linked hierarchical graphical models which are able to efficiently evaluate ... Keywords: Gait analysis, Hierarchical graphical model, Human pose estimation, Markov random fields

Jens Spehr; Simon Winkelbach; Friedrich M. Wahl

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Real-time individualized virtual humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This tutorial will present the latest techniques to model fast individualized animatable virtual humans for Real-Time applications. As a human is composed of a head and a body, we will analyze how these two parts can be modeled and globally animated ...

Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann; Daniel Thalmann

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Human Errors in Information Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the paper is to target audience and stakeholder individuals whom are in charge of securing the assets of their organisations and institutions. This paper starts by providing a brief overview of information security, outlining the main goals and techniques of the discipline. The paper also discusses the role of human factors and how the information security research community has recognised the increasingly crucial role of human behaviour in many security failures. This is followed by a literature review of human errors in information security. Finally, this paper discusses Reason's Generic Error Modelling System (GEMS) as a potential model for explaining human errors in information security [18]. The terms computer security, network security and information security are used interchangeably in this paper.

Munir Ahmed; Lukman Sharif; Muhammad Kabir; Maha Al-maimani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Effect of the iBEAM Evo Carbon Fiber Tabletop on Skin Sparing  

SciTech Connect

Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

Simpson, John B., E-mail: john.simpson@aro.co.nz; Godwin, Guy A.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Space radiation-induced bystander signaling in 2D and 3D skin tissue models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space radiation poses a significant hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions, and the low fluences of charged particles characteristic of this field suggest that bystander effects, the phenomenon in which a greater ...

Lumpkins, Sarah B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Improved Oceanic Cool-Skin Corrections Using a Refined Solar Penetration Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oceanic near-surface temperature profile must be accurately characterized to enable precise determination of air–sea heat exchange and satellite retrievals of sea surface temperature. An improved solar transmission parameterization is ...

Gary A. Wick; J. Carter Ohlmann; Christopher W. Fairall; Andrew T. Jessup

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Numerical Model of Skin Electropermeabilization Based on In Vivo Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a protective barrier preventing internal tissues from exposure to trauma, ultraviolet radiation, temperature

Ljubljana, University of

236

Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body Speaker(s): Miriam Byrne Date: April 14, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Miriam Byrne is a participating guest in the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group at LBL. She is an academic member of staff in the Physics Department at the National University of Galway, Ireland. Her research interests, primarily funded by European Commission radiation protection programs, focus on the mechanisms of aerosol transport to and from human body surfaces. Over the last ten years, she has been involved in tracer aerosol experiments to determine rates of particle deposition and resuspension from skin, hair and clothing, as well as studying particle transport into skin pores and hair follicles, and contact transfer from

237

Investigation of surface inhomogeneity and estimation of the GOES skin temperature assimilation errors of the MM5 implied by the inhomogeneity over Houston metropolitan area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study developed a parameterization method to investigate the impacts of inhomogeneous land surfaces on mesoscale model simulations using a high-resolution 1-d PBL model. Then, the 1-d PBL model was used to investigate the inhomogeneity-caused model errors in applying the GOES satellite skin temperature assimilation technique into the MM5 over the Houston metropolitan area (HOU). In order to investigate the surface inhomogeneity impacts on the surface fluxes and PBL variables over HOU, homo- and inhomogeneous 1-d PBL model simulations were performed over HOU and compared to each other. The 1-d PBL model was constructed so that the surface inhomogeneities were able to be represented within model grid elements using a methodology similar to Avissar and Pielke (1989). The surface inhomogeneities over HOU were defined using 30-m resolution land cover data produced by Global Environment Management (GEM), Inc. The inhomogeneity parameterization method developed in the 1-d model was applied to a standard MM5 simulation to test the applicability of the parameterization to 3-d mesoscale model simulations. From the 1-d simulations it was inferred that the surface inhomogeneities would enhance the sensible heat flux by about 36 % and reduce the latent heat flux by about 25 %, thereby inducing the warmer (0.7 %) and drier (-1.0 %) PBL and the colder and moister PBL top induced by greater turbulent diffusivities. The 3-d application of the inhomogeneity parameterization indicated consistent results with the 1-d in general, with additional effects of advection and differential local circulation. The original GOES simulation was warmer compared to observations over HOU than over surrounding areas. The satellite data assimilation itself would lead to a warm bias due to erroneous estimation of gridpoint-mean skin temperature by the satellite, but 1-d simulations indicate that the impact of this error should be much weaker than what was observed. It seems that, unless the already existing warm and dry bias of the MM5 is corrected, the inhomogeneity parameterization in the MM5 would adversely affect the MM5 performance. Therefore, consideration of the surface inhomogeneities in the urban area needs to be confined to the GOES skin temperature retrieval errors at the moment.

Han, Sang-Ok

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Scenario Driven Data Modelling  

... an alert is generated that allows humans to query the model and a stored version of the data that matched the model. The high level steps of SDDM are as follows: ...

239

Artificial Skin Ridges Enhance Local Tactile Shape Discrimination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the fundamental requirements for an artificial hand to successfully grasp and manipulate an object is to be able to distinguish different objects' shapes and, more specifically, the objects' surface curvatures. In this study, we investigate the possibility of enhancing the curvature detection of embedded tactile sensors by proposing a ridged fingertip structure, simulating human fingerprints. In addition, a curvature detection approach based on machine learning methods is proposed to provide the embedded sensors with the ability to discriminate the surface curvature of different objects. For this purpose, a set of experiments were carried out to collect tactile signals from a 2 \\times 2 tactile sensor array, then the signals were processed and used for learning algorithms. To achieve the best possible performance for our machine learning approach, three different learning algorithms of Na\\"ive Bayes (NB), Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), and Support Vector Machines (SVM) were implemented and compared ...

Salehi, Saba; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; 10.3390/s110908626

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies Program What does this mean for me? Investments by major companies like the Redskins show the growing market demand for solar technology, as the SunShot Initiative works to accelerate this growth to make solar energy cheaper. If solar power could score a touchdown, then this week's news would definitely count. On Wednesday, the Washington Redskins announced they are working with NRG Energy, one of America's largest energy companies, to bring renewable energy to the football franchise. This means more than just a few panels on the roof. Through the partnership, NRG will install 8,000 translucent solar panels to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies Program What does this mean for me? Investments by major companies like the Redskins show the growing market demand for solar technology, as the SunShot Initiative works to accelerate this growth to make solar energy cheaper. If solar power could score a touchdown, then this week's news would definitely count. On Wednesday, the Washington Redskins announced they are working with NRG Energy, one of America's largest energy companies, to bring renewable energy to the football franchise. This means more than just a few panels on the roof. Through the partnership, NRG will install 8,000 translucent solar panels to

242

In vitro models for investigating keratinocyte responses to ultraviolet B radiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes the use of 2- and 3-dimensional cell-based models for studying how skin cells respond to ultraviolet radiation. These methods were used to… (more)

Fernandez, Tara L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assessment of Roughness Length Schemes Implemented within the Noah Land Surface Model for High Altitude Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current land surface models still have difficulties with producing reliable surface heat fluxes and skin temperature (Tsfc) estimates for high altitude regions, which may be addressed via adequate parameterization of the roughness lengths for ...

Donghai Zheng; Rogier Van Der Velde; Zhongbo Su; Martijn J. Booij; Arjen Y. Hoekstra

244

An integrated monitoring/modeling framework for assessing human-nature interactions in urbanizing watersheds: Wappinger and Onondaga Creek watersheds, New York, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In much of the world, rapidly expanding areas of impervious surfaces due to urbanization threaten water resources. Although tools for modeling and projecting land use change and water quantity and quality exist independently, to date it is rare to find ... Keywords: Impervious surface, Remote sensing, Socio-economic factors, Uncertainty, Urbanization, Water resources

Bongghi Hong; Karin E. Limburg; Myrna H. Hall; Giorgos Mountrakis; Peter M. Groffman; Karla Hyde; Li Luo; Victoria R. Kelly; Seth J. Myers

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin -Heart Rate Monitors -Popular Mechanics http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/breakthroughs/new-electronic-sensors-stick-to-your-skin?click=pm_latest[8/14/2011 5:59:45 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin - Heart Rate Monitors - Popular Mechanics http://www Electronic Sensors That Stick to Your Skin Like Temporary Tattoos Nice tattoo. Or is it a heart-rate monitor to measure the electrical activity of the heart, muscles and brain. And using the same principles behind

Rogers, John A.

246

On Sea Surface Salinity Skin Effect Induced by Evaporation and Implications for Remote Sensing of Ocean Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of a cool and salty sea surface skin under evaporation was first proposed by Saunders in 1967, but few efforts have since been made to perceive the salt component of the skin layer. With two salinity missions scheduled to launch in ...

Lisan Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

DOI: 10.1007/s10439-010-0190-4 Effect of Surfactant Mixtures on Skin Structure and Barrier Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associate Editor Daniel Takashi Kamei oversaw the review of this article. Abstract—We investigated the effect of two commonly studied surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (C 12TAB), on skin barrier properties. Using skin conductivity, FT-IR of stratum corneum samples, and penetration of radiolabelled SDS, we determined that addition of C12TAB lowers the ability of SDS to perturb skin’s barrier properties. Ultrafiltration experiments revealed that addition of C12TAB serves to decrease the concentration of monomers and sub-micellar aggregates. None of the measured skin properties including enhancement of skin conductivity, perturbation of lipid structure and skin concentration of SDS correlated with the total SDS concentration in the donor compartment (i.e., the total SDS concentration). However, all these parameters correlated well against the concentration of monomers and sub-micellar aggregates. These findings provide the evidence of the importance of monomer and sub-micellar components in altering skin barrier properties.

Monica A. James-smith; Brittney Hellner; Nancy Annunziato; Samir Mitragotri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Humans, Robots and Market Crashes: A Laboratory Study ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Du?y, J. (2006). Agent-Based Models and Human SubjectFinancial markets, agent-based models, experimentalIn response, several agent-based models have been proposed.

Feldman, Todd; Friedman, Daniel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Climate: monthly and annual average Earth skin temperature GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth skin temperature GIS data at Earth skin temperature GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of the region is +0.5 added to the the Lat/Lon value. These data are

250

Requirement for vasoactive amines for production of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injection of antigen into the dermis of the flank of an appropriately immunized rat, guinea pig, monkey, or man results, 24-48 h later, in the formation of an erythematous, indurated lesion. Similar skin testing of immunized mice generally fails to produce such lesions (1-3). The explanation for this particular difference between mice and men is unknown but there is reason to believe that it may not stem from differences in immunologically competent cells. Two observations support this view. (a) Appropriately immunized mice exhibit antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) ' reactions when the site of elicitation is the foot pad (4) or the ear (5). (b) Mice exhibit most other manifestations of cell-mediated immunity, in a normal fashion, despite their failure to produce DTH reactions in the flank skin. Thus, mice must have appropriately reactive T cells but there may be some difficulty in delivering the cells required for the production of DTH reactions to the flank skin. In support of this notion, it has been shown that ifperitoneal exudate cells are added to the eliciting dose of antigen placed in the flank skin the lesions that result are morphologically

K. Gershon; Philip W. Askenase; Michael; D. Gershon

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Interfacial Mechanics of the Thin Oxide Skin on Liquid Gallium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to micromold the metal for these applications is enabled by the ... The oxide skin is elastic and yields under a critical stress, at which point the metal flows. ... Interface Bond Strength of HIP-Clad Depleted Uranium and 6061- Aluminum ... Quantitative NanoSIMS Analysis of Grain Boundary Segregation in Bulk ...

252

The tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma  

SciTech Connect

During the last ten years at the National Cancer Institute, 11 patients have received 12 courses of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy to skin grafts used for wound closure after the resection of soft-tissue sarcomas. The intervals between grafting and the initiation of radiation ranged between 3 and 20 weeks, and 4 patients received chemotherapy at the same time as their radiation. Ten of the 12 irradiated grafts remained intact after the completion of therapy. One graft had several small persistently ulcerated areas that required no further surgical treatment, and one graft required a musculocutaneous flap for reconstruction of a persistent large ulcer. Acute radiation effects on the grafted skin sometimes developed at slightly lower doses than usually seen with normal skin, but these acute effects necessitated a break in therapy on only five occasions. Concurrent chemotherapy and a relatively short interval between grafting and the initiation of radiation seemed to contribute to more severe radiation reactions. This experience indicates that postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy can be delivered to skin grafted areas without undue fear of complications, especially if the graft is allowed to heal adequately prior to initiating therapy and if chemotherapy is not given in conjunction with radiation.

Lawrence, W.T.; Zabell, A.; McDonald, H.D. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Coordination studies with PNNL's global change assessment model: integrated science modeling and applications to the human dimensions. Final technical report for period October 1996 - March 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) supported by the DOE Program on Health and Environmental Research: Environmental Sciences Program under Grant No. DOE DFGO2-96ER62284. As part of this research proposal, we designed the model that better represent spatial variations and treat the process relevant towards evaluating the biogeochemical cycles important to determining atmospheric composition and resulting climatic effects at the regional scale. The process level understanding of regional impacts into the Integrated Assessment (IA) model will help to improve the understanding of climate change impacts and extend the range of issues, which can be addressed in an IA framework. On the application front, the newly developed model has been applied to a selected set of studies to address policy related questions on climate change, in particular, the role of forestry, and land-use for historical greenhouse gas emissions; projections of future methane emissions; a research study related to energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; and radiative forcing and estimation of a number of important greenhouse gases. In the following, the significant findings from the DOE supported study are outlined.

Wuebbles, Donald J.; Jain Atul

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Transport Pathways and Enhancement Mechanisms within Localized and Non-Localized Transport Regions in Skin Treated with Low-Frequency Sonophoresis and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in transdermal drug delivery utilizing low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) have revealed that skin permeability enhancement is not homogenous across the skin surface. Instead, ...

Polat, Baris E.

