Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection Induces Autophagy in both Cultured Cells and Human Skin Vesicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Devenish, F. Di Sano, J. F. Dice, M. Difiglia, S. Dinesh-Kumar, C. W. Distelhorst, M. Djavaheri-Mergny, F...Czymmek, Z. Talloczy, B. Levine, and S. P. Dinesh-Kumar. 2005. Autophagy regulates programmed cell death...

Marie-Noëlle Takahashi; Wallen Jackson; Donna T. Laird; Timothy D. Culp; Charles Grose; John I. Haynes II; Luca Benetti

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Thiothymidine plus low-dose UVA kills hyperproliferative human skin cells independently of their human papilloma virus status  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...further (1-3). Solar radiation is the major...development of the basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC...fraction of incident solar UVA (wavelengths...1:1,000) from Cell Signaling Technology, Inc. Secondary...

Olivier Reelfs; Yao-Zhong Xu; Andrew Massey; Peter Karran; and Alan Storey

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged human skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin-color to track human body. In this paper, we discuss... on human faces. Using skin color as a feature ... Source: Yang, Jie - Human Computer Interaction Institute & School...

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging human skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin-color to track human body. In this paper, we discuss... on human faces. Using skin color as a feature ... Source: Yang, Jie - Human Computer Interaction Institute & School...

6

Identification of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin Feng Yang, Katrina M. Waters, Bobbie-Jo Webb-Robertson, Lye-Meng Markillie, Rachel M. Wirgau, Shawna M. Hengel, Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, and David L. Stenoien. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Our focus has been on identifying the early events that occur after low dose ionizing radiation exposure that precede and often regulate downstream events such as altered transcription, protein secretion and epigenetic regulation. Phosphorylation is one of the earliest detectible events that occurs following radiation exposure and plays important roles in multiple biological pathways including DNA damage repair, transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. Very robust

7

Assessment of penetration of quantum dots through in vitro and in vivo human skin using the human skin equivalent model and the tape stripping method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum dots (QDs) are rapidly emerging as an important class of nanoparticles (NPs) with potential applications in medicine. However, little is known about penetration of QDs through human skin. This study investigated skin penetration of QDs in both in vivo and in vitro human skin. Using the tape stripping method, this study demonstrates for the first time that QDs can actually penetrate through the stratum corneum (SC) of human skin. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy diverse X-ray (EDX) analysis showed accumulation of QDs in the SC of a human skin equivalent model (HSEM) after dermal exposure to QDs. These findings suggest possible transdermal absorption of QDs after dermal exposure over a relatively long period of time.

Jeong, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwan; Yi, Sang Min [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Jin Ho; Sohn, Kyung Hee; Park, Kui Lea [National Institute of Toxicological Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [National Institute of Toxicological Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Meyoung-Kon [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Sang Wook, E-mail: skin4u@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

Enhancement of DNA repair in human skin cells by thymidine dinucleotides: Evidence for a p53-mediated mammalian SOS?response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1562 , 7929831 . 24 Tishler R B Calderwood S K Coleman C N Price B D ( 1993 ) Cancer Res 53 : 2212 – 2216 , 8485705 . 25 Hupp T R Meek D W Midgley...35 Weeda G Van Ham R C A Masurel R Westerveld A Odijk H de Wit J Bootsma D van der Eb A J Hoeijmakers H J ( 1990 ) Mol Cell...

Mark S. Eller; Tomoko Maeda; Cristina Magnoni; Diana Atwal; Barbara A. Gilchrest

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and push-ups respiration, sweating, changes in skin... ;Future of PETMAN usage in enviroment dangerousto humans transformation into a free standing, self Source: Takac,...

10

Skin strain analysis software for the study of human skin deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin strain studies have never been conducted in a precise and automated fashion. Previous in vivo strain investigations have been labor intensive and the data resolution was extremely limited such that their results were ...

Marecki, Andrew T. (Andrew Thomas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Low dose and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model. and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model. Sally A. Amundson and Alexandre Mezentsev Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Radiological Research, New York, NY 10032 Significant structural abnormalities develop within several days of exposure of the 3-dimensional normal human skin tissue model EPI-200 (MatTek) to high or low doses of low LET radiation. Disruption of the basal layer occurs following high radiation doses, and premature cornification is evident after both high and low dose exposures. In bystander tissue that is near irradiated portions of the tissue, but is not itself irradiated, we also observe premature cornification, increased apoptosis and micronucleus formation. Changes in global gene expression also occur

12

Low dose and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model and bystander responses in a 3-D human skin model Sally A. Amundson Columbia University Medical Center Abstract Significant structural abnormalities develop within several days of exposure of the 3-dimensional normal human skin tissue model EPI-200 (MatTek) to high or low doses of low LET radiation. Disruption of the basal layer occurs following high radiation doses, and premature cornification is evident after both high and low dose exposures. In bystander tissue that is near irradiated portions of the tissue, but is not itself irradiated, we also observe premature cornification, increased apoptosis and micronucleus formation. Changes in global gene expression also occur in both directly irradiated and bystander EPI-200 tissue. Although the unfolding over time

13

Risk Group, Skin Lesion History, and Sun Sensitivity Reliability in Squamous Cell Skin Cancer Progression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Skin tanning characteristics 0.207 Always burns, no tan 11 (14.1) 7 (21.2) 5 (15.6) 23 (16.1) Always burns, tans minimally 16 (20.5) 11 (33.3) 9 (28.1) 36 (25.2) Burns moderately 28 (35.9) 7 (21.2) 13...

Mary C. Clouser; Robin B. Harris; Denise J. Roe; Kathylynn Saboda; James Ranger-Moore; Laura Duckett; and David S. Alberts

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function of human skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function...Stanford, CA 94305 The ubiquitous presence of solar UV radiation in human life is essential for...defense against environmental exposures like solar UV radiation, and its effects on UV targets...

Krysta Biniek; Kemal Levi; Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Repair of UV Dimers in Skin DNA of Patients with Basal Cell Carcinoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carcinoma have a reduced capacity to repair UV-induced...after a brief exposure to solar-simulated UV radiation...Therefore, a reduced capacity to repair photolesions...induced in human skin by solar-simulating UV radiation...Grossman L. DNA repair capacity for ultraviolet light-induced...

Dan Segerbäck; Malgorzata Strozyk; Erna Snellman; and Kari Hemminki

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Development of a membrane impregnated with a poly(dimethylsiloxane)/poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer for a high-throughput screening of the permeability of drugs, cosmetics, and other chemicals across the human skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We aimed to develop a high-throughput screening (HTS) system for preliminary predictions of human skin permeability by using an artificial membrane that can mimic the permeation behaviour of lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds across the human skin. In this study, we synthesized a copolymer containing poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 6000 and impregnated it onto a supportive membrane filter to prepare a PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer-impregnated membrane. In addition, we synthesized another polymer without PEG units and used it to prepare an impregnated membrane for determining the role of PEG 6000 units in the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer-impregnated membrane. The permeation characteristics of the impregnated membranes were evaluated on the basis of the permeability coefficients of 12 model compounds with different lipophilicities, by using a 2-chamber diffusion cell, and these permeability coefficients were compared with those across the human skin. We obtained a good correlation between the permeability coefficients across the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer-impregnated membrane and human skin. Further, we evaluated the permeation characteristics of a 96-well plate model of the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer by using 6 model compounds. We obtained an ideal correlation between the permeability coefficients across the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer using a 96-well plate and those across the human skin. Thus, the PDMS/PEG 6000 copolymer would be a good candidate for preliminary evaluation of the permeability of lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds across the human skin.

Ryotaro Miki; Yasuna Ichitsuka; Takumi Yamada; Soichiro Kimura; Yuya Egawa; Toshinobu Seki; Kazuhiko Juni; Hideo Ueda; Yasunori Morimoto

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fisetin inhibits human melanoma cell growth through direct binding to p70S6K and mTOR: Findings from 3-D melanoma skin equivalents and computational modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The incidence of melanoma continues to rise. Inspite of treatment advances, the prognosis remains grim once the disease has metastasized, emphasizing the need to explore additional therapeutic strategies. One such approach is through the use of mechanism-based dietary intervention. We previously showed that the flavonoid fisetin inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we studied fisetin-mediated regulation of kinases involved in melanoma growth and progression. Time-course analysis in 3-D melanoma constructs that transitioned from radial to vertical growth showed that fisetin treatment resulted in significant decrease in melanocytic lesions in contrast to untreated controls that showed large tumor nests and invading disseminated cells. Further studies in melanoma cultures and mouse xenografts showed that fisetin-mediated growth inhibition was associated with dephosphorylation of AKT, mTOR and p70S6K proteins. In silico modeling indicated direct interaction of fisetin with mTOR and p70S6K with favorable free energy values. These findings were validated by cell-free competition assays that established binding of fisetin to p70S6K and mTOR while little affinity was detected with AKT. Kinase activity studies reflected similar trend with % inhibition observed for p70S6K and mTOR at lower doses than AKT. Our studies characterized, for the first time, the differential interactions of any botanical agent with kinases involved in melanoma growth and demonstrate that fisetin inhibits mTOR and p70S6K through direct binding while the observed inhibitory effect of fisetin on AKT is mediated indirectly, through targeting interrelated pathways.

Deeba N. Syed; Jean-Christopher Chamcheu; Mohammad Imran Khan; Mario Sechi; Rahul K. Lall; Vaqar M. Adhami; Hasan Mukhtar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Skin melanin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Skin melanin Skin melanin Name: Janae Lepir Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How does the skin produce melanin? Replies: There are special cells in the skin called melanocytes. They synthesize melanin from an amino acid, tyrosine. (Amino acids make up proteins; there are about 20 different ones). Melanocytes can be stimulated by a hormone in the pituitary gland called melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH). I don't know how much biology you've had, but melanocytes are derived from an interesting embryonic tissue called the neural crest, which also gives rise to a lot of different types of neurons, so embryologically melanocytes are related to neurons. If melanocytes become malignant, it becomes a very bad form of cancer, called melanoma (often called "skin cancer", although there are other forms of skin cancer).

19

Skin Evolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Skin Evolution Skin Evolution Name: Olga Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do you think it is possible that our ancestors were actually black, and that a gene mutation for an enzyme in the metabollic pathway of melanin meant that not enough melanin was produced some of us ended up with white skin. Primitive apes have black skin, and we evolved from them, so doesn't this mean that humans orginally had black skin??? Replies: Most likely, yes, humans probably evolved from dark-skinned ancestors. I will take issue, however, with your statement that "primitive apes have black skin;" we can't say that for absolute certain, because we have no primitive apes to compare to. All we have now are modern apes. All modern apes - homo sapiens, pan troglodytes, gorilla gorilla - are highly, probably equally, evolved. (One could make an argument that homo sapiens is in many ways more generalized - note the generalized dentition, fragile skeleton, etc. - than other modern apes, and thus could be said to be more primitive.) As far as that goes, the only modern apes with white skin I know of are a color variant of homo sapiens.

20

Human embryonic stem cells for brain repair?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...repair compiled by Siddharthan Chandran, Maeve Caldwell and Nick Allen Human embryonic stem cells for brain repair? Su-Chun...stromal cell co-culture system. This type of technique has merits in its simplicity and the differentiated progenies appear to...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal Modeling and Experimental Validation of Human Hair and Skin Heated by Broadband Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution within the hair follicle is highly non-uniform: the minimum temperature occurs at the follicle Sun, PhD,1 Alex Chaney,1 Robert Anderson, PhD,2 and Guillermo Aguilar, PhD 1 * 1 Department:(a)determinetheoveralleffectofPPxonskinhumidi- tyandassociatedskinopticalproperties,and;(b)developaPT numerical model to study the spatial and temporal hair and skin temperature

Aguilar, Guillermo

22

In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X?Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent technological improvements allow the method of in vivo XRF to provide useful sensibility for diagnostics or monitoring in biomedical applications. In cases of hereditary sanguine disorders as the ??thalassaemia or a genetic disorder like Haemochromatosis there is a high concentration of elements as Fe Zn and Cu in the skin and internal organs due to the treatment of those abnormalities or due to the own dysfunction caused by the disease. The levels of Fe related to the patient bearers of the ??thalassaemia are determined at the moment measuring a protein in the sanguine current called ferritin. The monitoring of the protein is ineffective in several situations such as when the patient suffers any disturbance of health. Nowadays the main forms of measuring the levels of those metals through hepatic storage are the biopsy of the liver that is invasive and potentially dangerous presenting a rate of mortality of 0.1% and by means of magnetic susceptibilities that employs a quantum superconductor which is highly expensive and there are only three main world centers with this equipment This work investigates the use of a Si PIN?diode detector and a 238Pu source (13 and 17keV; 13%; 95.2mCi; 86y) for the measurement of Fe skin levels compatible with those associated to the disease ??thalassaemia. XRF spectra were analyzed using a set of AXIL?WinQXAS programs elaborated and disseminated by the IAEA. The determination coefficient of the calibration model (sensitivity curve) was 0.97. Measurements on skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range from 10 to 150 parts per million (ppm) indicate that we are able to detect Fe at levels of the order of 15ppm using monitoring periods of 50 seconds and skin entrance dose less than 10 mSv The literature reports skin Fe levels from 15.0 to 60.0 ppm in normal persons and from 70 to 150 ppm in thalassaemics patients. So the employed methodology allows the measurement of the skin Fe concentration.

M. Estevam; C. R. Appoloni

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ablation of p21waf1cip1 Expression Enhances the Capacity of p53-deficient Human Tumor Cells to Repair UVB-induced DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an early initiating event in solar UVB-induced skin cell transformation...restore much of the DNA repair capacity lost in these precancerous...p21waf1cip1 expression enhances the capacity of p53-deficient human tumor...can significantly enhance the capacity of p53-deficient human tumor...

Jean-Philippe Therrien; Martin Loignon; Régen Drouin; and Elliot A. Drobetsky

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Gaussian-function-based deconvolution method to determine the penetration ability of petrolatum oil into in vivo human skin using confocal Raman microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human skin pre-treated with petrolatum was analyzed in vivo using confocal Raman microscopy in order to determine the penetration depth of the oil into the skin. The broad Raman peak (2820–3030?cm?1) measured in vivo on human skin in the high wavenumber region exhibits two prominent main Raman peaks at 2880?cm?1 and 2935?cm?1 that originated from cutaneous lipids and keratin and two main peak shoulders at 2850?cm?1 and 2980?cm?1 that originated from lipids and keratin, respectively. Topical application of petrolatum oil onto the skin gives rise to an increase of the intensity of the broad lipid–keratin Raman peak (2820–3030?cm?1). Herewith, not only the intensity of the lipid part but also of the keratin part is increased, making the normalization to keratin and the determination of the petrolatum penetration profile erroneous. To solve this problem, the Gaussian-function-based deconvolution method is introduced in analyzing the Raman spectrum of the lipid–keratin peak and the least square method is applied for analyzing the petrolatum penetration profile. Results obtained in vivo show that the petrolatum oil does not penetrate deeper than 10?µm into intact human skin.

Chun-Sik Choe; Jürgen Lademann; Maxim E Darvin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Recommendation of short tandem repeat profiling for authenticating human cell lines, stem cells, and tissues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standard for human cell lines. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.of cross-contaminated cell lines: a call for action. Cellstatus in human cancer cell lines. Cancer Biol. Ther. 7:

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Electrically induced fusion of different human cell types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fusion of human cells of the cerebrospinal fluid and of the peripheral blood is reported, as well as the fusion of these cells with tomato protoplasts. The cells were fused by applying short-time electric ...

V. Neumann; F. Siegemund; B. Baeßler

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesoderm and Cardiac Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesoderm and Cardiac Cells Using Size InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22065 ABSTRACT: The ability to generate human for the differentiation of pluripotent cells such as human embryonic stem cells (hESC) rely on the generation

Zandstra, Peter W.

28

Skin flicks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The written and artistic part of this thesis are both separated into the two categories of "SKIN" and "FLICKS". The Artistic part of my thesis consists of five artificial skins made on my body, and a series of video tapes ...

Orth, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann), 1964-

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Use of human cell lines The use of human cell lines and tissues in the laboratory presents potential hazards. These potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of human cell lines The use of human cell lines and tissues in the laboratory presents a well characterized human cell line that the user believes is void of any bloodborne pathogen or any the cell line has been used and/or will be used. Any work with human cell lines in animals requires ABSL-2

Arnold, Jonathan

30

A Muscular Rig for Smooth Skinning in Autodesk Maya.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The limitations of the default skinning methods in Autodesk Maya can be compensated for when seeking realistic skin deformations of a human being. The… (more)

Björkman, Pontus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

UV-induced DNA Damage and Mutations in Hupki (Human p53 Knock-in) Mice Recapitulate p53 Hotspot Alterations in Sun-exposed Human Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development of severely sun-damaged skin and...year (6 , 7) . Chronic sun exposure causes cumulative...spatial and statistical distribution of chromatin) and that...histologically normal, sun-damaged skin. Materials...and stored at room temperature. Vitamin A Clinical...

Jun-Li Luo; Wei-Min Tong; Jung-Hoon Yoon; Manfred Hergenhahn; Riita Koomagi; Qin Yang; Dominique Galendo; Gerd P. Pfeifer; Zhao-Qi Wang; and Monica Hollstein

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Continuous human cell lines and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Substantially genetically stable continuous human cell lines derived from normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and processes for making and using the same. In a preferred embodiment, the cell lines are derived by treating normal human mammary epithelial tissue with a chemical carcinogen such as benzo(a)pyrene. The novel cell lines serve as useful substrates for elucidating the potential effects of a number of toxins, carcinogens and mutagens as well as of the addition of exogenous genetic material. The autogenic parent cells from which the cell lines are derived serve as convenient control samples for testing. The cell lines are not neoplastically transformed, although they have acquired several properties which distinguish them from their normal progenitors. 2 tabs.

Stampfer, M.R.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Continuous human cell lines and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Substantially genetically stable continuous human cell lines derived from normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and processes for making and using the same. In a preferred embodiment, the cell lines are derived by treating normal human mammary epithelial tissue with a chemical carcinogen such as benzo[a]pyrene. The novel cell lines serve as useful substrates for elucidating the potential effects of a number of toxins, carcinogens and mutagens as well as of the addition of exogenous genetic material. The autogenic parent cells from which the cell lines are derived serve as convenient control samples for testing. The cell lines are not neoplastically transformed, although they have acquired several properties which distinguish them from their normal progenitors.

Stampfer, Martha R. (Oakland, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Vorozhko, Valeriya [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Cell Cycle and Cancer Biology Research Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (United States); Zuna, Rosemary E. [Department of Pathology, University of Oklahoma HSC (United States); Hanigan, Marie H. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Gorbsky, Gary J. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Cell Cycle and Cancer Biology Research Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (United States); Plafker, Scott M. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Angeletti, Peter C. [Nebraska Center for Virology (United States); Ceresa, Brian P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States)], E-mail: brian-ceresa@oushc.edu

2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

35

Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) protects skin cells from ionizing radiation via heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cancer [19]. However, along with the destruction of tumors, surrounding normal tissues may also be injured, including brain, lung, intestine and skin. Skin covers the largest area of the body and functions to protect the body from all types of noxious......

Wei Zhu; Jing Xu; Yangyang Ge; Han Cao; Xin Ge; Judong Luo; Jiao Xue; Hongying Yang; Shuyu Zhang; Jianping Cao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Low-temperature atmospheric plasma increases the expression of anti-aging genes of skin cells without causing cellular damages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to employ various types of plasma in the field of skin care have increased consistently because it can regulate many biochemical reactions that are normally unaffected by light-based therapy. One metho...

Jeong-Hae Choi; Hyun-Wook Lee; Jae-Koo Lee…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Correction: Structure of the inhibitory receptor for human natural killer cells resembles haematopoietic receptors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... inhibitory receptor for human natural killer cells resembles haematopoietic receptors Qing R.FanQ R

Qing R. Fan; Lidia Mosyak; Christine C. Winter; Nicolai Wagtmann; Eric O. Long; Don C. Wiley

1997-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

An investigation of solar radiation induced cell death in a human keratinocyte cell line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular Biology 64: Cell Death Regulators...investigation of solar radiation induced cell death in a human...Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland...basal and squamous cell carcinomas) accounting...radiation from non-solar type UV lamp sources...

Alanna Maguire; James Walsh; and Fiona M. Lyng

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon...

40

A comparative analysis of DNA methylation across human embryonic stem cell lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

human embryonic stem cell lines. Genome Biology 2011 12:R62.human embryonic stem cell lines Pao-Yang Chen 1,2 , Suhuaembryonic stem cell (HESC) lines. It had previously been

Chen, Pao-Yang; Feng, Suhua; Joo, Jong; Jacobsen, Steve E; Pellegrini, Matteo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Transcriptional and Epigenetic Responses of Human Cells to Low Dose  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transcriptional and Epigenetic Responses of Human Cells to Low Dose Transcriptional and Epigenetic Responses of Human Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Identified through High Throughput ChIP-Seq Analysis Carl Anderson Brookhaven National Laboratory Abstract The major consequence of human exposures to ionizing radiation (IR) is considered to be an increased incidence of cancer (Brenner et al., 2003). Exposure of cells to 1 Gy of IR produces approximately 40 double-stranded breaks, 1000 single-stranded breaks, and 1000 damaged bases per genome equivalent (Pandita and Richardson, 2009); however, most direct DNA damage is rapidly repaired. Exposure to IR also induces epigenetic changes including both increases and decreases in DNA methylation, and increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic changes can both initiate cancer and

42

Skinlike Electronic Patch Takes Pulse, Promises New Human-Machine Integration: Scientific American http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=skin-electronic-patch[8/14/2011 6:02:32 AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skinlike Electronic Patch Takes Pulse, Promises New Human-Machine Integration: Scientific American http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=skin-electronic-patch[8/14/2011 6:02:32 AM] You might Show Most Commented Latest Posts by SA Editors Home » News » Skinlike Electronic Patch Takes Pulse

Rogers, John A.

43

Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...therapies. We have seen in this review that human enterovirulent bacteria...a monolayer. Only a recent report describes the extrusion of cells...established. In a recent and complete review, Fang et al. (838) have...in this paper, because our review does not purport to be exhaustive...

Vanessa Liévin-Le Moal; Alain L. Servin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Airway epithelial cell response to human metapneumovirus infection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators.

Bao, X.; Liu, T.; Spetch, L.; Kolli, D. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Garofalo, R.P. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Casola, A. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)], E-mail: ancasola@utmb.edu

2007-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

45

Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14{sup +} monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant.

Shirley, Shawna A. [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Montpetit, Alison J. [College of Nursing, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Lockey, R.F. [Division of Allergy and Immunology, Joy McCann Culverhouse Airway Disease and Nanomedicine Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Florida and VA Hospital Medical Center, MDC 19, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Mohapatra, Shyam S. [Division of Allergy and Immunology, Joy McCann Culverhouse Airway Disease and Nanomedicine Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Florida and VA Hospital Medical Center, MDC 19, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)], E-mail: smohapat@health.usf.edu

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

Seamless Correction of the Sickle Cell Disease Mutation of the HBB Gene in Human Induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seamless Correction of the Sickle Cell Disease Mutation of the HBB Gene in Human Induced ABSTRACT: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common human genetic disease which is caused by a single effector nucleases; induced pluripotent stem cells; piggyBac transposon; sickle cell disease; gene therapy

Zhao, Huimin

47

The Efficacy of a Broad-spectrum Sunscreen to Protect Engineered Human Skin from Tissue and DNA Damage Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...responses of the skin to solar UVR, 3 whereas photoaging...are diagnosed in Canada (2) . It has been...that a child born in Canada today has a 1 in...Skin exposure to solar UVR induces significant...Sunscreen Treatment and Solar UVR Irradiation...Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Canada, were applied at...

Vickram Bissonauth; Régen Drouin; David L. Mitchell; Marc Rhainds; Joël Claveau; and Mahmoud Rouabhia

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cutaneous Markers of Photo-Damage and Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Skin: A Meta-Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma of the...Queensland University of Technology; and 4 School of...with risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC...actinic keratoses, solar elastosis, solar...Carcinomas, Basal Cell Epithelioma, Nonmelanoma...Actinic[Mesh], solar keratosis, Elastosis...

Mohammad Khalesi; David C. Whiteman; Suhail A.R. Doi; Justin Clark; Michael G. Kimlin; and Rachel E. Neale

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Friction Induced Skin Tags  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duplantis KL, Jones BH. Friction blisters. Pathophysiology,Friction Induced Skin Tags Francisco Allegue MD 1 , Carmenetiopathogenic role for friction. Introduction Skin tags (

Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evidence for a role of calmodulin in serum stimulation of Na+ influx in human fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...modulin-dependent phosphodiesterase activity (16). Other workers have shown that these agents also inhibit other cal...from human fore- skin were obtained from James Regan (Oak Ridge National Lab- oratory). The cells were cultured in...

N E Owen; M L Villereal

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion by immunor (IM28)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Immunor (IM28), an analog of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) by inhibiting reverse ... ability of IM28 to inhibit the cell-cell fusion mediated by HIV envelope ...

Donatien Mavoungou; Virginie Poaty-Mavoungou; Marie-Yvonne Akoume…

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mechanisms of Telomere Protection and Deprotection in Human Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complex (ORC) subunits 1-6 binds origins of replication on chromosomes in the G1-phase of the cell cycle. The binding of ORC to replication origins mediates recruitment of other factors, including Cdc6, Cdc45, Cdt1, and MDM 2-7, which all work together... to license the replication origin for firing (reviewed in [90]). It is important to note that while budding yeast has sequence-specific recruitment of ORC to replication origins, ORC recruitment in humans appears to be sequence independent [90...

Sarthy, Jay Francis

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)] [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)] [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)] [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)] [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

Cell lines for the production of monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A. These antibodies have potential application as human blood group reagents, as markers for terminally differentiated erythroid cells and as immunofluorescent labels of somatically variant human erythrocytes.

Bigbee, William L. (Livermore, CA); Fong, Stella S. N. (Del Mar, CA); Jensen, Ronald H. (Livermore, CA); Vanderlaan, Martin (San Ramon, CA); Langlois, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measurement of Human Mobility Using Cell Phone Data: Developing Big Data for Demographic Science*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of Human Mobility Using Cell Phone Data: Developing Big Data for Demographic Science, cell phone call records and develop, test, and compare five measures of mobility. Cell phone data, test, and compare five measures of mobility derived from cell phone call record data. Cell phone data

Washington at Seattle, University of

56

Role of copper in the regulation of CU, ZN-superoxide dismutase in human K562 erythroleukemia cells and human fibroblasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activation of the enzyme CU2Zn2-SUperoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) by its copper cofactor was studied in K562 erythroleukemia cells and skin fibroblasts. K562 cells were incubated in medium supplemented with 0-50 IIM CUC12 or ZnCI2 for 24 h and extracts...

Yu, Dan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A mouse embryonic stem cell bank for inducible overexpression of human chromosome 21 genes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mouse embryonic stem cell bank of inducible human chromosome 21 gene expression is shown to be an important resource for investigating trisomy.

Rossella De Cegli; Antonio Romito; Simona Iacobacci; Lei Mao; Mario Lauria; Anthony O Fedele; Joachim Klose; Christelle Borel; Patrick Descombes; Stylianos E Antonarakis; Diego di Bernardo; Sandro Banfi; Andrea Ballabio; Gilda Cobellis

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fisetin induces apoptosis in human nonsmall lung cancer cells via a mitochondria-mediated pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study investigated the apoptotic effects of fisetin, a phenolic compound, against the human ... cell lung cancer cell line, NCI-H460. Fisetin showed dose-dependent cytotoxic activity against NCI- ... ...

Kyoung Ah Kang; Mei Jing Piao; Jin Won Hyun

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Lymphoid cell-glioma cell interaction enhances cell coat production by human gliomas: novel suppressor mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dick B Macchi S Papazoglou EH Oldfield PL Kornblith BH Smith MK Gately Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide...tumor biopsy specimens and characterized by a combination of ultra-structural, biochemical, and biophysical techniques (7...

SJ Dick; B Macchi; S Papazoglou; EH Oldfield; PL Kornblith; BH Smith; MK Gately

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Multilayered Organization of Engineered Human Skin Does Not Influence the Formation of Sunlight-induced Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers in Cellular DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Laval University, Quebec, Canada G1K 7P4; Unite de Recherche en...Recherche, CHUQ, Quebec, Quebec, Canada G1L 3L5; and Faculty of Medicine...Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 2M4 E. A. D. Solar UVB initiates skin cancer mainly...

Jean-Philippe Therrien; Mahmoud Rouabhia; Elliot A. Drobetsky; and Régen Drouin

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling Human Neural Development Using Pluripotent Stem Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jaenisch R. Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model withharboring the mutation for sickle cell disease 20 . Despite

Patterson, Michaela Cyr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotentSurface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined of Chemical Engineering, d David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, and e Harvard

Saha, Krishanu

63

Alterations in Langerhans Cells and Thy-1+ Dendritic Epidermal Cells in Murine Epidermis during the Evolution of Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Skin Cancers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the mice was removed with electric clippers once per week, and...m2, and about 60% of the energy was emitted within the UVB...removed from the site with electric clippers, 8-methoxypsoralen...Histological diagnosisSquamous cell car cinomaFibrosarcomaSpindle cell...

Joseph Alcalay; Janet N. Craig; and Margaret L. Kripke

1989-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Alpha-Toxin Induces Programmed Cell Death of Human T cells, B cells, and Monocytes during USA300 Infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This investigation examines the influence of alpha-toxin (Hla) during USA300 infection of human leukocytes. Survival of an USA300 isogenic deletion mutant of hla (USA300Dhla) in human blood was comparable to the parental wild-type strain and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) plasma membrane permeability caused by USA300 did not require Hla. Flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following infection by USA300, USA300Dhla, and USA300Dhla transformed with a plasmid over-expressing Hla (USA300Dhla Comp) demonstrated this toxin plays a significant role inducing plasma membrane permeability of CD14 +, CD3 +, and CD19 + PBMCs. Rapid plasma membrane permeability independent of Hla was observed for PMNs, CD14 + and CD19 + PBMCs following intoxication with USA300 supernatant while the majority of CD3 + PBMC plasma membrane permeability induced by USA300 required Hla. Addition of recombinant Hla to USA300Dhla supernatant rescued CD3 + and CD19 + PBMC plasma membrane permeability generated by USA300 supernatant. An observed delay in plasma membrane permeability caused by Hla in conjunction with Annexin V binding and ApoBrdU Tunel assays examining PBMCs intoxicated with recombinant Hla or infected with USA300, USA300Dhla, USA300Dhla Comp, and USA300DsaeR/S suggest Hla induces programmed cell death of monocytes, B cells, and T cells that results in plasma membrane permeability. Together these findings underscore the importance of Hla during S. aureus infection of human tissue and specifically demonstrate Hla activity during USA300 infection triggers programmed

Tyler K. Nygaard; Kyler B. Pallister; Ashley L. Dumont; Mark Dewald; Robert L. Watkins; Erik Q. Pallister; Cheryl Malone; Shannon Griffith; Er R. Horswill; Victor J. Torres; Jovanka M. Voyich

65

Drug and radiation sensitivity testing of primary human tumor cells using the adhesive-tumor-cell culture system (ATCCS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In summary, the ATCCS is an efficient culture system which grows clonogenic cells from greater than 80% of human cancers. The ATCCS supports the growth of malignant cells from human cancers. The ATCCS shows classical drug and radiation survival curves which routinely achieve over 1 log of kill. The ATCCS has high CFE and permits sensitivity testing from small samples. Clinical correlations for the chemosensitivity assay were satisfactory. Radiosensitivity in vitro correlates with tumor histology.

Baker, F.L.; Spitzer, G.; Ajani, J.A.; Brock, W.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Abortive HIV Infection Mediates CD4 T-Cell Depletion and Inflammation in Human Lymphoid Tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factors like HIV-1 Tat, Vpr, and Nef released from infected cells (Schindler et al., 2006; Westendorp etAbortive HIV Infection Mediates CD4 T-Cell Depletion and Inflammation in Human Lymphoid Tissue 94143 Summary The mechanism by which CD4 T-cells are depleted in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly

Levin, Judith G.

67

Directed Differentiation and Functional Maturation of Cortical Interneurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Human pluripotent stem cells are a powerful tool for modeling brain development and disease. The human cortex is composed of two major neuronal populations: projection neurons and local interneurons. Cortical interneurons comprise a diverse class of cell types expressing the neurotransmitter GABA. Dysfunction of cortical interneurons has been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. Here, we demonstrate the highly efficient derivation of human cortical interneurons in an NKX2.1::GFP human embryonic stem cell reporter line. Manipulating the timing of SHH activation yields three distinct GFP+ populations with specific transcriptional profiles, neurotransmitter phenotypes, and migratory behaviors. Further differentiation in a murine cortical environment yields parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing neurons that exhibit synaptic inputs and electrophysiological properties of cortical interneurons. Our study defines the signals sufficient for modeling human ventral forebrain development in vitro and lays the foundation for studying cortical interneuron involvement in human disease pathology.