255

Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

Jian Li

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and human-induced environmental changes have been altering the earth's surface and hydrological processes, and thus directly contribute to the severity of flood hazards. To understand these changes and their impacts, this research developed a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data have been addressed. This research develops an object-oriented hydrological modeling framework. Compared with traditional lumped or cell-based distributed hydrological modeling frameworks, the object-oriented framework allows basic spatial hydrologic units to have various size and irregular shape. This framework is capable of assimilating various GIS and remotely-sensed data with different spatial resolutions. It ensures the computational efficiency, while preserving sufficient spatial details of input data and model outputs. Sensitivity analysis and comparison of high resolution LIDAR DEM with traditional USGS 30m resolution DEM suggests that the use of LIDAR DEMs can greatly reduce uncertainty in calibration of flow parameters in the hydrologic model and hence increase the reliability of modeling results. In addition, subtle topographic features and hydrologic objects like surface depressions and detention basins can be extracted from the high resolution LiDAR DEMs. An innovative algorithm has been developed to efficiently delineate surface depressions and detention basins from LiDAR DEMs. Using a time series of Landsat images, a retrospective analysis of surface imperviousness has been conducted to assess the hydrologic impact of urbanization. The analysis reveals that with rapid urbanization the impervious surface has been increased from 10.1% to 38.4% for the case study area during 1974 - 2002. As a result, the peak flow for a 100-year flood event has increased by 20% and the floodplain extent has expanded by about 21.6%. The quantitative analysis suggests that the large regional detentions basins have effectively offset the adverse effect of increased impervious surface during the urbanization process. Based on the simulation and scenario analyses of land subsidence and potential climate changes, some planning measures and policy implications have been derived for guiding smart urban growth and sustainable resource development and management to minimize flood hazards.

Wang, Lei

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Human Resource Management on Social Capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past years, several researchers have analysed the relational dynamics that takes place inside and between organizations concept, mediating and moderating variables, effects, etc. considering it as a resource capable of contributing to the orientation ... Keywords: Human Resource Policy, Human Resources Management, Information Technology, Proposed a Model, Social Capital

Macarena López-Fernández; Fernando Martín-Alcázar; Pedro Miguel Romero-Fernández

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Anomalous skin effects in relativistic parallel propagating weakly magnetized electron plasma waves  

SciTech Connect

Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized electron plasma is presented and general expressions for longitudinal and transverse permittivites are derived. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves increases as we move from non-relativistic to highly relativistic regime. The ambient magnetic field reduces/enhances the skin effects for R-wave/L-wave as the strength of the field is increased. In general, the weak magnetic field effects are pronounced for the weakly relativistic regime as compared with other relativistic cases. The results are also graphically illustrated. On switching off the magnetic field, previous results for field free case are retrieved [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Priniples of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1984), Vol. 9, p. 106].

Abbas, Gohar; Bashir, M. F. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Guidelines for the Optimization of Protective Clothing: Heat Stress and Skin Contamination Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protective clothing (PCs) requirements present a challenge to radiation protection managers, particularly in environments that could potentially lead to an increased risk of heat stress. This report presents a guide to the development of a technically sound worker optimization program addressing skin contamination and heat stress risks. Project managers have successfully implemented this approach at one nuclear power plant and two Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites.

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subjects Protecting Human Subjects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Program exists to ensure that all research conducted at DOE institutions, whether...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Human Measure and Architecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This book bundles the human measure and architecting articles. The articles address the relationship between product creation and humans and the role of the system architect.

Gerrit Muller

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Developing an Index to Measure Urban Heat Island Effect Using Satellite Land Skin Temperature and Land Cover Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new index of calculating the intensity of urban heat island effects (UHI) for a city using satellite skin temperature and land cover observations is recommended. UHI, the temperature difference between urban and rural regions, is traditionally ...

Menglin S. Jin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Evaluations of Land–Ocean Skin Temperatures of the ISCCP Satellite Retrievals and the NCEP and ERA Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the skin temperature (ST) datasets of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) D satellite product, the ISCCP FD satellite product, the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40), the NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis, and the ...

Ben-Jei Tsuang; Ming-Dah Chou; Yuanchong Zhang; Andreas Roesch; Kun Yang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Toward an Integrated Land–Ocean Surface Skin Temperature Analysis from the Variational Assimilation of Infrared Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-East and -West window channel radiances are directly assimilated using a 1D variational technique, providing surface skin temperature (Ts) estimates over all surface types (land, water, or ...

Louis Garand

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part II: Field Measurements of Surface Heat Flux and Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI) described by Sromovsky et al. (Part I, this issue) was field-tested in a combination of freshwater and ocean deployments. Solar irradiance monitoring and field calibration techniques were ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

doi:10.5402/2011/617082 Research Article Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and the Occurrence of Skin Cancer in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2011 Catharina C. van Niekerk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. A cross-sectional study within a large populationbased dataset. Results. Skin cancer was found in 2.7 % (95 % CI: 2.3–3.1) of the 5366 individuals forming our dataset. The odds ratio (OR) for endometrioid cancer in the ovary to skin cancer in the under 50 age group was 8.9 (95 % CI: 3.2–25.0). The OR decreased in older patients to 1.2. Conclusions. Patients with epithelial ovarian malignancies show an increased risk of skin cancer. A significantly increased risk (4.3%) for endometrioid ovarian cancer was found in the group aged under 50. 1.

Isrn Obstetrics; Catharina C. Van Niekerk; Johan Bulten; Andrél. M. Verbeek

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Simulations of transonic shock-tube flow with a model micro-cylinder in the driver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique hand-held needle-free powder injection system, using a transient shock-tube flow to deliver powder genes and drugs into human skin for a wide range of treatments, has been proposed. In the development of such devices, a strong non-linear phenomenon, ... Keywords: Laminar, Separation, Shock-tube, Simulation, Transition, Turbulence

Yi Liu; Mark A. F. Kendall

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Model interoperability via Model Driven Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the factors that contribute to the inherent complexity of the software development process is the gap between the design and the formal analysis domains. Software design is often considered a human oriented task while the analysis phase draws on ... Keywords: Model Driven Development, Model interoperability, Petri Nets, Software development, UML

Mohamed A. Ameedeen; Behzad Bordbar; Rachid Anane

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Statistical models for analyzing human genetic variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. J. McDonald, A. Tandon, A. Waliszewska, K. Penney, R. G.Alicja Waliszewska, Arti Tandon, Robin R. Lincoln, CariA. Wal- iszewska, A. Tandon, R. R. Lincoln, C. DeLoa, S. A.

Sankararaman, Sriram

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Human Performance - Fossil Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All humans make errors. Industrial human errors can result in a loss of life and can significantly impact the productivity and cost effectiveness of any facility or company. Several industries in which human error has had a significant impact (for example, airline, medical, military, nuclear power, aviation, and chemical) have implemented human performance programs with excellent results. Human errors by fossil plant operators can easily challenge plant safety and production. In the fossil operations are...

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

271

Health burden of skin lesions at low arsenic exposure through groundwater in Pakistan. Is river the source?  

SciTech Connect

A significant proportion of groundwater in south Asia is contaminated with arsenic. Pakistan has low levels of arsenic in groundwater compared with China, Bangladesh and India. A representative multi-stage cluster survey conducted among 3874 persons {>=}15 years of age to determine the prevalence of arsenic skin lesions, its relation with arsenic levels and cumulative arsenic dose in drinking water in a rural district (population: 1.82 million) in Pakistan. Spot-urine arsenic levels were compared among individuals with and without arsenic skin lesions. In addition, the relation of age, body mass index, smoking status with arsenic skin lesions was determined. The geographical distribution of the skin lesions and arsenic-contaminated wells in the district were ascertained using global positioning system. The total arsenic, inorganic and organic forms, in water and spot-urine samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The prevalence of skin lesions of arsenic was estimated for complex survey design, using surveyfreq and surveylogistic options of SAS 9.1 software.The prevalence of definitive cases i.e. hyperkeratosis of both palms and soles, was 3.4 per 1000 and suspected cases i.e. any sign of arsenic skin lesions (melanosis and/or keratosis), were 13.0 per 1000 among {>=}15-year-old persons in the district. Cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) was calculated from levels of arsenic in water and duration of use of current drinking water source. Prevalence of skin lesions increases with cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) in drinking water and arsenic levels in urine. Skin lesions were 2.5-fold among individuals with BMI <18.5 kg/m{sup 2}. Geographically, more arsenic-contaminated wells and skin lesions were alongside Indus River, suggests a strong link between arsenic contamination of groundwater with proximity to river.This is the first reported epidemiological and clinical evidence of arsenic skin lesions due to groundwater in Pakistan. Further investigations and focal mitigation measures for arsenic may be carried out alongside Indus River.

Fatmi, Zafar, E-mail: zafar.fatmi@aku.edu [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)] [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan); Azam, Iqbal; Ahmed, Faiza; Kazi, Ambreen; Gill, Albert Bruce; Kadir, Muhmmad Masood; Ahmed, Mubashir; Ara, Naseem; Janjua, Naveed Zafar [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)] [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Culture Representation in Human Reliability Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding human-system response is critical to being able to plan and predict mission success in the modern battlespace. Commonly, human reliability analysis has been used to predict failures of human performance in complex, critical systems. However, most human reliability methods fail to take culture into account. This paper takes an easily understood state of the art human reliability analysis method and extends that method to account for the influence of culture, including acceptance of new technology, upon performance. The cultural parameters used to modify the human reliability analysis were determined from two standard industry approaches to cultural assessment: Hofstede’s (1991) cultural factors and Davis’ (1989) technology acceptance model (TAM). The result is called the Culture Adjustment Method (CAM). An example is presented that (1) reviews human reliability assessment with and without cultural attributes for a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system attack, (2) demonstrates how country specific information can be used to increase the realism of HRA modeling, and (3) discusses the differences in human error probability estimates arising from cultural differences.

David Gertman; Julie Marble; Steven Novack

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ontology-enriched Visualization of Human Anatomy  

SciTech Connect

The project focuses on the problem of presenting a human anatomical 3D model associated with other types of human systemic information ranging from physiological to anatomical information while navigating the 3D model. We propose a solution that integrates a visual 3D interface and navigation features with the display of structured information contained in an ontology of anatomy where the structures of the human body are formally and semantically linked. The displayed and annotated anatomy serves as a visual entry point into a patient's anatomy, medical indicators and other information. The ontology of medical information provides labeling to the highlighted anatomical parts in the 3D display. Because of the logical organization and links between anatomical objects found in the ontology and associated 3D model, the analysis of a structure by a physician is greatly enhanced. Navigation within the 3D visualization and between this visualization and objects representing anatomical concepts within the model is also featured.

Pouchard, LC

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Skin-to-Skin Replenishment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The proposed approach of resupplying the Sea Base may be unconventional from current US Navy operational methods, but is not without ...

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

Interstitial brachytherapy of periorificial skin carcinomas of the face: A retrospective study of 97 cases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze outcomes after interstitial brachytherapy of facial periorificial skin carcinomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 97 skin carcinomas (88 basal cell carcinomas, 9 squamous cell carcinomas) of the nose, periorbital areas, and ears from 40 previously untreated patients (Group 1) and 57 patients who had undergone surgery (Group 2). The average dose was 55 Gy (range, 50-65 Gy) in Group 1 and 52 Gy (range, 50-60 Gy) in Group 2 (mean implantation times: 79 and 74 hours, respectively). We calculated survival rates and assessed functional and cosmetic results de visu. Results: Median age was 71 years (range, 17-97 years). There were 29 T1, 8 T2, 1 T3, and 2 Tx tumors in Group 1. Tumors were <2 cm in Group 2. Local control was 92.5% in Group 1 and 88% in Group 2 (median follow-up, 55 months; range, 6-132 months). Five-year disease-free survival was better in Group 1 (91%; range, 75-97) than in Group 2 (80%; range, 62-90; p = 0.23). Of the 34 patients whose results were reassessed, 8 presented with pruritus or epiphora; 1 Group 2 patient had an impaired eyelid aperture. Cosmetic results were better in Group 1 than in Group 2 with, respectively, 72% (8/11) vs. 52% (12/23) good results and 28 (3/11) vs. 43% (10/23) fair results. Conclusions: Brachytherapy provided a high level of local control and good cosmetic results for facial periorificial skin carcinomas that pose problems of surgical reconstruction. Results were better for untreated tumors than for incompletely excised tumors or tumors recurring after surgery.

Rio, Emmanuel [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France)]. E-mail: e-rio@nantes.fnclcc.fr; Bardet, Etienne [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Ferron, Christophe [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France); Peuvrel, Patrick [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Supiot, Stephane [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Campion, Loic [Department of Biostatistics, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Beauvillain De Montreuil, Claude [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France); Mahe, Marc Andre [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Dreno, Brigitte [Department of Dermatology, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development and Construction of Bioclimatic Double Skin Active Facade for Hot and Humid Climate of UAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transparency in architecture is desirable for many reasons. In order to build transparent buildings with high levels of occupant comfort without compromising energy performance, facade technology and integration of facade and environmental systems become still more advanced. The present paper deals with the development and construction of mechanically ventilated double skin facade with HVAC integration for hot and humid climate like UAE. A case study is presented, illustrating potential benefits of careful application of the available technologies adopting an integrated approach from the early design phases. Moreover, the paper gives an introduction to test and demonstrate the performance of the facade and HVAC integration.

Karbor, R. G.; Mohamed, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Including the Human Factor in Dependability Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the construction of a dependability benchmark that captures the impact of the human system operator on the tested system. Our benchmark follows the usual model of injecting faults and perturbations into the tested system; however, our perturbations are generated by the unscripted actions of actual human operators participating in the benchmark procedure in addition to more traditional fault injection. We introduce the issues that arise as we attempt to incorporate human behavior into a dependability benchmark and describe the possible solutions that we have arrived at through preliminary experimentation. Finally, we describe the implementation of our techniques in a dependability benchmark that we are currently developing

Aaron B. Brown; Leonard C. Chung; David A. Patterson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Search Method for Real-time Knowledge Discovery Modeled on ...  

nodes in a system of multiple computers according to rules for complex, hierarchical system modeled on the human brain.

280

Human Rights and Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration, Human Rights and Security in Europe MRU Student Conference Proceedings 2012 Edited by Siril Berglund, Helen McCarthy and Agata Patyna #12;2 "Migration, Human Rights and Security...............................................................................................58 #12;3 "Migration, Human Rights and Security in Europe", MRU Student Conference Proceedings

Saunders, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effectiveness of Intrinsically Motivated Adaptive Agent for Sustainable Human-Agent Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To achieve sustainable human-agent interaction (HAI), we proposed a new model of intrinsically motivated adaptive agent, which learns about the human partner and behaves to satisfy its intrinsic motivation. To investigate the model's effectiveness, ... Keywords: Human-agent interaction (HAI), adaptive agent, intrinsic motivation, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), reinforcement learning

Takayuki Nozawa; Toshiyuki Kondo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Combining Modeling and Gaming for Predictive Analytics  

SciTech Connect

Many of our most significant challenges involve people. While human behavior has long been studied, there are recent advances in computational modeling of human behavior. With advances in computational capabilities come increases in the volume and complexity of data that humans must understand in order to make sense of and capitalize on these modeling advances. Ultimately, models represent an encapsulation of human knowledge. One inherent challenge in modeling is efficient and accurate transfer of knowledge from humans to models, and subsequent retrieval. The simulated real-world environment of games presents one avenue for these knowledge transfers. In this paper we describe our approach of combining modeling and gaming disciplines to develop predictive capabilities, using formal models to inform game development, and using games to provide data for modeling.

Riensche, Roderick M.; Whitney, Paul D.

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

ORISE: Human Subjects Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Protection Human Subjects Protection The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs technical assessments to assist U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories involved in human subjects research projects. Under DOE Order and Policy 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, and 10 CFR 745, DOE employees and contractors are expected to protect the rights and welfare of human research subjects. In support of the DOE Office of Science and the Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP), ORISE has most recently assisted with the development and distribution of tools to address classified research and to track potential human social cultural behavior systems (HSCB) research conducted by DOE laboratories. Examples of products that ORISE has developed in support of the HSPP

284

Studies of the uniqueness of solutions of pressure transient responses and the effects of fracture skin and wellbore storage, fracture geometry, and flowback of fracture fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work to investigate the ability to match observed pressure transient responses with a simulation model and the certainty of whether the simulation results are unique. To perform this work, INTERCOMP's Radial Single Well Gas Model (RADGAS) was used to establish a base case on which the uniqueness studies would be performed. Once the base cases were established, attempts were made to match their pressure transient responses, using RADGAS, with reservoir models having different characteristics; i.e., different fracture lengths, reservoir permeabilities, etc. The results of the study indicate that when certain parameters are accurately known through rock analysis and pressure studies, the simulations are unique, but that when a few key parameters are unknown and must be determined by matching the simulator response to the well's pressure transient behavior, uncertainty arises as to whether the solution is indeed unique. In addition to the uniqueness study, three additional exercises were performed to study the effects of fracture skin and wellbore storage, fracture geometry, and fracture fluid remaining in and around the fracture on the pressure transient responses and production forecasts of a well. 37 figures, 2 tables.

Bixel, H.C.; Christiansen, D.H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Human Errors: Disadvantages and Advantages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The traditional paradigm for learning and training of operators in complex systems is discussed and criticised to react on the strong influence (the doctrine of 'mental logic') coming from research carried out in artificial intelligence (AI). The most well known arguments against the AI-approach are presented and discussed in relation to expertise, intuition and implicit knowledge. The importance of faults and errors are discussed in the context of a new metaphor for cognitive structures to describe expertise, and how knowledge about unsuccessful behavior influences the actual decision making process of experts. Keywords: human error, meta learning, mental model, experience, expertise 1. INTRODUCTION Why is this type of statements "I learned more from my defeats than from my victories" (Napoleon, ca. 1819) sometimes (or always) true? To answer this question we need a new understanding of human errors, inefficient behavior, and expertise. In this paper we will discuss the importance of...

Matthias Rauterberg; Daniel Felix

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Human In Vivo Dose Response to Controlled,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exposure of LDIR in the normal skin of men undergoing therapeutic radiation for prostate cancer (research protocol: HIPAA compliant, IRB approved). Using newly developed...

287

Human and Artificial Agents in a Crash-Prone Financial Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2). Duffy, J. (2006). Agent-based models and human subjectF. (2005). Estimation of agent-based models: The case of anFinancial markets · Agent-based models · Experimental

Feldman, Todd; Friedman, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expressing explicitly the parameters of the standard Skyrme interaction in terms of the macroscopic properties of asymmetric nuclear matter, we show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and the double neutron/proton ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies leads to a more stringent limit on L approximately independent of E(sym)(rho(0)). The implication of these new constraints on the Delta r(np) of (208)Pb as well as the core-crust transition density and pressure in neutron stars is discussed.

Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Generation of a suite of 3D computer-generated breast phantoms from a limited set of human subject data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The authors previously reported on a three-dimensional computer-generated breast phantom, based on empirical human image data, including a realistic finite-element based compression model that was capable of simulating multimodality imaging data. The computerized breast phantoms are a hybrid of two phantom generation techniques, combining empirical breast CT (bCT) data with flexible computer graphics techniques. However, to date, these phantoms have been based on single human subjects. In this paper, the authors report on a new method to generate multiple phantoms, simulating additional subjects from the limited set of original dedicated breast CT data. The authors developed an image morphing technique to construct new phantoms by gradually transitioning between two human subject datasets, with the potential to generate hundreds of additional pseudoindependent phantoms from the limited bCT cases. The authors conducted a preliminary subjective assessment with a limited number of observers (n= 4) to illustrate how realistic the simulated images generated with the pseudoindependent phantoms appeared. Methods: Several mesh-based geometric transformations were developed to generate distorted breast datasets from the original human subject data. Segmented bCT data from two different human subjects were used as the 'base' and 'target' for morphing. Several combinations of transformations were applied to morph between the 'base' and 'target' datasets such as changing the breast shape, rotating the glandular data, and changing the distribution of the glandular tissue. Following the morphing, regions of skin and fat were assigned to the morphed dataset in order to appropriately assign mechanical properties during the compression simulation. The resulting morphed breast was compressed using a finite element algorithm and simulated mammograms were generated using techniques described previously. Sixty-two simulated mammograms, generated from morphing three human subject datasets, were used in a preliminary observer evaluation where four board certified breast radiologists with varying amounts of experience ranked the level of realism (from 1 ='fake' to 10 ='real') of the simulated images. Results: The morphing technique was able to successfully generate new and unique morphed datasets from the original human subject data. The radiologists evaluated the realism of simulated mammograms generated from the morphed and unmorphed human subject datasets and scored the realism with an average ranking of 5.87 {+-} 1.99, confirming that overall the phantom image datasets appeared more 'real' than 'fake.' Moreover, there was not a significant difference (p > 0.1) between the realism of the unmorphed datasets (6.0 {+-} 1.95) compared to the morphed datasets (5.86 {+-} 1.99). Three of the four observers had overall average rankings of 6.89 {+-} 0.89, 6.9 {+-} 1.24, 6.76 {+-} 1.22, whereas the fourth observer ranked them noticeably lower at 2.94 {+-} 0.7. Conclusions: This work presents a technique that can be used to generate a suite of realistic computerized breast phantoms from a limited number of human subjects. This suite of flexible breast phantoms can be used for multimodality imaging research to provide a known truth while concurrently producing realistic simulated imaging data.

Hsu, Christina M. L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Palmeri, Mark L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Veress, Alexander I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Dobbins, James T. III [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

LLNL's Saturday lectures explore computational modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

via computer simulation; fusion modeling; menacing microbes; and simulating the human heart on the world's fastest supercomputer. The lectures are free and will be held in the...

292

Phorbol myristate acetate and catechol as skin cocarcinogens in SENCAR mice. Environ. Health Perspect. 68  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enhancement of the carcinogenicity of benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P) and 3-propiolactone (BPL) by the mouse skin cocarcinogens phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and catechol were examined in female SEN-CAR mice, 30 per group. The carcinogen and cocarcinogen were applied simultaneously, three times weekly for 490-560 days. B(a)P and BPL were used at constant doses of 5 and 50 jig, respectively, in all experiments. PMA was used at three doses, 2.5, 1.0, and 0.5 p.g per application, and catechol was used at one dose, 2 mg per application. Control groups included animals that received carcinogen only, cocarcinogen only, acetone only, and no treatment. The carcinogenicity of B(a)P and BPL were enhanced by the cocarcinogens, particularly in terms of tumor multiplicity. For both carcinogens, the most marked cocarcinogenic effects were observed at the lowest dose of PMA used (0.5,ug per application). This observation applied for days to first tumor, animals with tumors, tumor multiplicity, and incidence of malignant skin tumors. Catechol applied alone did not induce any tumors; with PMA alone there were significant incidences of benign and malignant tumors, e.g., at a dose of only 0.5,ug per application, 15 of 30 animals had 28 tumors, 5 of which were squamous carcinomas. In two-stage carcinogenesis experiments with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as initiator and PMA as promoter, SENCAR mice showed a greater susceptibility to tumor induction when compared to ICR/Ha mice used in earlier work. This susceptibility was most notable in terms of rate of tumor appearance and tumor multiplicity.

Benjamin L. Van Duuren; Susan Melchionne; Irving Seidmant

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Analysis of Conductor Impedances Accounting for Skin Effect and Nonlinear Permeability  

SciTech Connect

It is often necessary to protect sensitive electrical equipment from pulsed electric and magnetic fields. To accomplish this electromagnetic shielding structures similar to Faraday Cages are often implemented. If the equipment is inside a facility that has been reinforced with rebar, the rebar can be used as part of a lighting protection system. Unfortunately, such shields are not perfect and allow electromagnetic fields to be created inside due to discontinuities in the structure, penetrations, and finite conductivity of the shield. In order to perform an analysis of such a structure it is important to first determine the effect of the finite impedance of the conductors used in the shield. In this paper we will discuss the impedances of different cylindrical conductors in the time domain. For a time varying pulse the currents created in the conductor will have different spectral components, which will affect the current density due to skin effects. Many construction materials use iron and different types of steels that have a nonlinear permeability. The nonlinear material can have an effect on the impedance of the conductor depending on the B-H curve. Although closed form solutions exist for the impedances of cylindrical conductors made of linear materials, computational techniques are needed for nonlinear materials. Simulations of such impedances are often technically challenging due to the need for a computational mesh to be able to resolve the skin depths for the different spectral components in the pulse. The results of such simulations in the time domain will be shown and used to determine the impedances of cylindrical conductors for lightning current pulses that have low frequency content.

Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Speer, R D

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

On the evaluation of human error probabilities for post-initiating events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantification of human error probabilities (HEPs) for the purpose of human reliability assessment (HRA) is very complex. Because of this complexity, the state of the art includes a variety of HRA models, each with its own ...

Presley, Mary R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Contact List, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division Contact List Human Resources Guest, User, Visitor (GUV) Center Occupational Medicine Training and Qualifications Office Note: All listed phone extensions are in the format of (631) 344-xxxx. Human Resources Robert Lincoln, Chief Human Resources Officer x7435 rlincoln@bnl.gov Margaret Hughes x2108 hughes@bnl.gov Elizabeth Gilbert x2315 gilbert@bnl.gov Human Resources Generalists Christel Colon, HR Manager - BES, GARS & ELS x8469 ccolon@bnl.gov Joann Williams, HR Manager - Support Operations x8356 williamsj@bnl.gov Joanna Hall, HR Manager - Photon Sciences x4410 jhall@bnl.gov Donna Dowling, HR Manager - Nuclear & Particle Physics x2754 dowling@bnl.gov Terrence Buck x8715 tbuck@bnl.gov

296

Integrated Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Human Error Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing human error is recognized in the power-generation industry as a key factor in reducing safety-related events as well as improving asset availability. Achieving a sustainable culture change that leads to human error reduction in plant operations and maintenance remains a significant challenge to the industry. This report presents a behavior-based approach to human performance improvement and error reduction. The report explains fundamental elements of culture change and describes proven practices...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Human and Gorilla Genes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human and Gorilla Genes Name: Eileen B Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the differences between the genetic mechanisms which affect...

299

Human Reliability Program (HRP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of SecurityHRP Training Certification- HTML- Flash10 CFR 712, Human Reliability ProgramHRP HandbookTools for Clinicians- Medication List- Medical Records Checklist

300

HQ - Human Resources Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

HQs Human Recources Operations delivers services, including position management, recruitment, staffing and classification, and reduction in force at Headquarters.  Click the "Contacts" Link to find...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

302

Publications & Resources, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or approved by Brookhaven National Laboratory or the Human Resources Division. Manuals Scientific Staff Manual Supervisors Personnel Manual SBMS Subject Areas Compensation...

303

Biosphere Process Model Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

A framework for modeling payments for ecosystem services with agent-based models, Bayesian belief networks and opinion dynamics models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an integrated modeling framework for simulating land-use decision making under the influence of payments for ecosystem services. The model combines agent-based modeling (ABM) with Bayesian belief networks (BBNs) and opinion dynamics models ... Keywords: Agent based modeling, Bayesian network, China, Human-environment interaction, IAMO-LUC, Land use change, Payments for environmental services, Social influence

Zhanli Sun, Daniel MüLler

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Intelligent agents for pandemic modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pandemic scenarios are very complex due to the wide number of variables and critical aspects which have to be considered. In fact these phenomena evolve quickly with strong inertia and influence of stochastic components (i.e. mutation, human decisions, ... Keywords: health care modeling, human behavior, intelligent agents, pandemic

Agostino G. Bruzzone; Marina Massei; Francesca Madeo; Federico Tarone; Julija Petuhova

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimating farfield organic chemical exposures, intake rates and intake fractions to human age classes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes the development and application of the Farfield Human Exposure (FHX) model. This screening level model brings together information on chemical partitioning, degradation, environmental fate and transport, and food web bioaccumulation ... Keywords: Bioaccumulation, Biotransformation, Exposure assessment, Human health, Multimedia modelling, Organic chemicals

Jon A. Arnot; Don Mackay; Roger Sutcliffe; Belinda Lo

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Humans and Gills  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Humans and Gills Humans and Gills Name: Shelley Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is it true that some babies are born with some sort of gills? How and when do humans adapt from breathing inside to breathing outside of the womb? Replies: Whoa! You have received a great deal of false information. First, babies are not born with gills! Get that out of your thinking! Babies do not "breath" for oxygen in the womb. They do "practice breathing" using the amniotic fluid of the womb, but it is not doing them any good otherwise. All of the embryo and fetal needs are received through the placenta. The mother provides everything that is needed. As for the gills, there is a stage in the early human embryo development whereby humans do show gill slits, but not functional gills. Slits are not gills!! As a matter of fact, all vertebrates show these same gill slits.

308

Models of and experiments with reaching tasks in haptic virtual environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents an analysis of human reaching movements in manipulation of flexible objects. To predict the trajectory of human hand we resort to two models, the lowest polynomial order model for the hand movement and the minimum hand jerk model. ... Keywords: dynamic environment, haptic interface, human movements, modeling, reaching task

Mikhail Svinin; Igor Goncharenko

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

[HUGE]: universal architecture for statistically based HUman GEsturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a universal architecture for statistically based HUman GEsturing (HUGE) system, for producing and using statistical models for facial gestures based on any kind of inducement. As inducement we consider any kind of signal that occurs in parallel ...

Karlo Smid; Goranka Zoric; Igor S. Pandzic

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Combining human and machine intelligence for making predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive literature in psychology, economics, statistics, operations research and management science has dealt with comparing forecasts based on human-expert judgment vs. (statistical) models in a variety of scenarios, ...