Asif M. Maroof; Sotirios Keros; Jennifer A. Tyson; Shui-Wang Ying; Yosif M. Ganat; Florian T. Merkle; Becky Liu; Adam Goulburn; Edouard G. Stanley; Andrew G. Elefanty; Hans Ruedi Widmer; Kevin Eggan; Peter A. Goldstein; Stewart A. Anderson; Lorenz Studer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Particulate depleted uranium is cytotoxic and clastogenic to human lung epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly used in military applications and consequently exposure to soldiers and non-combatants is potentially frequent and widespread. DU is suspected to be a carcinogen, potentially affecting the bronchial cells of the lung. Few studies have considered DU in human bronchial cells. Accordingly, we determined the cytotoxicity and clastogenicity of particulate DU in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEP2D cells). DU-induced concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells, and was not clastogenic after 24 h but induced chromosomal aberrations after 48 h. These data indicate that if DU is a human bronchial carcinogen, it is likely acting through a mechanism that involves DNA breaks after longer exposures.

Carolyne LaCerte; Hong Xie; AbouEl-Makarim Aboueissa; John Pierce Wise Sr.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Levels of High Energy Phosphates in Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines by 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sciences Levels of High Energy Phosphates in Human...Cell Lines by 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance...Levels of high energy phosphates in human...cell lines by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance...Levels of High Energy Phosphates in Human...Cell Lines by 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance...

Richard H. Knop; Desmond N. Carney; Chi Wan Chen; Jack S. Cohen; and John D. Minna

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Cell type-specific fusion cofactors determine human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tropism for T-cell lines versus primary macrophages.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Articles Cell type-specific fusion cofactors determine human immunodeficiency...determined by distinct cell type-specific fusion cofactors. We applied a recombinant...suggest the existence of cell type-specific fusion cofactors selective for each...

G Alkhatib; C C Broder; E A Berger

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA) is a growth factor for human, ovine and porcine thyroid cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA) provokes in murine erythroleukemia cells (MELC) a commitment to terminal differentiation leading to the activation of the expression of hemoglobin. HMBA has been tested also in other cells from colon cancer, melanoma or lung cancer. However it has not yet been tested in the thyroid. We demonstrate in this paper that HMBA in kinetics and concentration-response experiments increases the proliferation of human thyroid cells isolated from Graves'-Basedow patients. It also acts like a growth factor for ovine and porcine thyroid cells, respectively, from the OVNIS line and the ATHOS line. This molecule which is a differentiating factor in the MELC system and a growth factor in human thyroid cell cultures represents a potential to get human thyroid cell lines expressing specialized functions.

G. Fayet; T. Amphoux-Fazekas; A. Aouani; S. Hovsépian

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Wild-Type and Vector-Mediated Genomic Integration Profiles of Human Diploid Fibroblasts Analyzed by Third-Generation PacBio DNA Sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with variant hot spot preferences. DNase-Seq patterns of these sites in human tissues, including liver, muscle, heart, brain, skin, and embryonic stem cells further underline variant chromatin accessibility. In summary, AAV integration is dependent...

Daniela Hüser; Andreas Gogol-Döring; Wei Chen; Regine Heilbronn

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ultrastructural Heterogeneity of Follicular Dendritic Cells in the Human Tonsil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) form the framework of the germinal centre (GC). They act as accessory cells, by providing a favourable microenvironment for the germinal centre reaction.1-2 Secondary GCs consist ...

Louk H. P. M. Rademakers; Henk-Jan Schuurman

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Omalizumab may decrease IgE synthesis by targeting membrane IgE+ human B cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Omalizumab, is a humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibody used to treat allergic asthma. Decreased serum IgE levels, lower eosinophil and B cell counts have been noted as a result of treatment. In vitro studies and animal ...

Chan, Marcia A.; Gigliotti, Nicole M.; Dotson, Abby Louise; Rosenwasser, Lanny J.

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

Light scattering of human red blood cells during metabolic remodeling of membrane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the light scattering properties of individual human red blood cells (RBCs). We show that both the RBC static and dynamic scattering signals are altered by adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP)-driven membrane metabolic ...

Park, YongKeun

76

Monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A and cell lines for the production thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that are highly specific to and exhibit high affinity for glycophorin A.sup.N and differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A.

Vanderlaan, Martin (San Ramon, CA); Bigbee, William L. (Livermore, CA); Jensen, Ronald H. (Livermore, CA); Fong, Stella S. N. (San Diego, CA); Langlois, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

In Vivo Volume and Hemoglobin Dynamics of Human Red Blood Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human red blood cells (RBCs) lose ~30% of their volume and ~20% of their hemoglobin (Hb) content during their ~100-day lifespan in the bloodstream. These observations are well-documented, but the mechanisms for these volume ...

Malka, Roy

78

Double-Skin Façades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The double-skin façade is a system that consists of two building skins separated by a ventilated cavity (Fig. 9.1). The main aim of the cavity is to vary the physical properties of the façade throughout the ye...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Antiproliferative effect of memantine on human prostate, breast and colon cancer cell lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...45, 2004 Antiproliferative effect of memantine on human prostate, breast and colon...2004] 4382 We have tested the effect of memantine on ten human cancer cell lines, four...at approximately 20 ug/mL (91 uM) memantine. Ion-channels gated by the neurotransmitter...

Naseema M. Hoosein and Mansoor Abdul

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature11233 Landscape of transcription in human cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the functional elements present in the human genome sequence2 . The five-year pilot phase of the ENCODE project3 of the genetic information encoded by genomes and a significant proportion of a cell's regulatory capabilities-quarters of the human genome is capable of being transcribed, as well as observations about the range and levels

Dean, Matthew D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Profiles of Prostaglandin Biosynthesis in Sixteen Established Cell Lines Derived from Human Lung, Colon, Prostate, and Ovarian Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the application of capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry...H. T. Inhibition of murine natural killer cell activity by prostaglandins...Fischer, S. M. Arachidonate cascade and skin tumor promotion. In...Kersey, J. H., capillary gas chromatography-negative ion...

Walter C. Hubbard; Michael C. Alley; Theodore L. McLemore; and Michael R. Boyd

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Human serum activates CIDEB-mediated lipid droplet enlargement in hepatoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Human serum induced differentiation of hepatoma cells increases cellular lipid droplet (LD) size. •The observed increase in LD size correlates with increased PGC-1? and CIDEB expression. •Induction of CIDEB expression correlates with rescue of VLDL secretion and loss of ADRP. •siRNA knockdown of CIDEB impairs the human serum mediated increase in LD size. •This system represents a cost-efficient model to study CIDEB’s role in lipid biology. -- Abstract: Human hepatocytes constitutively express the lipid droplet (LD) associated protein cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB). CIDEB mediates LD fusion, as well as very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) maturation. However, there are limited cell culture models readily available to study CIDEB’s role in these biological processes, as hepatoma cell lines express negligible levels of CIDEB. Recent work has highlighted the ability of human serum to differentiate hepatoma cells. Herein, we demonstrate that culturing Huh7.5 cells in media supplemented with human serum activates CIDEB expression. This activation occurs through the induced expression of PGC-1?, a positive transcriptional regulator of CIDEB. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy revealed a correlation between CIDEB levels and LD size in human serum treated Huh7.5 cells. Human serum treatment also resulted in a rapid decrease in the levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Furthermore, individual overexpression of CIDEB was sufficient to down-regulate ADRP protein levels. siRNA knockdown of CIDEB revealed that the human serum mediated increase in LD size was CIDEB-dependent. Overall, our work highlights CIDEB’s role in LD fusion, and presents a new model system to study the PGC-1?/CIDEB pathway’s role in LD dynamics and the VLDL pathway.

Singaravelu, Ragunath [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada) [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Lyn, Rodney K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada) [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Srinivasan, Prashanth [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)] [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Delcorde, Julie [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada) [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Steenbergen, Rineke H.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta (Canada) [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta (Canada); Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology, Katz Centre for Pharmacy and Health Research, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2 (Canada); Pezacki, John P., E-mail: John.Pezacki@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of {gamma}-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

Chen Wenshu [Department of Life Science, Tzu Chi University, Hualien (China); Lee Yijang [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui [Department of Life Science, Tzu Chi University, Hualien (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of ?-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G2/M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

Wen-Shu Chen; Yi-Jang Lee; Yi-Chu Yu; Ching-Hui Hsaio; Jui-Hung Yen; Sz-Hsien Yu; Yu-Jia Tsai; Shu-Jun Chiu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Lysyl Oxidase LOX Is Absent in Basal and Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Its Knockdown Induces an Invading Phenotype in a Skin Equivalent Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a dermal substrate made of chitosan-cross-linked collagen-GAG...salt, Sigma), the classic inhibitor of the lysyl oxidase activity...that labels the nuclei. The chitosan-cross-linked collagen-GAG...6-Oxidase antagonists & inhibitors metabolism Skin Neoplasms...

Charbel Bouez; Caroline Reynaud; Emmanuelle Noblesse; Amélie Thépot; Claudine Gleyzal; Jean Kanitakis; Eric Perrier; Odile Damour; and Pascal Sommer

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

? Particles Initiate Biological Production of Superoxide Anions and Hydrogen Peroxide in Human Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...induce the cellular production of O2@ and H2O2 by...that the intracel lular production of O2@ and H202 is...18). MATERIALS AND METHODS Reagents. Cells were...concentration, 10 .LM).Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 30...intracellular O2@ and H202 production in human cells (19...

P. K. Narayanan; E. H. Goodwin; and B. E. Lehnert

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Biological Effects of Space Radiation on Human Cells: History, Advances and Outcomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......XIV crossed intense solar flares explaining...and clo- nogenic cell survival assays that...Although the onboard technology available did not...were likely due to solar flares. From all...time variation of solar cosmic rays during...double-strand breaks in human cells: history, progress......

Mira Maalouf; Marco Durante; Nicolas Foray

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fish Oil Inhibits Human Lung Carcinoma Cell Growth by Suppressing Integrin-Linked Kinase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Article Signaling and Regulation Fish Oil Inhibits Human Lung Carcinoma Cell Growth...show that dietary compounds, such as fish oil (which contains certain kinds of fatty...ILK enhanced the inhibitory effect of fish oil on cell growth. The inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated...

ShouWei Han; XiaoJuan Sun; Jeffrey D. Ritzenthaler; Jesse Roman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Fish Oil Inhibits Human Lung Carcinoma Cell Growth by Suppressing Integrin-Linked Kinase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Article Signaling and Regulation Fish Oil Inhibits Human Lung Carcinoma Cell...we show that dietary compounds, such as fish oil (which contains certain kinds of fatty...silencing ILK enhanced the inhibitory effect of fish oil on cell growth. The inhibitor of p38...

ShouWei Han; XiaoJuan Sun; Jeffrey D. Ritzenthaler; Jesse Roman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Generation of functional hemangioblasts from human embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(hES) cells using an in vitro differentiation system. Blast cells expressed gene signatures or into mice with ischemia-reperfusion injury of the retina, they localized to the site of injury the mortality rate after myocardial infarction and restored blood flow in hind limb ischemia in mouse models

Cai, Long

91

An Essential Role for BLNK in Human B Cell Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kitamura D. , Cell 69 , 823 ( 1992 ). 18 Pappu R. , Science 286 , 1949 ( 1999 ). 19...et al., Cell 69, 823 (1992) . R. Pappu, et al., Science 286, 1949 (1999...1994) ; A. Puel, S. F. Ziegler, R. H. Buckley, W. J. Leonard, Nature...

Yoshiyuki Minegishi; Jurg Rohrer; Elaine Coustan-Smith; Howard M. Lederman; Rajita Pappu; Dario Campana; Andrew C. Chan; Mary Ellen Conley

92

Dose-dependent cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of antineoplastic alkylating agents on human lymphoblastoid cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alkylating agents in clinical use as antineoplastics are strongly implicated as human carcinogens on the basis of animal studies and human epidemiologic studies. However, there is little quantitative information on the extent to which exposure to these drugs is mutagenic for normal (non-malignant) cells and the extent to which such mutagenicity correlates with cytotoxicity of these agents. Human lymphoblastoid cells (WIL2-NS) were exposed to graded doses of eight antineoplastic alkylating agents. Dose-dependent decreases in survival were used to calculate IC{sub 50}s for each of the drugs tested. The mutagenicity of these agents is correlated strongly with cytotoxicity. These results quantitate the dose-dependent cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of these bifunctional alkylating agents on human cells. All are cytotoxic and mutagenic, although their mutagenic efficiency varies.

Sanderson, B.J.S.; Johnson, K.J.; Henner, W.D. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Deok-Jin Jang 1 , Mingquan Guo 1 , Julia S.F.Chu 2 , Kyle T. Kurpinski 2 , Bjorn Rydberg 1 , Song Li 2 , and Daojing Wang 1 1. Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 2. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 We will present data obtained during the first year of our DOE/NASA Low Dose Radiation Research program. We utilized a comprehensive approach including transcriptomics, proteomics, phosphoproteomics, and biochemistry to characterize human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in response to low dose ionizing radiation. We first determined the cell survival, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of

94

Identification of Alkaline Phosphatase Positive Cells in Human Germinal Centres as Follicular Dendritic Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are exclusively found in germinal centers, where they form an extensive meshwork between the lymfoid cells. Many controversies exist about their origin. Ultrastructural studies...

L. H. P. M. Rademakers; R. A. De Weger…

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan)] [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

Carrier-mediated transport of monocarboxylic acids in BeWo cell monolayers as a model of the human trophoblast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The monolayer-forming, human choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, was used to study the mechanisms of monocarboxylic acid transport across the human trophoblast. Benzoic acid, acetic acid, and lactic acid were used as markers ...

Utoguchi, Naoki; Magnusson, Malin; Audus, Kenneth L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

SGHTL-34, a thyrotrophin-responsive immortalised human thyroid cell line generated by transfection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Normal human thyrocytes were immortalised by electroporation-mediated transfection with the plasmid pSVSneo. One resultant cell line (SGHTL-34) contains approximately 10 copies of simian virus 40 (SV40) early region incorporated into the genome and has been in continuous monolayer culture for 9 months. SGHTL-34 cells grow rapidly (doubling time 30 h) and contain cytokeratin filaments. They demonstrate a morphological change in response to thyrotrophin (TSH) and possess a TSH- and forskolin-sensitive adenylate cyclase, the thresholds for stimulation being 10 ?U/ml bovine TSH and 10?7 M forskolin. The development of this novel human thyrocyte cell line may allow further study of the regulation of human thyroid growth and differentiation.

G.StJ. Whitley; S.S. Nussey; A.P. Johnstone

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Intellectual Property and Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...novel. However, just 1 day after the claims were...PTO issued the patent on 1 December 1998. A separate (but...about $200,000 to $500,000 a year (13...the price of cells to $500 for academic investigators...opened the possibility of rebates for investigators who...

Jeanne F. Loring; Cathryn Campbell

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

99

Mechanosensitivity of human osteosarcoma cells and phospholipase C {beta}2 expression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bone adapts to mechanical load by osteosynthesis, suggesting that osteoblasts might respond to mechanical stimuli. We therefore investigated cell proliferation and phospholipase C (PLC) expression in osteoblasts. One Hertz uniaxial stretching at 4000 {mu}strains significantly increased the proliferation rates of human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 and primary human osteoblasts. However, U-2/OS, SaOS-2, OST, and MNNG/HOS cells showed no significant changes in proliferation rate. We investigated the expression pattern of different isoforms of PLC in these cell lines. We were able to detect PLC {beta}1, {beta}3, {gamma}1, {gamma}2, and {delta}1 in all cells, but PLC {beta}2 was only detectable in the mechanosensitive cells. We therefore investigated the possible role of PLC {beta}2 in mechanotransduction. Inducible antisense expression for 24 h inhibited the translation of PLC {beta}1 in U-2/OS cells by 35% and PLC {beta}2 in MG-63 by 29%. Fluid shear flow experiments with MG-63 lacking PLC {beta}2 revealed a significantly higher level of cells losing attachment to coverslips and a significantly lower number of cells increasing intracellular free calcium.

Hoberg, M. [Department of Orthopaedics, University of Tuebingen (Germany)]. E-mail: Maik.Hoberg@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Gratz, H.-H. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany); Noll, M. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany); Jones, D.B. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany)

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

100

Telomerase Regulation and Telomere Maintenance during Human T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Virus (HTLV-I) Transformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus (HTLV-I) is the etiological agent of the lymphoproliferative disorder, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and the neurodegenerative disease, tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated ...

Bellon, Marcia Lynn

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Human Cell-mediated Benzo(a)pyrene Cytotoxicity and Mutagenicity in Human Diploid Fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...them with a hemocytometer or electronic counter (Coulter Corp...equipped with automatic dpm calculation capability. The optical standards...P present in the medium does get metabolized by the cells...W. Nichols (eds.). Handbook of Mutagenicity Test Methods...

Ann E. Aust; Ken J. Falahee; Veronica M. Maher; and J. Justin McCormick

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Combined treatment with fenretinide and indomethacin induces AIF-mediated, non-classical cell death in human acute T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of fenretinide and indomethacin induces a high level of cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic pathway is caspase-independent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jurkat cells undergo AIF-mediated cell death. -- Abstract: Currently used cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy have a similar mechanism of action and low specificity. Applied simultaneously, they show an additive effect with strong side effects. Clinical trials with the use of different agents in cancer therapy show that the use of these compounds alone is not very effective in fighting cancer. An alternative solution could be to apply a combination of these agents, because their combination has a synergistic effect on some cancer cells. Therefore, in our investigations we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid-fenretinide when combined with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-indomethacin on the process of apoptosis in the acute human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. We demonstrate that treatment with the combination of the tested compounds induces the death of cells, that is peculiar and combines features of apoptosis as well as non-apoptotic cell death. In detail we observed, cell membrane permeabilization, phosphatydylserine exposure, no oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, no caspase-3 activation, but apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation. Taken together these results indicate, that Jurkat cells after treatment with a combination of fenretinide and indomethacin undergo AIF-mediated programmed cell death.

Hojka-Osinska, Anna, E-mail: hojka@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland)] [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Ziolo, Ewa, E-mail: ziolo@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland)] [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Rapak, Andrzej, E-mail: rapak@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland)] [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland)

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Differential expression of RANK on Langerhans cells and CD45RA and CD45RO/CLA on T cells in developing human skin after birth.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Die Haut, die Schnittstelle zwischen dem Körper und der Umgebung, ist das größte Organ des Körpers und hat zahlreiche Funktionen. Eine davon ist, dass die… (more)

Akguen, Johnnie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Human Cell-mediated Benzo(a)pyrene Cytotoxicity and Mutagenicity in Human Diploid Fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...60% methanol in water on a Spectra- Physics SP 8000 high-pressure liquid Chromatograph...of the B(a)P present in the medium does get metabolized by the cells under the...Legator, and W. W. Nichols (eds.). Handbook of Mutagenicity Test Methods, pp. 193-220...

Ann E. Aust; Ken J. Falahee; Veronica M. Maher; and J. Justin McCormick

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Discovering functional transcription-factor combinations in the human cell cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discovering functional transcription-factor combinations in the human cell cycle Zhou Zhu,1 Jay-factor (TF) combinations using phylogenetically conserved sequences and microarray-based expression data of binding sites in the vicinity of one another and whether these combinations result in more coherent

Church, George M.

107

Comparative morphology and tumourigenicity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines in athymic rats and mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four human hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5, Hep G2, Sk-Hep 1 and Mahlavu were inoculated subcutaneously into athymic Balb/c nude mice and N/NIH outbred nude rats, producing well encapsulated tumours. The 4 hepat...

Daniel Shouval; Lucia Schuger; Itzhak S. Levij; Lola M. Reid…

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

{sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Su Xiaoming [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Suzuki, Hiromi [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Omori, Katsunori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko [Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Advanced Engineering Services Company, Limited, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazu, Toru [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Ishioka, Noriaki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Takeo, E-mail: tohnishi@naramed-u.ac.j [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Securin depletion sensitizes human colon cancer cells to fisetin-induced apoptosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Securin is highly-expressed in various tumors including those of the colon. In this study, the role of securin in the anticancer effects of fisetin on human colon cancer cells was investigated. Fisetin-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells as indicated by TUNEL assay, Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining, Ser15-phosphorylation of p53, and cleavages of procaspase-3 and PARP. These effects were enhanced in HCT116 securin-null cells or in wild-type cells in which securin was knockdown by siRNA, but attenuated when wild-type or non-degradable securin was reconstituted. Moreover, fisetin did not induce apoptosis in HCT116 p53-null and HT-29 p53-mutant cells. Knockdown of securin in HCT116 p53-null cells potentiated fisetin-induced cytotoxicity by induction of apoptosis. Our results provide the first evidence to support that securin depletion sensitizes human colon cancer cells to fisetin-induced apoptosis.

Sz-Hsien Yu; Pei-Ming Yang; Chih-Wen Peng; Yi-Chu Yu; Shu-Jun Chiu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Telomere Targeting with a New G4 Ligand Enhances Radiation-Induced Killing of Human Glioblastoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitivity to ionizing radiation of 2 human telomerase-positive...Coulter) using CellQuest software. Apoptosis assessment...of TAC combined with radiation on GBM cells in vitro...trials with acceptable safety (49). In conclusion...sensitivity to ionizing radiation of 2 human hTERT-positive...

Patrick Merle; Bertrand Evrard; Anne Petitjean; Jean-Marie Lehn; Marie-Paule Teulade-Fichou; Emmanuel Chautard; Anne De Cian; Lionel Guittat; Phong Lan Thao Tran; Jean-Louis Mergny; Pierre Verrelle; and Andreï Tchirkov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity blocks cell-to-cell spread of human cytomegalovirus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...human prostaglandin G/H synthase 1 and 2 expressed in the baculovirus system . Biochim Biophys Acta 1209 : 130 – 139 . 49 Sifton DW ( 2003 ) Physicians' Desk Reference ( Thomson , Montvale ), 57 Edition . 50 Walter EA ( 1995 ) Reconstitution of cellular...

Jörg Schröer; Thomas Shenk

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Low Dose Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Joe Gray Priscilla Cooper Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The radiation Adaptive Response (adaptation, or AR) is a well documented, although evidently highly variable, protective phenomenon in which exposures to low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation result in reduced deleterious effects of subsequent higher exposures. Protection has been reported against a variety of biologically important endpoints, but its variability as a function of cell and tissue type and its genetic control are not well understood. The adaptive response is predicted to result in a non-linear dose response for cancer risk in the low dose range. However, the molecular mechanism(s) remain unknown, and such information is

113

Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguish between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype.

Jensen, Ronald H. (Livermore, CA); Vanderlaan, Martin (San Ramon, CA); Bigbee, William L. (Livermore, CA); Stanker, Larry H. (Livermore, CA); Branscomb, Elbert W. (Walnut Creek, CA); Grabske, Robert J. (Berkeley, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein components using gel electrophoresis, and by absorption spectral analysis. GeneraUy, the RNA content was <5% of the amount of DNA, and the ratio of the amount of protein to that of DNA was =1. 8-2 (w/w). Having developed a suitable methodology for routine isolation of chromatin from mammalian cells, studies of DNA damage in chromatin in vitro and in cultured human cells were pursued.

Dizdaroglu, Miral

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expression by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.

Garcia-Becerra, Rocio [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, Lorenza, E-mail: lorenzadiaz@gmail.com [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Camacho, Javier [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barrera, David; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Morales, Angelica [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, Cindy Sharon [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Avila, Euclides [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bargallo, Enrique [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Arrecillas, Myrna [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from a Bombay individual: Moving towards 'universal-donor' red blood cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bombay phenotype is one of the rare phenotypes in the ABO blood group system that fails to express ABH antigens on red blood cells. Nonsense or missense mutations in fucosyltransfrase1 (FUT1) and fucosyltransfrase2 (FUT2) genes are known to create this phenotype. This blood group is compatible with all other blood groups as a donor, as it does not express the H antigen on the red blood cells. In this study, we describe the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of a Bombay blood-type individual by the ectopic expression of established transcription factors Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc. Sequence analyses of fibroblasts and iPSCs revealed a nonsense mutation 826C to T (276 Gln to Ter) in the FUT1 gene and a missense mutation 739G to A (247 Gly to Ser) in the FUT2 gene in the Bombay phenotype under study. The established iPSCs resemble human embryonic stem cells in morphology, passaging, surface and pluripotency markers, normal karyotype, gene expression, DNA methylation of critical pluripotency genes, and in-vitro differentiation. The directed differentiation of the iPSCs into hematopoietic lineage cells displayed increased expression of the hematopoietic lineage markers such as CD34, CD133, RUNX1, KDR, {alpha}-globulin, and {gamma}-globulin. Such specific stem cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to produce a universal blood group donor, in-vitro, thus enabling cellular replacement therapies, once the safety issue is resolved.

Seifinejad, Ali; Taei, Adeleh [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Totonchi, Mehdi; Vazirinasab, Hamed [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hassani, Seideh Nafiseh [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghdami, Nasser [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Regenerative Biomedicine, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahbazi, Ebrahim [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdi, Reza Salman [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini, E-mail: Salekdeh@royaninstitute.org [Department of Molecular Systems Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Systems Biology, Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baharvand, Hossein, E-mail: Baharvand@royaninstitute.org [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Regenerative Biomedicine, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Developmental Biology, University of Science and Culture, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Varicella-Zoster Virus-Infected Human Sensory Neurons Are Resistant to Apoptosis, yet Human Foreskin Fibroblasts Are Susceptible: Evidence for a Cell-Type-Specific Apoptotic Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling)-positive cells...response, an area of research that merits further investigation. The...deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling] staining, and...Human physiology Humans In Situ Nick-End Labeling Microscopy...

C. Hood; A. L. Cunningham; B. Slobedman; R. A. Boadle; A. Abendroth

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

Brunetto de Farias, Caroline [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil) [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children's Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil) [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Abujamra, Ana Lucia [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil) [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children's Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Schwartsmann, Gilberto [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil) [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

119

Myostatin acts as an autocrine/paracrine negative regulator in myoblast differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? iPS-derived cells express myostatin and its receptor upon myoblast differentiation. ? Myostatin inhibits myoblast differentiation by inhibiting MyoD and Myo5a induction. ? Silencing of myostatin promotes differentiation of human iPS cells into myoblasts. -- Abstract: Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor (GDF-8), regulates proliferation of muscle satellite cells, and suppresses differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes via down-regulation of key myogenic differentiation factors including MyoD. Recent advances in stem cell biology have enabled generation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells, but it remains to be clarified whether myostatin is also involved in regulation of artificial differentiation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells. Here we show that the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells that were induced to differentiate into myoblasts expressed myostatin and its receptor during the differentiation. An addition of recombinant human myostatin (rhMyostatin) suppressed induction of MyoD and Myo5a, resulting in significant suppression of myoblast differentiation. The rhMyostatin treatment also inhibited proliferation of the cells at a later phase of differentiation. RNAi-mediated silencing of myostatin promoted differentiation of human iPS-derived embryoid body (EB) cells into myoblasts. These results strongly suggest that myostatin plays an important role in regulation of myoblast differentiation from iPS cells of human origin. The present findings also have significant implications for potential regenerative medicine for muscular diseases.

Gao, Fei; Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Gojo, Satoshi [Department of Cardiac Support, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Cardiac Support, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mazda, Osam, E-mail: mazda@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

Amelioration of motor/sensory dysfunction and spasticity in a rat model of acute lumbar spinal cord injury by human neural stem cell transplantation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human foetal stem cell grafts improve both motor and sensory functions in rats suffering from a spinal cord injury, demonstrating potential for cell replacement therapy in human spinal cord injuries.

Sebastiaan van Gorp; Marjolein Leerink; Osamu Kakinohana; Oleksandr Platoshyn; Camila Santucci; Jan Galik; Elbert A Joosten; Marian Hruska-Plochan; Danielle Goldberg; Silvia Marsala; Karl Johe; Joseph D Ciacci; Martin Marsala

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Abstract LB-191: Astrocytes promote colonization of human brain with breast cancer cells via inhibition of KISS1 expression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Astrocytes promote colonization of human brain with breast cancer cells via inhibition...that breast cancer metastatic cells to the brain exhibit much lower level of KISS1 expression...the mechanism that regulates KISS1 in the brain metastatic cells and promotes brain metastases...

Ilya V. Ulasov; Natalya V. Kaverina; JG Yoon; Hwahyung Lee; Purvaba Sarvaiya; Dmitry Malin; Vincent L. Cryns; Danny R. Welch; Charles K. Cobbs

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

CDK-associated Cullin 1 promotes cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2 in human lung cancer A549 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) expression increases in human lung carcinoma. •CAC1 promotes the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells. •CAC1 promotes human lung cancer A549 cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) in lung cancer, the effect of CAC1 on the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells, and the activation of signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Results showed that CAC1 expression was higher levels in human lung carcinoma than normal lung tissue, and CAC1 siRNA reduced the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing cell activity and cell division in vitro. The proportion of cells treated with CAC1 siRNA increased in the G1 phase and decreased in the S and G2/M phase, indicative of G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the proportions of early/late apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells were enhanced with CAC1 siRNA treatment. It was also found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways were involved in the proliferation of A549 cells. After CAC1 siRNA treatment, p-ERK1/2 levels decreased, and meanwhile p-p38 level increased, A549 cell proliferation increased when ERK1/2 signaling is activated by PMA. Our findings demonstrated that CAC1 promoted the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential cure target for treatment of human lung cancer.

Chen, Tian Jun [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China); Gao, Fei [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xi’an, Xi’an 710043 (China)] [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xi’an, Xi’an 710043 (China); Yang, Tian; Thakur, Asmitanand; Ren, Hui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China); Chen, Ming Wei, E-mail: xjtucmw@163.com [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong [Department of Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Epigenetic influences of low-dose bisphenol A in primary human breast epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantial evidence indicates that exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) during early development may increase breast cancer risk later in life. The changes may persist into puberty and adulthood, suggesting an epigenetic process being imposed in differentiated breast epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms by which early memory of BPA exposure is imprinted in breast progenitor cells and then passed onto their epithelial progeny are not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine epigenetic changes in breast epithelial cells treated with low-dose BPA. We also investigated the effect of BPA on the ER{alpha} signaling pathway and global gene expression profiles. Compared to control cells, nuclear internalization of ER{alpha} was observed in epithelial cells preexposed to BPA. We identified 170 genes with similar expression changes in response to BPA. Functional analysis confirms that gene suppression was mediated in part through an ER{alpha}-dependent pathway. As a result of exposure to BPA or other estrogen-like chemicals, the expression of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) became epigenetically silenced in breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, increased DNA methylation in the LAMP3 CpG island was this repressive mark preferentially occurred in ER{alpha}-positive breast tumors. These results suggest that the in vitro system developed in our laboratory is a valuable tool for exposure studies of BPA and other xenoestrogens in human cells. Individual and geographical differences may contribute to altered patterns of gene expression and DNA methylation in susceptible loci. Combination of our exposure model with epigenetic analysis and other biochemical assays can give insight into the heritable effect of low-dose BPA in human cells.

Weng, Yu-I; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Liu, Joseph; Deatherage, Daniel E.; Huang Yiwen; Zuo Tao; Rodriguez, Benjamin [Human Cancer Genetics Program, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Ching-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii [Department of Internal Medicine and Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tim H.-M., E-mail: Tim.Huang@osumc.ed [Human Cancer Genetics Program, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Nukbone® promotes proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from human amniotic membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Nukbone showed to be a good scaffold for adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. •Nukbone induced osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. •Results showed that Nukbone offer an excellent option for bone tissue regeneration due to properties. -- Abstract: Bovine bone matrix Nukbone® (NKB) is an osseous tissue-engineering biomaterial that retains its mineral and organic phases and its natural bone topography and has been used as a xenoimplant for bone regeneration in clinics. There are not studies regarding its influence of the NKB in the behavior of cells during the repairing processes. The aim of this research is to demonstrate that NKB has an osteoinductive effect in human mesenchymal stem cells from amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs). Results indicated that NKB favors the AM-hMSCs adhesion and proliferation up to 7 days in culture as shown by the scanning electron microscopy and proliferation measures using an alamarBlue assay. Furthermore, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, it was detected that two gene expression markers of osteoblastic differentiation: the core binding factor and osteocalcin were higher for AM-hMSCs co-cultured with NKB in comparison with cultivated cells in absence of the biomaterial. As the results indicate, NKB possess the capability for inducing successfully the osteoblastic differentiation of AM-hMSC, so that, NKB is an excellent xenoimplant option for repairing bone tissue defects.