Nagar, Yiftach

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Human exposure through food chains:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using information collected under the community right to know'' provision of the Superfund reauthorization act, the US Environmental Protection Agency has revealed that some two to three billion pounds of toxic chemicals are released annually to the atmosphere from industries in the US. Human populations can contact these environmental pollutants through food, water, and air in varying amounts each day throughout a lifetime. A realistic strategy for managing the potential health risks of industrial emissions requires a comprehensive approach with adequate attention to uncertainties. Using contaminant transfers from air to milk and as a case study, I consider here two important issues in exposure assessment --- (1) estimation of and (2) reduction of uncertainty in exposure estimates. This case study provides a distinction between variability, ignorance and uncertainty. For the air/milk pathways, I explore the use of exposure models that combine information on environmental partitioning with data on human diet, behavior patterns, and physiology into a numerical expression that links ambient air concentrations with chronic daily intake. I examine how uncertainty limits current exposure modeling efforts and suggest research to reduce these uncertainty. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

McKone, T.E.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments This database contains information on records collections related to human radiation...

313

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Global Environmental Change and Human Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with human rights, human security or environmental change ifEnvironmental Change and Human Security By Matthew, RichardChange and Human Security. Cambridge, Massachusetts &

Kunnas, Jan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Defense Report Finding Aids Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiments Records 1944-1994 Exit Human Radiation Experiments Site This...

316

Spontaneous Human Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spontaneous Human Combustion Spontaneous Human Combustion Name: S. Phillips. Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: One of our 8th grade students has tried to find information in our library about spontaneous human combustion, but to no avail. Could you tell us where we might locate a simple reference, or provide some in information about this subject for him. Replies: Sorry, but this is definitely "fringe science"...try asking in bookstores. I seem to recall one of those "believe it or not" type of TV shows did an episode on spontaneous human combustion a few years ago in which they reported on some British scientists who investigated this purported phenomenon. Remember that people (back in the Dark Ages, and before) used to believe in "spontaneous generation" of certain plants and animals because they were not aware of the reproduction methods used by those plants and animals.

317

Macintosh human interface guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Macintosh Human Interface Guidelines describes the way to create products that optimize the interaction between people and Macintosh computers. It explains the whys and hows of the Macintosh interface in general terms and specific details. Macintosh ...

Apple Computer, Inc.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Medical Humanities Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the making: Memoirs and medical education. Iowa City, IA:shoes: empathy and othering in medical students' education.through the thread of medical humanities 1 . The essay by

Shapiro, Johanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Dogs and Human Diseases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diseases Name: Doris Status: Other Grade: 9-12 Location: OK Date: NA Question: Can a dog contact the shingles or chicken pox virus from a human? Replies: Hi Doris, Great...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Communication Mercury Levels in Locally Manufactured Mexican Skin-Lightening Creams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Mercury is considered one of the most toxic elements for plants and animals. Nevertheless, in the Middle East, Asia and Latin America, whitening creams containing mercury are being manufactured and purchased, despite their obvious health risks. Due to the mass distribution of these products, this can be considered a global public health issue. In Mexico, these products are widely available in pharmacies, beauty aid and health stores. They are used for their skin lightening effects. The aim of this work was to analyze the mercury content in some cosmetic whitening creams using the cold vapor technique coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). A total of 16 skin-lightening creams from the local market were investigated. No warning information was noted on the packaging. In 10 of the samples, no mercury was detected. The mercury content in six of the samples varied between 878 and 36,000 ppm, despite the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that the limit for mercury in creams should be less than 1 ppm. Skin creams containing mercury are still available and commonly used in Mexico and many developing countries, and their contents are poorly controlled.

Claudia P. Peregrino; Myriam V. Moreno; Silvia V. Mir; Alma D. Rubio; Luz O. Leal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Automatic segmentation of human facial tissue by MRI-CT fusion: A feasibility study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to develop automatic image segmentation methods to segment human facial tissue which contains very thin anatomic structures. The segmentation output can be used to construct a more realistic human face model for a variety of ... Keywords: Bayesian, Data fusion, Human facial tissue, Level Sets, Medical image segmentation, Partial volume

Emre H. Kale; Erkan U. Mumcuoglu; Salih Hamcan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Extracting data from human manipulation of objects towards improving autonomous robotic grasping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Humans excel in manipulation tasks, a basic skill for our survival and a key feature in our manmade world of artefacts and devices. In this work, we study how humans manipulate simple daily objects, and construct a probabilistic representation model ... Keywords: Contact points, Human demonstration, Manipulation task representation, Motion pattern, Probabilistic object representation, Stable grasp

Diego R. Faria; Ricardo Martins; Jorge Lobo; Jorge Dias

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Integrated Ocean Skin and Bulk Temperature Measurements Using the Calibrated Infrared In Situ Measurement System (CIRIMS) and Through-Hull Ports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and performance of a shipboard-integrated system for underway skin and bulk temperature is presented. The system consists of the Calibrated Infrared In situ Measurement System (CIRIMS) and through-hull temperature sensors. The CIRIMS ...

A. T. Jessup; R. Branch

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Retrieval of Lake Bulk and Skin Temperatures Using Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR-2) Data: A Case Study Using Lake Tahoe, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1999, four monitoring stations were permanently moored on Lake Tahoe, California–Nevada. Each monitoring station provides near-real-time measurements of the surface skin temperature and bulk temperature on a near-continuous basis. Day and ...

Simon J. Hook; Fred J. Prata; Ronald E. Alley; Ali Abtahi; Robert C. Richards; S. Geoffrey Schladow; SveinnÓ Pálmarsson

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Development of Fast-Time Simulation Techniques to Model Safety Issues in the National Airspace System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental design limitations in MIDAS limit the scalability and practicality of MIDAS as a tool to model human performanceFundamental design limitations in MIDAS limit the scalability and practicality of MIDAS as a tool to model human performance

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Planet-scale Human Mobility Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research into, and design and construction of mobile systems and algorithms requires access to large-scale mobility data. Unfortunately, the wireless and mobile research community lacks such data. For instance, the largest available human contact traces contain only 100 nodes with very sparse connectivity, limited by experimental logistics. In this paper we pose a challenge to the community: how can we collect mobility data from billions of human participants? We re-assert the importance of large-scale datasets in communication network design, and claim that this could impact fundamental studies in other academic disciplines. In effect, we argue that planet-scale mobility measurements can help to save the world. For example, through understanding large-scale human mobility, we can track and model and contain the spread of epidemics of various kinds.

Pan Hui; Richard Mortier; Tristan Henderson; Jon Crowcroft

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Primer to Human Threading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human Threading(TM) is new approach in developing innovative computing technologies. It uses novel physiologic combinations to measure the human brain and body in an effort to create greater efficiency among human and machine. A divergent group of measurement ... Keywords: BCI, EEG, HCI, Human ThreadingTM, Information systems

Christopher Liapis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effects of anticipatory perceptual simulation on practiced human-robot tasks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the aim of attaining increased fluency and efficiency in human-robot teams, we have developed a cognitive architecture for robotic teammates based on the neuro-psychological principles of anticipation and perceptual simulation through top-down biasing. ... Keywords: Anticipation, Cognitive models, Human-robot interaction, Human-robot teamwork, Human-subject studies, Joint practice, Perceptual simulation, Priming, Top-down bias

Guy Hoffman; Cynthia Breazeal

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Turkey vs. human digestion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turkey vs. human digestion Turkey vs. human digestion Name: wallyb Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How is the digestive system of turkeys different from that of humans? Replies: Hmmm.. been a while since I had sophomore biology, so I can't completely answer this one, but I can say a few things. One, since turkeys are birds, and birds as a general rule have not had teeth for several million years at least, the turkey needs a way to mash up its food -- thus, the crop, which is essentially like another stomach: the turkey (and many other birds, for that matter) swallows small stones which serve in lieu of teeth, mashing up food via muscular action in the crop, from whence the "chewed" food moves on into the rest of the digestive tract. As for any other differences, I'll have to leave that to someone else with more ornithological experience...

332

Relocation Guide, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relocation Information Guide Relocation Information Guide The Human Resources Division is providing this Information Guide to you to help ease the transition of relocating to Long Island. Relocating to a new place can be an exciting as well as stressful time. We have compiled information that can be very helpful with the many issues you may face. You may also seek assistance from the recruiter you work with in Human Resources. Service Disclaimer - This web page contains links to other Internet sites. These links are not endorsements of any products or services and no information in such site has been endorsed or approved by Brookhaven National Laboratory or the Human Resources Division. Here are some of the issues: Cost of living Buying or renting a home Schools in the area

333

THE HUMAN FACTOR* By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*I gratefully acknowledge the advice, encouragement, and inspiration of Nuria Chinchilla from IESE who encouraged me to think about the issue of human sustainability in both societies and companies. The helpful comments of the editor and the reviewers substantially clarified the arguments. ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVES, (in press) Although most of the research and public pressure concerning sustainability has been focused on the effects of business and organizational activity on the physical environment, companies and their management practices profoundly affect the human and social environment as well. This article briefly reviews the literature on the direct and indirect effects of organizations and their decisions about people on human health and mortality. It then considers some possible explanations for why social sustainability has received relatively short shrift in management writing, and outlines a research agenda for investigating the links between social sustainability and organizational effectiveness as well as the role

Jeffrey Pfeffer; R Esearch; P Aper; S Eries; Building Sustainable Organizations; Jeffrey Pfeffer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Life Cycle Human Capital Formation, Search Intensity, and Wage Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents and estimates a unified model where both human capital investment and job search are endogenized. This unification not only enables me to quantify the relative contributions of each mechanism to life cycle wage dynamics, but also to investigate potential interactions between human capital investment and job search. Within the unified framework, the expectation of rising rental rates of human capital through searching in the future gives workers more incentive to invest in human capital. In the meantime, unemployed workers reduce their reservation rates to leave unemployment quickly to take advantage of human capital accumulation on the job. The results show that these interactions are well supported by data. Allowing for these interactions as well as heterogeneity in search technology, the unified model predicts that both human capital accumulation and job search contribute significantly to the wage growth over the life cycle with human capital accumulation accounting for 40 % of total wage growth and job search accounting for 50%. The remaining 10 % is due to the interactions of the two forces. Furthermore, job search dominates wage growth earlier in the life cycle while human capital accumulation dominates later in the life cycle. ?This paper is one of the chapters in my Ph.D. thesis. I thank my committee members, Audra Bowlus, Hiroyuki Kasahara, and Lance Lochner for their continuous guidance and support. I would also like to thank Chris Robinson, Fabien Postel-Vinay, Todd Stinebrickner, Ben Lester as well as

Huju Liu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

de la Chapelle, Albert (Helsingfors, FI); Vogelstein, Bert (Baltimore, MD); Kinzler, Kenneth W. (Baltimore, MD)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Are some human ecosystems self-defeating?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex patterns of human behaviour are difficult to capture in agent-based simulations of socio-ecological systems. Even knowing each individual agent's strategy at one point in time may not help when trying to predict the collective behaviour of certain ... Keywords: Agent-based models, Bar problem, Cartesians and Stochasts, Evolutionarily stable strategies, Minority game, Self-defeating systems, Socio-ecological systems

David Batten

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Human factors simulation tools for the course of action analysis in COIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyzing and modeling of insurgency behavior and decisions is a complex task that can only be conducted by systematic as well as system-view methods. Different approaches like Human Behavior Representation (HBR), Organization Behavior Representation ... Keywords: Human Behavior Representation (HBR), Mass Behavior Representation (MBR), Organization Behavior Representation (OBR), cognitive modeling, decision support tool, mission analysis

Markus Bresinsky; Harald Schaub

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Protection against 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) - induced cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes by an inducer of the glutathione detoxification pathway  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur mustard (SM or mustard gas) was first used as a chemical warfare agent almost 100 years ago. Due to its toxic effects on the eyes, lungs, and skin, and the relative ease with which it may be synthesized, mustard gas remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. SM exposed skin develops fluid filled bullae resulting from potent cytotoxicity of cells lining the basement membrane of the epidermis. Currently, there are no antidotes for SM exposure; therefore, chemopreventive measures for first responders following an SM attack are needed. Glutathione (GSH) is known to have a protective effect against SM toxicity, and detoxification of SM is believed to occur, in part, via GSH conjugation. Therefore, we screened 6 potential chemopreventive agents for ability to induce GSH synthesis and protect cultured human keratinocytes against the SM analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). Using NCTC2544 human keratinocytes, we found that both sulforaphane and methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) stimulated nuclear localization of Nrf2 and induced expression of the GSH synthesis gene, GCLM. Additionally, we found that treatment with CDDO-Me elevated reduced GSH content of NCTC2544 cells and preserved their viability by {approx} 3-fold following exposure to CEES. Our data also suggested that CDDO-Me may act additively with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a nucleophilic scavenging agent, to increase the viability of keratinocytes exposed to CEES. These results suggest that CDDO-Me is a promising chemopreventive agent for SM toxicity in the skin. - Highlights: > CDDO-Me treatment increased intracellular GSH in human keratinocytes. > CDDO-Me increased cell viability following exposure to the half-mustard, CEES. > The cytoprotective effect of CDDO-Me was likely due to scavenging with endogenous GSH.

Abel, Erika L.; Bubel, Jennifer D.; Simper, Melissa S.; Powell, Leslie; McClellan, S. Alex [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Andreeff, Michael [Department of Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, John, E-mail: john.digiovanni@austin.utexas.edu [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Available Technologies: Heart and Torso Phantom Model of ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Models the human torso, heart, and lungs for improving SPECT and PET imaging ; Develops and validates algorithms to ...

342

Risk Adjusted Budget Allocation Models with Application in ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

However, it is difficult to convert human losses into monetary terms precisely, and ..... optimization model to minimize the expected potential error resulting from ...

343

Patient-Specific Finite Element Models of Proximal Femur Stiffness ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models were validated experimentally by fracturing human cadaveric femurs in a testing machine, using specially designed fixtures, load cells, and high speed ...

344

A Tissue-Level Electromechanical Model of the Left Ventricle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EA are stochastic search methods inspired from the natural selection process. ..... Ten Tusscher KH, Noble D, Noble PJ, Panfilov AV (2004) A model for human ...

345

Human computing and machine understanding of human behavior: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A widely accepted prediction is that computing will move to the background, weaving itself into the fabric of our everyday living spaces and projecting the human user into the foreground. If this prediction is to come true, then next generation computing ... Keywords: affective computing, analysis, human behavior understanding, human sensing, multimodal data, socially-aware computing

Maja Pantic; Alex Pentland; Anton Nijholt; Thomas S. Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Development of A Human Systems Simulation Laboratory: Strategic Direction  

SciTech Connect

The Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) at the Idaho National Laboratory is one of few facilities of its kind that allows human factors researchers to evaluate various aspects of human performance and human system interaction for proposed reactor designs and upgrades. A basic system architecture, physical configuration and simulation capability were established to enable human factors researchers to support multiple, simultaneous simulations and also different power plant technologies. Although still evolving in terms of its technical and functional architecture, the HSSL is already proving its worth in supporting current and future nuclear industry needs for light water reactor sustainability and small modular reactors. The evolution of the HSSL is focused on continual physical and functional refinement to make it a fully equipped, reconfigurable facility where advanced research, testing and validation studies can be conducted on a wider range of reactor technologies. This requires the implementation of additional plant models to produce empirical research data on human performance with emerging human-system interaction technologies. Additional beneficiaries of this information include system designers and HRA practitioners. To ensure that results of control room crew studies will be generalizable to the existing and evolving fleet of US reactors, future expansion of the HSSL may also include other SMR plant models, plant-specific simulators and a generic plant model aligned to the current generation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and future advanced reactor designs. Collaboration with industry partners is also proving to be a vital component of the facility as this helps to establish a formal basis for current and future human performance experiments to support nuclear industry objectives. A long-range Program Plan has been developed for the HSSL to ensure that the facility will support not only the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, but also to provide human factors guidance for all future developments of the nuclear industry.

Jacques Hugo; Katya le Blanc; David Gertman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Infrared Continental Surface Emissivity Spectra and Skin Temperature Retrieved from IASI Observations over the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface temperature and emissivity spectra are essential variables for improving models of the earth surface–atmosphere interaction or retrievals of atmospheric variables such as thermodynamic profiles, chemical composition, cloud and aerosol ...

Virginie Capelle; Alain Chédin; Eric Péquignot; Peter Schlüssel; Stuart M. Newman; Noelle A. Scott

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Design of a building structural skin using multi-objective optimization techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-disciplinary System Design Optimization was used to design the geometry and to select the materials for the structural facade of a building. A multi-objective optimization model was developed, capable of optimizing ...

Merello, Riccardo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Objective method to report planner-independent skin/rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: An objective method was proposed and compared with a manual selection method to determine planner-independent skin and rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning. Methods: The maximal dose to skin and rib was objectively extracted from a dose volume histogram (DVH) of skin and rib volumes. A virtual skin volume was produced by expanding the skin surface in three dimensions (3D) external to the breast with a certain thickness in the planning computed tomography (CT) images. Therefore, the maximal dose to this volume occurs on the skin surface the same with a conventional manual selection method. The rib was also delineated in the planning CT images and its maximal dose was extracted from its DVH. The absolute (Abdiff=|D{sub max}{sup Man}-D{sub max}{sup DVH}|) and relative (Rediff[%]=100x(|D{sub max}{sup Man}-D{sub max}{sup DVH}|)/D{sub max}{sup DVH}) maximal skin and rib dose differences between the manual selection method (D{sub max}{sup Man}) and the objective method (D{sub max}{sup DVH}) were measured for 50 balloon-based HDR (25 MammoSite and 25 Contura) patients. Results: The average{+-}standard deviation of maximal dose difference was 1.67%{+-}1.69% of the prescribed dose (PD). No statistical difference was observed between MammoSite and Contura patients for both Abdiff and Rediff[%] values. However, a statistically significant difference (p value dose difference compared with maximal skin dose difference for both Abdiff (2.30%{+-}1.71% vs 1.05%{+-}1.43%) and Rediff[%] (2.32%{+-}1.79% vs 1.21%{+-}1.41%). In general, rib has a more irregular contour and it is more proximally located to the balloon for 50 HDR patients. Due to the inverse square law factor, more dose difference was observed in higher dose range (D{sub max}>90%) compared with lower dose range (D{sub max}low dose ranges. Conclusions: The objective method using volumetric information of skin and rib can determine the planner-independent maximal dose compared with the manual selection method. However, the difference was dose point in 3D planning CT images.

Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States) and Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Human Capital Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan Human Capital Plan More Documents & Publications Strategic Use of Human Capital DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2011 - 2015) Energy.gov Careers & Internships For Staff &...

351

Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis: Benefits and Challenges of Simulating Human Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, there has been considerable work on dynamic event trees and other areas related to dynamic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The counterpart to these efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) has centered on the development of specific methods to account for the dynamic nature of human performance. In this paper, the author posits that the key to dynamic HRA is not in the development of specific methods but in the utilization of cognitive modeling and simulation to produce a framework of data that may be used in quantifying the likelihood of human error. This paper provides an overview of simulation approaches to HRA; reviews differences between first, second, and dynamic generation HRA; and outlines potential benefits and challenges of this approach.

R. L. Boring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Eye Color in Humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eye Color in Humans Eye Color in Humans Name: Kristi Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: The dominant characteristic is the one most likely to appear in the offspring. In human beings, brown is the dominant color for eyes. The children who inherit at least on dominant gene will have either brown, green, or hazel eyes. Only childten who inherit two recessive genes will have pure blue eyes. If there are eight children in the family, what color eyes will most of them have? Replies: http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/archive.htm Search under eye color Steve Sample You answer is of course dependent on the genes of the parents. If both parents do not have the recessive gene, then no children will have light colored eyes. If one has a recessive gene and the other not, then still no children will have light color eyes and on the average 25% of the eight children could have the recessive gene. If both parents have the recessive gene, then 25% of the eight children could have light color eyes.

353

Dog vs. human language  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dog vs. human language Dog vs. human language Name: Michelle Conte Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why can't dogs talk like humans? Replies: In very simple terms, they aren't made for it. In order to produce any kind of vocal sound, we not only need a set of vocal chords (or vibratory organs of some sort), we also need an air pipe and cranium shaped to deliver the vibrations in the right way -- you actually use your own head as a sort of sounding plate for several primary sounds (non-percussive) Dogs don't have the right shaped heads for the job, as well as the inability to vocalize many of the percussive sounds which make up a good percentage of our languages due to a differently shaped mouth. However, all things considered, we'd be ill-equipped to call meetings over long distances by simply howling, like dogs and their kin are wont to do in the wild.

354

Human factoring administrative procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Conservation of angular momentum during human locomotion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Problem: Our goal is to describe stable human locomotion, including walking and running, using the concept of conservation of angular momentum about the center of mass (CM) of the body. Motivation: The mechanics of walking and running are extremely complicated, exemplified by the fact that no robots can perform robust human walking. By focusing on angular momentum, a fundamental physical concept, we hope to develop a relatively simple model of stable motion. The angular momentum of a system is conserved if no external torques act on the system. During the aerial phase of locomotion, angular momentum is obviously conserved, but the interaction of the feet with the ground introduces external torques on the body. Therefore, there is no a priori reason for angular momentum in the CM frame to be conserved. However, recent observations in our research indicate that angular momentum is conserved to a large extent. Previous Work: Surprisingly, very little research has been done with regard to angular momentum during human locomotion. In 1986 Raibert mentioned the idea that “a control system that keeps the angular momentum constant during stance could achieve higher efficiency and better performance [2], ” but this approach has not been explored thoroughly. Approach: Our approach was to analyze real human locomotion data gathered in the Gait Laboratory of Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. The Gait Laboratory has facilities to obtain position data from markers placed at various

Marko Popovic; Wendy Gu; Hugh Herr

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A Real-Time Speech-Driven Talking Head using Active Appearance Models Barry-John Theobald and Nicholas Wilkinson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of anatomical layers, which include bone, muscle, subcutaneous fat, and skin. The problem is compounded be rendered in one of three ways: 1) using computer graphics models [13], using image-based techniques [7, 10, 14], or a hybrid of the two [8, 12]. The choice of renderer will largely be determined

Theobald, Barry-John

357

Innovative approaches to integrated global change modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated models are important tools to investigate the interactions between planetary processes and the growing impacts of human populations - in short: global change. Current models still have significant shortcomings, notably in their representation ... Keywords: Global change, Innovative approaches, Integrated assessment, Modelling, Research priorities

Carlo Giupponi, Mark E. Borsuk, Bert J. M. De Vries, Klaus Hasselmann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Cloud service selection based on variability modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection among Cloud services is a recent problem in research and practice. The diversity of decision-relevant criteria, configurability of Cloud services and the need to involve human decision-makers require holistic support through models, methodologies ... Keywords: cloud service selection, decision-making, feature modeling, variability modeling

Erik Wittern; Jörn Kuhlenkamp; Michael Menzel

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Human activity recognition based on surrounding things  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes human activity recognition based on the actual semantics of the human’s current location. Since predefining the semantics of location is inadequate to identify human activities, we process information about things to automatically ...

Naoharu Yamada; Kenji Sakamoto; Goro Kunito; Kenichi Yamazaki; Satoshi Tanaka

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sun Protection Intervention for Highway Workers: Long-Term Efficacy of UV Photography and Skin Cancer Information on Men’s Protective Cognitions and Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Background The risk for skin cancer is increased among older males and outdoor workers who have high levels of ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Purpose This study was designed to examine the long-term efficacy of UV photography interventions on male outdoor workers, the potential mediators of its impact, and the efficacy of UV photography and skin cancer vs. aging information with this population. Methods One hundred forty-eight male outdoor workers were randomly assigned to one of four intervention conditions or a control condition in a two by two plus one

Frederick X. Gibbons; Laura A. Walsh; James A. Kulik, Ph.D.; M. Gerrard; F. X. Gibbons; J. L. Dykstra; H. I. M. Mahler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

In vitro models for airway epithelial cell culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is about the development of a physiologically relevant model of the human airway. Various factors such as the cell model, physiochemical factors such as the cell substrate properties including its stiffness, shear ...

Sivathanu, Vivek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

An Interpretable Stroke Prediction Model using Rules and Bayesian Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We aim to produce predictive models that are not only accurate, but are also interpretable to human experts. Our models are decision lists, which consist of a series of if...then... statements (for example, if high blood ...

Letham, Benjamin

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory More Documents & Publications PIA - Human Resources Information...

364

Quantum Circuit Model Topological Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Circuit Model Topological Model Comparison of Models Topological Quantum Computation Eric Rowell Texas A&M University October 2010 Eric Rowell Topological Quantum Computation #12;Quantum Circuit Model Topological Model Comparison of Models Outline 1 Quantum Circuit Model Gates, Circuits

Rowell, Eric C.

365

Human portable preconcentrator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated.

Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hannum, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

NONE

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Proper Setup of HVAC System in Conjunction with Sound Building 'Skin' Design for Alleviation of IAQ and Energy Performance Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption in buildings is a growing concern. Many buildings are energy hogs simply because they were not set up properly to begin with. The building envelope and infiltration of unconditioned air is also a major concern in hot and humid climates, not only because of the loss of energy, but also because of damage that can result to insulation, drywall, and structure in addition to promotion of mold and mildew growth. Proper setup of the HVAC system, in conjunction with sound building “skin” design, can alleviate many of these problems. This paper will explain how most mixed air HVAC systems are set up with problems to begin with and how to identify and solve those problems. It will explain different control schemes that specifically deal with proper building pressurization

Rosenberg, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Low-energy E1 strength in select nuclei: Possible constraints on the neutron skins and the symmetry energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlations between low-lying electric dipole (E1) strength and neutron skin thickness are systematically investigated with the fully self-consistent random-phase approximation using the Skyrme energy functionals. The presence of strong correlation among these quantities is currently under dispute. We find that the strong correlation is present in properly selected nuclei, namely in spherical neutron-rich nuclei in the region where the neutron Fermi levels are located at orbits with low orbital angular momenta. The significant correlation between the fraction of the energy-weighted sum value and the slope of the symmetry energy is also observed. The deformation in the ground state seems to weaken the correlation.

Tsunenori Inakura; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Kazuhiro Yabana

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cadmium induces autophagy through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling in skin epidermal cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal which is environmentally and occupationally relevant. The mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced autophagy are not yet completely understood. The present study shows that cadmium induces autophagy, as demonstrated by the increase of LC3-II formation and the GFP-LC3 puncta cells. The induction of autophagosomes was directly visualized by electron microscopy in cadmium-exposed skin epidermal cells. Blockage of LKB1 or AMPK by siRNA transfection suppressed cadmium-induced autophagy. Cadmium-induced autophagy was inhibited in dominant-negative AMPK-transfected cells, whereas it was accelerated in cells transfected with the constitutively active form of AMPK. mTOR signaling, a negative regulator of autophagy, was downregulated in cadmium-exposed cells. In addition, cadmium generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) at relatively low levels, and caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) activation and ATP depletion. Inhibition of PARP by pharmacological inhibitors or its siRNA transfection suppressed ATP reduction and autophagy in cadmium-exposed cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced autophagy signaling was attenuated by either exogenous addition of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or by overexpression of these enzymes. Consequently, these results suggest that cadmium-mediated ROS generation causes PARP activation and energy depletion, and eventually induces autophagy through the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling and the down-regulation of mTOR in skin epidermal cells. - Highlights: > Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, induces autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling. > Cadmium generates intracellular ROS at low levels and this leads to severe DNA damage and PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, which are the upstream events of LKB1-AMPK-mediated autophagy. > This novel finding may contribute to further understanding of cadmium-mediated diseases.

Son, Young-Ok; Wang Xin; Hitron, John Andrew [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Zhang Zhuo [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Cheng Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Ding Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Report: EM Human Capital Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN CAPITAL September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Human Capital Subcommittee Background: The enhancement of the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) human capital has been a central tenet of the Assistant Secretary's tenure, reflecting the critical nature of this resource to the achievement of EM's mission. Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB or Board) has reviewed the program's human capital issues and the plans EM has developed to address them. This review produced a number of recommendations that were presented in the Board's FY 2006 report to the Assistant Secretary and were later approved and implemented to varying degrees. * Recommendation 2006-01: Develop accountability for the Human Capital Plan

371

Determination of positions of optical elements of the human eye  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An original method for noninvasive determining the positions of elements of intraocular optics is proposed. The analytic dependence of the measurement error on the optical-scheme parameters and the restriction in distance from the element being measured are determined within the framework of the method proposed. It is shown that the method can be efficiently used for determining the position of elements in the classical Gullstrand eye model and personalised eye models. The positions of six optical surfaces of the Gullstrand eye model and four optical surfaces of the personalised eye model can be determined with an error of less than 0.25 mm. (human eye optics)

Galetskii, S O; Cherezova, T Yu [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

CAPITAL STRUCTURE, LIQUIDITY AND TRANSFERABLE HUMAN CAPITAL IN COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes how human capital and economic uncertainty affect capital structure and managerial compensation. We model a competitive industry where wealth constrained managers provide human capital that can be transferred across firms, and where equityholders give managers access to the physical assets of the firm. Equityholders and managers bargain for the firm’s stochastic free cash flows. We show that the level of net debt acts as a tool to attract and retain human capital. Negative net debt occurs in volatile and human capital intensive industries. Cash holdings (or unused lines of credit) in booms serve as a costly hedge against liquidity shocks in recession. The cost of holding cash is internalized by managers, unlike the cost associated with raising cash in recession through a dilutive equity issue. We obtain simple expressions for the equilibrium payout rate and the managerial compensation rate and we show how, in recessions, they are influenced by each party’s outside option.