Rodríguez-Fuentes, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana G. [Depto. Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Enríquez-Jiménez, Juana [Depto. Biología de la Reproducción, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ), México City 14000 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología de la Reproducción, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ), México City 14000 (Mexico); Alcántara-Quintana, Luz E. [Subd. de Investigación, Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico City 07370 (Mexico)] [Subd. de Investigación, Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico City 07370 (Mexico); Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth [Depto. Biología Molecular e Histocompatibilidad, Hospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, México City 4800 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología Molecular e Histocompatibilidad, Hospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, México City 4800 (Mexico); Piña-Barba, María C. [Depto. Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico); Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando [Depto. Biología Celular y Tisular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología Celular y Tisular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico); and others

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, Ren& #233; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

Abstract B50: Supercooling under magnetic field can control the risk for malignant transformations of human pluripotent stem (iPS) cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...supercooling under magnetic field (2 kHz...human iPS cell lines from adult...human iPS cell lines for the supercooling under magnetic field group in 1...supercooling under magnetic field group (p0...human iPS cell lines which carry...

Hisashi Moriauchi; Makoto Mihara; Raymond Chung; Yue Zhang; and Chifumi Sato

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Cytogenetic characterization of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity in Cobalt-60 irradiated human lymphoblastoid cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The dose-effect relationships of cells exposed to ionizing radiation are frequently described by linear quadratic (LQ) models over an extended dose range. However, many mammalian cell lines, when acutely irradiated in G2 at doses ?0.3 Gy, show hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) as measured by reduced clonogenic cell survival, thereby indicating greater cell lethality than is predicted by extrapolation from high-dose responses. We therefore hypothesized that the cytogenetic response in G2 cells to low doses would also be steeper than predicted by LQ extrapolation from high doses. We tested our hypothesis by exposing four normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines to 0–400 cGy of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The cytokinesis block micronucleus assay was used to determine the frequencies of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. To characterize the dependence of the cytogenetic damage on dose, univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare the responses in the low- (HRS) and high-dose response regions. Our data indicate that the slope of the response for all four cell lines at ?20 cGy during G2 is greater than predicted by an LQ extrapolation from the high-dose responses for both micronuclei and bridges. These results suggest that the biological consequences of low-dose exposures could be underestimated and may not provide accurate risk assessments following such exposures.

Gnanada S. Joshi; Michael C. Joiner; James D. Tucker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat responds to T-cell activation signals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS, infects and kills lymphoid cells bearing the CD4 antigen. In an infected cell, a number of cellular as well as HIV-encoded gene products determine the levels of viral gene expression and HIV replication. Efficient HIV replication occurs in activated T cells. Utilizing transient expression assays, the authors show that gene expression directed by the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) increases in response to T-cell activation signals. The effects of T-cell activation and of the HIV-encoded trans-activator (TAT) are multiplicative. Analysis of mutations and deletions in the HIV LTR reveals that the region responding to T-cell activation signals is located at positions -105 to -80. These sequences are composed of two direct repeats, which are homologous to the core transcriptional enhancer elements in the simian virus 40 genome. The studies reveal that these elements function as the HIV enhancer. By acting directly on the HIV LTR, T-cell activation may play an important role in HIV gene expression and in the activation of latent HIV.

Tong-Starksen, S.E.; Luciw, P.A.; Peterlin, B.M.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stromal cells differentiate into hepatic-like cells and form functional three-dimensional structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background aims Previously, we have shown that human decidua-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (DMSC) are mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) with a clonal differentiation capacity for the three embryonic layers. The endodermal capacity of DMSC was revealed by differentiation into pulmonary cells. In this study, we examined the hepatic differentiation of DMSC. Methods DMSC were cultured in hepatic differentiation media or co-cultured with murine liver homogenate and analyzed with phenotypic, molecular and functional tests. Results and Conclusions DMSC in hepatic differentiation media changed their fibroblast morphology to a hepatocyte-like morphology and later formed a 3-dimensional (3-D) structure or hepatosphere. Moreover, the hepatocyte-like cells and the hepatospheres expressed liver-specific markers such as synthesis of albumin (ALB), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), ?-fetoprotein (AFP) and cytokeratin-18 (CK-18), and exhibited hepatic functions including glycogen storage capacity and indocyanine green (ICG) uptake/secretion. Human DMSC co-cultured with murine liver tissue homogenate in a non-contact in vitro system showed hepatic differentiation, as evidenced by expression of AFP and ALB genes. The switch in the expression of these two genes resembled liver development. Indeed, the decrease in AFP and increase in ALB expression throughout the co-culture were consistent with the expression pattern observed during normal liver organogenesis in the embryo. Interestingly, AFP and ALB expression was significantly higher when DMSC were co-cultured with injured liver tissue, indicating that DMSC respond differently under normal and pathologic micro-environmental conditions. In conclusion, DMSC-derived hepatospheres and DMSC co-cultured with liver homogenate could be suitable in vitro models for toxicologic, developmental and pre-clinical hepatic regeneration studies.

Rafael Bornstein; Maria I. Macias; Paz de la Torre; Jesus Grande; Ana I. Flores

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cytotoxicity of Human Endogenous Retrovirus K Specific T Cells Toward Autologous Ovarian Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bio-Organic Chemistry Laboratory, SRI International, Menlo Park, California [M. I...8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl) ethenyl]benzoic acid; SRi 1238, 2-(3,4-dihydro-4...squamous HBE cells with the retinoid SRI 1238, which inhibited AP-I without...

Kiera Rycaj; Joshua B. Plummer; Bingnan Yin; Ming Li; Jeremy Garza; Laszlo G. Radvanyi; Lois M Ramondetta; Kevin Lin; Gary L. Johanning; Dean G Tang; and Feng Wang-Johanning

132

Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NF?B Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 ?g/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NF?B inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

Mazière, Cécile, E-mail: maziere.cecile@chu-amiens.fr [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France)] [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France); Salle, Valéry [Internal Medicine, North Hospital University, Place Victor Pauchet, Amiens 80000 (France) [Internal Medicine, North Hospital University, Place Victor Pauchet, Amiens 80000 (France); INSERM U1088 (EA 4292), SFR CAP-Santé (FED 4231), University of Picardie – Jules Verne (France); Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France)] [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France)

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

133

Human skin pigmentation, migration and disease susceptibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dixon, K. M. , Sequeira, V. B., Camp, A. J., Mason, R. S. 2010 Vitamin...and pollution levels in 18th and 19th century Birmingham, England. Am. J. Phys...2007 Malignant melanoma in the 21st century. I. Epidemiology, risk factors, screening...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mechanisms of hormonal regulation of CAD gene expression and inhibition by Aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist in human breast cancer cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CAD gene is trifunctional and expresses carbamoylphosphate synthetase/aspartate carbamyltransferase/dihydroorotase, which are required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. CAD gene activities are induced in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and treatment...

Khan, Shaheen Munawar Ali

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Functional expression of P-glycoprotein in primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts and BeWo cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to investigate the functional expression of the efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), in primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts and BeWo cell monolayers. Uptake studies with primary ...

Utoguchi, Naoki; Chandorkar, Gurudatt A.; Avery, Michael; Audus, Kenneth L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Abstract 2043: Modeling the differential responses of cancer stem cells (CSCs) as heterogeneous versus homogenous populations in human cancers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Biomodels, LLC, Watertown, MA. Emerging data suggests that many human cancers including breast, brain, lung, colon, pancreatic and head and neck cancer are maintained by a subpopulation of self-renewing cells characterized as cancer stem...

Maria L. Mancini

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Comparative Study on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Patent Law in the United States, the European Patent Organization, and China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the recent developments in biotechnology, associated patent law issues have been a growing concern since the 1980s. Among all the subcategories within the general field of biotechnology, human embryonic stem cell ...

Zhu, Huan

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Antitumor Activity of Ethanol Extract from Hippophae Rhamnoides L. Leaves towards Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells In Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the effects of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves on the growth and differentiation of human acute myeloid leukemia cells (KG-1a, HL60, and U937). The extract of Hippophae rhamnoides L...

G. T. Zhamanbaeva; M. K. Murzakhmetova…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Multifactorial T-cell Hypofunction That Is Reversible Can Limit the Efficacy of Chimeric Antigen Receptor–Transduced Human T cells in Solid Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) targeting tumor-associated...Design: Human T cells expressing CAR targeting mesothelin or fibroblast...Monu N, Ayala A Frey AB.Defective proximal TCR signaling inhibits...57. Chmielewski M Abken H.CAR T cells transform to trucks...

Edmund K. Moon; Liang-Chuan Wang; Douglas V. Dolfi; Caleph B. Wilson; Raghuveer Ranganathan; Jing Sun; Veena Kapoor; John Scholler; Ellen Puré; Michael C. Milone; Carl H. June; James L. Riley; E. John Wherry; and Steven M. Albelda

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Studies on Shiga toxin type 1 mediated tumor necrosis factor synthesis in a human monocytic cell line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDIES ON SHIGA TOXIN TYPE 1 MEDIATED TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR SYNTHESIS IN A HUMAN MONOCYTIC CELL LINE A Thesis by RAMESH SAKIRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AII M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1997 Major Subject: Biology STUDIES ON SHIGA TOXIN TYPE 1 MEDIATED TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR SYNTHESIS IN A HUMAN MONOCYTIC CELL LINE A Thesis by RAMESH SAKIRI Submitted to Texas A8M University in partial...

Sakiri, Ramesh

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Raddeanin A induces human gastric cancer cells apoptosis and inhibits their invasion in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Raddeanin A is a triterpenoid saponin in herb medicine Anemone raddeana Regel. •Raddeanin A can inhibit 3 kinds of gastric cancer cells’ proliferation and invasion. •Caspase-cascades’ activation indicates apoptosis induced by Raddeanin A. •MMPs, RECK, Rhoc and E-cad are involved in Raddeanin A-induced invasion inhibition. -- Abstract: Raddeanin A is one of the triterpenoid saponins in herbal medicine Anemone raddeana Regel which was reported to suppress the growth of liver and lung cancer cells. However, little was known about its effect on gastric cancer (GC) cells. This study aimed to investigate its inhibitory effect on three kinds of different differentiation stage GC cells (BGC-823, SGC-7901 and MKN-28) in vitro and the possible mechanisms. Proliferation assay and flow cytometry demonstrated Raddeanin A’s dose-dependent inhibitory effect and determined its induction of cells apoptosis, respectively. Transwell assay, wounding heal assay and cell matrix adhesion assay showed that Raddeanin A significantly inhibited the abilities of the invasion, migration and adhesion of the BGC-823 cells. Moreover, quantitative real time PCR and Western blot analysis found that Raddeanin A increased Bax expression while reduced Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Survivin expressions and significantly activated caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Besides, Raddeanin A could also up-regulate the expression of reversion inducing cysteine rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK), E-cadherin (E-cad) and down-regulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, MMP-14 and Rhoc. In conclusion, Raddeanin A inhibits proliferation of human GC cells, induces their apoptosis and inhibits the abilities of invasion, migration and adhesion, exhibiting potential to become antitumor drug.

Xue, Gang [Department of Oncology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)] [Department of Oncology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Zou, Xi [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)] [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Zhou, Jin-Yong [Laboratory Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)] [Laboratory Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Sun, Wei [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)] [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Wu, Jian [Laboratory Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)] [Laboratory Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Xu, Jia-Li [Department of Oncology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)] [Department of Oncology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China); Wang, Rui-Ping, E-mail: ruipingwang61@hotmail.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)] [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Glutathione level regulates HNE-induced genotoxicity in human erythroleukemia cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of the most abundant and toxic lipid aldehydes formed during lipid peroxidation by reactive oxygen species. We have investigated the genotoxic effects of HNE and its regulation by cellular glutathione (GSH) levels in human erythroleukemia (K562) cells. Incubation of K562 cells with HNE (5-10 {mu}M) significantly elicited a 3- to 5-fold increased DNA damage in a time- and dose-dependent manner as measured by comet assay. Depletion of GSH in cells by L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) significantly increased HNE-induced DNA damage, whereas supplementation of GSH by incubating the cells with GSH-ethyl ester significantly decreased HNE-induced genotoxicity. Further, overexpression of mGSTA4-4, a HNE-detoxifying GST isozyme, significantly prevented HNE-induced DNA damage in cells, and ablation of GSTA4-4 and aldose reductase with respective siRNAs further augmented HNE-induced DNA damage. These results suggest that the genotoxicity of HNE is highly dependent on cellular GSH/GST/AR levels and favorable modulation of the aldehyde detoxification system may help in controlling the oxidative stress-induced complications.

Yadav, Umesh C.S.; Ramana, Kota V.; Awasthi, Yogesh C. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555-0647 (United States); Srivastava, Satish K. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555-0647 (United States)], E-mail: ssrivast@utmb.edu

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Toxic effects of low doses of Bisphenol-A on human placental cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humans are exposed daily to a great number of xenobiotics and their metabolites present as pollutants. Bisphenol-A (BPA) is extensively used in a broad range of products including baby bottles, food-storage containers, medical equipment, and consumer electronics. Thus, BPA is the most common monomer for polycarbonates intended for food contact. Levels of this industrial product are found in maternal blood, amniotic fluid, follicular fluid, placental tissue, umbilical cord blood, and maternal urine. In this study, we investigated toxic effects of BPA concentrations close to levels found in serum of pregnant women on human cytotrophoblasts (CTB). These cells were isolated from fresh placentas and exposed to BPA for 24 h. Our results showed that very low doses of BPA induce apoptosis (2 to 3 times) as assessed using M30 antibody immunofluorescent detection, and necrosis (1.3 to 1.7 times) as assessed through the cytosolic Adenylate Kinase (AK) activity after cell membrane damage. We also showed that BPA increased significantly the tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene expression and protein excretion as measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA luminescent test, respectively. Moreover, we observed that induction of AK activation and TNF-alpha gene expression require lower levels of BPA than apoptosis or TNF-alpha protein excretion. Our findings suggest that exposure of placental cells to low doses of BPA may cause detrimental effects, leading in vivo to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, prematurity and pregnancy loss.

Benachour, Nora [Laboratory of Research in Reproductive and Gestational Health, Quebec (Canada); Aris, Aziz, E-mail: aziz.aris@usherbrooke.c [Laboratory of Research in Reproductive and Gestational Health, Quebec (Canada); Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, University of Sherbrooke Hospital Centre, Quebec (Canada)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Final Report: Latent Expression of Genetic Damage in Human Lung Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was aimed at furthering understanding of the latent effects of ionizing radiation. The underlying premise was that such latent (i.e., delayed) effects stemmed from radiation-induced genetic instability. As model system to investigate certain aspects of genomic instability, they proposed to look at chromosomal instability involving quasi-targeted radiation-induced breakpoints in the vicinity of the HPRT gene in EJ30 human epithelial cells. Using whole chromosome painting of the X chromosome, the authors were able to show that about 15% of randomly selected 6-thioguanine resistant (6TG{prime}) mutants involved translocations in the terminal portion of Xq. Subsequent analysis, using human genomic YAC probes confirmed that all the translocations were either within (or near Xq26.1), the cytogenetic location of HPRT, whereas none were found elsewhere involving the X chromosome.

Cornforth, Michael N.

1999-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

The significance of the host inflammatory response on the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapies utilising human adult stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlling the fate of implanted hMSCs is one of the major drawbacks to be overcome to realize tissue engineering strategies. In particular, the effect of the inflammatory environment on hMSCs behaviour is poorly understood. Studying and mimicking the inflammatory process in vitro is a very complex and challenging task that involves multiple variables. This research addressed the questions using in vitro co-cultures of primary derived hMSCs together with human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs); the latter are key agents in the inflammatory process. This work explored the in vitro phenotypic changes of hMSCs in co-culture direct contact with monocytes and lymphocytes isolated from blood using both basal and osteogenic medium. Our findings indicated that hMSCs maintained their undifferentiated phenotype and pluripotency despite the contact with PBMCs. Moreover, hMSCs demonstrated increased proliferation and were able to differentiate specifically down the osteogenic lineage pathway. Providing significant crucial evidence to support the hypothesis that inflammation and host defence mechanisms could be utilised rather than avoided and combated to provide for the successful therapeutic application of stem cell therapies.

Navarro, Melba, E-mail: mnavarro@ibecbarcelona.eu [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom) [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom); Biomaterials for Regenerative Therapies Group, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona, 08028 (Spain); Pu, Fanrong; Hunt, John A. [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom)] [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Disrupting the wall accumulation of human sperm cells by artificial corrugation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamics in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Swimming along walls is beneficial for directing and sorting cells, but may be detrimental if homogeneous populations are desired, such as in counting microchambers. In this work, we characterize the motion of human sperm cells $\\sim$60$\\mu$m long, strongly confined to $\\sim$20$\\mu$m shallow chambers. We investigate the nature of the cell trajectories between the confining surfaces and their accumulation near the borders. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and bottom surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion in between the two surfaces. We show that the introduction of artificial petal-shaped corrugation in the lateral boundaries limits the accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. The steady state limit is achieved over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate based on the assumption that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our predictions also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the corrugated chambers than in the non-corrugated ones, which is another practical reason to prefer the former for microfluidic applications in biomedicine.

H. A. Guidobaldi; Y. Jeyaram; C. A. Condat; M. Oviedo; I. Berdakin; V. V. Moshchalkov; L. C. Giojalas; A. V. Silhanek; V. I. Marconi

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

HSV-sr39TK Positron Emission Tomography and Suicide Gene Elimination of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Their Progeny in Humanized Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reversible engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells. Engineering immunity against cancer by the adoptive transfer of hematopoietic...296:2410-3. 4. Wirth T , Parker N Yla-Herttuala S.History of gene therapy.Gene 2013;525:162-9. 5. Morgan RA...

Eric H. Gschweng; Melissa N. McCracken; Michael L. Kaufman; Michelle Ho; Roger P. Hollis; Xiaoyan Wang; Navdeep Saini; Richard C. Koya; Thinle Chodon; Antoni Ribas; Owen N. Witte; and Donald B. Kohn

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Development and Investigation of Synthetic Skin Simulant Platform (3SP) in Friction Blister Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant opportunity to take a similar approach of applying an engineering viewpoint to repeatably model the onset and formation of blisters on human skin. The authors have developed the Synthetic Skin Simulant Platform (3SP) to fulfill this role. The 3SP...

Guerra, Carlos

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Alzheimer's disease skin fibroblasts selectively express a bradykinin signaling pathway mediating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is generated under conditions known as risk factors for AD, including stroke and traumatic head injury. BK B2 increases I/L B2 BK receptors in AD skin fibroblasts In established human fetal lung fibroblast models of protein kinase C (PKC). We now show that skin fibro- blasts of patients with AD developing around age 35

Steinbach, Joe Henry

150

Viability of adult rat skin following 13 Mev proton irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

then removed from suspension by centrifugation and washed twice in Smith's chick heart growth media. 33 All cells removed from the biopsy by this enzyme dissection were placed in culture to check viability. Two Rose chambers con- taining the first scraping... Dissipation . Diagram ? Proton Energy Dissipation 17 17 Cell Suspension Filter Tube. Exploded View of Rose Chamber 24 Rat 822, Gross Appearance 37 SB. Rat 822, Skin Section. 38 Rat 771, Gross Appearance 37 Rat 771, Skin Section. 38 7A. 7B. Rat 835...

Caraway, Bobby Lamar

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Expression of recombinant human mast cell chymase with Asn-linked glycans in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recombinant human mast cell chymase (rhChymase) was expressed in secreted form as an active enzyme in the SuperMan5 strain of GlycoSwitch® Pichia pastoris, which is engineered to produce proteins with (Man)5(GlcNAc)2 Asn-linked glycans. Cation exchange and heparin affinity chromatography yielded 5 mg of active rhChymase per liter of fermentation medium. Purified rhChymase migrated on SDS–PAGE as a single band of 30 kDa and treatment with peptide N-glycosidase F decreased this to 25 kDa, consistent with the established properties of native human chymase (hChymase). Polyclonal antibodies against hChymase detected rhChymase by Western blot. Active site titration with Eglin C, a potent chymase inhibitor, quantified the concentration of purified active enzyme. Kinetic analyses with succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe (suc-AAPF) p-nitroanilide and thiobenzyl ester synthetic substrates showed that heparin significantly reduced KM, whereas heparin effects on kcat were minor. Pure rhChymase with Asn-linked glycans closely resembles hChymase. This bioengineering approach avoided hyperglycosylation and provides a source of active rhChymase for other studies as well as a foundation for production of recombinant enzyme with human glycosylation patterns.

Eliot T. Smith; Evan T. Perry; Megan B. Sears; David A. Johnson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Neutron skins and neutron stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

Identification of human metapneumovirus-induced gene networks in airway epithelial cells by microarray analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. Little is known about the response to hMPV infection of airway epithelial cells, which play a pivotal role in initiating and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional profiles of airway epithelial cells infected with hMPV using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Of the 47,400 transcripts and variants represented on the Affimetrix GeneChip Human Genome HG-U133 plus 2 array, 1601 genes were significantly altered following hMPV infection. Altered genes were then assigned to functional categories and mapped to signaling pathways. Many up-regulated genes are involved in the initiation of pro-inflammatory and antiviral immune responses, including chemokines, cytokines, type I interferon and interferon-inducible proteins. Other important functional classes up-regulated by hMPV infection include cellular signaling, gene transcription and apoptosis. Notably, genes associated with antioxidant and membrane transport activity, several metabolic pathways and cell proliferation were down-regulated in response to hMPV infection. Real-time PCR and Western blot assays were used to confirm the expression of genes related to several of these functional groups. The overall result of this study provides novel information on host gene expression upon infection with hMPV and also serves as a foundation for future investigations of genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of this important viral infection. Furthermore, it can facilitate a comparative analysis of other paramyxoviral infections to determine the transcriptional changes that are conserved versus the one that are specific to individual pathogens.

Bao, X. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Sinha, M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)]|[UTMB Bioinformatics Program, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Liu, T.; Hong, C. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Luxon, B.A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)]|[UTMB Bioinformatics Program, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Garofalo, R.P. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)]|[Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)]|[Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Casola, A. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)]|[Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)]|[Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)], E-mail: ancasola@utmb.edu

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Novel Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein, gpUS9, Which Promotes Cell-to-Cell Spread in Polarized Epithelial Cells, Colocalizes with the Cytoskeletal Proteins E-Cadherin and F-Actin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solubility. Immunofluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy...of human fibroblasts (HF) in culture (reviewed...ARPE-19) cells by fusion of the virion envelope...Immunofluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy...cultures of nonpolarized HF (, , ). Since a substantial...

Ekaterina Maidji; Sharof Tugizov; Gerardo Abenes; Thomas Jones; Lenore Pereira

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ? We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ? SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ? SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ? 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT–SSX, and more than half of SYT–SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT–SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue.

Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

32 July/August2010 PublishedbytheIEEEComputerSociety 0272-1716/10/$26.002010IEEE DigitalHumanFaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- able in skin than in, say, a wax candle. Correctly depicting human skin is important in fields that it integrates well with existing pipelines. Several real-time algorithms for simulating skin exist (for more

Gutierrez, Diego

157

ARM - Measurement - Surface skin temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin temperature skin temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface skin temperature The radiative surface skin temperature, from an IR thermometer measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface in its field of view. Categories Radiometric, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments IRT : Infrared Thermometer MFRIRT : Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer External Instruments

158

Emerging Nanomedicine for Skin Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Skin cancer is a common cancer and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Topical treatment is an attractive option compared with systemic route due to the reduced association with systemic to...

Puiyan Lee; Adnan Nasir; Kenneth K. Y. Wong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mesh Resolution Augmentation using 3D Skin Bank Won-Sook Lee*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a 100-micron resolution scan of plaster cast molds of the actors' faces. Human skin was modeled using, as shown in Figure 1. Each individual is presented with closed eyes and mouth due to the use of plaster

Lee, WonSook

160

Sensitive skins and somatic processing for affective and sociable robots based upon a somatic alphabet approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sense of touch is one of the most important senses of the human body. This thesis describes the biologically inspired design of "sensitive skins" for two different robotic platforms: Leonardo, a high degree-of-freedom, ...

Stiehl, Walter Daniel, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Structure-activity relationship of antioxidants for inhibitors of linoleic acid hydroperoxide-induced toxicity in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structure-activity relationship of antioxidants for the protective effects on linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LOOH)-induced toxicity were examined in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ?-Tocopherol,...

Takao Kaneko; Naomichi Baba; Mitsuyoshi Matsuo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Detecting pornographic images by localizing skin Sotiris Karavarsamisa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" / "porn" and "skin" / "non-skin", respectively. The extracted

Blekas, Konstantinos

163

Action Spectra for Human Skin Cells: Estimates of the Relative Cytotoxicity of the Middle Ultraviolet, Near Ultraviolet, and Violet Regions of Sunlight on Epidermal Keratinocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Spectroradiometric Measurements of Sunlight. The solar irradiance measurements were made...the epidermis, and the incident solar energy (under given conditions) at each...currently available for calculating solar irra diano: at given geographical...

Rex M. Tyrrell and Mireille Pidoux

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Stimulation of Cell Proliferation and Estrogenic Response by Adrenal C19-?5-Steroids in the ZR-75-1 Human Breast Cancer Cell Line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Clinical Investigation (1). Richard Poulin Fernand Labrie 2 MRC Group in Molecular...Human Breast Cancer Cell Line1 Richard Poulin and Fernand Labrie2 MRC Group in Molecular...in breast cancer. 23. 31. 32. 1. Poulin, R., and Labrie, F. Stimulation of...

Richard Poulin and Fernand Labrie

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Effects of oxysterols on cell viability, inflammatory cytokines, VEGF and reactive oxygen species production on human retinal cells: cytoprotective effects and prevention of VEGF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production on human retinal cells: cytoprotective effects and prevention of VEGF secretion by resveratrol B Recherche INSERM 866 (Lipides, Nutrition, Cancer) ­ Equipe Biochimie Métabolique et Nutritionnelle, and IL-8 secretion. 7-OH enhanced VEGF secretion. No cytotoxic effects were identified with 25-OH which

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Phenotypic Characteristics of Cell Lines Derived from Disseminated Cancer Cells in Bone Marrow of Patients with Solid Epithelial Tumors: Establishment of Working Models for Human Micrometastases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...serum deprivation. Exp. Cell Res., 224: 208-213, 1996. 59 Van der Velde-Zimmermann D., Verdaasdonk M. A., Rademakers L. H., De Weger R. A., Van den Tweel J. G., Jogling P. Fibronectin distribution in human bone marrow stroma: matrix...

Elmar Putz; Klaus Witter; Sonja Offner; Peter Stosiek; Alfred Zippelius; Judith Johnson; Robert Zahn; Gert Riethmüller; Klaus Pantel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

An Automated Method to Quantify Radiation Damage in Human Blood Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is a well established method to assess the absorbed dose in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. Because mature lymphocytes circulate throughout the body, the dose to these cells is believed to represent the average whole body exposure. Cytogenetic methods measure the incidence of structural aberrations in chromosomes as a means to quantify DNA damage which occurs when ionizing radiation interacts with human tissue. Methods to quantify DNA damage at the chromosomal level vary in complexity and tend to be laborious and time consuming. In a mass casualty scenario involving radiological/nuclear materials, the ability to rapidly triage individuals according to radiation dose is critically important. For high-throughput screening for dicentric chromosomes, many of the data collection steps can be optimized with motorized microscopes coupled to automated slide scanning platforms.

Gordon K. Livingston, Mark S. Jenkins and Akio A. Awa

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

Carrier-mediated transport of valproic acid in BeWo cells, a human trophoblast cell line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The biochemical mechanisms mediating the rapid distribution of valproic acid across placenta are not precisely known. We have characterized valproic acid transport by the human trophoblast using the human choriocarcinoma ...

Utoguchi, Naoki; Audus, Kenneth L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE Melanoma The Most Lethal Form advances in nanotechnology to increase our understanding of melanoma and to develop new tools into controllable cells or target them for destruction. Investigators also are using nanotechnology to understand

Engman, David M.

170

Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on this data, GH could be a new therapeutic target in melanoma.

Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States) [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States)] [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

Galectin-9 accelerates transforming growth factor ?3-induced differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Galectin-9 (Gal-9), a ?-galactoside binding lectin, plays a crucial role in innate and adaptive immunity. In the rat collagen-induced arthritis model, administration of Gal-9 induced repair of existing cartilage injury even when joints were already swollen with cartilage destruction. We thus attempted to explore the role of Gal-9 in chondrocyte differentiation utilizing human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pellet cultures. During chondrogenesis induced by transforming growth factor ?3 (TGF?3), \\{MSCs\\} strongly expressed endogenous Gal-9. Expression of Gal-9 peaked on day 14 and the neutralization of endogenous Gal-9 resulted in the reduced chondrogenesis, indicating possible involvement of Gal-9 in TGF?-mediated chondrogenesis. In pellets, addition of Gal-9 significantly enhanced TGF?3-induced chondrogenesis, as evidenced by increasing proteoglycan content, but not cell proliferation. In the absence of Gal-9, collagen expression by \\{MSCs\\} switched from type I to type II on 28 days after stimulation with TGF?3. When \\{MSCs\\} were co-stimulated with Gal-9, the class switch occurred on day 21. In addition, Gal-9 synergistically enhanced TGF?3-induced phosphorylation of Smad2, though Gal-9 did not itself induce detectable Smad2 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Gal-9 has a beneficial effect on cartilage repair in injured joints by induction of differentiation of \\{MSCs\\} into chondrocytes.

Tomohiro Arikawa; Akihiro Matsukawa; Kota Watanabe; Ken-mei Sakata; Masako Seki; Megumi Nagayama; Keisuke Takeshita; Kanako Ito; Toshiro Niki; Souichi Oomizu; Rika Shinonaga; Naoki Saita; Mitsuomi Hirashima

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan) [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)] [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)] [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan) [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human dermis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 Developing a predictive model of human skin colouring Symon D'Oyly Cotton Summary: Developing a predictive model of human skin colouring Symon D'Oyly Cotton Ela...

174

Human Enhancer of Filamentation 1 Is a Mediator of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1?–Mediated Migration in Colorectal Carcinoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...37C. Cells were exposed to hypoxia by placing them in a mixed gas incubator that was infused with an atmosphere consisting of 94...ischemia. Stroke 2005;36:2457-62. 13 Martin-Rendon E , Hale SJ, Ryan D, et al. Transcriptional profiling of human cord...

Sun-Hee Kim; Dianren Xia; Sang-Wook Kim; Vijaykumar Holla; David G. Menter; and Raymond N. DuBois

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Activation of Proteinase-Activated Receptor 1 Promotes Human Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation Through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...antibody for 1 hour at room temperature before detection using chemiluminescence...ectodomain shedding in mammalian development. Science 1998;282:1281-4...cells and its inhibition by snake venom peptides, trigramin...crucial contributors to the development of human colon cancer. We...

Dalila Darmoul; Valérie Gratio; Hélène Devaud; Franck Peiretti; and Marc Laburthe

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Abstract A20: Deacetylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 with ethanol in human colonic epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Modulation of PPARalpha and PPARbeta by ethanol in human breast cancer cell lines Nagaraj...14-18, 2007; Los Angeles, CA 3464 Ethanol consumption is associated with an increased...mechanisms involved are still unclear. Ethanol modulates isoforms of the peroxisome proliferator-activated...

Hyeran Jang; Mary Moyer; Sang-Woon Choi

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial and medical applications raises the urgent need for tools that can predict NP toxicity. Global transcriptome and proteome analyses were conducted on three human cell types, exposed to two high aspect ratio NP types, to identify patterns of expression that might indicate high versus low NP toxicity. Three cell types representing the most common routes of human exposure to NPs, including macrophage-like (THP-1), small airway epithelial and intestinal (Caco-2/HT29-MTX) cells, were exposed to TiO2 nanobelts (TiO2-NB; high toxicity) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT; low toxicity) at low (10 µg/mL) and high (100 µg/mL) concentrations for 1 and 24 h. Unique patterns of gene and protein expressions were identified for each cell type, with no differentially expressed (p < 0.05, 1.5-fold change) genes or proteins overlapping across all three cell types. While unique to each cell type, the early response was primarily independent of NP type, showing similar expression patterns in response to both TiO2-NB and MWCNT. The early response might, therefore, indicate a general response to insult. In contrast, the 24 h response was unique to each NP type. The most significantly (p < 0.05) enriched biological processes in THP-1 cells indicated TiO2-NB regulation of pathways associated with inflammation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA replication stress and genomic instability, while MWCNT-regulated pathways indicated increased cell proliferation, DNA repair and anti-apoptosis. These two distinct sets of biological pathways might, therefore, underlie cellular responses to high and low NP toxicity, respectively.

Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Tolic, Ana; Xie, Yumei; Lai, Xianyin; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Waters, Katrina M.; Holian, Andrij; Witzmann, Frank A.; Orr, Galya

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Asperlin induces G{sub 2}/M arrest through ROS generation and ATM pathway in human cervical carcinoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} A new anti-cancer effect of an antibiotics, asperlin, is exploited. {yields} Asperlin induced human cervical cancer cell apoptosis through ROS generation. {yields} Asperlin activated DNA-damage related ATM protein and cell cycle associated proteins. {yields} Asperlin could be developed as a new anti-cancer therapeutics. -- Abstract: We exploited the biological activity of an antibiotic agent asperlin isolated from Aspergillus nidulans against human cervical carcinoma cells. We found that asperlin dramatically increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation accompanied by a significant reduction in cell proliferation. Cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and reduction of Bcl-2 could also be detected after asperlin treatment to the cells. An anti-oxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), however, blocked all the apoptotic effects of asperlin. The involvement of oxidative stress in asperlin induced apoptosis could be supported by the findings that ROS- and DNA damage-associated G2/M phase arrest and ATM phosphorylation were increased by asperlin. In addition, expression and phosphorylation of cell cycle proteins as well as G2/M phase arrest in response to asperlin were significantly blocked by NAC or an ATM inhibitor KU-55933 pretreatment. Collectively, our study proved for the first time that asperlin could be developed as a potential anti-cancer therapeutics through ROS generation in HeLa cells.

He, Long; Nan, Mei-Hua [Chemical Biology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 30 Yeongudanji-ro, Ochang-eup, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-883 (Korea, Republic of)] [Chemical Biology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 30 Yeongudanji-ro, Ochang-eup, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-883 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Hyun Cheol [College of Medical and Life Sciences, Silla University, 100 Silladaehak-gil, Sasang-gu, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of)] [College of Medical and Life Sciences, Silla University, 100 Silladaehak-gil, Sasang-gu, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ho [College of Pharmacy, ChungNam National University, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)] [College of Pharmacy, ChungNam National University, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jae Hyuk [Chemical Biology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 30 Yeongudanji-ro, Ochang-eup, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-883 (Korea, Republic of)] [Chemical Biology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 30 Yeongudanji-ro, Ochang-eup, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-883 (Korea, Republic of); Erikson, Raymond Leo [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ahn, Jong Seog, E-mail: jsahn@kribb.re.kr [Chemical Biology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 30 Yeongudanji-ro, Ochang-eup, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-883 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Yeon, E-mail: bykim@kribb.re.kr [Chemical Biology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 30 Yeongudanji-ro, Ochang-eup, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-883 (Korea, Republic of); World Class Institute, KRIBB, 30 Yeongudanji-ro, Ochang-eup, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-883 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Identification of Envelope Determinants of Feline Leukemia Virus Subgroup B That Permit Infection and Gene Transfer to Cells Expressing Human Pit1 or Pit2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...M. Eiden, C. C. Burns, and J. Overbaugh...cells using either human Pit receptor, may be useful...Boomer M. Eiden C. C. Burns J. Overbaugh Three distinct...M. Eiden, C. C. Burns, and J. Overbaugh...cells using either human Pit receptor, may be useful...

James Sugai; Maribeth Eiden; Maria M. Anderson; Neal Van Hoeven; Christopher D. Meiering; Julie Overbaugh

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Neutron skins and neutron stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: The neutron skin of a heavy nucleus as well as many neutron-star properties are highly sensitive to the poorly constrained density dependence of the symmetry energy.Purpose: To provide for the first time meaningful theoretical errors and to assess the degree of correlation between the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb and several neutron-star properties.Methods: A proper covariance analysis based on the predictions of an accurately calibrated relativistic functional “FSUGold” is used to quantify theoretical errors and correlation coefficients.Results: We find correlation coefficients of nearly 1 (or ?1) between the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb and a host of observables of relevance to the structure, dynamics, and composition of neutron stars.Conclusions: We suggest that a follow-up Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) measurement, ideally with a 0.5% accuracy, could significantly constrain the equation of state of neutron-star matter.

F. J. Fattoyev and J. Piekarewicz

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

"Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Skin Cancer- What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf May 20, 2010 #12;Supporters for the Deaf ("REAP") #12;Overview Skin Overview What is skin cancer? Who is at risk? How common is skin cancer? Signs of skin cancer Prevention Treatments #12;Skin Overview Skin is the largest organ in your body

Goldman, Steven A.

182

Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is national interest in the development of sophisticated materials that can automatically detect and respond to chemical and biological threats without the need for human intervention. In living systems, cell membranes perform such functions on a routine basis, detecting threats, communicating with the cell, and triggering automatic responses such as the opening and closing of ion channels. The purpose of this project was to learn how to replicate simple threat detection and response functions within artificial membrane systems. The original goals toward developing 'smart skin' assemblies included: (1) synthesizing functionalized nanoparticles to produce electrochemically responsive systems within a lipid bilayer host matrices, (2) calculating the energetics of nanoparticle-lipid interactions and pore formation, and (3) determining the mechanism of insertion of nanoparticles in lipid bilayers via imaging and electrochemistry. There are a few reports of the use of programmable materials to open and close pores in rigid hosts such as mesoporous materials using either heat or light activation. However, none of these materials can regulate themselves in response to the detection of threats. The strategies we investigated in this project involve learning how to use programmable nanomaterials to automatically eliminate open channels within a lipid bilayer host when 'threats' are detected. We generated and characterized functionalized nanoparticles that can be used to create synthetic pores through the membrane and investigated methods of eliminating the pores either through electrochemistry, change in pH, etc. We also focused on characterizing the behavior of functionalized gold NPs in different lipid membranes and lipid vesicles and coupled these results to modeling efforts designed to gain an understanding of the interaction of nanoparticles within lipid assemblies.

Montano, Gabriel A.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Allen, Amy; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Wheeler, David Roger

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted {alpha}1 helix resulting in an open A pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-{angstrom} displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d-LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint on CD1d-LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3{alpha} loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3{beta} and J{beta} segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells.

López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V.; Kung, Jennifer E.; Gumperz, Jenny; Adams, Erin J. (UC); (UW-MED)

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

184

Help:Skins | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skins Skins Jump to: navigation, search Clicking on the my preferences link in the upper right while logged in then click on the Skin button to change your skin. You can also preview the skin by clicking the (preview) links next to each skin. You can make changes to the current skin's stylesheet file (CSS) by creating a subpage of your userpage, "User:Yourname/monobook.css" for example. This requires your site admin to have enabled this feature -- if it is, you will see advice text at the top of your custom CSS page about clearing your browser's cache. Tools.png Tip for wiki admins: To enable this feature, you have to set $wgAllowUserCss to your LocalSettings.php. See also Help:Preferences Manual:Gallery of user styles (no official skins) Retrieved from

185

Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radiation-induced ICAM-1 Expression via TGF-?1 Pathway on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells; Comparison between X-ray and Carbon-ion Beam Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......expression in cells irradiated with car- bon-ion beam and the same...HUVE cells at 48 hours after car- bon beam irradiation. ICAM-1...human lymphoblasts and mice are defective in radiation- induced apoptosis...endothelial growth factor in lung car- cinoma cells. Int J Radiat......

Hiroki Kiyohara; Yasuki Ishizaki; Yoshiyuki Suzuki; Hiroyuki Katoh; Nobuyuki Hamada; Tatsuya Ohno; Takeo Takahashi; Yasuhiko Kobayashi; Takashi Nakano

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication in Human Cells by Debio-025, a Novel Cyclophilin Binding Agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the spleens of CBA/Ca mice. The cell suspensions were put on ice and were irradiated...HIV-1 capsid sequences from the Los Alamos database indicated that 19.74 of strains...Pietro Scalfaro, and Kamel Besseghir are employees of Debiopharm. REFERENCES 1 Aberham...

Roger G. Ptak; Philippe A. Gallay; Dirk Jochmans; Andrew P. Halestrap; Urs T. Ruegg; Luke A. Pallansch; Michael D. Bobardt; Marie-Pierre de Béthune; Johan Neyts; Erik De Clercq; Jean-Maurice Dumont; Pietro Scalfaro; Kamel Besseghir; Roland M. Wenger; Brigitte Rosenwirth

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

Modulation of Growth of a Human Prostatic Cancer Cell Line (PC-3) in Agar Culture by Normal Human Lung Fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fibroblasts; FBS, fetal bovine serum: CFE, colony-forming efficiency; CD, colony...prepared hard-agar base. Scoring for CFE and CD. Growth of PC-3 was defined as...establish a colony of 10 or more cells (CFE) and also as the continued growth of established...

David Kirk; Marika F. Szalay; M. Edward Kaighn

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Effects of Calcium Depletion on Human Cells in Vitro and the Anomalous Behavior of the Human Melanoma Cell Line MM170  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | 0 Ethylene Glycols 0 Nucleosides 50-89-5 Thymidine...biosynthesis Egtazic Acid pharmacology Ethylene Glycols pharmacology Humans Interphase...Freeman, E. A., Hollinger, S., Price, P. J., and Calisher, C. The effect...

Peter G. Parsons; Peter Musk; Patricia D. Goss; and John Leah

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Efficient myogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells by the transduction of engineered MyoD protein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •MyoD was engineered to contain protein transduction domain and endosome-disruptive INF7 peptide. •The engineered MyoD-IT showed efficient nuclear targeting through an endosomal escape by INF7 peptide. •By applying MyoD-IT, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were differentiated into myogenic cells. •hASCs differentiated by applying MyoD-IT fused to myotubes through co-culturing with mouse myoblasts. •Myogenic differentiation using MyoD-IT is a safe method without the concern of altering the genome. -- Abstract: Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) have great potential as cell sources for the treatment of muscle disorders. To provide a safe method for the myogenic differentiation of hASCs, we engineered the MyoD protein, a key transcription factor for myogenesis. The engineered MyoD (MyoD-IT) was designed to contain the TAT protein transduction domain for cell penetration and the membrane-disrupting INF7 peptide, which is an improved version of the HA2 peptide derived from influenza. MyoD-IT showed greatly improved nuclear targeting ability through an efficient endosomal escape induced by the pH-sensitive membrane disruption of the INF7 peptide. By applying MyoD-IT to a culture, hASCs were efficiently differentiated into long spindle-shaped myogenic cells expressing myosin heavy chains. Moreover, these cells differentiated by an application of MyoD-IT fused to myotubes with high efficiency through co-culturing with mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Because internalized proteins can be degraded in cells without altering the genome, the myogenic differentiation of hASCs using MyoD-IT would be a safe and clinically applicable method.

Sung, Min Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of) [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Mun, Ji-Young [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ohsuk [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of) [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ki-Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Doo-Byoung, E-mail: dboh@kribb.re.kr [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of) [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cannabinoid inhibits HIV-1 Tat-stimulated adhesion of human monocyte-like cells to extracellular matrix proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractAims The aim of this study was to assess the effect of select cannabinoids on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transactivating (Tat) protein-enhanced monocyte-like cell adhesion to proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Main methods Collagen IV, laminin, or an ECM gel was used to construct extracellular matrix layers. Human U937 monocyte-like cells were exposed to Tat in the presence of ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CP55,940, and other select cannabinoids. Cell attachment to ECM proteins was assessed using an adhesion assay. Key findings THC and CP55,940 inhibited Tat-enhanced attachment of U937 cells to ECM proteins in a mode that was linked to the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R). The cannabinoid treatment of Tat-activated U937 cells was associated with altered ?1-integrin expression and distribution of polymerized actin, suggesting a modality by which these cannabinoids inhibited adhesion to the ECM. Significance The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex structure that is composed of cellular elements and an extracellular matrix (ECM). HIV-1 Tat promotes transmigration of monocytes across this barrier, a process that includes interaction with ECM proteins. The results indicate that cannabinoids that activate the CB2R inhibit the ECM adhesion process. Thus, this receptor has potential to serve as a therapeutic agent for ablating neuroinflammation associated with HIV-elicited influx of monocytes across the BBB.

Erinn S. Raborn; Melissa Jamerson; Francine Marciano-Cabral; Guy A. Cabral

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Effect of TNF- alpha On The Odontogenic Potential Of Human Dental Stem Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dental  stem  cells  for  craniofacial   tissue  engineering.  Oral  Surgery,  Oral  Medicine,  Oral  Pathology  and  Oral  Radiology,  

Tseng, Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cell-Free Transmission of Human Adenovirus by Passive Mass Transfer in Cell Culture Simulated in a Computer Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...averaged them from 15 in silico simulations (Fig. 8E). As expected...as shown previously for simulations of biological diffusion processes...transcomplementation. The modeling platform established here...effects, which will allow the modeling of cell-cell spreading...

Artur Yakimovich; Heidi Gumpert; Christoph J. Burckhardt; Verena A. Lütschg; Andreas Jurgeit; Ivo F. Sbalzarini; Urs F. Greber

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damagein Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg, Torsten Groesser, Antoine Snijders, Kelly Trego, Ju Han, Do Yup Lee, Bahram Parvin, Trent Northen, Andrew J. Wyrobek, and Priscilla K. Cooper Berkeley Lab SFA P.I.: Gary Karpen Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture

195

Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-?B, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPAR?/?-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, and NF-?B signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ? Chronic As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure to lung epithelial cells resulted in a cancer-like phenotype. ? Mice injected with arsenic transformed (B-As) cells displayed metastatic tumors. ? Microarray profiling revealed changes in mitochondrial metabolism and ROS response. ? p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, PPAR? and NF-?B networks promoted pro-cancer signaling. ? B-As cells represent a lung cancer model to explore As-associated carcinogenesis.

Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)] [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

Ishihara, Seiichiro [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)] [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Haga, Hisashi, E-mail: haga@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)] [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Yasuda, Motoaki [Department of Oral Pathobiological Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, N13-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan)] [Department of Oral Pathobiological Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, N13-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)] [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Nishioka, Takeshi [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, N12-W5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)] [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, N12-W5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Name: Richard Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A student in my anatomy and physiology class asked me, "When it's very cold outside in the winter, why does your skin hurt MORE than usual when you bang your finger or someone slaps you on the arm?" Replies: Wow! This is one outstanding question. Mammals respond to cold weather with the hypothalamus releasing thyrotropin releasing factor. This production increases with the severity of the cold weather and the length of the exposure to cold over a long period of time (at least three to four weeks). The thyroid responds by slowly increasing in size and releases thyroxine at higher quantities. Thyroxine increases the sensitivity of the entire nervous system. As a matter of fact, as you probably know, it increases the metabolism wholesale! within the body. This gets complicated so I'm keeping it simple. So, the bottom line is thyroxine. It just heightens our sensitivity not only to cold but our entire nervous system is enhanced.

198

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

199

Dissecting Biological Dark Matter: Single Cell Genetic Analysis of TM7, a Rare and Uncultivated Microbe from the Human Mouth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a microfluidic device that allows the isolation and genome amplification of individual microbial cells, thereby enabling organism-level genomic analysis of complex microbial ecosystems without the need for culture. This device was used to perform a directed survey of the human subgingival crevice and to isolate bacteria having rod-like morphology. Several isolated microbes had a 16S rRNA sequence that placed them in candidate phylum TM7, which has no cultivated or sequenced members. Genome amplification from individual TM7 cells allowed us to sequence and assemble >1,000 genes, providing insight into the physiology of members of this phylum. This approach enables single-cell genetic analysis of any uncultivated minority member of a microbial community.

Fenner, Marsha W; Marcy, Yann; Ouverney, Cleber; Bik, Elisabeth M.; Losekann, Tina; Ivanova, Natalia; Martin, H. Garcia; Szeto, E.; Platt, Darren; Hugenholtz, Philip; Relman, David A.; Quake, Stephen R.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yi-Chuang [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wei-Chang [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yeou-Lih [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Yu, E-mail: mt037@mail.fy.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A human pluripotent stem cell platform for assessing developmental neural toxicity screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current methods of testing chemicals for developmental neural toxicity include animal testing...in vitro...testing using cultured primary cells or cell lines. Here, we review the current state of neural toxicity ...

Zhonggang Hou; Jue Zhang; Michael P Schwartz; Ron Stewart…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Pathophysiology of human red blood cell probed by quantitative phase microscopy by YongKeun Park.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a strong correlation between the membrane fluctuations and the material properties of living cells. The former, consisting of submicron displacements, can be altered by changing the cells' pathophysiological ...

Park, YongKeun, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Follicular Dendritic Cells in Human Germinal Centres and Lymphomatous Follicles; A Morphological Comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Follicular Dendritic Cells (FDC) are non-lymphoid cells which are able to trap immune-complexes. FDC are exclusively present in germinal centres of lymphoid organs and form a meshwork with their extensions wit...

L. H. P. M. Rademakers; J. P. J. Peters…

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Dark and light zones of germinal centres of the human tonsil: an ultrastructural study with emphasis on heterogeneity of follicular dendritic cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cellular composition of the dark and light zones of germinal centres in human tonsils was quantitatively determined by electron microscopy. In addition to the well known germinal-centre B-cells, we defined...

L. H. P. M. Rademakers

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

JBC/2012/413260 Revision Identification of Biologically Relevant Enhancers in Human Erythroid Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

erythroid cells, a highly specialized cell type evolved to provide adequate amounts of oxygen throughout cells that have evolved to efficiently carry out their primary functions of oxygen transport and Molecular Biology, Center for Comparative Genomics and Bioinformatics, the Pennsylvania State University

Hardison, Ross C.

206

Laminin-dependent and Laminin-independent Adhesion of Human Melanoma Cells to Sulfatides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with the cells (Table 4). The antiserum does not inhibit G361 cell attachment on thrombospondin...inhibits laminin bind ing to the cells and does not inhibit laminin binding to the sulfatide...Sulfatides In: A. Lajtha (ed.), Handbook of Neurochemistry, Vol. 3, pp. 163-177...

David D. Roberts; Ulla M. Wewer; Lance A. Liotta; and Victor Ginsburg

1988-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Interpretation of the modality of touch on an artificial arm covered with an EIT-based sensitive skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During social interaction humans extract important information from tactile stimuli that can improve their understanding of the interaction. The development of a similar capability in a robot will contribute to the future success of intuitive human-robot ... Keywords: LogitBoost, Physical human-robot interaction, artificial sensitive skin, electrical impedance tomography, force and tactile sensing, recognition, sensing and perception, supervised machine learning

David Silvera Tawil; David Rye; Mari Velonaki

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Mouse mammary tumor virus uses mouse but not human transferrin receptor 1 to reach a low pH compartment and infect cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a pH-dependent virus that uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) for entry into cells. Previous studies demonstrated that MMTV could induce pH 5-dependent fusion-from-with of mouse cells. Here we show that the MMTV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion requires both the entry receptor and low pH (pH 5). Although expression of the MMTV envelope and TfR1 was sufficient to mediate low pH-dependent syncytia formation, virus infection required trafficking to a low pH compartment; infection was independent of cathepsin-mediated proteolysis. Human TfR1 did not support virus infection, although envelope-mediated syncytia formation occurred with human cells after pH 5 treatment and this fusion depended on TfR1 expression. However, although the MMTV envelope bound human TfR1, virus was only internalized and trafficked to a low pH compartment in cells expressing mouse TfR1. Thus, while human TfR1 supported cell-cell fusion, because it was not internalized when bound to MMTV, it did not function as an entry receptor. Our data suggest that MMTV uses TfR1 for all steps of entry: cell attachment, induction of the conformational changes in Env required for membrane fusion and internalization to an appropriate acidic compartment.

Wang Enxiu; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ying Qihua [Department of Microbiology and Abramson Family Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, 313BRBII/III, 421 Curie Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Meertens, Laurent; Dragic, Tanya [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Davey, Robert A. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX (United States); Ross, Susan R. [Department of Microbiology and Abramson Family Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, 313BRBII/III, 421 Curie Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: rosss@mail.med.upenn.edu

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

Comparison of the Effects of Carbon Ion and Photon Irradiation on the Angiogenic Response in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy resistance is a commonly encountered problem in cancer treatment. In this regard, stabilization of endothelial cells and release of angiogenic factors by cancer cells contribute to this problem. In this study, we used human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells to compare the effects of carbon ion and X-ray irradiation on the cells' angiogenic response. Methods and Materials: A549 cells were irradiated with biologically equivalent doses for cell survival of either carbon ions (linear energy transfer, 170 keV/{mu}m; energy of 9.8 MeV/u on target) or X-rays and injected with basement membrane matrix into BALB/c nu/nu mice to generate a plug, allowing quantification of angiogenesis by blood vessel enumeration. The expression of angiogenic factors (VEGF, PlGF, SDF-1, and SCF) was assessed at the mRNA and secreted protein levels by using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Signal transduction mediated by stem cell factor (SCF) was assessed by phosphorylation of its receptor c-Kit. For inhibition of SCF/c-Kit signaling, a specific SCF/c-Kit inhibitor (ISCK03) was used. Results: Irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays (6 Gy) but not carbon ions (2 Gy) resulted in a significant increase in blood vessel density (control, 20.71 {+-} 1.55; X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; carbon ion, 16.33 {+-} 1.03; number per microscopic field). Concordantly, irradiation with X-rays but not with carbon ions increased the expression of SCF and subsequently caused phosphorylation of c-Kit in endothelial cells. ISCK03 treatment of A549 cells irradiated with X-rays (6 Gy) resulted in a significant decrease in blood vessel density (X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; X-ray and ISCK03, 4.33 {+-} 0.71; number of microscopic field). These data indicate that irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays but not with carbon ions promotes angiogenesis. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that SCF is an X-ray-induced mediator of angiogenesis in A549 cells, a phenomenon that could not be observed with carbon ion irradiation. Thus, in this model system evaluating angiogenesis, carbon ion irradiation may have a therapeutic advantage. This observation should be confirmed in orthotopic lung tumor models.

Kamlah, Florentine, E-mail: Kamlah@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Haenze, Joerg [Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Arenz, Andrea [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Seay, Ulrike; Hasan, Diya [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Juricko, Janko; Bischoff, Birgit [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Gottschald, Oana R. [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Fournier, Claudia; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Scholz, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Seeger, Werner [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Rose, Frank [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Low-dose responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in single living human cells measured by synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-dose responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in single living human cells measured, and reproductive defects in animals1-6 and humans.7-14 Among this family of pollutants, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

211

Cell-specific expression and pathway analyses reveal alterations in trauma-related human T cell and monocyte pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...distribution in the whole-blood leukocyte fraction from trauma patients and healthy...Samples were sheared by passage through shredder columns (Qiagen), and the eluate was immediately frozen at ?70°C until...positively expressing two T cell markers (CD2 light green and CD3 dark green), two monocyte...

Krzysztof Laudanski; Carol Miller-Graziano; Wenzhong Xiao; Michael N. Mindrinos; Daniel R. Richards; Asit De; Lyle L. Moldawer; Ronald V. Maier; Paul Bankey; Henry V. Baker; Bernard H. Brownstein; J. Perren Cobb; Steve E. Calvano; Ronald W. Davis; Ronald G. Tompkins

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post box-10502, New Delhi-110067 (India)

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

Regulated expression of the MRP8 and MRP14 genes during terminal differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calcium-binding proteins MRP8 and MRP14 are induced during monomyelocytic cell maturation and may mediate the growth arrest in differentiating HL-60 cells. We determined the levels of a protein complex (PC) containing MRP8 and MRP14 and investigated the mechanism by which the genes encoding these proteins are regulated in HL-60 cells treated with the differentiation-inducing agent mycophenolic acid. Elevated levels of the PC were found to directly parallel gains in the steady-state levels of MRP8 and MRP14 mRNA. Transcription studies with the use of nuclear run-on experiments revealed increased transcription initiation at the MRP8 and MRP14 promoters after MPA treatment. 1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}, which induces HL-60 cell differentiation by another mechanism, was also found to increase transcription initiation at the MRP8 and MRP14 promoters, suggesting that this initiation is the major control of MRP8 and MRP14 gene expression during terminal differentiation of human promyelocytic cells.

Warner-Bartnicki, A.L.; Murao, S.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

1992-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

214

Antiproliferation and apoptosis induced by tamoxifen in human bile duct carcinoma QBC939 cells via upregulated p53 expression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tamoxifen (TAM) is a nonsteroidal antiestrogen that has been used in the treatment of breast cancer for over 30 years. Recently, it was shown that TAM also has efficacy on gastrointestinal neoplasms such as hepatocarcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma, and that the chemopreventive activities of TAM might be due to its abilities to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of tamoxifen on growth and apoptosis in the human bile duct carcinoma (BDC) cell line QBC939 using MTT assay, inverted microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, classic DNA fragmentation agarose gel electrophoresis assay, PI single- and FITC/PI double-staining flow cytometry, and Western blotting. Our data revealed that TAM could significantly inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in QBC939 cells. Increased expression of p53 was observed in TAM-treated cells, indicating that p53 might play an important role in TAM-induced apoptosis in QBC939 cells. These results provide significant insight into the anticarcinogenic action of TAM on BDC.

Han, Peng; Kang, Jin-He; Li, Hua-Liang [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Cell Biology and Tumor Cell Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Cell Biology and Tumor Cell Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Hu, Su-Xian [First Hospital Attached to Fujian Medical University, Xiamen 361004 (China)] [First Hospital Attached to Fujian Medical University, Xiamen 361004 (China); Lian, Hui-Hui; Qiu, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Jian [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Cell Biology and Tumor Cell Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Cell Biology and Tumor Cell Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Li, Wen-Gang, E-mail: lwg11861@163.com [First Hospital Attached to Fujian Medical University, Xiamen 361004 (China)] [First Hospital Attached to Fujian Medical University, Xiamen 361004 (China); Chen, Qing-Xi, E-mail: chenqx@xmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Cell Biology and Tumor Cell Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China) [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Cell Biology and Tumor Cell Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

2009-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Knockdown of human deubiquitinase PSMD14 induces cell cycle arrest and senescence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PSMD14 (POH1, also known as Rpn11/MPR1/S13/CepP1) protein within the 19S complex (19S cap; PA700) is responsible for substrate deubiquitination during proteasomal degradation. The role of PSMD14 in cell proliferation and senescence was explored using siRNA knockdown in carcinoma cell lines. Our results reveal that down-regulation of PSMD14 by siRNA transfection had a considerable impact on cell viability causing cell arrest in the G0-G1 phase, ultimately leading to senescence. The molecular events associated with decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and senescence include down-regulation of cyclin B1-CDK1-CDC25C, down-regulation of cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21{sup /Cip} and p27{sup /Kip1}. Most notably, phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein was markedly reduced in PSMD14 knockdown cells. A comparative study with PSMB5, a subunit of the 20S proteasome, revealed that PSMB5 and PSMD14 have different effects on cell cycle, senescence and associated molecular events. These data support the view that the 19S and 20S subunits of the proteasome have distinct biological functions and imply that targeting 19S and 20S would have distinct molecular consequences on tumor cells.

Byrne, Ann; McLaren, Rajashree P.; Mason, Paul; Chai, Lilly; Dufault, Michael R.; Huang, Yinyin; Liang, Beirong; Gans, Joseph D.; Zhang, Mindy; Carter, Kara; Gladysheva, Tatiana B.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Biemann, Hans-Peter N.; Booker, Michael; Goldberg, Mark A.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Lillie, James [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)] [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Madden, Stephen L., E-mail: steve.madden@genzyme.com [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Jiang, Yide, E-mail: yide.jiang@genzyme.com [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)] [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids cells humans Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the stomach... the effects of PPI action on acid levels 36. Our original gastric acid secretion model tracks four cell... popula- tions in the stomach considered critical for...

217

MiR-145 regulates PAK4 via the MAPK pathway and exhibits an antitumor effect in human colon cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 played an important role in inhibiting cell growth by directly targeting PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 may function as tumor suppressors. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of numerous cellular events; accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs play a key role in a wide range of biological functions, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer. Down-regulated expression of miR-145 has been reported in colon cancer tissues and cell lines. The molecular mechanisms underlying miR-145 and the regulation of colon carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the levels of miR-145 in human colon cancer cells using qRT-PCR and found markedly decreased levels compared to normal epithelial cells. We identified PAK4 as a novel target of miR-145 using informatics screening. Additionally, we demonstrated that miR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4 and that its abundance is inversely associated with miR-145 expression in colon cancer cells; we confirmed this relationship using the luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, restoration of miR-145 by mimics in SW620 cells significantly attenuated cell growth in vitro, in accordance with the inhibitory effects induced by siRNA mediated knockdown of PAK4. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that miR-145 downregulates P-ERK expression by targeting PAK4 and leads to inhibition of tumor growth.

Wang, Zhigang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Xiaoping [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine (China)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine (China); Yang, Zhili; Du, Hangxiang; Wu, Zhenqian; Gong, Jianfeng; Yan, Jun [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Qi, E-mail: zhengqi1957@yahoo.com.cn [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated 6th People's Hospital, Shanghai (China)

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Functional Diversity of DNA Methyltransferase Inhibitors in Human Cancer Cell Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Cell Lines Carlo Stresemann 1 Bodo Brueckner 1 Tanja Musch 1 Helga Stopper 2 Frank...hypomethylation. Cell 1995;81:197-205. 7 Brueckner B, Lyko F. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors...Cancer Res 2003;63:7563-70. 23 Brueckner B, Boy RG, Siedlecki P, et al. Epigenetic...

Carlo Stresemann; Bodo Brueckner; Tanja Musch; Helga Stopper; Frank Lyko

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

MXI1, a Putative Tumor Suppressor Gene, Suppresses Growth of Human Glioblastoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...proportion of cells in G2-M (Table 2). Rather than suggesting that overexpression of MX!! leads to an inability to pro ceed beyond the G2-M boundary and through mitosis, the correspond ing decrease in the proportion of cells in G@-G@may reflect...

Daniel S. Wechsler; Candace A. Shelly; Christy A. Petroff; Chi V. Dang

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

CXCR3+ T Regulatory Cells Selectively Accumulate in Human Ovarian Carcinomas to Limit Type I Immunity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CD25+ regulatory T cells.J Exp Med 2007;204:735-45. 26. Yamazaki T , Yang XO, Chung Y, Fukunaga A, Nurieva R, Pappu B, et alCCR6 regulates the migration of inflammatory and regulatory T cells.J Immunol 2008;181:8391-401. 27...

Nassima Redjimi; Caroline Raffin; Isabelle Raimbaud; Pascale Pignon; Junko Matsuzaki; Kunle Odunsi; Danila Valmori; and Maha Ayyoub

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Modulation of PPAR? and PPAR? by ethanol in human breast cancer cell lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Long-term exposure of breast cell lines to ethanol affects the transcriptional signature...mammospheres. Here we aimed to determine whether ethanol, or its metabolite, acetaldehyde, stimulate...cell lines were incubated +/- 25 mM ethanol and subjected to DNA microarray analysis...

Nagaraj Gopisetty Venkata; Peter Cabot; Greg Monteith; Sarah Roberts-Thomson

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Chromium reduces the in vitro activity and fidelity of DNA replication mediated by the human cell DNA synthesome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is known to be a carcinogenic metal ion, with a complicated mechanism of action. It can be found within our environment in soil and water contaminated by manufacturing processes. Cr(VI) ion is readily taken up by cells, and is recognized to be both genotoxic and cytotoxic; following its reduction to the stable trivalent form of the ion, chromium(Cr(III)), within cells. This form of the ion is known to impede the activity of cellular DNA polymerase and polymerase-mediated DNA replication. Here, we report the effects of chromium on the activity and fidelity of the DNA replication process mediated by the human cell DNA synthesome. The DNA synthesome is a functional multiprotein complex that is fully competent to carry-out each phase of the DNA replication process. The IC{sub 50} of Cr(III) toward the activity of DNA synthesome-associated DNA polymerases {alpha}, {delta} and {epsilon} is 15, 45 and 125 {mu}M, respectively. Cr(III) inhibits synthesome-mediated DNA synthesis (IC{sub 50} = 88 {mu}M), and significantly reduces the fidelity of synthesome-mediated DNA replication. The mutation frequency induced by the different concentrations of Cr(III) ion used in our assays ranges from 2-13 fold higher than that which occurs spontaneously, and the types of mutations include single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions. Single nucleotide substitutions are the predominant type of mutation, and they occur primarily at GC base-pairs. Cr(III) ion produces a lower number of transition and a higher number of transversion mutations than occur spontaneously. Unlike Cr(III), Cr(VI) ion has little effect on the in vitro DNA synthetic activity and fidelity of the DNA synthesome, but does significantly inhibit DNA synthesis in intact cells. Cell growth and proliferation is also arrested by increasing concentrations of Cr(VI) ion. Our studies provide evidence indicating that the chromium ion induced decrease in the fidelity and activity of synthesome mediated DNA replication correlates with the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of this metal ion; and promotes cell killing via inhibition of the DNA polymerase activity mediating the DNA replication and repair processes utilized by human cells.

Dai Heqiao; Liu Jianying; Malkas, Linda H.; Catalano, Jennifer; Alagharu, Srilakshmi [Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Division, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana University Cancer Research Institute, 1044 W. Walnut Street R4-170 Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Hickey, Robert J. [Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Division, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana University Cancer Research Institute, 1044 W. Walnut Street R4-170 Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: rohickey@iupui.edu

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of low-concentration triclosan on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humans at all ages are continually exposed to triclosan (TCS), a widely used antimicrobial agent that can be found in many daily hygiene products, such as toothpastes and shampoos; however, the toxicological and biological effects of TCS in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are far from being well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCS on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by measuring the cytotoxicity, morphological changes, lipid accumulation, and the expression of adipocyte differentiation biomarkers during 21-day adipogenesis. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in un-induced hMSCs treated with high-concentration TCS (? 5.0 ?M TCS), but not with low-concentration treatments (? 2.5 ?M TCS). TCS inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner in the 0.156 to 2.5 ?M range as indicated by morphological changes with Oil Red O staining, which is an index of lipid accumulation. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by a decrease in gene expression of specific adipocyte differentiation biomarkers including adipocyte protein 2, lipoprotein lipase, and adiponectin. Our study demonstrates that TCS inhibits adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs under concentrations that are not cytotoxic and in the range observed in human blood. -- Highlights: ? TCS is cytotoxic to un-induced hMSCs at concentrations ? 5.0 ?M. ? TCS at concentrations ? 2.5 ?M is not cytotoxic to induced hMSCs. ? TCS at non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits lipid formation in induced hMSCs. ? TCS decreases the expression of specific biomarkers of adipocyte differentiation. ? TCS at concentrations observed in human blood inhibits adipogenesis of hMSCs.

Guo, Li-Wu [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wu, Qiangen [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Green, Bridgett; Nolen, Greg [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Shi, Leming [Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); LoSurdo, Jessica [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)] [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Deng, Helen [Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)] [Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Bauer, Steven [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)] [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Fang, Jia-Long, E-mail: jia-long.fang@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Ning, Baitang, E-mail: baitang.ning@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Internalization of mesoporous silica nanoparticles induces transient but not sufficient osteogenic signals in human mesenchymal stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biocompatibility of nanoparticles is the prerequisite for their applications in biomedicine but can be misleading due to the absence of criteria for evaluating the safety and toxicity of those nanomaterials. Recent studies indicate that mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) can easily internalize into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) without apparent deleterious effects on cellular growth or differentiation, and hence are emerging as an ideal stem cell labeling agent. The objective of this study was to thoroughly investigate the effect of MSNs on osteogenesis induction and to examine their biocompatibility in hMSCs. Uptake of MSNs into hMSCs did not affect the cell viability, proliferation and regular osteogenic differentiation of the cells. However, the internalization of MSNs indeed induced actin polymerization and activated the small GTP-bound protein RhoA. The MSN-induced cellular protein responses as believed to cause osteogenesis of hMSCs did not result in promotion of regular osteogenic differentiation as analyzed by cytochemical stain and protein activity assay of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). When the effect of MSNs on ALP gene expression was further examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, MSN-treated hMSCs were shown to have significantly higher mRNA expression than control cells after 1-hour osteogenic induction. The induction of ALP gene expression by MSNs, however, was absent in cells after 1-day incubation with osteogenic differentiation. Together our results show that the internalization of MSNs had a significant effect on the transient protein response and osteogenic signal in hMSCs, thereby suggesting that the effects of nanoparticles on diverse aspects of cellular activities should be carefully evaluated even though the nanoparticles are generally considered as biocompatible at present.

Huang, D.-M. [Center for Nanomedicine Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: dmhuang@nhri.org.tw; Chung, T.-H. [Stem Cell Research Center, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Hung, Y.; Lu, F.; Wu, S.-H.; Mou, C.-Y. [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yao, M. [Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.-C. [Stem Cell Research Center, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Department of Forensic Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: ycchenmd@ntu.edu.tw

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Characterization of a human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line (UCLA RO 82 W-1)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thyroid tumor cell line has been established from the metastases of a follicular carcinoma in a female patient. Although the primary tumor released thyroglobulin (Tg) into the circulation (> 10000 ng/ml), th...

B. Estour; A. J. Van Herle; G. J. F. Juillard; T. L. Totanes…

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Neutron Radiation Enhances Cisplatin Cytotoxicity Independently of Apoptosis in Human Head and Neck Carcinoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Therapeutics, Preclinical Pharmacology Neutron Radiation Enhances Cisplatin Cytotoxicity...carcinoma (HNSCC) cells and asked if fast neutron radiation enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity...determinant for cisplatin cytotoxicity. Neutron radiation effectively enhanced cisplatin...

Harold E. Kim; Mary Ann Krug; Inn Han; John Ensley; George H. Yoo; Jeffrey D. Forman; Hyeong-Reh Choi Kim

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Production of Large Amounts of Hydrogen Peroxide by Human Tumor Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...spectrophotometric method. Mouse fibroblasts...metastasis. Production of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide...sources of hydrogen peroxide production in these...MATERIALS AND METHODS Cell Lines...modified method of Ding and...width. 794 PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE...

Ted P. Szatrowski and Carl F. Nathan

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...02115, USA 2 Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School...propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation...associated with the booming nanotechnology industry and its many related...neural stem cell apoptosis. Nanotechnology 20, 115 101. ( doi:10...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Interplay between chromatin state, regulator binding, and regulatory motifs in six human cell types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The regions bound by sequence-specific transcription factors can be highly variable across different cell types despite the static nature of the underlying genome sequence. This has been partly attributed to changes in ...

Kellis, Manolis

230

Human endothelial stem/progenitor cells, angiogenic factors and vascular repair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...issue 'Translation and commercialization of regenerative medicines...but also for pathological processes, such as tumour development...Supplement Translation and commercialization of regenerative medicines...cells in the neoangiogenic process? Biochim. Biophys. Acta...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles With a modest effort, many of the energy-efficient technologies developed for buildings can be transferred to the transportation sector. The goal of vehicle thermal management research at LBL is to save the energy equivalent of one to two billion gallons of gasoline per year, and improve the marketability of next-generation vehicles using advanced solar control glazings and insulating shell components to reduce accessory loads. Spectrally selective and electrochromic window glass and lightweight insulating materials improve the fuel efficiency of conventional and hybrid vehicles and extend the range of electric vehicles by reducing the need for air conditioning and heating, and by allowing the downsizing of equipment.

232

Specific gene expression by extremely low-dose ionizing radiation which related to enhance proliferation of normal human diploid cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrated that X-ray irradiation at low doses of between 2 and 5 cGy stimulated proliferation of a normal human diploid. At low doses of between 2 and 5 cGy, ERK1/2 was phosphorylated as efficiently as at higher doses between 50 and 100 cGy of X-rays, while the p53 protein level was not increased by doses below 50 cGy. On the other hand, the p53 protein was efficiently accumulated at higher doses of X-ray more than 100 cGy. ERK1/2 was phosphorylated by doses over 50 cGy with increasing doses. We found that activated ERK1/2 augmented phosphorylation of the Elk-1 protein. Furthermore, over expression of ERK2 in NCI-H1299, and human lung carcinoma cells, potentiated enhanced proliferation, while down-regulation of ERK2 using the anti-sense ERK2 gene abrogated the stimulative effect of low-dose irradiation. These results indicate that a limited range of low-dose ionizing radiation differentially activate ERK1/2 kinases, which causes enhanced proliferation of cells receiving very low doses of ionizing radiation.

Masami Watanabe; Keiji Suzuki; Seiji Kodama

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A noninvasive skin imaging system Symon Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A noninvasive skin imaging system Symon Cotton School of Computer Science, University Of Birmingham arriving at a diagnosis. A previous paper [Cotton and Claridge 1996] presented a model of colour formation­dimensional colour space, is limited to a curved surface [Cotton and Claridge 1996]. As abnormal skin often has a di

Claridge, Ela

234

Interleukin 7 (IL-7) selectively promotes mouse and human IL-17–producing ?? cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...36 Komschlies KL ( 1994 ) Administration of recombinant human IL-7...Geiselhart LA ( 2001 ) IL-7 administration alters the CD4:CD8 ratio...11 ): 1255 – 1265 . 45 Bonneville M O’Brien RL Born WK...Quantitative PCR was performed with Power SYBR Green PCR Master Mix...

Marie-Laure Michel; Dick J. Pang; Syeda F. Y. Haque; Alexandre J. Potocnik; Daniel J. Pennington; Adrian C. Hayday

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Tumorigenic MLL-Homeobox Network in Human Glioblastoma Stem Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Erickson P, Bemis L, Li E, et alAltered HOX and WNT7A expression in human lung cancer.Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2000;97:12776-81. 54. Palmqvist L , Pineault N, Wasslavik C Humphries RK.Candidate genes for expansion and transformation of hematopoietic...

Marco Gallo; Jenny Ho; Fiona J. Coutinho; Robert Vanner; Lilian Lee; Renee Head; Erick K. M. Ling; Ian D. Clarke; Peter B. Dirks

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

DNA Amplification and Tumorigenicity of the Human Melanoma Cell Line MeWo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...H.J, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology [J. C. C...tumor growth was conducted by Gilbert ef al. (8) using a human...59: 221-226, 1977. 8. Gilbert, F., Balaban,G., Brangman...37:765-768,1983. 9. Gilbert, F., Balaban, G., Breg...

Inna Shtromas; Bradley N. White; Jeanette J. A. Holden; Dorothy L. Reimer; and John C. C. Roder

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Toll like receptor-3 priming alters diesel exhaust particle-induced cytokine responses in human bronchial epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Inflammation is considered central in the pathology of health effects from airborne particulate matter (PM). Preexisting inflammatory disorders, such as asthma, but also pulmonary infections, appear to be a risk factor of adverse health effects from PM exposure. Thus, to assess whether and how preexisting inflammation may sensitize lung cells toward additional proinflammatory effects of PM, human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were primed with the highly proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, Poly I:C, prior to exposure with diesel exhaust particles (DEP). DEP-exposure alone induced increased gene-expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and CXCL8 (IL-8) but did not affect expression of CCL5 (RANTES), while TLR3-priming alone induced expression of IL-6, CXCL8 and CCL5. DEP-exposure exacerbated IL-6 and CXCL8 responses in TLR3-primed cells, while TLR3-induced CCL5 was suppressed by DEP. TLR3-priming and DEP-exposure resulted in possible additive effects on p38 phosphorylation and I?B-degradation, while DEP rather suppressed ERK and JNK-activation. However, TLR3-priming elicited a considerable increase in p65-phosphorylation at serine 536 which is known to enhance the transcriptional activity of NF-?B. DEP-exposure was unable to induce p65-phosphorylation. Thus TLR3-priming may affect susceptibility toward DEP by activating both shared and complementing pathways required for optimal expression of proinflammatory genes such as IL-6 and CXCL8. The study underscores that primed “sick” cells may be more susceptible toward effects of particle-exposure and respond both stronger and differently compared to unprimed “healthy” cells.

Nicolai S. Bach; Marit Låg; Johan Øvrevik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The inhibitory effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (Ferucarbotran) on osteogenic differentiation and its signaling mechanism in human mesenchymal stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are very useful for monitoring cell trafficking in vivo and distinguish whether cellular regeneration originated from an exogenous cell source, which is a key issue for developing successful stem cell therapies. However, the impact of SPIO labeling on stem cell behavior remains uncertain. Here, we show the inhibitory effect of Ferucarbotran, an ionic SPIO, on osteogenic differentiation and its signaling mechanism in human mesenchymal stem cells. Ferucarbotran caused a dose-dependent inhibition of osteogenic differentiation, abolished the differentiation at high concentration, promoted cell migration, and activated the signaling molecules, {beta}-catenin, a cancer/testis antigen, SSX, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). An iron chelator, desferrioxamine, suppressed all the above Ferucarbotran-induced actions, demonstrating an important role of free iron in the inhibition of osteogenic differentiation that is mediated by the promotion of cell mobilization, involving the activation of a specific signaling pathway.

Chen, Ying-Chun [Center for Nanomedicine Research, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County 350, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Liu, Hon-Man [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lai, I-Yin [Center for Nanomedicine Research, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County 350, Taiwan (China); Yao, Ming [Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Szu-Chun [Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ko, Bor-Sheng [Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yao-Chang [Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chung-Shi [Center for Nanomedicine Research, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County 350, Taiwan (China); Huang, Dong-Ming, E-mail: dmhuang@nhri.org.t [Center for Nanomedicine Research, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County 350, Taiwan (China)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Thermal comfort, skin temperature distribution, and sensible heat loss distribution in the sitting posture in various asymmetric radiant fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aimed at investigating the thermal comfort for the whole body as well as for certain local areas, skin temperatures, and sensible heat losses in various asymmetric radiant fields. Human subject experiments were conducted to assess the overall comfort sensation and local discomfort, and local skin temperatures were measured. Through thermal manikin experiments, we discovered a new method for the precise measurement of the local sensible heat loss in nonuniform thermal environments. The local sensible heat losses were measured by the use of a thermal manikin that had the same local skin temperatures as the human subjects. The experimental conditions consisted of the anterior–posterior, right–left, and up–down asymmetric thermal environments created by radiation panels. A total of 35 thermal environmental conditions were created ranging from 25.5 to 30.5 °C for air temperature, from 11.5 to 44.5 °C for surface temperature of radiation panels, from 40% RH to 50% RH for humidity, and less than 0.05 m/s for inlet air velocity to the climatic chamber. The local skin temperature changed depending on the environmental thermal nonuniformity, even if the mean skin temperature remained almost the same. It is essential to use the skin temperature distribution as well as mean skin temperature for expressing thermal comfort in nonuniform environments. The local sensible heat loss changed depending on the environmental thermal nonuniformity, even if the mean sensible heat loss remained almost the same. The relationship between the local skin temperature and local sensible heat loss cannot be depicted by a simple line; instead, it varies depending on the environmental thermal nonuniformity. The local heat discomfort in the head area was dependent on both the local skin temperature and local sensible heat loss. However, the local cold discomfort in the foot area was related only to the local skin temperature.

Tomonori Sakoi; Kazuyo Tsuzuki; Shinsuke Kato; Ryozo Ooka; Doosam Song; Shengwei Zhu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Suppression of human colorectal carcinoma cell growth by wild-type p53  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dean, L. Kincla, H. R. Sykes, A. R. Lehmann, I. A. Wise, Exp. Cell Res. 183, 473 (1989)]. 15. S. J. Baker...JOSEPH C. LOFTUS,* TIMOTHY E. O'TOOLE, EDWARD F. PLOW, ALISON GLASs, ANDREW L. FRELINGER III, MARK H. GINSBERG The ligand-binding...

SJ Baker; S Markowitz; ER Fearon; JK Willson; B Vogelstein

1990-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Cyclic AMP Signaling as a Mediator of Vasculogenic Mimicry in Aggressive Human Melanoma Cells In vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Malignant Melanoma in the 21st Century, Part 2: Staging, Prognosis...Levin LR. Molecular details of cAMP generation in mammalian cells...Integrating signals between cAMP and the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK...Epac proteins: multi-purpose cAMP targets. Trends Biochem Sci...

Jean-Claude Lissitzky; Danielle Parriaux; Elodie Ristorcelli; Alain Vérine; Dominique Lombardo; and Patrick Verrando

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Genetic programs in human and mouse early embryos revealed by single-cell RNA?sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... embryos were obtained from the Center for Clinical Reproductive Medicine at the Jiangsu People’s Hospital, Nanjing, China, with patients’ written informed consent and institutional approval. Single-cell isolation ... 26?and?35) at the Center for Clinical Reproductive Medicine at the Jiangsu People’s Hospital, Nanjing, China, with written informed consent and institutional approval. Sperm was obtained from ...

Zhigang Xue; Kevin Huang; Chaochao Cai; Lingbo Cai; Chun-yan Jiang; Yun Feng; Zhenshan Liu; Qiao Zeng; Liming Cheng; Yi E. Sun; Jia-yin Liu; Steve Horvath; Guoping Fan

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

243

Classification of Human Epithelial Type 2 Cell Indirect Immunofluoresence Images via Codebook Based Descriptors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Australia Sullivan Nicolaides Pathology, Australia Abstract The Anti-Nuclear Antibody (ANA) clinical of several vari- ants of the descriptor on two publicly available datasets: ICPR HEp-2 cell classification contest dataset and the new SNPHEp-2 dataset. To our knowledge, this is the first time codebook

Sanderson, Conrad

244

Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hypothesized that the relative radiation sensitivity of hippocampal...therapies to reduce radiation-induced normal tissue...cells has potential safety concerns such as teratoma...could safely attenuate radiation-induced cognitive...employing Ethovision XT software (v5.0; Noldus Information...

Munjal M. Acharya; Lori-Ann Christie; Mary L. Lan; Erich Giedzinski; John R. Fike; Susanna Rosi; and Charles L. Limoli

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Ionizing Radiation Induces a Transient Increase in Cytosolic Free [Ca2+] in Human Epithelial Tumor Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells, oscillations in cytosolic [Ca2i@ levels...microscope was used with a 75 W Xenon arc, Nikon UVF 40X (numerical...mm was observed as well as oscillations with a period of 2.8 0...the responders by multiple oscillations in [Ca2@] . . . . . As...

Daniel G. Todd and Ross B. Mikkelsen

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

RhoA Silencing Reverts the Resistance to Doxorubicin in Human Colon Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Statins are competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl...statins, whereas the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 and the RhoA inhibitor...The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin overcomes cell...loaded in nanoparticles of chitosan in mice: safety and efficacy...

Sophie Doublier; Chiara Riganti; Claudia Voena; Costanzo Costamagna; Elisabetta Aldieri; Gianpiero Pescarmona; Dario Ghigo; and Amalia Bosia

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Prediction of Human Tumor Cell Chemosensitivity Using the Sister Chromatid Exchange Assay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...40-70% of pa tients (3,4). Results of CFE assays are expressed as the average survival...Therefore, a primary deficiency of the CFE assay, and of the stem cell assays based...TX 77030. 4The abbreviations used are: CFE, colony-forming efficiency; SCE, sister...

Dennis F. Deen; Laura E. Kendall; Laurence J. Marton; Philip J. Tofilon

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Procter & Gamble and Temple University scientists model skin...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

industry. For example, a better understanding of skin permeation could enable the pharmaceutical industry to advance drugs that are administered through the skin. P&G,...

249

Skin-Like Prosthetic Polymer Surfaces - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mimic skin. ORNL scientists combined superhydrophobic polymer inventions with carbon nanotubes to create a self-cleaning skin-like surface material with the ability to transmit...

250

Ras inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress in human cancer cells with amplified Myc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

targets Nrf2 and eIF2a, both regulated by active p-PERK. FTS also induced an increase in p-PERK, while small interfering RNA to PERK reduced Nrf2 and ATF4 and rescued cells from FTS-induced death. BIP p38 and MEK, negatively regulates the ER stress cascades BIP/PERK/Nrf2 and eIF2a/ATF4/ATF3

Shamir, Ron

251

Cloning of a Brain-type Isoform of Human Rab GDI and Its Expression in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines and Tumor Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cloning of a Brain-type Isoform of Human Rab GDI and Its Expression in Human Neuroblastoma...for GTP. Recently, two isoforms of Rab GDI cDNA were isolated from rats and mice...isolated a brain-type isoform of human Rab GDI cDNA and examined its expression in neuroblastoma...

Noriyuki Nishimura; Junko Goji; Hajime Nakamura; Satoshi Orita; Yoshimi Takai; Kimihiko Sano

1995-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through the dysregulation of autophagy in human THP-1 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation decreases autophagy in THP-1 cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of autophagy induces inflammation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p62/Sqstm1 accumulation by impairment of autophagy is related to NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation is involved in the activation of mTOR and decreased AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. Monocytes/macrophages are some of the cells involved in the inflammatory process in atherogenesis. Autophagy exerts a protective effect against cellular stresses like inflammation, and it is regulated by nutrient-sensing pathways. The nutrient-sensing pathway includes SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, which is implicated in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes including inflammation and autophagy. The mechanism through which the dysfunction of SIRT1 contributes to the regulation of inflammation in relation to autophagy in monocytes/macrophages is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment with 2-[(2-Hydroxynaphthalen-1-ylmethylene)amino]-N-(1-phenethyl)benzamide (Sirtinol), a chemical inhibitor of SIRT1, induces the overexpression of inflammation-related genes such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6 through nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B signaling activation, which is associated with autophagy dysfunction, as shown through p62/Sqstm1 accumulation and decreased expression of light chain (LC) 3 II in THP-1 cells. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, also induces inflammation-related NF-{kappa}B activation. In p62/Sqstm1 knockdown cells, Sirtinol-induced inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation is blocked. In addition, inhibition of SIRT1 is involved in the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and is implicated in decreased 5 Prime -AMP activated kinase (AMPK) activation, leading to the impairment of autophagy. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, abolishes Sirtinol-induced inflammation and NF-{kappa}B activation associated with p62/Sqstm1 accumulation. In summary, SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation and dysregulates autophagy via nutrient-sensing pathways such as the mTOR and AMPK pathways, in THP-1 cells.

Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kitada, Munehiro; Kanasaki, Keizo [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan)] [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan); Koya, Daisuke, E-mail: koya0516@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan)] [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan)

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

26, 2011 26, 2011 Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy J. Tyson McDonald, Julia Fox, Heather Szelag, Annie Kang, Heiko Enderling, Peter Nowd, Douglas Scheinder, Giannoula Lakka Klement, Ingolf Tuerk, and Lynn Hlatky Center of Cancer Systems Biology, Steward St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, 736 Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02135. Primary tissue represents a better model for studies than immortalized cell lines that are adapted

254

Nrf2 expression and activity in human T lymphocytes: stimulation by T cell receptor activation and priming by inorganic arsenic and tert-butylhydroquinone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nrf2 expression and activity in human T lymphocytes: stimulation by T cell receptor activation-2-23-23-47-94; E-mail : laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr Abbreviations: Nrf2: Nuclear Factor-erythroid 2-related-2: interferon-J, TNF-D: tumor necrosis factor-a, TCR: T cell receptor, Ab: antibody, aCD3/aCD28: monoclonal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

earth skin temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

earth skin temperature earth skin temperature Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords climate

256

Active skin for turbulent drag reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evidence that spanwise traveling waves of the right amplitude, wavelength and frequency can result in significant turbulent drag reduction. Such traveling waves can be induced in the smart skin via active-material actuation. The flow control technique...

Mani, Raghavendran

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53 gene expression levels compared to cell lines without p53 sequestration. Our data reveal the characteristic cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 by the heat shock protein mortalin in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines, as is the case for other cancers, such as glioblastomas and hepatocellular carcinomas.

Gestl, Erin E., E-mail: egestl@wcupa.edu [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States); Anne Boettger, S., E-mail: aboettger@wcupa.edu [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

The TAL1 complex targets the FBXW7 tumor suppressor by activating miR-223 in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in 60% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and initiates T-ALL in mouse models. By performing global microRNA (miRNA) expression ...

Mansour, Marc R.

259

Nuclear Factor-KB Dimer Exchange Promotes a p21waf1/cip1 Superinduction Response in Human T Leukemic Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Factor-KB Dimer Exchange Promotes a p21waf1/cip1 Superinduction Response in Human ability to induce p21waf1/cip1 . Here, we provide evidence that sequential NF-KB-activating signals induce heightened NF-KB DNA binding and p21waf1/cip1 induction in CEM and additional T leukemic cell lines

Miyamoto, Shigeki

260

Chemical Data Mining of the NCI Human Tumor Cell Line Database Huijun Wang, Jonathan Klinginsmith, Xiao Dong, Adam C. Lee, Rajarshi Guha, Yuqing Wu,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Data Mining of the NCI Human Tumor Cell Line Database Huijun Wang, Jonathan Klinginsmith resource particularly for testing data mining methods that bridge chemical, biological, and genomic information. In this paper we describe a formal knowledge discovery approach to characterizing and data mining

Wu, Yuqing Melanie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mutagenicity of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in V79 Cells Expressing Human SULT1A1: Identification and Mass Spectrometric Quantification of DNA Adducts Formed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mutagenicity of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in V79 Cells Expressing Human SULT1A1: Identification and Mass Spectrometric Quantification of DNA Adducts Formed ... 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a heterocyclic product of the Maillard reaction, is a ubiquitous food contaminant. ... Hydroxymethylfurfural: A Possible Emergent Cause of Honey Bee Mortality? ...

Bernhard H. Monien; Wolfram Engst; Gitte Barknowitz; Albrecht Seidel; Hansruedi Glatt

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response by TZD18, a novel dual ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ?/?, in human breast cancer cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cancer cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2002;74:155-65. 8 Fenner MH , Elstner E. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...MDA-MB-231. Mol Carcinog 2002;34:165-71. 12 Liu H , Zang C, Fenner MH, et al. Growth inhibition and apoptosis in human Philadelphia...

Chuanbing Zang; Hongyu Liu; Janina Bertz; Kurt Possinger; H. Phillip Koeffler; Elena Elstner; Jan Eucker

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hypersensitivity of human and rodent Fanconi anemia (FA) cells to bystander  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paul Wilson Paul Wilson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Abstract Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by developmental defects, progressive bone marrow failure, and cellular hypersensitivity to agents that induce DNA interstrand crosslinks and oxidative stress [1]. The disease is transmitted either as an autosomal-recessive or X-linked trait, and mutations in 13 FA genes have been identified in FA patients (with more likely to be discovered). Previously, we reported on the hypersensitivity of the isogenic Fancg-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant KO40 for sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction following low dose 3.86-MeV plutonium-238 α-particle irradiation where <1% of cell nuclei are hit.

264

The skin's role in human thermoregulation and comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interactions and phase change in fibrous material B. Jmaterials Sources of further information and advice References Phase change

Arens, Edward A; Zhang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Uneven distribution of aerobic mesophilic bacteria on human skin.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fig. 1) consists ofa clock electric motor, an electric impulse counter...60 times per min by the clock electric motor. After the first 1 ml was removed...7) on/offswitch; (8) electric motor; (9) support stand; (10...

W A Keith Jr; R J Smiljanic; W A Akers; L W Keith

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Trichophyton eboreum sp. nov. Isolated from Human Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Krajden, and G. Land. 1997. Laboratory handbook of dermatophytes. Star Publishing Company...and G. Land (ed.), Laboratory handbook of dermatophytes. Star Publishing Company...and G. Land (ed.), Laboratory handbook of dermatophytes. Star Publishing Company...

Jochen Brasch; Yvonne Gräser

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Role of CXCR4 in Cell-Cell Fusion and Infection of Monocyte-Derived Macrophages by Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Strains: Two Distinct Mechanisms of HIV-1 Dual Tropism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CCR5 negative and wild-type macrophages. Fusion mediated by UG021 and UG024...C. Berger E. A. Cell type-specific fusion cofactors determine human...CCR5 negative and wild-type macrophages. Fusion mediated by UG021 and UG024...

Yanjie Yi; Stuart N. Isaacs; Darlisha A. Williams; Ian Frank; Dominique Schols; Erik De Clercq; Dennis L. Kolson; Ronald G. Collman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a biologic model and could be useful for future experimental studies for the application of BNCT to colon carcinoma.

Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra, E-mail: dagrosa@cnea.gov.a [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Crivello, Martin [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires(Argentina); Perona, Marina [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto [Department of Instrumentation and Control, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano [Argentina Reactor, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Casal, Mariana [Institute of Oncology 'Angel H. Roffo', University of Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kahl, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Juvenal, Guillermo Juan [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Pisarev, Mario Alberto [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Department of Human Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Novel small molecule induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using high-throughput screening with small-molecule libraries, we identified a compound, KCG165 [(2-(3-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)ethoxy)-1,10b-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c] quinazolin-5(6H)-one)], which strongly activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity. KCG165-induced phosphorylations of p53 at Ser{sup 6}, Ser{sup 15}, and Ser{sup 20}, which are all key residues involved in the activation and stabilization of p53. Consistent with these findings, KCG165 increased level of p53 protein and led to the accumulation of transcriptionally active p53 in the nucleus with the increased occupancy of p53 in the endogenous promoter region of its downstream target gene, p21{sup WAF1/CIP}. Notably, KCG165-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Furthermore, we suggested topoisomerase II as the molecular target of KCG165. Together, these results indicate that KCG165 may have potential applications as an antitumor agent.

Park, Sang Eun [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Yong Ki [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jae Du [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bum Tae [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Ghil [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: bigguy@krict.re.kr

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

270

Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and pregnancy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arginine, proline, nicotinate, nicotinamide and glutathione pathways were affected.

Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States)] [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States)] [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States) [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Effects of the PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone on endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro: Differences between human and mouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonists and PPAR{gamma}/{alpha} dual agonists have been or are being developed for clinical use in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemias. A common tumor finding in rodent carcinogenicity studies for these agonists is hemangioma/hemangiosarcoma in mice but not in rats. We hypothesized that increased endothelial cell proliferation may be involved in the mechanism of PPAR agonist-induced vascular tumors in mice, and we investigated the effects on endothelial cells utilizing troglitazone, the first clinically used PPAR{gamma} agonist, in vivo and in vitro. Troglitazone (400 and 800 mg/kg/day) induced hemangiosarcomas in mice in a 2-year bioassay. We showed that troglitazone increased endothelial cell proliferation in brown and white adipose tissue and liver in mice at sarcomagenic doses after 4 weeks of treatment. Troglitazone was cytotoxic both to human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC1) and mouse mammary fat pad microvascular endothelial cells (MFP MVEC) at high concentrations. However, MFP MVEC were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of troglitazone based on the much lower LC{sub 50} in HMEC1 (17.4 {mu}M) compared to MFP MVEC (92.2 {mu}M). Troglitazone increased the proliferation and survival of MFP MVEC but not HMEC1 in growth factor reduced conditions. Our data demonstrate that troglitazone may induce hemangiosarcomas in mice, at least in part, through enhancement of survival and proliferation of microvascular endothelial cells. Such an effect does not occur with human cells, suggesting that human may react differently to exposure to PPAR agonists compared with mice.

Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko [Department of Pathology and Microbiology and the Eppley Institute for Cancer Research, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 983135 Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, NE 68198-3135 (United States); Vetro, Joseph A. [Center for Drug Delivery and Nanomedicine and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6025 (United States); Suzuki, Shugo; Varney, Michelle L. [Department of Pathology and Microbiology and the Eppley Institute for Cancer Research, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 983135 Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, NE 68198-3135 (United States); Han, Huai-Yun [Center for Drug Delivery and Nanomedicine and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6025 (United States); Nascimento, Merielen; Pennington, Karen L.; Arnold, Lora L.; Singh, Rakesh K. [Department of Pathology and Microbiology and the Eppley Institute for Cancer Research, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 983135 Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, NE 68198-3135 (United States); Cohen, Samuel M. [Department of Pathology and Microbiology and the Eppley Institute for Cancer Research, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 983135 Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, NE 68198-3135 (United States)], E-mail: scohen@unmc.edu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells on akermanite-bioactive ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, the effects of a calcium magnesium silicate bioactive ceramic (akermanite) on proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) have been investigated and compared with the classical ceramic (?-tricalcium phosphate, ?-TCP). Akermanite and ?-TCP disks were seeded with hBMSC and kept in growth medium or osteogenic medium for 10 days. Proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation were evaluated on day 1, 4, 7 and 10. The data from the Alamar Blue assay and lactic acid production assay showed that hBMSC proliferated more significantly on akermanite than on ?-TCP. The analysis of osteoblast-related genes, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OC), indicated that akermanite ceramics enhanced the expression of osteoblast-related genes, but type I collagen (COL I) showed no noticeable difference among akermanite and ?-TCP ceramics. Furthermore, this stimulatory effect was observed not only in osteogenic medium, but also in normal growth medium without osteogenic reagents such as l-ascorbic acid, glycerophosphate and dexamethasone. This result suggests that akermanite can promote osteoblastic differentiation of hBMSC in vitro even without osteogenic reagents, and may be used as a bioactive material for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications.