Bart M. Lambrecht; Grzegorz Pawlina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Quantum physics and human values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following concepts: the quantum conception of nature; the quantum conception of man; and the impact upon human values. (LSP).

Stapp, H.P.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency  

SciTech Connect

A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period.

Athas, W.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Modelling Mediterranean landscape succession-disturbance dynamics: A landscape fire-succession model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a spatially explicit Landscape Fire-Succession Model (LFSM) developed to represent Mediterranean Basin landscapes and capable of integrating modules and functions that explicitly represent human activity. Plant-functional types are used to ... Keywords: Landscape fire-succession model, Mediterranean landscape, Pattern-oriented modelling, Succession-disturbance dynamics, Wildfire regime

James D. A. Millington; John Wainwright; George L. W. Perry; Raul Romero-Calcerrada; Bruce D. Malamud

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model: Version 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is the part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents the human systems. EPPA is a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model ...

Paltsev, Sergey.

377

Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model ...

Thompson, Tammy M.

378

Gas permeation carbon capture --- Process modeling and optimization  

SciTech Connect

A multi-staged gas permeation carbon capture process model was developed in Aspen Custom Modeler{reg_sign} (ACM) and optimized in the context of the retrofit of a 550 MW subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The gas permeation stages in the process are described by a custom multi-component, hollowfiber membrane model. Gas transport across the asymmetric membrane was modeled according to the solution-diffusion model for the selective skin layer and the assumption of negligible flux resistance by the porous support. Counter-current, one-dimensional plug flow was assumed with permeate pressure drop in the fiber lumen side due to capillary constrained flow. A modular optimization framework was used to minimize the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) by optimizing a set of key process variables. The framework allows the external control of multiple simulation modules from different software packages from a common interface.

Morinelly, Juan; Miller, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The efficacy of human post-editing for language translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Language translation is slow and expensive, so various forms of machine assistance have been devised. Automatic machine translation systems process text quickly and cheaply, but with quality far below that of skilled human translators. To bridge this ... Keywords: experiment, language translation, modeling, post-editing

Spence Green; Jeffrey Heer; Christopher D. Manning

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Intelligent human interface based on mental cloning-based software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on our experience in adapting emotional experiences of the software engineers in the evolutionary design of software systems. This paper represents the progress report on the development relative to the state of art needed to have ... Keywords: Cognitive modeling, Facial analysis, Human computer interaction, Intelligent software, Software development, Sound analysis

Hamido Fujita; Jun Hakura; Masaki Kurematu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An european approach to the integrated management of human factors in aircraft maintenance: introducing the IMMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous research in aviation maintenance has highlighted the need to understand normal practice in order to advance the potential impact of Human Factors and bring aviation to a new safety level. What to do with this information then is crucial. What ... Keywords: aviation maintenance, human factors lifecycle, operational process model

Marie Ward; Nick McDonald

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Multiscale quality assessment of Global Human Settlement Layer scenes against reference data using statistical learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for quality assessment of the Global Human Settlement Layer scenes against reference data is presented. It relies on two settlement metrics; the local average and gradient functions that quantify the notions of settlement density and flexible ... Keywords: Big data analytics, CSL model, Human settlements, Linear regression, PANTEX, Settlement metrics

Georgios K. Ouzounis, Vasileios Syrris, Martino Pesaresi

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The safe system approach: a road safety strategy based on human factors principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In most safety critical domains, safety has been improved through the application of contemporary human error models and management methods. But the common strategic approach to improve road safety has so far mainly been built on the view that individual ... Keywords: human factors, road safety, road users, safe System approach, safety, system safety, vision zero

Peter Larsson, Claes Tingvall

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Human Error in Airway Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report examines human errors in Airway Facilities (AF) with the intent of preventing these errors from being passed on to the new Operations Control Centers. To effectively manage errors, they first have to be identified. Human factors engineers researched human error literature, analyzed human errors recorded in AF databases, and conducted structured interviews with AF representatives. This study enabled them to categorize the types of human errors, identify potential causal factors, and recommend strategies for their mitigation. The results provide preventative measures that designers, developers, and users can take to reduce human error. 17. Key Words Human Error Error Mitigation Operations Control Centers Error Mitigation Strategies 18. Distribution Statement This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia, 22161. 19. Security Classif. (of this report) 20. Security Classif. (of this page) 21. No. of Pages 23 22. Price Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was accomplished under the sponsorship of the Office of Chief Scientist for Human Factors, AAR-100. The research team greatly appreciates the support supplied by Beverly Clark of AOP-30 and our subject matter expert, Kermit Grayson of Grayson Consulting. We also wish to extend our thanks to the people interviewed at the facilities who gave their valuable time in helping us to achieve the goals of our project. iv v Table of Contents Page Acknowledgments..........................................................................................................................iii Executive Summary......................................................................................

Vicki Ahlstrom; Vicki Ahlstrom Act; Donald G. Hartman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An overview of the evolution of human reliability analysis in the context of probabilistic risk assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Since the Reactor Safety Study in the early 1970's, human reliability analysis (HRA) has been evolving towards a better ability to account for the factors and conditions that can lead humans to take unsafe actions and thereby provide better estimates of the likelihood of human error for probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of recent reviews of operational events and advances in the behavioral sciences that have impacted the evolution of HRA methods and contributed to improvements. The paper discusses the importance of human errors in complex human-technical systems, examines why humans contribute to accidents and unsafe conditions, and discusses how lessons learned over the years have changed the perspective and approach for modeling human behavior in PRAs of complicated domains such as nuclear power plants. It is argued that it has become increasingly more important to understand and model the more cognitive aspects of human performance and to address the broader range of factors that have been shown to influence human performance in complex domains. The paper concludes by addressing the current ability of HRA to adequately predict human failure events and their likelihood.

Bley, Dennis C. (Buttonwood Consulting Inc., Oakton, VA); Lois, Erasmia (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Kolaczkowski, Alan M. (Science Applications International Corporation, Eugene, OR); Forester, John Alan; Wreathall, John (John Wreathall and Co., Dublin, OH); Cooper, Susan E. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Animating Faces Using Appearance Models B. Theobald1, I. Matthews2, N. Wilkinson1, J.F. Cohn2,3, S. Boker4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) can be rendered in real-time, and 6) can generate animated sequences directly from motion captured, subcutaneous fat, and skin. The problem is compounded by the fact that we are all expert at detecting unexpected results when the model is animated. 3) To prevent artifacts in the rendered mesh care is required

Theobald, Barry-John

387

Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy on Human Blood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dielectric spectra of human blood reveal a rich variety of dynamic processes. Achieving a better characterization and understanding of these processes not only is of academic interest but also of high relevance for medical applications as, e.g., the determination of absorption rates of electromagnetic radiation by the human body. The dielectric properties of human blood are studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, systematically investigating the dependence on temperature and hematocrit value. By covering a frequency range from 1 Hz to 40 GHz, information on all the typical dispersion regions of biological matter is obtained. We find no evidence for a low-frequency relaxation (alpha-relaxation) caused, e.g., by counterion diffusion effects as reported for some types of biological matter. The analysis of a strong Maxwell-Wagner relaxation arising from the polarization of the cell membranes in the 1-100 MHz region (beta-relaxation) allows for the test of model predictions and the determination of various intrinsic cell properties. In the microwave region beyond 1 GHz, the reorientational motion of water molecules in the blood plasma leads to another relaxation feature (gamma-relaxation). Between beta- and gamma-relaxation, significant dispersion is observed, which, however, can be explained by a superposition of these relaxation processes and is not due to an additional delta-relaxation often found in biological matter. Our measurements provide dielectric data on human blood of so far unsurpassed precision for a broad parameter range. All data are provided in electronic form to serve as basis for the calculation of the absorption rate of electromagnetic radiation and other medical purposes. Moreover, by investigating an exceptionally broad frequency range, valuable new information on the dynamic processes in blood is obtained.

M. Wolf; R. Gulich; P. Lunkenheimer; A. Loidl

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

389

Model Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...thus establishing appropriate and important benchmarks. Benchmarking can go beyond validation and also measure relative computational speed, accuracy, and breadth for available modeling approaches and implementations, providing valuable information for users to discern the best models and for modelers...

390

Computer Models of Vocal Tract Evolution: An Overview and Critique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human speech has been investigated with computer models since the invention of digital computers, and models of the evolution of speech first appeared in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Speech science and computer models have a long shared history because ... Keywords: computer modeling, descended larynx, evolution of speech, vocal tract evolution

Bart De Boer; W. Tecumseh Fitch

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Modeling & Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling & Simulation Modeling & Simulation Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this...

393

The development of an improved human capital index for assessing and forecasting national capacity and development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human capital theory is accepted as one of the foundational theories of socioeconomic development. Although, according to founding scholars, any acquired qualities and abilities that help individuals and groups be economically productive can be considered as individual or group human capital, the classical human capital model focuses on schooling and training as the major factors comprising human capital on individual, group, and national levels. Consequently, current human capital measurement tools generally assess only educational attainment on these levels. Because of this overly simplified approach, the present manner in which human capital is commonly measured by national and international entities creates difficulty in accurately assessing the strengths and weaknesses of human capital within and between countries. A major challenge to improvement of human capital variables is identification and availability of data. The factors suggested to have significant impact on human capital are mostly intangible. Collecting such data is cost prohibitive for many developing countries. Consequently, national policy-makers, multinational corporations and international aid organizations use simplified estimates of human capital. The purpose of this dissertation is to construct and validate a more comprehensive human capital index. Study research questions include: 1) What are the significant factors that affect national human capital as revealed in the literature? 2) Can an expanded measure of national human capital be developed to reflect adequate content of HC identified in the literature? 3) What is the preliminary evidence supporting the validity of the newly developed human capital index? This analysis resulted in the formation of a new human capital index, which is expanded due to the incorporation of new variables together with the routinely used education measures. The sample panel data is from 163 countries for the years 2000-2005. Literature content analysis, factor analysis and regression analyses are used to support the exploration of the research questions. The results of the analyses suggest that a human capital model, which includes additional variables together with currently used education variables, predicts the level of national economic development significantly better than the model which includes only education measures. These results have implications for human resource development, corporate human capital management, national education, and international aid policies.

Verkhohlyad, Olha

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Human and modeling approaches for humanitarian transportation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent disasters have highlighted the need for more effective supply chain management during emergency response. Planning and prioritizing the use of trucks and helicopters to transport humanitarian aid to affected communities ...

Gralla, Erica Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Statistical Alignment Models for . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-increasing amount of parallel data opens a rich resource to multilingual natural language processing, enabling models to work on various translational aspects like detailed human annotations, syntax and semantics. With efficient statistical models, many cross-language applications have seen significant progresses in recent years, such as statistical machine trans-lation, speech-to-speech translation, cross-lingual information retrieval and bilingual lexicog-raphy. However, the current state-of-the-art statistical translation models rely heavily on the word-level mixture models — a bottleneck, which fails to represent the rich varieties and depen-dencies in translations. In contrast to word-based translations, phrase-based models are more robust in capturing various translation phenomena than the word-level (e.g., local word reordering), and less susceptive to the errors from preprocessing such as word segmentations and tok-enizations. Leveraging phrase level knowledge in translation models is challenging yet reward-ing: it also brings significant improvements on translation qualities. Above the phrase-level are

Bing Zhao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Evaluating probabilistic models learned from data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several learning algorithms have been proposed to construct probabilistic models from data using the Bayesian networks mechanism. Some of them permit the participation of human experts in order to create a knowledge representation of the domain. However, ... Keywords: Bayesian networks, learning algorithms, model evaluation, virtual sensors

Pablo H. Ibargüengoytia; Miguel A. Delgadillo; Uriel A. García

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humanized” mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury ...

Thomas, David K.

398

A framework for human microbiome research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of microbial communities and their genes (the microbiome) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project ...

Friedman, Jonathan

399

Human genome. 1993 Program report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Strategic Use of Human Capital | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

use of human capital. Strategic Use of Human Capital More Documents & Publications DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2011 - 2015) Inspection Report: DOEIG-0888 Human Capital...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Obtaining oblique technique source-to-skin distances for irregular field (Clarkson) calculations: The Mayo Off-axis Distance Indicator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant dose inhomogeneities may exist between the supraclavicular fossa (SCF) and the internal mammary chain (IMC) regions in the irregular L-shaped (hockey stick) field associated with breast cancer treatments. This dose inhomogeneity exists, in part, because of a positive air gap in the SCF and a negative air gap in the IMC locations. Independent of treatment technique, (i.e., whether anterior-posterior (AP) or oblique fields are used), accurate source-to-skin distance (SSD) values for the SCF, IMC, and axilla are necessary when doing an irregular field (Clarkson) dose calculation. However, when an oblique technique is used to treat the hockey stick field, obtaining non-central-axis SSDs is not as straightforward as when an AP technique is employed. The Mayo Off-axis Distance Indicator was constructed to slide into the blocking tray slot of the simulator or treatment machine. This mechanical measuring device provides quick and accurate SSD measurements for non-central-axis points under either AP or, more importantly, oblique treatment conditions.

Lajoie, W.N. (Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, MN (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Accommodating complexity and human behaviors in decision analysis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report for a LDRD effort to address human behavior in decision support systems. One sister LDRD effort reports the extension of this work to include actual human choices and additional simulation analyses. Another provides the background for this effort and the programmatic directions for future work. This specific effort considered the feasibility of five aspects of model development required for analysis viability. To avoid the use of classified information, healthcare decisions and the system embedding them became the illustrative example for assessment.

Backus, George A.; Siirola, John Daniel; Schoenwald, David Alan; Strip, David R.; Hirsch, Gary B.; Bastian, Mark S.; Braithwaite, Karl R.; Homer, Jack [Homer Consulting] Homer Consulting

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

HVAC Sensors, Controls, and Human Feedback Interfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Sensors, HVAC Sensors, Controls, and Human Controls, and Human Feedback Interfaces Feedback Interfaces April 26, 2010 Dr. Amr Gado Emerson Climate Technologies Heating And...