Hongli Sun; Chengtie Wu; Kerong Dai; Jiang Chang; Tingting Tang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Short-hairpin RNA-mediated Heat shock protein 90 gene silencing inhibits human breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hsp90 is over-expressed in human breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shRNA-mediated gene silencing of Hsp90 resulted in inhibition of cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and NF-kB were down-regulation after transfection due to Hsp90 silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor growth ratio was decline due to Hsp90 silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PCNA expression was down-regulation due to Hsp90 silencing. -- Abstract: Hsp90 interacts with proteins that mediate signaling pathways involved in the regulation of essential processes such as proliferation, cell cycle control, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Hsp90 inhibition is therefore an attractive strategy for blocking abnormal pathways that are crucial for cancer cell growth. In the present study, the role of Hsp90 in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was examined by stably silencing Hsp90 gene expression with an Hsp90-silencing vector (Hsp90-shRNA). RT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that Hsp90-shRNA specifically and markedly down-regulated Hsp90 mRNA and protein expression. NF-kB and Akt protein levels were down-regulated in Hsp90-shRNA transfected cells, indicating that Hsp90 knockout caused a reduction of survival factors and induced apoptosis. Treatment with Hsp90-shRNA significantly increased apoptotic cell death and caused cell cycle arrest in the G1/S phase in MCF-7 cells, as shown by flow cytometry. Silencing of Hsp90 also reduced cell viability, as determined by MTT assay. In vivo experiments showed that MCF-7 cells stably transfected with Hsp90-shRNA grew slowly in nude mice as compared with control groups. In summary, the Hsp90-shRNA specifically silenced the Hsp90 gene, and inhibited MCF-7 cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Possible molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Hsp90-shRNA include the degradation of Hsp90 breast cancer-related client proteins, the inhibition of survival signals and the upregulation of apoptotic pathways. shRNA-mediated interference may have potential therapeutic utility in human breast cancer.

Zuo, Keqiang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China)] [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Li, Dan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Pulli, Benjamin [Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)] [Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Yu, Fei; Cai, Haidong; Yuan, Xueyu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhang, Xiaoping, E-mail: zxpsibs@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Lv, Zhongwei, E-mail: heyixue163@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China)

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

Protective effects of ion-imprinted chitooligosaccharides as uranium-specific chelating agents against the cytotoxicity of depleted uranium in human kidney cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Occupational internal contamination with depleted uranium (DU) compounds can induce radiological and chemical toxicity, and an effective and specific uranium-chelating agent for clinical use is urgently needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a series of synthesized water-soluble metal-ion-imprinted chitooligosaccharides can be used as uranium-specific chelating agents, because the chitooligosaccharides have excellent heavy metal ion chelation property and the ion-imprinting technology can improve the selective recognition of template ions. DU-poisoned human renal proximal tubule epithelium cells (human kidney 2 cells, HK-2) were used to assess the detoxification of these chitooligosaccharides. The DU-chelating capacity and selectivity of the chitooligosaccharides were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Cell viability, cellular accumulation of DU, membrane damage, DNA damage, and morphological changes in the cellular ultrastructure were examined to assess the detoxification of these chitooligosaccharides. The results showed that the Cu2+-imprinted chitooligosaccharides, especially the Cu2+-imprinted glutaraldehyde-crosslinked carboxymethyl chitooligosaccharide (Cu-Glu-CMC), chelated DU effectively and specifically, and significantly reduced the loss of cell viability induced by DU and reduced cellular accumulation of DU in a dose-dependent manner, owing to their chelation of DU outside cells and their prevention of DU internalization. The ultrastructure observation clearly showed that Cu-Glu-CMC-chelated-DU precipitates, mostly outside cells, were grouped in significantly larger clusters, and they barely entered the cells by endocytosis or in any other way. Treatment with Cu-Glu-CMC also increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and reduced membrane damage and DNA damage induced by DU oxidant injury. Cu-Glu-CMC was more effective than the positive control drug, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), in protection of HK-2 cells against DU cytotoxicity, as a result of its chelation of UO22+ to prevent the DU internalization and its antioxidant activity.

Xiao-fei Zhang; Chun-lei Ding; He Liu; Li-hong Liu; Chang-qi Zhao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Protective effect of estrogen on E.coli invasion in primary human hepatocytes and HuH-7 carcinoma cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Protective effect of estrogen on E.coli invasion in primary human hepatocytes...estrogen may effect bacterial...uropathogenic Dr E.coli in hepatocarcinoma...and primary human hepatocytes...Also, the effect of pretreatment...anti-estrogen) on E.coli invasion was...and primary human hepatocytes...

Rashmi Kaul; Senait Assefa; Aunna Herbst; Stephen C. Strom; Mark G. Martens; Gary Watson; Harvey Sharp; and Anil K. Kaul

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Light-induced Photoactivation of Hypericin Affects the Energy Metabolism of Human Glioma Cells by Inhibiting Hexokinase Bound to Mitochondria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Experimental Therapeutics Light-induced Photoactivation...Hypericin Affects the Energy Metabolism of Human...of glioma tumors. Light-induced photoactivation...hypericin affects the energy metabolism of human...December 15. 1998] Light-induced Photoactivation...Hypericin Affects the Energy Metabolism of Human...

Laurent Miccoli; Arnaud Beurdeley-Thomas; Gonzague De Pinieux; Franck Sureau; Stéphane Oudard; Bernard Dutrillaux; and Marie-France Poupon

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

Michael Cornforth

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

The gentle touch receptors of mammalian skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...musical symphony of neural impulses that the brain translates as a touch. Each LTMR end...neural dialogue between the skin and the brain. The challenge for future research is...represented and processed in the spinal cord and brain and enables the richness of touch perceptions...

Amanda Zimmerman; Ling Bai; David D. Ginty

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Src Family Kinase Inhibitor PP2 Restores the E-Cadherin/Catenin Cell Adhesion System in Human Cancer Cells and Reduces Cancer Metastasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion system and are therefore candidates...Immunoblotting. For protein detection, cells were rinsed...enhanced chemiluminescence detection system (Amersham, Arlington...route in a 1% DMSO vehicle as a volume of 0.10...

Jeong-Seok Nam; Yoshinori Ino; Michiie Sakamoto; and Setsuo Hirohashi

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Detection of Human Lung Epithelial Cell Growth Factors Produced by a Lung Carcinoma Cell Line: Use in Culture of Primary Solid Lung Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...PMSF, phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride; CFE, colony-forming efficiency. of cells...cells to A549-I CM. Fold increase in CFE over controls is shown for the response...responsedeterminedas percentageof control CFE. Fivewellswereusedper conditionand the...

Jill M. Siegfried

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DU145 human prostate cancer cells express functional Receptor Activator of NF-B: New insights in the prostate cancer bone metastasis process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DU145 human prostate cancer cells express functional Receptor Activator of NF-B: New insights in the prostate cancer bone metastasis process. Mori K.1, 2, * , Le Goff B. 1, 2 , Charrier C. 1, 2 , Battaglia S;40(4):981-90" DOI : 10.1016/j.bone.2006.11.006 #12;2 Abstract Prostate cancer metastases to bone are observed

Boyer, Edmond

282

Efficient production and purification of recombinant human interleukin-12 (IL-12) overexpressed in mammalian cells without affinity tag  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Interleukin-12 is a heterodimeric, pro-inflammatory cytokine that is a key driver of cell-mediated immunity. Clinical interest in IL-12 is significant due to its potent anti-tumor activity and efficacy in controlling certain infectious diseases such as Leishmaniasis and Listeria infection. For clinical applications, the ease of production and purification of IL-12 and the associated cost continues to be a consideration. In this context, we report a simple and effective heparin-affinity based purification of recombinant human IL-12 (hIL-12) from the serum-free supernatants of stable IL-12-transduced HEK293 cells. Fractionation of culture supernatants on heparin Sepharose columns revealed that hIL-12 elutes as a single peak in 500 mM NaCl. Coomassie staining and Western blot analysis showed that hIL-12 eluted in 500 mM NaCl is homogeneous. Purity of hIL-12 was ascertained by RP-HPLC and ESI-MS analysis, and found to be ?98%. Western blot analysis, using monoclonal antibodies, demonstrated that the crucial inter-subunit disulfide bond linking the p35 and p40 subunits is intact in the purified hIL-12. Results of far UV circular dichroism, steady-state tryptophan fluorescence, and differential scanning calorimetry experiments suggest that purified hIL-12 is in its stable native conformation. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and bioactivity studies demonstrate that hIL-12 is obtained in high yields (0.31 ± 0.05 mg/mL of the culture medium) and is also fully bioactive. Isothermal titration calorimetry data show that IL-12 exhibits a moderate binding affinity (Kd(app) = 69 ± 1 ?M) to heparin. The purification method described in this study is expected to provide greater impetus for research on the role of heparin in the regulation of the function of IL-12. In addition, the results of this study provide an avenue to obtain high amounts of IL-12 required for structural studies which are aimed at the development of novel IL-12-based therapeutics.

Srinivas Jayanthi; Bhanu prasanth Koppolu; Sean G. Smith; Rashmi Jalah; Jenifer Bear; Margherita Rosati; George N. Pavlakis; Barbara K. Felber; David A. Zaharoff; Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Gene expression profiling reveals novel regulation by bisphenol-A in estrogen receptor-{alpha}-positive human cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bisphenol-A (BPA) shows proliferative actions in uterus and mammary glands and may influence the development of male and female reproductive tracts in utero or during early postnatal life. Because of its ability to function as an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, BPA has the potential to disrupt normal endocrine signaling through regulation of ER target genes. Some genes are regulated by both estradiol (E2) and BPA, but those exclusive to either agent have not been described. Using a yeast strain incorporating a vitellogenin A2 ERE-LacZ reporter gene into the genome, we found that BPA induced expression of the reporter in colonies transformed with the ER{alpha} expression plasmid, illustrating BPA-mediated regulation within a chromatin context. Additionally, a reporter gene transiently transfected into the endometrial cancer (Ishikawa) cell line also showed BPA activity, although at 100-fold less potency than E2. To compare global gene expression in response to BPA and E2, we used a variant of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line stably expressing HA-tagged ER{alpha}. Cultures were treated for 3 h with an ethanol vehicle, E2 (10{sup -8} M), or BPA (10{sup -6} M), followed by isolation of RNA and microarray analysis with the human U95A probe array (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA). More than 300 genes were changed 2-fold or more by either or both agents, with roughly half being up-regulated and half down-regulated. A number of growth- and development-related genes, such as HOXC1 and C6, Wnt5A, Frizzled, TGF{beta}-2, and STAT inhibitor 2, were found to be affected exclusively by BPA. We used quantitative real-time PCR to verify regulation of the HOXC6 gene, which showed decreased expression of approximately 2.5-fold by BPA. These results reveal novel effects by BPA and E2, raising interesting possibilities regarding the role of endocrine disruptors in sexual development.

Singleton, David W. [Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology, and Anatomy, Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, University of Cincinnati, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States); Feng, Yuxin [Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology, and Anatomy, Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, University of Cincinnati, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States); Yang, Jun [Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology, and Anatomy, Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, University of Cincinnati, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States); Puga, Alvaro [Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, Adrian V. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Khan, Sohaib A. [Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology, and Anatomy, Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, University of Cincinnati, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States)]. E-mail: sohaib.khan@uc.edu

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); Ivanov, Ilia N. (Knoxville, TN); Shibata, Jason (Manhattan Beach, CA)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

285

Light & Skin Interactions: Simulations for Computer Graphics Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light & Skin Interactions immerses you in one of the most fascinating application areas of computer graphics: appearance simulation. The book first illuminates the fundamental biophysical processes that affect skin appearance, and reviews seminal ...

Gladimir V. G. Baranoski; Aravind Krishnaswamy

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Extracellular HIV-1 Tat induces human beta-defensin-2 production via NF-kappaB/AP-1 dependent pathways in human B cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Defensins, a family of antimicrobial peptides, are one of the first lines of host defense. Human beta-defensins (hBD) such as hBD-2 and -3 have anti-HIV activity. Previous studies have shown that HIV-1 virion can...

Sung Mi Ju; Ah Ra Goh; Dong-Joo Kwon; Gi Soo Youn; Hyung-Joo Kwon…

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Determination of 10B in lymphoma human cells after boron carrier treatment: comparison of 10BPA and immuno-nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current cancer treatments lead to insufficient distribution of therapeutic agents in tumor cells due to their lack of selectivity often causing adverse effects in the normal cell uptake of the drug. The challe...

Marco Giovanni Persico; Patrizia Chiari; Raffaela Biesuz…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Antitumor activity of PBI-1737 in xenograft human prostate PC-3 cancer by inhibition of cell adhesion and migration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cells identifies AR regulated interrelated networks of transcription...which the AR dominates this process is unclear. To identify...analysis also revealed that interrelated networks of transcription...cells identifies AR regulated interrelated networks of transcription...

Mouna Lagraoui; Brigitte Grouix; Marie-Eve Fafard; Dannyck Gaudreau; Natalie St-Amant; Lilianne Geerts; Francois Sarra-Bournet; Valerie Perron; Jean-Simon Duceppe; Boulos Zacharie; Christopher Penney; and Lyne Gagnon

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Efficient and Scalable Expansion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Under Clinically Compliant Settings: A View in 2013  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In contrast, the strategy of autogenic therapies relies on providing cell products to treat only the patient who donated the parental cells, which adheres more closely to the principle of hiPSC therapies. Since t...

Ying Wang; Linzhao Cheng; Sharon Gerecht

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Influence of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on cellular structures and processes in human keratinocytes (HaCaT)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background The use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma in dermatology to improve the healing of chronic wounds is a promising application. The antimicrobial properties of physical plasma offer on the one hand the killing of bacteria, which are often a problem in chronic wounds. On the other hand, plasma can activate cells which are involved in the wound closure. Objective To guarantee a safe application it is essential to understand basic interactions between physical plasma and human skin cells. Methods In our study, human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) were directly plasma treated with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma source and effects on viability, DNA, cell cycle, intracellular concentration of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis were observed. Results A treatment time-dependent loss of recovered adherent HaCaT cells after 24 h and a linear increase of DNA damage were observed, which was no longer evident 24 h after plasma stimulation, except for long treatment times. An accumulation of HaCaT cells in G2/M phase and a decrease in the G1 phase was caused by DBD plasma. The increasing formation of intracellular ROS is also attributed to plasma treatment. In contrast to other studies we did not find clear evidences for apoptosis in adherent HaCaT cells. A culture medium exchange subsequently after plasma treatment weakened the observed effects. Conclusion DBD plasma treatment resulted in oxidative stress in human keratinocytes which is related to deficient cell performance.

Susanne Blackert; Beate Haertel; Kristian Wende; Thomas von Woedtke; Ulrike Lindequist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Identification of Human Cytomegalovirus UL84 Virus- and Cell-Encoded Binding Partners by Using Proteomics Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...000 Da, and 1,250 laser shots were averaged for...cells with a UL44-dsRed fusion expression plasmid along...UL44-dsRed expresses a fusion protein composed of the...with UL84 and pp65-HA fusion expression plasmids...and transfected cells. HF cells were infected and...

Yang Gao; Kelly Colletti; Gregory S. Pari

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

Highly purified, multi-wall carbon nanotubes induce light-chain 3B expression in human lung cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •HTT2800-treated BEAS-2B cells induced LC3B in a time-dependent manner. •HTT2800-treated BEAS-2B cells showed decreased cell proliferation that was both time- and dose-dependent. •Addition of 3-MA, LC3B-II protein and mRNA levels were significantly decreased. •3-MA and E64-d + pepstatin A, but not brefeldin A, provided protection against HTT2800-induced cell death. •These results suggest that HTT2800 predominantly causes autophagy rather than apoptotic cell death in BEAS-2B cells. -- Abstract: Bronchial epithelial cells are targets of inhalation and play a critical role in the maintenance of mucosal integrity as mechanical barriers against various particles. Our previous result suggest that vapor-grown carbon fiber, HTT2800, which is one of the most highly purified multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) showed cellular uptake of the carbon nanotube, increased cell death, enhanced DNA damage, and induced cytokine release. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagy may critically influence vital cellular processes such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and inflammation and thereby may play a critical role in pulmonary diseases. Autophagy was recently recognized as a critical cell death pathway, and autophagosome accumulation has been found to be associated with the exposure of various nanoparticles. In this study, the authors focus on the autophagic responses of HTT2800 exposure. The HTT2800-exposed cells induced LC3B expression and induced cell growth inhibition.

Tsukahara, Tamotsu, E-mail: ttamotsu@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan)] [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Matsuda, Yoshikazu [Clinical Pharmacology Educational Center, Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Ina-machi, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan)] [Clinical Pharmacology Educational Center, Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Ina-machi, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Usui, Yuki [Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)] [Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Haniu, Hisao [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)] [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

293

Use of human embryonic stem cells to model pediatric gliomas with H3.3K27M histone mutation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Neurosurgery, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering...Neurosurgery, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering...Neurosurgery, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering...

Kosuke Funato; Tamara Major; Peter W. Lewis; C. David Allis; Viviane Tabar

294

Covert Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication in Dendritic Cells and in DC-SIGN-Expressing Cells Promotes Long-Term Transmission to Lymphocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...It is thus conceivable that a previously underestimated, surreptitious replication of X4 isolates in DCs will be the main source...HeLa CD4 DC-SIGN cells), confirming the occurrence of surreptitious HIV replication in these cells. Interestingly, replicative...

Cinzia Nobile; Caroline Petit; Arnaud Moris; Katharina Skrabal; Jean-Pierre Abastado; Fabrizio Mammano; Olivier Schwartz

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer {gamma}-Radiation-Induced NF{kappa}B-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NF{kappa}B regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NF{kappa}B-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNF{kappa}B-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-I{kappa}B{alpha}-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NF{kappa}B activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NF{kappa}B. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NF{kappa}B becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the {kappa}B-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NF{kappa}B-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NF{kappa}B by the I{kappa}B{alpha} mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NF{kappa}B overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced the IR-induced inhibition of cell survival. Conclusions: These results strongly suggest that curcumin inhibits IR-induced TA in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner in human neuroblastoma cells.

Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. •MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. •p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

Wu, Huijuan [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Xiao, ZhengHua [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China)] [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China); Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Hao, Quan, E-mail: quanhao2002@163.com [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV{sub L}, in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own.

Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Length of cell division/mitosis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Length of cell division/mitosis Length of cell division/mitosis Name: Mrs. Goeheler Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are a 5/6 grade class at Lake Louise in Palatine. We are studying cell division- mitosis. We would like to know how long this process takes? Can you please help us with this question? thanks for your help. Replies: For cells that are actively growing and dividing (say, for instance, human skin cells - fibroblasts- that are grown in culture dishes) the entire cell cycle takes about 20-24 hours. The cell cycle is usually described as having four "phases". In the G1 phase, the cell grows and also senses whether the environment is right to go on to divide. The d decision to divide is made in G1 phase. The second phase is S phase, where the DNA of the cell is copied (replicated). It's called S because this is the phase where DNA Synthesis occurs. The third phase is called G2. Here, the cell grows more, makes sure that all of its chromosomes are fully copied, and gets ready to divide. The fourth phase is M phase, where mitosis and cell division occurs. M phase usually takes about 1 hour; G1 phase is variable (depending on growth conditions); S phase usually takes about 6-8 hours, and G2 is normally 2-5 S phase usually takes about 6-8 hours, and G2 is normally 2-5 hours. Just how this cycle is regulated - and how the "decisions" are made - is a very hot topic in cell biology research these days. You're on to something big and exciting here!

299

Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of the human microbiome have revealed that even healthy individuals differ remarkably in the microbes that occupy habitats such as the gut, skin and vagina. Much of this diversity remains unexplained, although diet, ...

Alm, Eric J.

300

Development of quantitative real time PCR to assess human brain microvascular endothelial cell susceptibility to HIV -1 infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Laboratories, Carlsbad, CA) 10% heat inactivatedfrom Invitrogen Corp. (Carlsbad, CA) and propagated asInvitrogen Corp. , Carlsbad, CA). Cells were maintained in a

Chao, Ying Sheng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Targeted and Nontargeted Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Delayed Genomic Instability in Human Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...humans receive some radiation exposure, mostly...risks associated with radiation exposure come from populations exposed to ionizing radiation, primarily from epidemiologic...However, those doses, in the range of 0.2 to 2.5...

Lei Huang; Perry M. Kim; Jac A. Nickoloff; and William F. Morgan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Abstract 3464: Epigenetic mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation in human lung epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Epigenetic mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation in human...Southern Maine, Portland, ME. Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly used in military...research information on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. In our...

Hong Xie; Carolyne LaCerte; and John P. Wise

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Effects of oncogenic Ras and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase on the adhesion of normal human cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activating mutations in RAS oncogenes commonly arise in human cancers. However, in experimental settings, oncogenic RAS has most often been studied at supraphysiological levels of expression. Importantly, work by others ...

Waldman, Lynne K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Surface Zwitterionization of Expanded Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) Membranes via Atmospheric Plasma-Induced Polymerization for Enhanced Skin Wound Healing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface Zwitterionization of Expanded Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) Membranes via Atmospheric Plasma-Induced Polymerization for Enhanced Skin Wound Healing ... Incubation of cell suspension with the samples was performed at 37 °C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and for 24 h. ...

Jheng-Fong Jhong; Antoine Venault; Chun-Chung Hou; Sheng-Han Chen; Ta-Chin Wei; Jie Zheng; James Huang; Yung Chang

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 ?M treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 ?M. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ?The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ?Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells. ?Triclosan suppresses membrane ruffling of activated mast cells. ?Triclosan's effects persist when early mast cell signaling events are bypassed. ?Supports use of triclosan as a topical treatment for eczema.

Palmer, Rachel K., E-mail: rachel.palmer@maine.edu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Gosse, Julie A., E-mail: julie.gosse@umit.maine.edu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Inactivation of Human MAD2B in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells Leads to Chemosensitization to DNA-Damaging Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...regulation of cell cycle progression through...Based on our analysis, impaired TLS...4 Jansen JG, de Wind N. Biological functions...EJ. DNA sequence analysis of spontaneous mutagenesis...gastric cancer cells. Life Sci 2006;78:1277-86...Guo Y, et al. Analysis of genetic alterations...

Hiu Wing Cheung; Abel C.S. Chun; Qi Wang; Wen Deng; Liang Hu; Xin-Yuan Guan; John M. Nicholls; Ming-Tat Ling; Yong Chuan Wong; Sai Wah Tsao; Dong-Yan Jin; and Xianghong Wang

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Green Tea Component, Catechin, Induces Apoptosis of Human Malignant B Cells via Production of Reactive Oxygen Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...enhanced by As2O3 via production of intracellular ROS. Materials and Methods Cells and cell culture...H, Maeda M, et al. Production of hydrogen peroxide and methionine...phosphorylation and H2O2 production in transformed and non-transformed...

Tomonori Nakazato; Keisuke Ito; Yasuo Ikeda; and Masahiro Kizaki

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy Management by Enhanced Glycolysis in G1-phase in Human Colon Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metabolites involved in energy and redox metabolism...mKO2 (red), mAG (green), and both mKO2 and...cell-cycle phase-dependent energy metabolism, possibly...G2-M phases both emitted green fluorescence, they could...cell-cycle-dependent changes in energy metabolism clearly...

Yan Bao; Kuniaki Mukai; Takako Hishiki; Akiko Kubo; Mitsuyo Ohmura; Yuki Sugiura; Tomomi Matsuura; Yoshiko Nagahata; Noriyo Hayakawa; Takehiro Yamamoto; Ryo Fukuda; Hideyuki Saya; Makoto Suematsu; and Yoji Andrew Minamishima

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Neoplastic Transformation of a Human Colonic Epithelial Cell Line: In Vitro Evidence for the Adenoma to Carcinoma Sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...AA/C1 [colony-forming efficiency (CFE) on plastic of 1.05%] was isolated...C1/SB cell line which had an increased CFE on plastic (6.13%) although the cells...On continuous in vitro passage, the CFE in agarose of AA/C1/SB10 has increased...

Ann C. Williams; Sara J. Harper; Christos Paraskeva

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Proteomic Identification of Paclitaxel-Resistance Associated hnRNP A2 and GDI 2 Proteins in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Proteomic Identification of Paclitaxel-Resistance Associated hnRNP A2 and GDI 2 Proteins in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells ... Using 2DE with MALDI-TOF and LC?MS/MS, we found hnRNP A2 and GDI 2 may represent potential biomarkers of the paclitaxel-resistance of ovarian cancer for tailored cancer therapy. ... The expressions of ALDH 1A1, annexin A1, hnRNP A2, and GDI 2 proteins were validated by Western blot, which was consistent with proteomic analysis. ...

Dong Hyeon Lee; Kwanghoe Chung; Ji-Ae Song; Tae-heon Kim; Haeyoun Kang; Jin Hyong Huh; Sang-geun Jung; Jung Jae Ko; Hee Jung An

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

Telomerase-Dependent Oncolytic Adenovirus Sensitizes Human Cancer Cells to Ionizing Radiation via Inhibition of DNA Repair Machinery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surgical resection, radiation, and cytotoxic...the threshold for radiation-induced tumor cell death; the safety and efficacy of...1-3). Ionizing radiation primarily targets...with the CalcuSyn software (BioSoft), and...

Shinji Kuroda; Toshiya Fujiwara; Yasuhiro Shirakawa; Yasumoto Yamasaki; Shuya Yano; Futoshi Uno; Hiroshi Tazawa; Yuuri Hashimoto; Yuichi Watanabe; Kazuhiro Noma; Yasuo Urata; Shunsuke Kagawa; and Toshiyoshi Fujiwara

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Induction of apoptosis by extracelluar organic metabolite isolated from actinomycete Streptomyces sp. BIT-64 in human leukemia cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Presence of meningioma stroma mesenchymal stem-like cells. Eui Hyun Kim Seok Ku Kang Yonsei University College of Medicine...be a source of meningioma microenvironment. Citation Format: Eui Hyun Kim, Seok Ku Kang. Presence of meningioma stroma mesenchymal...

Yung Hyun Choi; Min Ho Han; Cheng-Yun Park; Gi-Young Kim; Byung Tae Choi; Won Ho Lee; Seong-Yun Jeong

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nucleic Acid Content and Nuclear Chromatin Structure of Human Bladder Cell Culture Lines as Studied by Flow Cytofluorometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...characterizing tissue culture cell lines, as we have done home,and perhaps in distinguishing benign and malignant epithelial...Sharpless, T., and Darzynkiewicz, z. Urinary Cytology Automation. Preliminary Studies with Acridine Orange Stain and Flow-Through...

Myron R. Melamed; Zbigniew Darzynkiewicz; Frank Traganos; and Thomas K. Sharpless

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Disruption of Cellular Energy Balance by Suramin in Intact Human Prostatic Carcinoma Cells, a Likely Antiproliferative Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...transforming growth factor Y(44). Thus, inhibition of tetrazolium conversion was not competitively...serum, multiple growth factors, or calcium. The rapid...suramin of tetrazolium conversion in intact DU 145 cells...disruption of cellular energy balance or respiration...

Randall Rago; Jacque Mitchen; Ann-Lii Cheng; Terry Oberley; and George Wilding

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Physiological Melatonin Inhibition of Human Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Vitro: Evidence for a Glutathione-mediated Pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...message of melatonin to the intracellular processes controlling the proliferation of MCF-7...milieu. Thus, it functions in reductive processes that are essential for protein metabolism...cells in vitro. In: Prog. 18th Ann. Mtg. Bioelectromagnetics Society, pp. 1...

David E. Blask; Sean T. Wilson; and Fred Zalatan

1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Differences and Similarities in Viral Life Cycle Progression and Host Cell Physiology after Infection of Human Dendritic Cells with Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara and Vaccinia Virus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recombinant vaccinia virus vectors. Gene 142: 167-174. 12 Bronte, V., M. W. Carroll, T. J. Goletz, M. Wang, W. W. Overwijk, F. Marincola, S. A. Rosenberg, B. Moss, and N. P. Restifo. 1997. Antigen expression by dendritic cells correlates...

Ann Chahroudi; David A. Garber; Patrick Reeves; Luzheng Liu; Daniel Kalman; Mark B. Feinberg

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (?-N) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between ?-N and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

D. Q. Fang (???); Y. G. Ma (???); X. Z. Cai (???); W. D. Tian (???); H. W. Wang (???)

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Changes in gene expression in human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to low concentrations of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epidemiology studies suggest that there may be a weak association between high level exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and renal tubule cell carcinoma. Laboratory animal studies have shown an increased incidence of renal tubule carcinoma in male rats but not mice. TCE can undergo metabolism via glutathione (GSH) conjugation to form metabolites that are known to be nephrotoxic. The GSH conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione (DCVG), is processed further to the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. We have cultured human renal tubule cells (HRPTC) in serum-free medium under a variety of different culture conditions and observed growth, respiratory control and glucose transport over a 20 day period in medium containing low glucose. Cell death was time- and concentration-dependent, with the EC{sub 5} for DCVG being about 3 {mu}M and for DCVC about 7.5 {mu}M over 10 days. Exposure of HRPTC to sub-cytotoxic doses of DCVC (0.1 {mu}M and 1 {mu}M for 10 days) led to a small number of changes in gene expression, as determined by transcript profiling with Affymetrix human genome chips. Using the criterion of a mean 2-fold change over control for the four samples examined, 3 genes at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC increased, namely, adenosine kinase, zinc finger protein X-linked and an enzyme with lyase activity. At 1 {mu}M DCVC, two genes showed a >2-fold decrease, N-acetyltransferase 8 and complement factor H. At a lower stringency (1.5-fold change), a total of 63 probe sets were altered at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC and 45 at 1 {mu}M DCVC. Genes associated with stress, apoptosis, cell proliferation and repair and DCVC metabolism were altered, as were a small number of genes that did not appear to be associated with the known mode of action of DCVC. Some of these genes may serve as molecular markers of TCE exposure and effects in the human kidney.

Lock, Edward A. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 280 Calhoun Street, PO Box 250140, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)]. E-mail: e.lock@ljmu.ac.uk; Barth, Jeremy L. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, 173 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Argraves, Scott W. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, 173 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Schnellmann, Rick G. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 280 Calhoun Street, PO Box 250140, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Diospyrin derivative, an anticancer quinonoid, regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondria by modulating cytosolic calcium in human breast carcinoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diospyrin diethylether (D7) caused oxidative stress-dependent activation of PC-PLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated PC-PLC induced a sustained-release of Ca{sup 2+} from endoplasmic reticulum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The elevated cytosolic Ca{sup +2} led to the calpain-caspase12 dependent apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D7-Induced Ca{sup +2} also found to accentuate the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Diospyrin diethylether (D7), a bisnaphthoquinonoid derivative, exhibited an oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis in several human cancer cells and tumor models. The present study was aimed at evaluation of the increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} leading to the apoptotic cell death triggered by D7 in MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. A phosphotidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, viz. U73122, and an antioxidant, viz. N-acetylcysteine, could significantly prevent the D7-induced rise in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} and PC-PLC activity. Using an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Ca{sup 2+} mobilizer (thapsigargin) and an ER-IP3R antagonist (heparin), results revealed ER as a major source of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} which led to the activation of calpain and caspase12, and cleavage of fodrin. These effects including apoptosis were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of Bapta-AM (a cell permeable Ca{sup 2+}-specific chelator), or calpeptin (a calpain inhibitor). Furthermore, D7-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} was found to alter mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by either Bapta-AM or ruthenium red (an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter). Thus, these results provided a deeper insight into the D7-induced redox signaling which eventually integrated the calcium-dependent calpain/caspase12 activation and mitochondrial alterations to accentuate the induction of apoptotic cell death.

Kumar, Binod [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India) [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Amit [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghosh, Subhalakshmi [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: bnp@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, Kaushala P. [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Hazra, Banasri, E-mail: banasrihazra@yahoo.co.in [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

320

An evaluation of genotoxicity in human neuronal-type cells subjected to oxidative stress under an extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The possible genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) exposure is still a controversial topic. The most of the reported data suggests that it alone does not affect DNA integrity, but several recent reports have suggested that sinusoidal ELF-MF may increase the effect of known genotoxic agents. Only a few studies deal with non sinusoidal ELF-MF, including pulsed magnetic field (PMF), which are produced by several devices. The aim of this study is to investigate whether PMF exposure can interfere with DNA damage and repair in the presence of a genotoxic oxidative agent in neuronal type cells. To this purpose gamma-H2AX foci formation, which is a sensitive marker of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), was investigated at different points of time (1, 24, 48, 72 h) after the H2O2 treatment (300 ?M for 1 h) under PMF exposure (1 mT, 50 Hz) in human neuroblastoma BE(2)C cells. Moreover, cytotoxicity evaluation, by MTT assay and cell cycle analysis, was performed at various points of time after the treatment. Taken together, results suggest that PMF exposure does not interfere with genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by oxidative stress.

Gianfranco Giorgi; Mariangela Lecciso; Miriam Capri; Stella Lukas Yani; Angela Virelli; Ferdinando Bersani; Brunella Del Re

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with neutron star observations K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro as varying the neutron radius of 208Pb. The neutron skin thickness Sn is determined in the comparison with the astronomical observations of massive neutron stars (NSs), the standard scenario of NS cooling

323

Isolation and effects of citrus limonoids on cytochrome p450 inhibition, apoptotic induction and cytotoxicity on human cancer cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(deacetylnomilinic acid 17beta-D glucopyranoside), have shown superoxide scavenging at millimolar levels. Micromolar amounts of LG and OG induced rapid necrosis of SH-SY5Y cells. Cytotoxicity was correlated (P = 0.046) to a concentration and timedependent increase...