404

Homeland Security/Forensics/Human Identity News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Humans spend greater than 90 percent of their time indoors, but we ... Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis ...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ORISE: Human Subjects Research Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Research Database Section 10, Part 745 of the Code of Federal Regulations and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 443.1 and 481.1 require the maintenance of...

406

Coördinating human-robot communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As robots begin to emerge from the cloisters of industrial and military applications and enter the realms of coöperative partners for people, one of the most important facets of human-robot interaction (HRI) will be ...

Brööks, Andrëw G. (Brööks Zoz)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool  

A new software tool enables the easy and quick selection of applicable regulatory guidelines as a starting point for human factors engineering (HFE) analyses.  Once selected, each guideline can be viewed on screen.  The software tracks and reports the ...

408

Human Genome Education Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will contribute to the final revisions of each unit during the second-year of this grant.

Richard Myers; Lane Conn

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Performing Bayesian inference with exemplar models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic models have recently received much attention as accounts of human cognition. However, previous work has focused on formulating the abstract problems behind cognitive tasks and their probabilistic solutions, rather than considering mechanisms that could implement these solutions. Exemplar models are a successful class of psychological process models that use an inventory of stored examples to solve problems such as identification, categorization and function learning. We show that exemplar models can be interpreted as a sophisticated form of Monte Carlo approximation known as importance sampling, and thus provide a way to perform approximate Bayesian inference. Simulations of Bayesian inference in speech perception and concept learning show that exemplar models can account for human performance with only a few exemplars, for both simple and relatively complex prior distributions. Thus, we show that exemplar models provide a possible mechanism for implementing Bayesian inference.

Lei Shi; Naomi H. Feldman (naomi; Thomas L. Griffiths (tom

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Modeling Air-Pollution Damages from Fossil Fuel Use in Urban...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

important indoor pollution sources. We have taken one such model, prepared by the World Bank, and modified it to incorporate damages estimates from human exposure to air...

411

The perceived efficacy of an empowerment model of youth development among Vermont educational leaders.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Family and Consumer Sciences Education (FCSE) expresses a vision of emancipatory education through an empowerment model of human development, as reflected in the FCSE National… (more)

Woods, Barbara A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Search Method for Real-time Knowledge Discovery Modeled on the ...  

Search Method for Real-time Knowledge Discovery Modeled on the Human Brain Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contact ORNL About This Technology

413

Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012 Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012 Celebrating Excellence in Humanities 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1950" Brian Catlos History University of Texas at Arlington 47th Annual Walter Prescott Webb Essay Competition. Guerrero Literature/Creative Writing Humanities Undergraduate Research Award "I Once Was Lost: The (Found

California at Santa Cruz, University of

414

The Ouroboros Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the core of the Ouroboros Model lies a self-referential recursive process with alternating phases of data acquisition and evaluation. Memory entries are organized in schemata. Activation at a time of part of a schema biases the whole structure and, in particular, missing features, thus triggering expectations. An iterative recursive monitor process termed 'consumption analysis' is then checking how well such expectations fit with successive activations. A measure for the goodness of fit, "emotion", provides feedback as (self-) monitoring signal. Contradictions between anticipations based on previous experience and actual current data are highlighted as well as minor gaps and deficits. The basic algorithm can be applied to goal directed movements as well as to abstract rational reasoning when weighing evidence for and against some remote theories. A sketch is provided how the Ouroboros Model can shed light on rather different characteristics of human behavior including learning and meta-learning. Partial implementations proved effective in dedicated safety systems.

Knud Thomsen

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

Transient Analysis of Cold Winds on Exposed Skin: Reflections on the Assessment of Wind Chill Equivalent Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transient analysis of the human–environment thermal interaction in cold and windy environments is presented. The site selected to represent this interaction is the head–face, which is depicted as a hollow cylinder wherein heat is conducted in ...

Avraham Shitzer

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we provide a mathematical model for the electrolocation in weakly electric fishes. We first investigate the forward complex conductivity problem and derive the approx- imate boundary conditions on the skin of the fish. Then we provide a dipole approximation for small targets away from the fish. Based on this approximation, we obtain a non-iterative location search algorithm using multi-frequency measurements. We present numerical experi- ments to illustrate the performance and the stability of the proposed multi-frequency location search algorithm. Finally, in the case of disk- and ellipse-shaped targets, we provide a method to reconstruct separately the conductivity, the permittivity, and the size of the targets from multi-frequency measurements.

Ammari, Habib; Garnier, Josselin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Context: Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Yang, JC; Huber, ML; Boyer, CI; 1995. Modeling of Hydrogen Fluoride Formation From Flame Suppressants During Combustion.. ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

418

Modeling Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... News And Events. 24th NIST Computer Modeling Workshop. New Quantum Computing Algorithm Could Simulate Giant Particle Accelerators. ...

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

FTCP Human Factors Engineering Supplemental Competencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Factors Engineering Functional Area Qualification Competencies Examples for DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel

420

Five design challenges for human computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human computation systems, which draw upon human competencies in order to solve hard computational problems, represent a growing interest within HCI. Despite the numerous technical demonstrations of human computation systems, however, there are few design ... Keywords: citizen science, crowdsourcing, design framework, games with a purpose, human computation

Stuart Reeves; Scott Sherwood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Human Capital Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Capital Management Human Capital Management Human Capital Management The strategic management of human capital requires comprehensive planning and analysis in order to develop, implement, and evaluate programs that support every facet of employee work life. DOE human capital initiatives are designed to support continuous improvement and accountability in accordance with the DOE Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP), which is an internal DOE audit process of servicing human resources offices and addresses those documents that require coordination with the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer before being implemented; Human Resource Directors; the Department's 5-year Strategic Human Capital Management Plan; Departmental element workforce plans; the Department's personnel accountability program that is used

422

Evaluating functional displays for hydropower system: model-based guidance of scenario design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss the human role in hydropower system control, noting how it is different from other supervisory control environments and noting the typical shortcomings in current displays provided to hydropower system controllers. We describe steps towards ... Keywords: Evaluation, Functional displays, Human control model, Human supervisory control, Hydropower system control, Scenario design, Situation awareness, Trust

Xilin Li; Penelope Sanderson; Rizah Memisevic; William Wong; Sanjib Choudhury

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Automated geometric features evaluation method for normal foot skeleton model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Normal foot model" is a geometric model of a healthy human foot. As the comparison of the processed feet requires a reference ideal healthy foot parameterization it was necessary to create such a model by defining skeleton geometric features and generating ...

Bartosz Borucki; Krzysztof Nowi?Ski; Micha? Chlebiej; Andrzej Rutkowski; Pawe? Adamczyk; Jacek Laskowski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

User modelling for live help systems: initial results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the role of user modelling in live help systems for e-commerce web sites. There are several potential benefits with user modelling in this context: 1) Human assistants can use the personal information in the user models to provide ...

Johan Aberg; Nahid Shahmehri; Dennis Maciuszek

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Quantitative Assessment of Human-Induced Loss of Offsite Power (HI-LOOP) Event Frequencies at U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants (NPP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a framework for developing improved methods and models for quantifying the frequencies of human-induced loss of offsite power (HI-LOOP) initiators at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). Leveraging these methods and models should enhance the NPP probabilistic risk assessment model completeness and would be useful for the NPP on-line risk models. The primary focus of the report is on investigating the impact of human activities on the frequencies of switchyard-centered ...

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

The impact of environmental factors on human life-history evolution: an optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

life-history evolution, infection stresses, life expectancy, optimal energy allocation, size is vtEt, the amount of energy allocated to Evolutionary optimization model of human life history 1201, E.V. 2001. Evolution of life history: models based on optimization of energy allocation (in Russian

427

Understanding human values in adopting new technology-A case study and methodological discussion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a method for understanding and modelling human values in the evaluation of new technology in social settings, and analyses the validity of the proposed method in a specific use case. The method, which is based on the Schwartz universal ... Keywords: Evaluation methods, School attendance control, Schwartz's value model, User experience evaluation, Value based design

Minna Isomursu; Mari Ervasti; Marianne Kinnula; Pekka Isomursu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Human gene sequencing makes advances  

SciTech Connect

The Human Genome Project is a federal project that is on the scale of the Manhattan Project of the 1940s. The focus of this project is to map and sequence the 100,000 plus genes and 3 billion base pairs that comprise the human genome. This effort has made two recent advances. First, two of the major companies involved in this project formed a strategic alliance that will pump up to 125 million dollars into this project. Second, researchers at Argonne National Lab. have tested a new sequencing technique that could identify 100 million base pairs a day when fully implemented.

Alper, J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Friction Induced Skin Tags  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Cutaneous lesions in occult spinal dysraphism-correlationin different forms of occult spinal dysraphism [ 12 ]. An

Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

TiBor Skin  

• Compressor turbine blades • Food processor blades • Chain saw chains • Cutting tools PATENTS AND AWARDS The Y-12 National Security Complex has ...

431

A model for information technologies that can be creative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To contribute to HCI investigation and interface design that develops interactive systems for creative solutions, I attempt to formulate a model of the human capability to combine familiar objects or concepts in an unusual way. Important components of ... Keywords: abstraction, adaptation, association, combination, creativity support tools, features, graphical user interfaces, human-computer interaction, integration, interactive systems, representations design, selection, similarity

Johan F. Hoorn

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Aiding tomorrow's augmented cognition researchers through modeling and simulation curricula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in the newly emerged field of Augmented Cognition (AugCog) has demonstrated great potential to develop more intelligent computational systems capable of monitoring and adapting the systems to the changing cognitive state of human operators in ... Keywords: adaptive technology, augmented cognition, cognitive neuroscience, curriculum development, human-computer interaction, modeling, simulation

Julie Drexler; Randall Shumaker; Denise Nicholson; Cali Fidopiastis

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However, these important grazers have been hunted to ecological extinction in some places for their eggs, meat, and skin. The conservation initiative for the survival of sea turtles requires the protection of their primary habitats in conjunction with a decrease in their interaction with humans. One way these objectives can be met is through the creation of species distribution maps (SDMs). For this thesis, a SDM was created from a generalized additive model used to identify major feeding areas for East Pacific green turtles residing in the Galapagos Islands. The input for the model was green turtle sighting locations during a June 2010 marine life observation survey and remotely sensed values of four oceanographic parameters obtained from satellite sensors (Bathymetry, Sea Surface Temperature, Chlorophyll a, and Current Speed). Line transects of intertidal and subtidal shoreline regions of the islands of Isabela, San Cristobal, and Floreana were also completed, to describe similarities and differences in macroalgal abundance between the locations. A generalized additive model (GAM) explained 56% of the data's null deviance and had a true positive rate of 0.83. The corresponding species distribution map indicated that East Pacific green sea turtles prefer to forage in warm, low chlorophyll a, slow moving waters at depths mostly less than 250m throughout the archipelago. ANOVA analyses showed that macroalgal abundance was statistically different (p-value < 0.01) between the islands of San Cristobal and Isabela. The line transects analysis also documented that red algae was the most prominent phyla at the sites and that the macroalgal abundance did not vary much between months June 2010 and April/May 2011. With these results, potential foraging areas for East Pacific green turtles can be identified and protected. Future studies will be focused on the collection of macroalgae from coastal areas outlined in the SDM and the interactions between green turtles and their competitors and/or predators. This information can be used to validate the areas delineated by the model and to further the understanding of the spatial-temporal effects on macroalgal abundance.

Duncan, Roxanne

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Simulation: Moving from Technology Challenge to Human Factors Success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used.

Gould, Derek A., E-mail: dgould@liv.ac.uk [Royal Liverpool University NHS Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Chalmers, Nicholas [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Johnson, Sheena J. [University of Manchester, Manchester Business School (United Kingdom); Kilkenny, Caroline [University of Hull, Psychology Department (United Kingdom); White, Mark D. [University of Liverpool, School of Engineering (United Kingdom); Bech, Bo [University Hospital of Skane, Vascular Center Malmoe (Sweden); Lonn, Lars [National University Hospital of Denmark, Department of Radiology and Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Bello, Fernando [Imperial College London, Clinical Skills Centre, Department of Surgery and Cancer (United Kingdom)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Review: Multi-agent modeling and simulation of an Aedes aegypti mosquito population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work deals with the simulation of a mosquito Aedes aegypti population. The mosquito population was modeled using an individual-based approach. The model consists of agents representing A. aegypti mosquitoes, human beings, some mammals and ... Keywords: Aedes aegypti mosquito, Agent-based model, BG-Sentinel, Ecological model, Individual-based model, Multi-agent simulation

Sandro Jerônimo de Almeida; Ricardo Poley Martins Ferreira; Álvaro E. Eiras; Robin P. Obermayr; Martin Geier

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21  

SciTech Connect

Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Numerical Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011... or field repair, durability, weight and cost efficiency, and extreme climate. ... Cohesive zone model is implemented to investigate the interfacial ...

438

PREDICTIVE MODELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1) chemical flooding; 2) carbon dioxide miscible flooding; 3) in-situ combustion; 4) polymer flooding; and 5) steamflood. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes. The IBM PC/AT version includes a plotting capability to produces a graphic picture of the predictive model results.

Ray, R.M. (DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Regional Climates in the GISS Global Circulation Model: Synoptic-Scale Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model simulations of global climate change are seen as an essential component of any program at understanding human impact on the global environment. A major weakness of current general circulation models (GCMs), however, is their perceived ...

B. Hewitson; R. G. Crane

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Improving the Fanger model's thermal comfort predictions for naturally ventilated spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fanger model is the official thermal comfort model in U.S. and international standards and is based on the heat balance of the human body with the environment. This investigation focuses on re-specifying the parameters ...

Truong, Phan Hue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Human and unhuman commonsense reasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ford has introduced a non-monotonic logic, System LS, inspired by an empirical study of human non-monotonic reasoning. We define here a defeasible logic FDL based on Fordh's logic, and in doing so identify some similarities and differences between Ford's ...

Michael J. Maher

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A Literary Human Exinction Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly's (MWS) novel, The Last Man, published in 1826, is an epic narrative about the destruction of the human race. This paper provides a synopsis of this book and assesses its relationships to contemporary future studies. The paper also delves into the history of apocalyptic writing and thinking, using this book an entry point to past literature.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Human retroviruses and AIDS 1994  

SciTech Connect

This compendium, including accompanying floppy diskettes, is the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts it comprises: (I) Nucleic Acid Alignments and Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Alignments; (III) Analysis; (IV) Related Sequences; (V) Database communications.