Poulose, Shibu M.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Inactivation of Human MAD2B in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells Leads to Chemosensitization to DNA-Damaging Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...eukaryotes. Annu Rev Biochem 2002;71:17-50. 4 Jansen JG, de Wind N. Biological functions of translesion synthesis proteins in...Curr Opin Cell Biol 2004;16:328-34. 41 Couedel C, Mills KD, Barchi M, et al. Collaboration of homologous recombination...

Hiu Wing Cheung; Abel C.S. Chun; Qi Wang; Wen Deng; Liang Hu; Xin-Yuan Guan; John M. Nicholls; Ming-Tat Ling; Yong Chuan Wong; Sai Wah Tsao; Dong-Yan Jin; and Xianghong Wang

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKC? mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ju, Tsai-Kai [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yuan-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Ming-Shyue [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jiun-Hong [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Hsinyu, E-mail: hsinyu@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Center for Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

SNAI1 Is Required for Tumor Growth and Lymph Node Metastasis of Human Breast Carcinoma MDA-MB-231 Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...indicate this fact. The authors thank Amalia Montes and Vanesa Santos for excellent technical assistance; and Drs. Virtanen and...Cell Biol 2000;2:84-9. 6 Cano A, Perez-Moreno MA, Rodrigo I, et al. The transcription factor snail controls epithelial-mesenchymal...

David Olmeda; Gema Moreno-Bueno; Juana M. Flores; Angels Fabra; Francisco Portillo; and Amparo Cano

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Bcl-XL small interfering RNA suppresses the proliferation of 5-fluorouracil-resistant human colon cancer cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1 2 Fuminori Teraishi 1 Shuhong Wu 1 Xiaobo Cao 1 Jonathan Daniel 1 W. Roy Smythe 1 Bingliang Fang 1 2 Requests for reprints...colorectal cancer cell lines. Int J Cancer 2003;106:66-73. 7 Violette S, Poulain L, Dussaulx E, et al. Resistance of colon cancer...

Hongbo Zhu; Wei Guo; Lidong Zhang; John J. Davis; Fuminori Teraishi; Shuhong Wu; Xiaobo Cao; Jonathan Daniel; W. Roy Smythe; and Bingliang Fang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Genetic control and dynamics of the cellular immune response to the human T–cell leukaemia virus, HTLV–I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Charles R. M. Bangham 1 * Sarah E. Hall 1 Katie J. M. Jeffery 1 Alison M. Vine 1 Aviva Witkover 1 Martin A. Nowak 2 Dominik...Wucherpfennig, K. W., H llsberg, P., Richardson, J. H., Benjamin, D. & Ha er, D. A. 1992 T-cell activation by auto...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Characterization of a Second Human Cyclin A That Is Highly Expressed in Testis and in Several Leukemic Cell Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0 U, Cu a@a@w-@'as@@ @Cu Cu 0 @jW@W 0 @:i@:ithth a ?@O4@ n_Co (00)0) I CO .J 0) 0) ,-@ ID@DFig. 3. Expression of cyclin Al in various hu man cell lines shown by Northern blots. Each lane contains 10 @zgtotal RNAs. Top...

Rong Yang; Roberta Morosetti; H. Phillip Koeffler

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Novel Cell Entry Pathway for a DAF-Using Human Enterovirus Is Dependent on Lipid Rafts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dorahy, R. A. Ingham, G. F. Burns, and R. D. Barry. 1997...R. D. Barry, and G. F. Burns. 1998. Antibody binding to...depletion inhibits clathrin-coated pit budding. Proc. Natl. Acad...regulatory switch for coated pit formation. J. Cell Biol. 123...

Amanda D. Stuart; Hannah E. Eustace; Thomas A. McKee; T. D. K. Brown

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase in a Stable Human B-Lymphocyte Cell Line, RPMI-1788, Cultured in the Absence of Mitogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RPMI-1788) in a long-term culture has shown...RPMI-1788) in a long-term culture has shown...environment with chemical wastes, e.g., cig...starting cell density, storage of blood and lymphocytes...absence of mitogens in long-term culture. The use...

H. J. Freedman; H. L. Gurtoo; J. Minowada; B. Paigen; and J. B. Vaught

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 Targets a Novel Cell Surface Antigen Expressed by a Wide Spectrum of Human Solid Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lactotetraose series ganglioside 3-iso-LD1 is widely expressed on brain...osteosarcoma-associated antigen recognized by the mAbs TP-1 and TP-3 (17) , and the decay-accelerating...35) Normal neuronal cells , 6-iso-LD1 DMAb-22 (29) Fetal brain...

Shakeel Modak; Kim Kramer; S. Humayun Gultekin; Hong Fen Guo; and Nai-Kong V. Cheung

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Expression of a drug resistance gene in human neuroblastoma cell lines: modulation by retinoic acid-induced differentiation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...labeled riboprobe per ml. Filters were...exposed for 2 to 4 days at -70?C. RNase...Accumulations were per- formed in SH-SY5Y...and without 3 or 4 days of retinoic acid treatment...retinoic acid was begun 2 days before the cells were...LSH-PE or 200 ng of PE per ml (equimolar concentrations...

S E Bates; L A Mickley; Y N Chen; N Richert; J Rudick; J L Biedler; A T Fojo

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Association of Decreased Intercellular Communication with the Immortal but not the Tumorigenic Phenotype in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...per 100-mm dish were plated in medium containing 30 /J.MTG. After 3 wk, the plates were stained and TG' colonies containing...observed in the two cell lines is a function of the immortalization process. Previous observations using a variety of techniques to show...

Sandra R. Eldridge; Thomas W. Martens; Carol A. Sattler; and Michael N. Gould

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

HLA targeting efficiency correlates with human T-cell response magnitude and with mortality from influenza A infection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mononuclear cells obtained from a household cohort study performed...they also were higher for Hispanic, African American...6801 5.6 USA South Texas Hispanics A*6801 5.2 Taiwan Saisiat...3906 7.3 USA South Texas Hispanics B*3906 5.6 Venezuela Perija...

Tomer Hertz; Christine M. Oshansky; Philippa L. Roddam; John P. DeVincenzo; Miguela A. Caniza; Nebojsa Jojic; Simon Mallal; Elizabeth Phillips; Ian James; M. Elizabeth Halloran; Paul G. Thomas; Lawrence Corey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced. At high E2 concentration, classical genomic pathway involving ER binding to the regulatory regions was reduced, and alternate or indirect activation of genes through Oct-1 became more prominent.

Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath, E-mail: csab@bio.psgtech.ac.in [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India)] [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India); Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar [Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne (Germany); Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India)] [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India)

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Extensive esterification of adrenal C19-delta 5-sex steroids to long-chain fatty acids in the ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells (ZR-75-1) were incubated with the 3H-labeled adrenal C19-delta 5-steroids dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its fully estrogenic derivative, androst-5-ene-3 beta,17 beta-diol (delta 5-diol) for various time intervals. When fractionated by solvent partition, Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and silica gel TLC, the labeled cell components were largely present (40-75%) in three highly nonpolar, lipoidal fractions. Mild alkaline hydrolysis of these lipoidal derivatives yielded either free 3H-labeled DHEA or delta 5-diol. The three lipoidal fractions cochromatographed with the synthetic DHEA 3 beta-esters, delta 5-diol 3 beta (or 17 beta)-monoesters and delta 5-diol 3 beta,17 beta-diesters of long-chain fatty acids. DHEA and delta 5-diol were mainly esterified to saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. For delta 5-diol, the preferred site of esterification of the fatty acids is the 3 beta-position while some esterification also takes place at the 17 beta-position. Time course studies show that ZR-75-1 cells accumulate delta 5-diol mostly (greater than 95%) as fatty acid mono- and diesters while DHEA is converted to delta 5-diol essentially as the esterified form. Furthermore, while free C19-delta 5-steroids rapidly diffuse out of the cells after removal of the precursor (3H)delta 5-diol, the fatty acid ester derivatives are progressively hydrolyzed, and DHEA and delta 5-diol thus formed are then sulfurylated prior to their release into the culture medium. The latter process however is rate-limited, since new steady-state levels of free steroids and fatty acid esters are rapidly reached and maintained for extended periods of time after removal of precursor, thus maintaining minimal concentrations of intracellular steroids.

Poulin, R.; Poirier, D.; Merand, Y.; Theriault, C.; Belanger, A.; Labrie, F.

1989-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoidable skin cancers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: avoidable skin cancers Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 "Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Summary: "Skin Cancer- What to Look For"...

340

Mechanistic investigation of skin barrier perturbation induced by surfactants in the presence of humectants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stratum corneum (SC) of the skin functions as a barrier between the body and the environment. Surfactants such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) are used in skin cleansers and in skin-care formulations because of their ...

Ghosh, Saswata

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gender differences in skin: A review of the literature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: There has been increasing interest in studying gender differences in skin to learn more about disease pathogenesis and to discover more effective treatments. Recent advances have been made in our understanding of these differences in skin histology, physiology, and immunology, and they have implications for diseases such as acne, eczema, alopecia, skin cancer, wound healing, and rheumatologic diseases with skin manifestations. Objective: This article reviews advances in our understanding of gender differences in skin. Methods: Using the PubMed database, broad searches for topics, with search terms such as gender differences in skin and sex differences in skin, as well as targeted searches for gender differences in specific dermatologic diseases, such as gender differences in melanoma, were performed. Additional articles were identified from cited references. Articles reporting gender differences in the following areas were reviewed: acne, skin cancer, wound healing, immunology, hair/alopecia, histology and skin physiology, disease-specific gender differences, and psychological responses to disease burden. Results: A recurring theme encountered in many of the articles reviewed referred to a delicate balance between normal and pathogenic conditions. This theme is highlighted by the complex interplay between estrogens and androgens in men and women, and how changes and adaptations with aging affect the disease process. Sex steroids modulate epidermal and dermal thickness as well as immune system function, and changes in these hormonal levels with aging and/or disease processes alter skin surface pH, quality of wound healing, and propensity to develop autoimmune disease, thereby significantly influencing potential for infection and other disease states. Gender differences in alopecia, acne, and skin cancers also distinguish hormonal interactions as a major target for which more research is needed to translate current findings to clinically significant diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Conclusions: The published findings on gender differences in skin yielded many advances in our understanding of cancer, immunology, psychology, skin histology, and specific dermatologic diseases. These advances will enable us to learn more about disease pathogenesis, with the goal of offering better treatments. Although gender differences can help us to individually tailor clinical management of disease processes, it is important to remember that a patient's sex should not radically alter diagnostic or therapeutic efforts until clinically significant differences between males and females arise from these findings. Because many of the results reviewed did not originate from randomized controlled clinical trials, it is difficult to generalize the data to the general population. However, the pressing need for additional research in these areas becomes exceedingly clear, and there is already a strong foundation on which to base future investigations.

Harry Dao Jr.; Rebecca A. Kazin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Skin Disease In Dermatomyositis -- What Patients And Their Families Often Want To Know  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the upper eyelids (heliotrope erythema), the cheeks ofcharacteristic violet (heliotrope) skin color seen in whitecharacteristic violet (heliotrope) skin color seen in white

Sontheimer, Richard D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous skin effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin detector. Row 2(a) illustrates the effect of occlusion and rotational... Skin Patch Detection in Real-World Images Hannes Kruppa, Martin A. Bauer and Bernt Schiele... :...

344

Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cells of the airways due to internal exposure to alpha-particle emitters, e.g. radon. Inhalation of radon, a colorless and odorless gas, one of the products of the decay of uranium which occurs naturally in the earth?s crust, is the second major cause... epithelial tissue plays an important role in normal lung physiology. square4 lung epithelia are target tissues for occupational internal exposures and for radon exposure (26); square4 the epithelium of bronchioles appears to be the origin...

Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Differential antineoplastic and biochemical effects of resveratrol and 3,3’,4,4’,5,5’-hexahydroxystilbene in HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the skin of grapes and red wine, has recently attracted public...order to further enhance these qualities, our group synthesized a novel...that M8 caused a significant increase in dCTP pools, while depleting...concentrations and caused a significant increase in intracellular UTP pools...

Monika Fritzer-Szekeres; Zsuzsanna Horvath; Philipp Saiko; Christoph Illmer; Sibylle Madlener; Michael Grusch; Marek Murias; Walter Jaeger; Norbert Handler; Thomas Erker; Maria Ozsvar-Kozma; and Thomas Szekeres

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

PD 0332991, a selective cyclin D kinase 4/6 inhibitor, preferentially inhibits proliferation of luminal estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer cell lines in vitro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistant breast cancer cell line JIMT-1. Cancer Genetnegative' breast cancer cell lines growing in vitro. Breasthuman breast cancer cell lines in vitro Richard S Finn 1 ,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Inhibition of PARP1 by small interfering RNA enhances docetaxel activity against human prostate cancer PC3 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •PARP1 siRNA enhances docetaxel’s activity against PC3 cells. •PARP1 siRNA enhances docetaxel’s activity against EGFR/Akt/FOXO1 pathway. •PARP1 siRNA and PARP1 inhibitor differently affect the phosphorylation and expression of FOXO1. -- Abstract: Though poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors have benefits in combination with radiotherapy in prostate cancers, few is known about the exactly role and underlying mechanism of PARP1 in combination with chemotherapy agents. Here our data revealed that inhibition of PARP1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could enhance docetaxel’s activity against PC3 cells, which is associated with an accelerate repression of EGF/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway. Our results provide a novel role of PARP1 in transcription regulation of EGFR/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway and indicate that PARP1 siRNA combined with docetaxel can be an innovative treatment strategy to potentially improve outcomes in CRPC patients.

Wu, Wenqi, E-mail: wwqwml@163.com [Department of Urology, Minimally Invasive Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Urology (China)] [Department of Urology, Minimally Invasive Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Urology (China); Kong, Zhenzhen; Duan, Xiaolu; Zhu, Hanliang; Li, Shujue; Zeng, Shaohua; Liang, Yeping [Department of Urology, Minimally Invasive Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Urology (China)] [Department of Urology, Minimally Invasive Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Urology (China); Iliakis, George [Institute of Medical Radiation Biology, University of Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Radiation Biology, University of Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany); Gui, Zhiming [Department of Urology, The Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College (China)] [Department of Urology, The Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College (China); Yang, Dong [Department of Urology, Minimally Invasive Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Urology (China)] [Department of Urology, Minimally Invasive Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Urology (China)

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Marianne B. Sowa, Claere von Neubeck, R. Joe Robinson, Paula M. Koehler, Norman J. Karin, Xihai Wang, Katrina M. Waters and Harish Shankaran Ionizing radiation exposure triggers a cell signaling program which includes proliferation, the DNA damage response, and tissue remodeling. The activated signaling pathways lead to the induction of both protective effects as well as adverse consequences. A fundamental question is whether signaling cascades initiated by low doses are fundamentally different than those initiated by high doses. To address this question we have applied a systems biology approach to examine the radiation induced temporal responses of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model. Using microarray-

349

Regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in Ah responsive and Ah nonresponsive human breast cancer cells by 17 B-estradiol and 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study focused on the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4) protein secretion and MRNA expression. In human breast cancer cells, 17 O-estradiol (E2) induced IGFBP-4...

Schrope, Katherine Eillene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cell fusion mediated by interaction of a hybrid CD4.CD8 molecule with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein does occur after a long lag time.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...01 cells. CD4.CD8 molecule does not interfere in the fusion...Coexpression of CD4.CD8 with CD4 does not interfere dominantly with...human immunodeficiency virus does not require the cytoplasmic...J. C. Jamieson (ed.), Handbook of physiology. Oxford University...

H Golding; R Blumenthal; J Manischewitz; D R Littman; D S Dimitrov

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear skin emergence in Skyrme deformed Hartree-Fock calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of the charge and matter densities and the corresponding rms radii for even-even isotopes of Ni, Kr, and Sn has been performed in the framework of deformed self-consistent mean field Skyrme HF+BCS method. The resulting charge radii and neutron skin thicknesses of these nuclei are compared with available experimental data, as well as with other theoretical predictions. The formation of a neutron skin, which manifests itself in an excess of neutrons at distances greater than the radius of the proton distribution, is analyzed in terms of various definitions. Formation of a proton skin is shown to be unlikely. The effects of deformation on the neutron skins in even-even deformed nuclei far from the stability line are discussed.

Sarriguren, P; de Guerra, E Moya; Antonov, A N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Neutron skin of nuclei near the neutron drip line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performing Skyrme-type deformed Hartree-Fock calculations, the possible presence of neutron skin in nuclei towards neutron drip line is studied. The thickness of the neutron skin is found to be nearly constant in all directions if it is measured perpendicular to the surface, and in a given nucleus the number of neutrons being inside of the neutron skin is almost independent of the deformation (namely, spherical shape or normal deformation or superdeformation). In the region of medium-heavy nuclei our calculation shows the presence of a series of neutron-rich nuclei, in which a neutron skin is present and yet the neutron one-particle spectra are far from those in a harmonic oscillator (plus spin-orbit) potential.

I. Hamamoto and X. Z. Zhang

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Numerical modeling of a wing skin peen forming process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years shot peering has been used to provide fatigue resistance and form to airplane wing skins at the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company. In this process, ... to replicate the shot peening process used a...

R. D. VanLuchene; E. J. Cramer

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Mpemba paradox: Hydrogen bond memory and water-skin supersolidity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical reproduction of measurements, experimental evidence for skin super-solidity and hydrogen-bond memory clarified that Mpemba paradox integrates the heat emission-conduction-dissipation dynamics in the source-path-drain cycle system.

Chang Q Sun

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

355

Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep Stephen W. Carmichael Mayo Clinic. Coming Events 2011 EMAS 2011 May 15­19, 2011 Angers, France www.emas-web.net IUMAS-V May 22­27, 2011

Heller, Eric

356

Fluorescent silica colloids for study and visualization of skin care products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to long exposures to cold and dry air (7). Different skin care products are used to hy- drate dryFluorescent silica colloids for study and visualization of skin care products Swaminathan Iyer: The efficacy of skin care products depends on the time and dynamics of their absorbance by the skin, and its

Sokolov, Igor

357

Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXR?) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXR? mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXR? binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXR? plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ? Liver X receptor ? mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ? LXR? and RXR? dimerization further activated this induction. ? Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ? LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ? ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXR? binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Zhou, Tianyan [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Chen, Guangping, E-mail: guangping.chen@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Activation of tat-defective human immunodeficiency virus by ultraviolet light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet light (UV) is known to cause activation of gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promoter. To address the question of whether tat-defective HIV-1 provirus could be rescued by UV irradiation we examined its effect on HeLa cells containing integrated proviruses with tat mutations. Exposure of these cells to an optimal dose of UV resulted in the production of infectious viruses. The degree of UV activation and reversion to infectious virus appeared to depend on the nature of the original tat mutation. Two of the mutants required cocultivation with tat-expressing cells to fully generate replication competent viruses, while a third mutant required only cocultivation with H9 cells. Sequencing of cDNA from cells infected with this last mutant demonstrated that the parental mutant sequence was retained and that genotypic revertants to the wild-type as well as new mutant sequences were generated. These results suggest that tat-defective HIV-1 provirus can be activated by UV and can subsequently revert to wild-type virus. This study raises the possibility that UV exposure of immune cells in the skin plays a role in the activation of defective HIV-1 in vivo.

Sadaie, M.R.; Tschachler, E.; Valerie, K.; Rosenberg, M.; Felber, B.K.; Pavlakis, G.N.; Klotman, M.E.; Wong-Staal, F. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Rescue from apoptosis in early (CD34-selected) versus late (non-CD34-selected) human hematopoietic cells by very late antigen 4- and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) 1-dependent adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...transplanted hematopoietic cells by bone marrow. Proc. NatI. Aced. Sci. USA, 85: 3180-3183, 1988. 18. Joling, P., Rademakers, L H. P. M., Verdaasdonk, M. A. M., Zimmermann, D., Spienngs, D. C. J., Werner, N., Werner, R. A...

MW Wang; U Consoli; CM Lane; A Durett; MJ Lauppe; R Champlin; M Andreeff; AB Deisseroth

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fisetin induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells through ERK1/2-mediated activation of caspase-8-/caspase-3-dependent pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid that has ... cells. However, the apoptosis-inducing effect of fisetin on tumor cell lines was investigated besides ... cells. In this study, we found that fisetin induce...

Tsung-Ho Ying; Shun-Fa Yang; Su-Ju Tsai; Shu-Ching Hsieh…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Identification of a potential HIV-induced source of bystander-mediated apoptosis in T cells: Upregulation of TRAIL in primary human macrophages by HIV-1 tat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The induction of apoptosis in T cells by bystander cells has been repeatedly implicated as a mechanism contributing to the T cell depletion seen in HIV infection. It has been shown that apoptosis ... could be ind...

Mingjie Zhang; Xingxiang Li; Xiaowu Pang; Linna Ding…

362

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human epidermal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stem cell lineages in human foreskin xenografted... 1975: 93: 649-658. 27. Jones Ph, Watt F M. Separation of human epidermal stem cells from transit... UNCORRECTED PROOF...

363

The critical roles of pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) component, Cdc6, in DNA replication and checkpoint response in human cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognition complex (ORC)………………………………………5 B. Cell division231 Breast cancer cell type ORC Origin Recognition Complexby the timely arrival of the ORC complex proteins that bind

Lau, Eric Kirk

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effects of Low-Dose Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Human Cells: The Role of Induced Genes and the Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report (9/15/1998-5/31/2005)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant was designed to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bystander effect of radiation (initially described in this laboratory) whereby damage signals are passed from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in a population. These signals induce genetic effects including DNA damage, mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the nonirradiated cells. Experiments were carried out in cultured mammalian cells, primarily human diploid cells, irradiated with alpha particles. This research resulted in 17 publications in the refereed literature and is described in the Progress Report where it is keyed to the publication list. This project was initiated at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and continued in collaboration with students/fellows at Colorado State University (CSU) and the New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

Little, John B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model John Miller 1 , Seema Varma 1 , William Chrisler 2 , Xihai Wang 2 and Marianne Sowa 2 1 Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, WA 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA Monte Carlo simulations of electrons stopping in liquid water are being used to model electron- beam irradiation of the full-thickness (FT) EpiDerm TM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes from a dermal layer of fibroblasts embedded in collagen. The simulations have shown the feasibility of exposing the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer (Miller et al. 2011). The variable-

366

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model Simulation of Electron Beam Irradiation of a Skin Tissue Model John Miller Washington State University Tri-Cities Abstract Monte Carlo simulations of electrons stopping in liquid water are being used to model electronbeam irradiation of the full-thickness (FT) EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes from a dermal layer of fibroblasts embedded in collagen. The simulations have shown the feasibility of exposing the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer (Miller et al. 2011). The variableenergy electron microbeam at PNNL (Sowa et al. 2005) was used as a model of device characteristics and

367

The use of polarized light for skin cancer detecton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancer will bc diagnosed in the United States each year, making it the 7'" most common form of cancer in the United States. In addition, because of current trends in sun exposure and artificial tanning, the rate of skin This Thesis follows 1he style.... 3 million new cases of skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year In 2000 alone, there were about 47, 700 new cases of melanoma and 7, 700 deaths attributed to the disease' . Because of current trends in sun exposure and artificial...

DeLaughter, Aimee Hill

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mysteries of human gene function Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene function By looking at antibodies, researchers can identify where, in a cell, genes...

369

Human hybrid hybridoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

1987-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

Subclonal variation and skin russeting in potato, (Solanum tuberosum L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of subclonal selection for putative russet skin mutations of 'Century Russet' was conducted in Texas and Colorado to improve the russeting character in 'Century Russet'. RAPD analysis of a segregating F I family derived from a russet x white cross and of three...

Oehlke, Leslie Lashaun

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Neutron skin of $^{208}$Pb from Coherent Pion Photoproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information on the size and shape of the neutron skin on $^{208}$Pb has been extracted from coherent pion photoproduction cross sections measured using the Crystal Ball together with the Glasgow tagger at the MAMI electron beam facility. On exploitation of an interpolated fit of a theoretical model to the measured cross sections the half-height radius and diffuseness of the neutron distribution are found to be 6.70$\\pm 0.03(stat)$ fm and 0.55$\\pm 0.01(stat)$$^{+0.02}_{-0.03}(sys)$ fm respectively, corresponding to a neutron skin thickness $\\Delta r_{np}$=0.15$\\pm 0.03(stat)$$^{+0.01}_{-0.03}(sys)$ fm. The results give the first successful extraction of a neutron skin with an electromagnetic probe and indicate the skin of $^{208}$Pb has a halo character. The measurement provides valuable new constraints on both the structure of nuclei and the equation of state for neutron-rich matter.

C. M. Tarbert; D. P. Watts; D. I. Glazier; P. Aguar; J. Ahrens; J. R. M. Annand; H. J. Arends; R. Beck; V. Bekrenev; B. Boillat; A. Braghieri; D. Branford; W. J. Briscoe; J. Brudvik; S. Cherepnya; R. Codling; E. J. Downie; K. Foehl; P. Grabmayr; R. Gregor; E. Heid; D. Hornidge; O. Jahn; V. L. Kashevarov; A. Knezevic; R. Kondratiev; M. Korolija; M. Kotulla; D. Krambrich; B. Krusche; M. Lang; V. Lisin; K. Livingston; S. Lugert; I. J. D. MacGregor; D. M. Manley; M. Martinez; J. C. McGeorge; D. Mekterovic; V. Metag; B. M. K. Nefkens; A. Nikolaev; R. Novotny; R. O. Owens; P. Pedroni; A. Polonski; S. N. Prakhov; J. W. Price; G. Rosner; M. Rost; T. Rostomyan; S. Schadmand; S. Schumann; D. Sober; A. Starostin; I. Supek; A. Thomas; M. Unverzagt; Th. Walcher; F. Zehr

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Regulated expression of the MRP8 and MRP14 genes in human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cell treated with the differentiation-inducing agents mycophenolic acid and 1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calcium-binding proteins MRP8 and MEP14 are present in mature monomyelocytic cells and are induced during differentiation. Previous studies have demonstrated that the proteins may mediate the growth arrest in differentiating HL-60 cells. We determined the levels of a protein complex (PC) containing MRP8 and MRP14 and investigated the mechanism by which the genes encoding these proteins are regulated in HL-60 cells treated with the differentiation-inducing agent mycophenorc acid (MPA)While the PC was barely detectable in untreated cells, MPA treatment resulted in elevated levels of the PC which were maximal at 3-4 d, and were found to directly parallel gains in the steady-state levels of MRP8 and MRP14 MRNA. Transcription studies with the use of nuclear run-on experiments revealed increased transcription initiation at the MRP8 and MRP14 promoters after MPA treatment. 1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}, which induces HL-60 cell differentiation by another mechanism, was also found to increase transcription initiation at the MRP8 and MRP14 promoters. Our results suggest that this initiation is the major control of maturation agent-mediated increases in MRP8 and MRPl4 gene expression, and support a role for the PC in terminal differentiation of human monomyelocytic cells.

Warner-Bartnicki, A.L.; Murao, S.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

RAZEGHI et al.: SKIN LESION IMAGE RECOGNITION 1 Skin Lesion Image Recognition with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a recognition rate of 20%, whilst with human in the loop the performance can be boosted to over 96%. We also diagnosis. Unlike the majority of publications in the area of computer vision for dermatology appli- cations of related work is an image analysis system presented in [1] that differentiates early melanoma from benign

Aickelin, Uwe

375

Inhibitory effect of snake venom toxin from Vipera lebetina turanica on hormone-refractory human prostate cancer cell growth: induction of apoptosis through inactivation of nuclear factor ?B  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2):675-83] snake venom toxin|Vipera...implicated in tumor development and resistance to...cancer cell death. Snake venom toxins (SVT...in PBS) at room temperature for 2 h. The cells...during mammary gland development. Cell 2001;107...Chung KH, Kim DS. Snake venom disintegrin...

Dong Ju Son; Mi Hee Park; Sang Jin Chae; Soon Ok Moon; Jae Woong Lee; Ho Sueb Song; Dong Cheul Moon; Sang Sun Kang; Young Ee Kwon; and Jin Tae Hong

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Percutaneous penetration of uranium in rats after a contamination on intact or wounded skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......hairless rats. Percutaneous penetration through wounded skin towards...1157-1165. Percutaneous penetration of uranium in rats after a...hairless rats. Percutaneous penetration through wounded skin towards...Kinetics Male Metabolic Clearance Rate Models, Biological Radiometry......

F. Petitot; C. Gautier; A. M. Moreels; S. Frelon; F. Paquet

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design of a thermal diffusion sensor for noninvasive assessment of skin surface perfusion and endothelial dysfunction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The skin microcirculation performs a range of vital functions, such as maintaining nutritional perfusion to the tissues and overall thermoregulation. Not only does impairment to the skin blood supply lead to tissue necrosis ...

Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-induced skin lesions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technique Summary: pigmented skin lesions M.MONCRIEFF,* S.COTTON, E.CLARIDGE AND P.HALL* *Department of Plastic... technique for imaging pigmented skin lesions and for...

379

Identification of genes expressed in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells by expressed sequence tags and efficient full-length cDNA cloning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was provided by the Stanford Human Genome Center (http://shgc-www.stanford.edu). RESULTS Library Construction and General...complete list of these genes will be available on the website at shgc.stc.sh.cn (the Shanghai Human Genome Center). The categories...

Mao Mao; Gang Fu; Ji-Sheng Wu; Qing-Hua Zhang; Jun Zhou; Li-Xin Kan; Qiu-Hua Huang; Kai-Li He; Bai-Wei Gu; Ze-Guang Han; Yu Shen; Jian Gu; Ya-Ping Yu; Shu-Hua Xu; Ya-Xin Wang; Sai-Juan Chen; Zhu Chen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Molecular identification of human G-substrate, a possible downstream component of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase cascade in cerebellar Purkinje cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...G-substrate cDNA. The result was analyzed on the RH server at the Stanford Human Genome Center’s web site (http://www-shgc.stanford.edu) and the relative map position was estimated. In Vitro Translation of Human G-Substrate. The cDNA coding...

Shogo Endo; Masako Suzuki; Mariko Sumi; Angus C. Nairn; Ryoji Morita; Kazuhiro Yamakawa; Paul Greengard; Masao Ito

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggressive skin malignancy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford University Collection: Biology and Medicine 3 Publication Schedule Advertising Summary: aggressive form of skin cancer -- malignant melanoma -- stress, including...

382

Skin cancer is the most com-mon form of cancer in the United  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin cancer is the most com- mon form of cancer in the United States. Excessive and unprotected exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation (UV light) is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. Howev- er, skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer! The damaging and cumulative effects

383

Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14 is that this behavior is extremely unhealthy and risky for their bodies, specifically their skin. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer found in young adults and second most common cancer found in adolescents

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

384

Somatically Mutated Regions of Immunoglobulin on Human B-Cell Lymphomas Code for Peptides That Bind to Autologous Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I, Providing a Potential Target for Cytotoxic T Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cell lines and differences in the mRNA level of class III, but not class II, between two lines was not seen. On the other...vincristine-resistant cell lines expressed 10-fold greater amount of class II isotype compared with the parental cells...

Clair S. Gricks; Eira Rawlings; Letizia Foroni; J. Alejandro Madrigal; and Peter L. Amlot

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

(4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone inhibits tubulin polymerization, induces G{sub 2}/M arrest, and triggers apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

(4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone (PHT) is a known cytotoxic compound belonging to the phenstatin family. However, the exact mechanism of action of PHT-induced cell death remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying PHT-induced cytotoxicity. We found that PHT displayed potent cytotoxicity in different tumor cell lines, showing IC{sub 50} values in the nanomolar range. Cell cycle arrest in G{sub 2}/M phase along with the augmented metaphase cells was found. Cells treated with PHT also showed typical hallmarks of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine exposure, increase of the caspase 3/7 and 8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. Studies conducted with isolated tubulin and docking models confirmed that PHT binds to the colchicine site and interferes in the polymerization of microtubules. These results demonstrated that PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization, arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle, and induces their apoptosis, exhibiting promising anticancer therapeutic potential. - Highlights: • PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization. • PHT arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle. • PHT induces caspase-dependent apoptosis.