Myers, G.; Korber, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S.; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Henderson, L.E.; Pavlakis, G.N. [eds.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Human-Machine Function Allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Human-machine function comparison...ability Comparatively slow and poor computers. Excellent and very rapid computers. Memory storage Poor short-term storage. Excellent long-term storage. Excellent short-term storage. Long-term storage very

445

Application of the pseudolinear flow model to the pressure transient analysis of fractured wells  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical basis for the pseudolinear flow model is established. It is demonstrated by using an analytical model that the linear flow graph (p vs ..sqrt..t) can be extended to the analysis of pressure data of fractured wells intersected by an intermediate or a high conductivity fracture ((k /SUB f/ b /SUB f/ greater than or equal to 15). It appears that the fracture conductivity effect during the pseudolinear flow period can be handled as a pseudo skin pressure drop which is additive to the pressure drop caused by fluid loss damage. The combination of the pseudolinear flow analysis with other interpretation techniques is illustrated through examples of field cases.

Cinco-Ley, H.; Rodriguez, F.; Samaniego, F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Nonlinear Modeling of the Dynamic Effects of Infused Insulin on Glucose: Comparison of Compartmental With Volterra Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a computational study that compares simulated compartmental (differential equation) and Volterra models of the dynamic effects of insulin on blood glucose concentration in humans. In the ...

Markakis, Michail

447

Definition: Numerical Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Numerical Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Numerical Modeling A computer model that is designed to simulate and reproduce the mechanisms of a particular system.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A computer simulation, a computer model, or a computational model is a computer program, run on a single computer, or a network of computers, that attempts to simulate an abstract model of a particular system. Computer simulations have become a useful part of mathematical modeling of many natural systems in physics, astrophysics, chemistry and biology, human systems in economics, psychology, social science, and engineering. Simulation of a system is represented as the running of the system's model.

448

Contractor Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contractor Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Contractor Human Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Contractor Human Resources Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Contractor Human Resources Contractor Human Resources Welcome The Contractor Human Resources mission is to provide expert advice and

449

Development and evaluation of a thermal model for haptic interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal interaction between the skin and an object is influenced by the thermal properties and initial temperatures of the skin and object, and by the contact force and surface roughness of the contact surfaces. This ...

Ho, Hsin-Ni

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

ISDAC Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Modeling Modeling of aerosol effects on Arctic stratiform clouds: Preliminary results from the ISDAC case study (poster 13J) Mikhail Ovchinnikov, Steve Ghan, Jiwen Fan, Xiaohong Liu (PNNL), Alexei Korolev, Peter Liu (Env. Canada) Shaocheng Xie (LLNL), Hugh Morrison (NCAR), ISDAC PI's, and members of the CMWG 2 Indirect Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign Science questions: How do properties of the arctic aerosol during April differ from those measured during the MPACE in October? To what extent do the different properties of the arctic aerosol during April produce differences in the microphysical and macrophysical properties of clouds and the surface energy balance? To what extent can cloud models and the cloud parameterizations used in climate models simulate the sensitivity of arctic clouds and

451

Biosystems Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biosystems Modeling Biosystems Modeling Phantoms We are a leader nationally and internationally in the development of models and methods for predicting the behavior of radionuclides and chemicals in the body, assessing the health effects of environmental hazards, and determining the exposure-dose relationships for environmental pollutants. Our work has been a key resource to the medical community in providing the basis for dose estimates in nuclear medicine. Our tools and skills are also applicable to the areas of occupational health and safety, public health and safety, radiation protection, environmental dosimetry, and battlefield effects. Our technology base includes mathematical modeling, bone dosimetry, phantom development, and neutron dosimetry. Please direct any questions concerning the Biosystems Modeling Group to:

452

Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this Model Procedure is to identify precautions and provide guidance to Medical Examiners/Coroners on the handling of a body or human remains that are potentially contaminated with...

453

OSPREY Model  

SciTech Connect

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to OSPREY to used and evaluate the model.

Veronica J. Rutledge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Psychophysiological signal processing for building a user model in adaptive e-learning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

User's psychophysiological state model allows taking into account learner's emotional and physiological states during technology-based learning. The capability of recognizing the "human factor" considerably improves the Human-Computer-Interaction process ... Keywords: adaptive e-learning, biofeedback sensors, learner's psychophysiological state, physiological data processing, user model

Tatiana Rikure; Leonid Novitsky

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The biokinetics of ruthenium in the human body  

SciTech Connect

The biokinetics of ruthenium (Ru) in the human body is of interest due mainly to the potential for occupational or environmental exposure to 106Ru (T1/2 = 373.6 d) and 103Ru (T1/2 = 39.3 d), which typically represent a significant portion of the fission products in a reactor inventory. During reactor operations or nuclear fuel reprocessing these ruthenium isotopes may be present as ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) vapor, a highly mobile form of ruthenium that has been involved in a number of cases of accidental exposure to 106Ru or 103Ru. This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for ruthenium and proposes a new respiratory model for inhaled RuO4 vapor, a new biokinetic for systemic (absorbed) ruthenium, and material-specific gastrointestinal absorption fractions for ruthenium. The proposed respiratory model for RuO4 differs from the current ICRP model mainly in that it depicts slower clearance of deposited activity from the respiratory tract and lower absorption to blood than depicted in the current ICRP model. The proposed systemic biokinetic model depicts more realistic paths of movement of absorbed ruthenium in the body than the current ICRP model and, in contrast to the present model, a less uniform distribution of systemic activity. Implications of the proposed models with regard to inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients for 106Ru are examined.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A blood circulation model for reference man  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic blood circulation model that predicts the movement and gradual dispersion of a bolus of material in the circulation after its intravenous injection into an adult human. The main purpose of the model is improve the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides that decay in the circulation to a significant extent. The model partitions the blood volume into 24 separate organs or tissues, right heart chamber, left heart chamber, pulmonary circulation, arterial outflow to the aorta and large arteries, and venous return via the large veins. Model results were compared to data obtained from injection of carbon 11 labeled carbon monoxide or rubidium 86.

Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Williams, L.R. [Indiana Univ., South Bend, IN (United States). Div. of Liberal Arts and Sciences

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Cloning humans, increasing intelligence, and AIDS money  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloning humans, increasing intelligence, and AIDS money Name: Eric T Jenes Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How close are we to cloning humans?...

458

Calibrating Bayesian Network Representations of Social-Behavioral Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While human behavior has long been studied, recent and ongoing advances in computational modeling present opportunities for recasting research outcomes in human behavior. In this paper we describe how Bayesian networks can represent outcomes of human behavior research. We demonstrate a Bayesian network that represents political radicalization research – and show a corresponding visual representation of aspects of this research outcome. Since Bayesian networks can be quantitatively compared with external observations, the representation can also be used for empirical assessments of the research which the network summarizes. For a political radicalization model based on published research, we show this empirical comparison with data taken from the Minorities at Risk Organizational Behaviors database.

Whitney, Paul D.; Walsh, Stephen J.

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

459

Bioscience & Health Homeland Security/Forensics/Human ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vehicle Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis. 13DO003_oles_fingerprintmap_CS ...

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Computer (and Human) Perfection at Checkers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1989 the Chinook project began with the goal of winning the human World Checkers Championship. There was an imposing obstacle to success ?the human champion, Marion Tinsley. Tinsley was as close to perfection at the game as was humanly possible. To ...

Jonathan Schaeffer

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

From here to human-level AI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human-level AI will be achieved, but new ideas are almost certainly needed, so a date cannot be reliably predicted-maybe five years, maybe five hundred years. I'd be inclined to bet on this 21st century. It is not surprising that human-level AI has proved ... Keywords: Elaboration tolerance, Human-level AI

John McCarthy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Human activities recognition using depth images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new method to classify human activities by leveraging on the cues available from depth images alone. Towards this end, we propose a descriptor which couples depth and spatial information of the segmented body to describe a human pose. Unique ... Keywords: depth image segmentation, human activity detection

Raj Gupta; Alex Yong-Sang Chia; Deepu Rajan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Integrating Human Performance and Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human error is a significant factor in the cause and/or complication of events that occur in the commercial nuclear industry. In recent years, great gains have been made using Human Performance (HU) tools focused on targeting individual behaviors. However, the cost of improving HU is growing and resistance to add yet another HU tool certainly exists, particularly for those tools that increase the paperwork for operations. Improvements in HU that are the result of leveraging existing technology, such as hand-held mobile technologies, have the potential to reduce human error in controlling system configurations, safety tag-outs, and other verifications. Operator rounds, valve line-up verifications, containment closure verifications, safety & equipment protection, and system tagging can be supported by field-deployable wireless technologies. These devices can also support the availability of critical component data in the main control room and other locations. This research pilot project reviewing wireless hand-held technology is part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRSP), a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The project is being performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing, and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRSP vision is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current nuclear reactor fleet.

Ronald K. Farris; Heather Medema

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Modelling I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Current Distribution and Lorentz Field Modelling Using Cathode Designs: A ... The electrical conductivity of the cathode-block and the collector bar is so ... load, creating a very uneven current distribution within the cathode.

465

PGMA Model  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PGMA Model PGMA Model PM-G1-F1-012802.doc Revised January 28, 2002 Page 1 The PGMA (Policy, Guidance, Metrics, Assessments) was originally conceived as a model to provide the framework for developing the components for DOE Information Technology (IT) related policies. Its specific purpose is to drive the development of the four components and ensure a corresponding element within each component. The model components are: POLICY C A concise statement supporting the Department=s needs for quality business solutions. C Link to existing IT policy statements without redundancy. GUIDANCE C Documentation, templates, references, checklists, training, (using Web and other means) to provide implementation mechanisms and techniques for policy adherence.

466

Batteries - Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Modeling Over the last few decades, a broad range of battery technologies have been examined at Argonne for transportation applications. Today the focus is on lithium-ion...

467

Iontophoretic {beta}-adrenergic stimulation of human sweat glands: possible assay for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activity in vivo.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constant-bore glass capillaries between oil blocks. Rates ofa small glass capillary into the skin to block cholinergic

Shamsuddin, A K M; Reddy, M M; Quinton, P M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

PREDICTIVE MODELS  

SciTech Connect

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1) chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2) carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3) in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4) polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5) steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

Ray, R.M. (DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Natural Statistical Models for Automatic Speech Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of state-of-the-art speech recognition systems is still far worse than that of humans. This is partly caused by the use of poor statistical models. In a general statistical pattern classification task, the probabilistic models should represent the statistical structure unique to and distinguishing those objects to be classified. In many cases, however, model families are selected without verification of their ability to represent vital discriminative properties. For example, Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are frequently used in automatic speech recognition systems even though they possess conditional independence properties that might cause inaccuracies when modeling and classifying speech signals. In this work, a new method for automatic speech recognition is developed where the natural statistical properties of speech are used to determine the probabilistic model. Starting from an HMM, new models are created by adding dependencies only if they are not already well captured by the HMM, and only if they increase the

Jeffrey Adam Bilmes

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Simulation-based computation of dose to humans in radiological environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans working in radiological environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO simulation software. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide radiation exposure information to, and collect radiation dose information from, workcell simulations. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these databases to compute and accumulate dose to programmable human models operating around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. The entire REMS capability can be operated from a single graphical user interface.

Breazeal, N.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K.R.; Watson, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vickers, D.S. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Ford, M.S. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Safety

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

A generic methodology for developing fuzzy decision models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important paradigm in decision-making models is utility-maximization where most models do not include actors' motives. Fuzzy set theory on the other hand offers a method to simulate human decision-making. However, the literature describing expert-driven ... Keywords: Agriculture, DM, Decision-making, ES, Expert systems, FIS, FLM, FRF, Fuzzy models, HFS, Hierarchical models, IAAS, ICR, MF, TSK, VMD

Roel Bosma; Jan van den Berg; Uzay Kaymak; Henk Udo; Johan Verreth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Climate Human Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Human Capital Climate Human Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Human Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1K 6NG Sector Carbon, Renewable Energy, Services Product Green executive search company, listed in London's PLUS marketplace since 30 MArch 2010, focusing on the following target sectors: Carbon Markets, Environmental Sciences, Research and Advisory, Financial Services, Renewable Energy Generation and Policy. References Climate Human Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Climate Human Capital is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Climate Human Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Human_Capital&oldid=343709

473

Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy J. Tyson McDonald Steward St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center Abstract Primary tissue represents a better model for studies than immortalized cell lines that are adapted to culture conditions and may no longer reflect a realistic biological state. In this study, normal tissues from clinically indicated robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were grossly identified, sectioned into frozen or formalin fixed samples, and processed as primary cultures. Normal epithelial and fibroblast primary cell cultures were derived from regions of normal tissue, as confirmed by analysis on adjacent tissue by hematoxylin and eosin staining, were exposed to acute

474

PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED MODELING OF HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fibrillation, never regained consciousness and died ... 5 min) human inhalation exposures to ... chemicals predicted in humans by physiologically based ...

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

DOE O 328.1, Human Capital Management Accountability Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements, roles and responsibilities for the Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) for human resources programs and ...

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Opportunities Benefits Office • Work-Life Balance Programs • International Services • Occupational Medicine • Salaries & Awards • Training & Qualifications The Human Resources and Occupational Medicine Division handles scientific and non-scientific employment, benefits, employee and labor relations, staff development, salaries and awards, employee records, and occupational medicine. For more information, click on the one of the services listed above. Brookhaven National Laboratory has a long-standing commitment to a policy of equal opportunity and diversity. Our goal is equality of opportunity in all aspects of employment, including placement, development programs, job assignments, transfers and promotions, without regard to race, color,

477

Simulation of human decision making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for computer emulation of human decision making defines a plurality of concepts related to a domain and a plurality of situations related to the domain, where each situation is a combination of at least two of the concepts. Each concept and situation is represented in the computer as an oscillator output, and each situation and concept oscillator output is distinguishable from all other oscillator outputs. Information is input to the computer representative of detected concepts, and the computer compares the detected concepts with the stored situations to determine if a situation has occurred.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM); Jordan, Sabina E. (Albuquerque, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

478

Guessing human-chosen secrets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guessing human-chosen secrets Joseph Bonneau University of Cambridge Churchill College May 2012 This dissertation is submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Declaration This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing... , including tables and footnotes. To Fletcher, for teaching me the value of hard work. I’m glad you’re back. —Joseph Bonneau, May 2012 Acknowledgements I am grateful to my supervisor Ross Anderson for help every step of the way, from answering my emails when I...

Bonneau, Joseph

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

479

Model replication: transformations to address model scalability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In model-driven engineering, it is often desirable to evaluate different design alternatives as they relate to scalability issues of the modeled system. A typical approach to address scalability is model replication, which starts by creating base models ... Keywords: domain-specific modeling, model transformation, model-driven engineering, scalability

Yuehua Lin; Jeff Gray; Jing Zhang; Steve Nordstrom; Aniruddha Gokhale; Sandeep Neema; Swapna Gokhale

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z