Magalhães, Hemerson I.F. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Wilke, Diego V. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Bezerra, Daniel P., E-mail: danielpbezerra@gmail.com [Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Cavalcanti, Bruno C. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Rotta, Rodrigo; Lima, Dênis P. de; Beatriz, Adilson [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas (Laboratório LP4), Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Moraes, Manoel O.; Diniz-Filho, Jairo [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Pessoa, Claudia, E-mail: c_pessoa@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Embryo Ethics — The Moral Logic of Stem-Cell Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Stem-Cell Debate. The question is whether the destruction of human embryos in stem-cell research amounts to the killing of human beings. Professor Michael J. Sandel on the stem-cell debate.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

A review of tissue-engineered skin bioconstructs available for skin reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vivo, this technology was rapidly...sheet then applied to the wound...Material handling and basement...application procedures. There is...sealant, applied to full-thickness...improved handling, cell attachment...keratinocytes. This technology is based...patented technology. It is used...results when applied simultaneously...operative procedure (van Zuijlen...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Ecology Impact of Human ecology Research Bonus Issue FROM SCHOLARSHIP TO POLICY MAKING OF HUMAN ECOLOGY APRIL 2005/VOLUME 33, NUMBER 1 #12;Human Ecology Volume 33, Number 1 April 2005 The New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph.D. Rebecca Q

Wang, Z. Jane

389

The human genome project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

Bell, G.I.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Differential expression of intronless carcinoma-associated antigen GA733-1 in two distinct classes of human breast cancer cell lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using differential hybridization, we have isolated a 0.8-kb GA733-1 cDNA clone which was selectively expressed in the MCF-7 and Au565 breast cancer cell lines but not in MB231 cells. Subsequent studies with 10 additional breast cancer cell lines have allowed us to identify two classes of breast cancer cell lines that display distinct expression of the GA733-1 antigen as well as other cellular parameters. The six GA733-1{sup +} cell lines (MCF-7, ZR75-1, MB468, Au565, BJ015, and MB453) exhibit a spherical or cuboidal shape. These cells tend to grow in clusters and display extensive cell-cell connections. In contrast, all GA733-1{sup -} cells (MB435s, MB231, MB436, MB157, BT549, and Hs578T) assume a more elongated, fibroblast-like morphology and grow in a discrete, uniform pattern. These results are consistent with previous findings suggesting the GA733 gene products function as cell-cell adhesion molecules. Generally, the GA733-1{sup -} cells actively produce lipid vesicles, whereas the GA733-1{sup +} cells are virtually inactive in lipid production. In addition, all six GA733-1{sup +} cell lines express keratin 19, which is only weakly expressed or not detectable in the GA733-1{sup -} cells. Comparative analysis of our results with previous studies has shown that GA733-1 expression is inversely related to vimentin expression and that the GA733-1{sup -}/VIM{sup +} cells display a much higher invasive propensity than the GA733-1{sup +}/VIM{sup -} lines in both in vitro and in vivo assays. However, there seems no obvious correlation of GA733-1 expression with that of estrogen receptor (ER) except that no GA733-1{sup -} cell lines express the receptor. The combination of these four parameters (ER, GA733-1, vimentin, and keratin 19), should contribute to the reliability of the histological grading of breast cancer and may provide a basis for improved treatment of breast cancer.

Xie, Bei; Horio, Murao; Collart, F.R. [and others

1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

The PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 triad in human breast cancer: Functional link between elevated Sac3 phosphatase and enhanced proliferation of triple negative cell lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We assess PAS complex proteins and phosphoinositide levels in breast cancer cells. •Sac3 and ArPIKfyve are markedly elevated in triple-negative breast cancer cells. •Sac3 silencing inhibits proliferation in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. •Phosphoinositide profiles are altered in breast cancer cells. •This is the first evidence linking high Sac3 with breast cancer cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The phosphoinositide 5-kinase PIKfyve and 5-phosphatase Sac3 are scaffolded by ArPIKfyve in the PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 (PAS) regulatory complex to trigger a unique loop of PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} synthesis and turnover. Whereas the metabolizing enzymes of the other 3-phosphoinositides have already been implicated in breast cancer, the role of the PAS proteins and the PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} conversion is unknown. To begin elucidating their roles, in this study we monitored the endogenous levels of the PAS complex proteins in cell lines derived from hormone-receptor positive (MCF7 and T47D) or triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) (BT20, BT549 and MDA-MB-231) as well as in MCF10A cells derived from non-tumorigenic mastectomy. We report profound upregulation of Sac3 and ArPIKfyve in the triple negative vs. hormone-sensitive breast cancer or non-tumorigenic cells, with BT cell lines showing the highest levels. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Sac3, but not that of PIKfyve, significantly inhibited proliferation of BT20 and BT549 cells. In these cells, knockdown of ArPIKfyve had only a minor effect, consistent with a primary role for Sac3 in TNBC cell proliferation. Intriguingly, steady-state levels of PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} in BT20 and T47D cells were similar despite the 6-fold difference in Sac3 levels between these cell lines. However, steady-state levels of PtdIns3P and PtdIns5P, both regulated by the PAS complex, were significantly reduced in BT20 vs. T47D or MCF10A cell lines, consistent with elevated Sac3 affecting directly or indirectly the homeostasis of these lipids in TNBC. Together, our results uncover an unexpected role for Sac3 phosphatase in TNBC cell proliferation. Database analyses, discussed herein, reinforce the involvement of Sac3 in breast cancer pathogenesis.

Ikonomov, Ognian C., E-mail: oikonomo@med.wayne.edu; Filios, Catherine, E-mail: cfilios@med.wayne.edu; Sbrissa, Diego, E-mail: dsbrissa@med.wayne.edu; Chen, Xuequn, E-mail: xchen@med.wayne.edu; Shisheva, Assia, E-mail: ashishev@med.wayne.edu

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermal simulation of buildings with double-skin façades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Highly glazed commercial buildings with double-skin façades may overheat during summertime due to a coincidence of high outside temperatures, solar gains and internal heat gains. To optimize thermal comfort and minimize cooling loads, the thermal behaviour of this type of building, therefore, requires careful investigation at the design stage. However, complex physical phenomena—notably optical, thermodynamic and fluid dynamic processes—are involved and as yet, no single simulation tool is able to handle all these processes while remaining an efficient design tool. This paper presents a method based on the coupling of three different types of simulation models that is economical in terms of computing time, and thereby, suitable for design purposes. These models are: spectral optical model, computational fluid dynamics model and building energy simulation model. Various tools are available at each modelling level. The method is demonstrated on a commercial building with double-skin façades and additionally, night-time ventilation.

H. Manz; Th. Frank

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

Abbas, G., E-mail: gohar.abbas@gcu.edu.pk; Sarfraz, M. [Department of Physics, GC University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Forman Christian College University, Farozpur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

EGF-receptor phosphorylation and downstream signaling are activated by benzo[a]pyrene 3,6-quinone and benzo[a]pyrene 1,6-quinone in human mammary epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is activated by xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes to highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolites. Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that benzo[a]pyrene quinones (BPQs), 1,6-BPQ and 3,6-BPQ, are able to induce epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cell signaling through the production of reactive oxygen species. Recently, we have reported that BPQs have the potential to induce the expression of genes involved in numerous pathways associated with cell proliferation and survival in human mammary epithelial cells. In the present study we demonstrated that BPQs not only induced EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation, but also induced EGFR-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 and several signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). The effects of BPQs were evaluated in a model of EGF withdrawal in MCF10-A cells. We found that BPQs (1 {mu}M), induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation at positions Y845, Y992, Y1068, and Y1086. PLC-{gamma}1 phosphorylation correlated with the phosphorylation of tyrosine-Y992, a proposed docking site for PLC-{gamma}1 on the EGFR. Additionally, we found that BPQs induced the activation of STAT-1, STAT-3, STAT-5a and STAT-5b. STAT5 was shown to translocate to the nucleus following 3,6-BPQ and 1,6-BPQ exposures. Although the patterns of phosphorylation at EGFR, PLC-{gamma}1 and STATs were quite similar to those induced by EGF, an important difference between BPQ-mediated signaling of the EGFR was observed. Signaling produced by EGF ligand produced a rapid disappearance of EGFR from the cell surface, whereas BPQ signaling maintained EGFR receptors on the cell membrane. Thus, the results of these studies show that 1,6-BPQ and 3,6-BPQ can produce early events as evidenced by EGFR expression, and a prolonged transactivation of EGFR leading to downstream cell signaling pathways.

Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes [Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Avenida Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca 62210, Morelos (Mexico); Melendez, Karla; Hudson, Laurie G.; Lauer, Fredine T. [University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy Toxicology Program, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Burchiel, Scott W. [University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy Toxicology Program, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)], E-mail: sburchiel@salud.unm.edu

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of slug tests in wells containing a finite-thickness skin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of a finite-thickness skin (low-permeability zone surrounding the well bore face) on the response of slug tests is investigated by using a numerical model and a simple analytical solution. The results show that, for skins of finite thicknesses, estimates of hydraulic conductivity provided by slug tests can be more representative of the skin than of the surrounding formation. When a finite-thickness skin is present, the slug test response is shifted along the horizontal axis, making estimates of hydraulic conductivity unreliable. This result is different from that obtained by using an analytical solution for a skin of infinitesimal thickness.

Faust, C.R.; Mercer, J.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Targeting different types of human meningioma and glioma cells using a novel adenoviral vector expressing GFP-TRAIL fusion protein from hTERT promoter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of Ad/gTRAIL (an adenoviral vector in which expression of GFP and TRAIL is driven by a human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERT)...

Jessica T Li; Ka Bian; Alan L Zhang; Dong H Kim…

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Expression of the Human Cytomegalovirus UL11 Glycoprotein in Viral Infection and Evaluation of Its Effect on Virus-Specific CD8 T Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2012. Decoding human cytomegalovirus. Science 338 :1088-1093. doi: 10.1126/science.1227919 . 4. Dunn, W , C Chou, H Li...critical for superinfection by cytomegalovirus. Science 328 :102-106. doi: 10.1126/science...

Ildar Gabaev; Endrit Elbasani; Stefanie Ameres; Lars Steinbrück; Richard Stanton; Marius Döring; Tihana Lenac Rovis; Ulrich Kalinke; Stipan Jonjic; Andreas Moosmann; Martin Messerle

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Compartmentalization of Regulatory Subunits of Cyclic Adenosine 3?:5?-Monophosphate-dependent Protein Kinases in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...culture bank of the Breast Cancer Task Force of the National Cancer Institute at the...Kebabean (eds.). Cyclic Nucleotides. Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, Vol...protein kinases in human lymphocytes: fundamental alteration in chronic lymphocytic leukemia...

C. L. Kapoor and Y. S. Cho-Chung

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Spontaneous Recovery in Acute Human Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Functional T-Cell Thresholds and Relative Importance of CD4 Help  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IMMUNITY Spontaneous Recovery in Acute Human...Sciences Center and National Jewish Hospital...established a large national network of patients...thresholds that predict recovery. Interestingly...appropriate institutional review boards. Acute HCV was...

Susan Smyk-Pearson; Ian A. Tester; Jared Klarquist; Brent E. Palmer; Jean-Michel Pawlotsky; Lucy Golden-Mason; Hugo R. Rosen

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

Different Energy Metabolism in Two Human Small Cell Lung Cancer Subpopulations Examined by 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Biochemical Analysis in Vivo and in Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Verlag Chemie, 1974. energy phosphate content and...spectroscopy studies of tumor energy metabolism...z , z ,, and Us relationship to intracapillarv...oxvhemoelobm saturation status and Ed. 2. New York...1989. Levels of high energy phosphates in human lung...

Paul E. G. Kristjansen; Mogens Spang-Thomsen; and Bjørn Quistorff

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human neural Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of adult human stem cells from the adult neural retina, as well as the standardization of methods... cell lines derived from adult human retina exhibit neural stem cell...

402

Fusion properties of cells infected with human parainfluenza virus type 3: receptor requirements for viral spread and virus-mediated membrane fusion.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...requirements for mediating fusion. The envelope of...parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPF3) contains...extensive cell fusion was evident in both cell types at both MOIs. In...for F to mediate fusion, and only the type-matched HN can...

A Moscona; R W Peluso

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Interference of silibinin with IGF-1R signalling pathways protects human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells from UVB-induced apoptosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Silibinin protects A431 cells from UVB irradiation-induced apoptosis. ? Up-regulation of the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways by UVB induces cell apoptosis. ? Silibinin inhibits IGF-1R pathways to repress caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet B (UVB) from sunlight is a major cause of cutaneous lesion. Silibinin, a traditional hepatic protectant, elicits protective effects against UVB-induced cellular damage. In A431 cells, the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) was markedly up-regulated by UVB irradiation. The activation of the IGF-1R signalling pathways contributed to apoptosis of the cells rather than rescuing the cells from death. Up-regulated IGF-1R stimulated downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). The subsequent activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 led to apoptosis. The activation of IGF-1R signalling pathways is the cause of A431 cell death. The pharmacological inhibitors and the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IGF-1R suppressed the downstream activation of JNK/ERK-caspases to help the survival of the UVB-irradiated A431 cells. Indeed, silibinin treatment suppressed the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways and thus protected the cells from UVB-induced apoptosis.

Liu, Weiwei; Otkur, Wuxiyar; Li, Lingzhi; Wang, Qiong; He, Hao; Zang, Linghe; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)] [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan)] [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan)] [Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Xia, Mingyu [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)] [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)] [China–Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Multiple Features of Advanced Melanoma Recapitulated in Tumorigenic Variants of Early Stage (Radial Growth Phase) Human Melanoma Cell Lines: Evidence for a Dominant Phenotype  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cells/ l(X)-mm dish) in culture medium containing 60 U.MTG (2-amino-6-mercap- topurine; Sigma). Somatic cell...Y,IL-6, oncostatin M, IL-1, and TNF-a during the process of tumor progression (11, 24, 38-41). Fig. 6 shows the...

Maria Rosa Bani; Janusz Rak; Dena Adachi; Rodney Wiltshire; Jeffrey M. Trent; Robert S. Kerbel; and Yaacov Ben-David

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Development of a mini 3D cell culture system using well defined nickel grids for the investigation of cell scaffold interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this research was to examine the organisational behaviour of skin cells in 3D culture using simple nickel grids of varying strut spacing. These allowed an ... span and fill in open spaces in these grids

Tao Sun; Rod Smallwood; Sheila MacNeil

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Differential Role of Transcription-Coupled Repair in UVB–Induced Response of Human Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy Most solar radiation-induced skin cancers...cellular components by the higher-energy shorter solar wavelengths comprising the UVB spectra...learn more about the response to solar radiation of the target cells for...

Mariarosaria D'Errico; Massimo Teson; Angelo Calcagnile; Tiziana Nardo; Naomi De Luca; Chiara Lazzari; Silvia Soddu; Giovanna Zambruno; Miria Stefanini; and Eugenia Dogliotti

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Radiation effects on humans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

408

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of cell biologist Don Francis Petersen, Ph.D., conducted November 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a transcript of an interview of Dr. Don Francis Petersen by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Petersen was selected for this interview because of his long research career at Los Alamos and his knowledge of the Atomic Energy Commission`s biomedical program. Dr. Petersen did not personally conduct research on human subjects. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Petersen discusses his remembrances of the early use of radionuclides as biological tracers, aspects of nuclear weapons testing in the 1940`s and 1950`s including fallout studies, the means by which research projects were approved, use of humans in the whole-body counter, and the Health Division Biomedical responsibilities.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Plk1 Self-Organization and Priming Phosphorylation of HsCYK-4 at the Spindle Midzone Regulate the Onset of Division in Human Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Animal cells initiate cytokinesis in parallel with anaphase onset, when an actomyosin ring assembles and constricts through localized activation of the small GTPase RhoA, giving rise to a cleavage furrow. Furrow formation ...

Burkard, Mark E.

410

Human Colon Adenocarcinomas Express a MUC1-associated Novel Carbohydrate Epitope on Core Mucin Glycans Defined by a Monoclonal Antibody (A10) Raised against Murine Ehrlich Tumor Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...enzymatic treatments) once bound...Mini-Protean Cell Electrophoresis; Bio-Rad...deionized water. Enzymatic Treatments. These treatments...4, and dialysis; (b) phenol...ether and dialysis against distilled water; (d) alkali treatment (b-elimination...

Maite Medina; Desireé Vélez; José A. Asenjo; Gustavo Egea; Francisco X. Real; Juana Gil; and José L. Subiza

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Alteration of Bcl-2 family proteins by the dietary compound fisetin in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells: a mechanism for apoptosis induction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract 3831: The dietary flavonoid fisetin negatively regulates NEDD9 expression...previously showed that the dietary flavonoid fisetin disrupted Wnt/beta-catenin signaling...including melanoma. Here, we report that fisetin treatment of melanoma cells resulted in...

Do Y. Lim and Jung H.Y. Park

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Meeting Report. Assessing Human Germ-Cell Mutagenesis in the Post-Genome Era: A Celebration of the Legacy of William Lawson (Bill) Russell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 20 years after Chernobyl. Boice JD Jr, Tawn EJ, Winther2006. Cancer risk among Chernobyl cleanup workers in EstoniaDNA Germ-Cell Mutagenesis in Chernobyl, Japanese, and Animal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Tumor Necrosis Factor-? Increases Reactive Oxygen Species by Inducing Spermine Oxidase in Human Lung Epithelial Cells: A Potential Mechanism for Inflammation-Induced Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...increasing levels of positive cell cycle regulators, as well as components...exposure to TNF-alpha, a general mediator of inflammation...molecular mechanism by which general inflammation can contribute...intratracheal administration of diesel exhaust particles. Carcinogenesis...

Naveen Babbar and Robert A. Casero, Jr.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cables Enhances Cdk2 Tyrosine 15 Phosphorylation by Wee1, Inhibits Cell Growth, and Is Lost in Many Human Colon and Squamous Cancers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regular Articles Tumor Biology Cables Enhances Cdk2 Tyrosine 15 Phosphorylation...phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events. Cables is a recently described novel cdk-interacting protein. In proliferating cells, Cables was predominantly localized in the nucleus...

Chin-Lee Wu; Sandra D. Kirley; Hua Xiao; Yenning Chuang; Daniel C. Chung; Lawrence R. Zukerberg

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Identification of the Fenretinide Metabolite 4-Oxo-Fenretinide Present in Human Plasma and Formed in Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cells through Induction of Cytochrome P450 26A1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from light. HPLC and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization...culture medium, and in plasma samples was evaluated...cell, medium, and plasma sample was added to...metabolite was made by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization...were recorded at 400 MHz on a Bruker Instruments...

Maria Grazia Villani; Valentina Appierto; Elena Cavadini; Manuela Valsecchi; Sandro Sonnino; Robert W. Curley; and Franca Formelli

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Control of mammalian cell mutagenesis and differentiation by chemicals which initiate or promote tumor formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was developed to predict the potential carcinogenic hazard of some environmental chemicals. In this assay, Chinese hamster V79 cells, which are susceptible to mutagenesis, are co-cultivated with cells capable of metabolizing chemical carcinogens. Use of this assay made it possible to demonstrate a relationship between the degree of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of a series of polycyclic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines and to study the organ specificity exhibited by some chemical carcinogens. However, most short-term in vitro assays are designed to detect mutagenic activity and therefore do not detect tumor promoting agents which are devoid of this activity. By analyzing various markers of terminal differentiation in cultured human melanoma and myeloid leukemia cells, we have established a relationship between the activity of a series of tumor promoting phorbol diesters in the mouse skin and their ability to induce terminal differentiation. We suggest that measuring alterations in the differentiation characteristics of some cultured cells may represent an approach by which environmental tumor promoting agents can be studied and detected.

Jones, C.A.; Huberman, E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Dendritic Epidermal T Cells in Ultraviolet-irradiated Skin Enhance Skin Tumor Growth by Inhibiting CD4+ T-Cell-mediated Immunity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...test. Allostimulatory capacity of LC was analyzed by...prolonged exposure to solar-simulated 1W irradiation...recovery in allo stimulatory capacity in the same system...when the allostimulatory capacity was more depressed...and UVB, as does the solar spectrum, and the mice...

Lois L. Cavanagh and Gary M. Halliday

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

UV Radiation Inhibits 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Levels in Human Skin: Evidence of Transcriptional Suppression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...one-carbon metabolism that involves a constellation of genes including methylenetetrahydrofolate...48-50, 50-53, 53 years), and energy intake (902, 902-1147, 1147-1399...on the other hand, participate in energy production and are not directly involved...

Benjamin L. Judson; Akira Miyaki; Vikram D. Kekatpure; Baoheng Du; Patricia Gilleaudeau; Mary Sullivan-Whalen; Arash Mohebati; Sudhir Nair; Jay O. Boyle; Richard D. Granstein; Kotha Subbaramaiah; James G. Krueger; and Andrew J. Dannenberg

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Targeting Ornithine Decarboxylase for the Prevention of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in Humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...incidence between 1977_1978 and 1998-1999 in Northcentral New Mexico. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2003;12:1105-8. 3...732-6. 8 Thompson SC , Jolley D, Marks R. Reduction of solar keratoses by regular sunscreen use. N Engl J Med 1993;329...

Craig A. Elmets and Mohammad Athar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ultraviolet B-induced DNA Damage in Human Skin and Its Modulation by a Sunscreen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract The UVB component of solar radiation is a risk factor for...defined as the ratio of the energy required to produce a MED...sunscreen compared with the energy required to produce the same...able to reduce many effects of solar radiation, it is unclear how...

Vladimir J. Bykov; Jan A. Marcusson; and Kari Hemminki

1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

High-resolution imaging of microvasculature in human skin in-vivo with optical coherence tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using swept-source optical coherence tomography,” Opt. Lett.J. G. Fujimoto, “Optical coherence tomography,” Science 254(volumes using optical coherence tomography,” Opt. Lett. 22(

Liu, Gangjun; Jia, Wangcun; Sun, Victor; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Human skin keratinocytes modified by a Friend-derived retroviral vector: A functional approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 %). Colony Forming Efficiency (CFE) assays were done withand negative controls. There was no difference in CFE (%CFE= 10.74±6.53 negative control vs % CFE= 9.22±5.45 with

Arango, M; Chamorro, C; Cohen-Haguenauer, O; Rojas, M; Restrepo, LM

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Steady-state directional diffuse reflectance and fluorescence of human skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or tissue of interest to excitation light (typically UV) and measuring the flu- orescence emission spectrum or diffuse according to whether a laser or a diffuse light source is used. These measurements can be carried by a high- speed detection system. The advantage of time- resolved over steady-state measurements

Pilon, Laurent

424

Int. J. Cancer: 92, 63-69 (2001) Author Version Cytostatic effect of polyethylene-glycol on human colonic adenocarcinoma cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Int. J. Cancer: 92, 63-69 (2001) Author Version Cytostatic effect of polyethylene-glycol on human Sécurité des Aliments, INRA, ENVT, 23 Ch. des Capelles, 31076 Toulouse, France Polyethylene glycol (PEG agent, polyethylene- glycol, against rat colonic carcinogenesis (Corpet and Parnaud, 1999, Parnaud et al

Boyer, Edmond

425

Clearance of Human-Pathogenic Viruses from Sludge: Study of Four Stabilization Processes by Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR and Cell Culture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...obtained when the amount of lime present makes up over 40% of...points of the blend of sludge and lime. Moreover, the use of quicklime...Adsorption of reovirus by minerals and soils. Appl. Environ...1976. Calcium hydroxide (lime) and the elimination of human...

S. Monpoeho; A. Maul; C. Bonnin; L. Patria; S. Ranarijaona; S. Billaudel; V. Ferré

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Retrovirus Vectors Bearing Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Env Transduce Human Cells by Using a New Receptor Localized to Chromosome 3p21.3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...used for phenotypic RH mapping ( www-shgc.stanford.edu/Mapping/rh...from the Stanford Human Genome Center (SHGC) () for phenotypic mapping of JVR. The...analysis). This result was submitted to the SHGC RH Server v4.0 ( www-shgc.stanford...

Sharath K. Rai; James C. DeMartini; A. Dusty Miller

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

WISP genes are members of the connective tissue growth factor family that are up-regulated in Wnt-1-transformed cells and aberrantly expressed in human colon tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...c-myc (28). Preliminary fine mapping indicates that WISP-1 is located near D8S1712 STS. WISP-2 is linked to the marker SHGC-33922 (lod = 1,000) on chromosome 20q12–20q13.1. Human WISP-3 mapped to chromosome 6q22–6q23 and is linked...

Diane Pennica; Todd A. Swanson; James W. Welsh; Margaret A. Roy; David A. Lawrence; James Lee; Jennifer Brush; Lisa A. Taneyhill; Bethanne Deuel; Michael Lew; Colin Watanabe; Robert L. Cohen; Mona F. Melhem; Gene G. Finley; Phil Quirke; Audrey D. Goddard; Kenneth J. Hillan; Austin L. Gurney; David Botstein; Arnold J. Levine

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Abstract #2266: Cables 1 knockdown in immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial cells results in their uptake of more malignant like characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2009; Denver, CO Abstract #2266: Cables 1 knockdown in immortalized human ovarian...Meeting-- Apr 18-22, 2009; Denver, CO Cables 1 is best known as a cyclin-dependent...Previously we reported that loss of Cables 1 expression was observed with high frequency...

Hideo Sakamoto; Anne Friel; Lawrence Zukerberg; Ronny Drapkin; Bo Rueda

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

How do microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work? Bacteria need energy to survive, in the same way that humans need food to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water. These types of MFCs can produce enough electricity to power ocean monitoring devices. How soon that humans need food to live. Bacteria get this energy in a two-step process. The first step requires, scientists in England published one of the first papers on electricity generation by bacteria. Today MFCs

Lee, Dongwon

430

Radiochemical investigations of 177Lu-DOTA-8-Aoc-BBN[7-14]NH2: an in vitro/in vivo assessment of the targeting ability of this new radiopharmaceutical for PC-3 human prostate cancer cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bombesin (BBN), a 14 amino acid peptide, is an analogue of human gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) that binds to GRP receptors (GRPr) with high affinity and specificity. The \\{GRPr\\} is over expressed on a variety of human cancer cells including prostate, breast, lung, and pancreatic cancers. The specific aim of this study was to identify a BBN analogue that can be radiolabeled with 177Lu and maintains high specificity for \\{GRPr\\} positive prostate cancer tumors in vivo. A preselected synthetic sequence via solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) was designed to produce a DOTA-BBN (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N?,N??,N???-tetraacetic acid) conjugate with the following general structure: DOTA-X-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH2), where the spacer group, X = ?-NH2(CH2)7COOH (8-Aoc). The BBN-construct was purified by reversed phase-HPLC (RP-HPLC). Electrospray Mass Spectrometry (ES-MS) was used to characterize both metallated and non-metallated BBN-conjugates. The new DOTA-conjugate was metallated with 177Lu(III)Cl3 or non-radioactive Lu(III)Cl3. The 177Lu(III)- and non-radiolabeled Lu(III)-conjugates exhibit the same retention times under identical RP-HPLC conditions. The 177Lu-DOTA-8-Aoc-BBN[7-14]NH2 conjugate was found to exhibit optimal pharmacokinetic properties in CF-1 normal mice. In vitro and in vivo models demonstrated the ability of the 177Lu-DOTA-8-Aoc-BBN[7-14]NH2 conjugate to specifically target GRP receptors expressed on PC-3 human prostate cancer cells.

C.Jeffrey Smith; Hariprasad Gali; Gary L. Sieckman; Donald L. Hayes; Nellie K. Owen; Dana G. Mazuru; Wynn A. Volkert; Timothy J. Hoffman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Apparatus for testing skin samples or the like  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for testing the permeability of living skin samples has a flat base with a plurality of sample-holding cavities formed in its upper surface, the samples being placed in counterbores in the cavities with the epidermis uppermost. O-rings of Teflon washers are respectively placed on the samples and a flat cover is connected to the base to press the rings against the upper surfaces of the samples. Media to maintain tissue viability and recovery of metabolites is introduced into the lower portion of the sample-holding cavities through passages in the base. Test materials are introduced through holes in the cover plate after assembly of the chamber.

Holland, J.M.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Comparative investigations of sodium arsenite, arsenic trioxide and cadmium sulphate in combination with gamma-radiation on apoptosis, micronuclei induction and DNA damage in a human lymphoblastoid cell line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the field of radiation protection the combined exposure to radiation and other toxic agents is recognised as an important research area. To elucidate the basic mechanisms of simultaneous exposure, the interaction of the carcinogens and environmental toxicants cadmium and two arsenic compounds, arsenite and arsenic trioxide, in combination with gamma-radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6) were investigated. Gamma-radiation induced significant genotoxic effects such as micronuclei formation, DNA damage and apoptosis, whereas arsenic and cadmium had no significant effect on these indicators of cellular damage at non-toxic concentrations. However, in combination with gamma-radiation arsenic trioxide induced a more than additive apoptotic rate compared to the sum of the single effects. Here, the level of apoptotic cells was increased, in a dose-dependent way, up to two-fold compared to the irradiated control cells. Arsenite did not induce a significant additive effect at any of the concentrations or radiation doses tested. On the other hand, arsenic trioxide was less effective than arsenite in the induction of DNA protein cross-links. These data indicate that the two arsenic compounds interact through different pathways in the cell. Cadmium sulphate, like arsenite, had no significant effect on apoptosis in combination with gamma-radiation at low concentrations and, at high concentrations, even reduced the radiation-induced apoptosis. An additive effect on micronuclei induction was observed with 1 ?M cadmium sulphate with an increase of up to 80% compared to the irradiated control cells. Toxic concentrations of cadmium and arsenic trioxide seemed to reduce micronuclei induction. The results presented here indicate that relatively low concentrations of arsenic and cadmium, close to those occuring in nature, may interfere with radiation effects. Differences in action of the two arsenic compounds were identified.

Sabine Hornhardt; Maria Gomolka; Linda Walsh; Thomas Jung

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Antiviral activity of 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodocytosine against human cytomegalovirus in human skin fibroblasts.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...readily reversed with 10-fold excess thymidine, whereby the 50...readily reversed with 10-fold excess of deoxycytidine, whereby...thymidine (dThd), NaF, lithium chloride, creatine phosphate...or an equimolar or 10-fold excess concentration ofdCyd or dThd...

J M Colacino; C Lopez

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial skin construct Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center (CFADC) Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 17 Conjunctive Types and SKInT Jean GoubaultLarrecq ? Summary: Conjunctive Types...

435

E-Print Network 3.0 - atopic dermatitis skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tacrolimus binds to an intracellular protein called the FK- 506 binding protein... the penetration rate through hairless mouse skin. Tacrolimus-loaded NLCs were found to have an...

436

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-related skin lesions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 | July 2002 729 Family Correlations of Arsenic Methylation Patterns in Children and Parents Summary: various health effects, including can- cers of the bladder, skin, and...

437

Atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air : plasma characterisation for skin therapy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A pulsed atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device operating in air is investigated for medical applications such as for skin disinfection and promotion of wound… (more)

Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative skin model Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by the limb, and a simpli- fied model of the anatomy under the skin. Users interactively paint weights... anatomic structures. Having modeled the contributions of passive ......

439

Predictors of occupational skin disease among seafood processing workers in the Western Cape.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. Occupational skin disease is common in seafood processing workers. While previous studies have reported an increased prevalence of symptoms (as high as 50%)… (more)

Burdzik, Amy.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - apso skin friction Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Three-Dimensional Flows Summary: Abstract Recent improvements in three techniques for measuring skin friction in two- and three- dimensional... that the oil- film...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute skin toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... skin Reproductive effects of not seen with glycols...

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - amphibian skin epithelium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ulcers & bloating are keySkin... AmphibiansInfections in Wild Amphibians D. Earl Green, DVMD. Earl Green, DVM Department of Interior... % of larvae -- Onset is sudden...

443

Development and validation of TOF-SIMS and CLSM imaging method for cytotoxicity study of ZnO nanoparticles in HaCaT cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) exhibit novel physiochemical properties and have found increasing use in sunscreen products and cosmetics. The potential toxicity is of increasing concern due to their close association with human skin. A time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging method was developed and validated for rapid and sensitive cytotoxicity study of ZnO \\{NPs\\} using human skin equivalent HaCaT cells as a model system. Assorted material, chemical, and toxicological analysis methods were used to confirm their shape, size, crystalline structure, and aggregation properties as well as dissolution behavior and effect on HaCaT cell viability in the presence of various concentrations of ZnO \\{NPs\\} in aqueous media. Comparative and correlative analyses of aforementioned results with TOF-SIMS and CLSM imaging results exhibit reasonable and acceptable outcome. A marked drop in survival rate was observed with 50 ?g/ml ZnO NPs. The CLSM images reveal the absorption and localization of ZnO \\{NPs\\} in cytoplasm and nuclei. The TOF-SIMS images demonstrate elevated levels of intracellular ZnO concentration and associated Zn concentration-dependent 40Ca/39K ratio, presumably caused by the dissolution behavior of ZnO NPs. Additional validation by using stable isotope-labeled 68ZnO \\{NPs\\} as tracers under the same experimental conditions yields similar cytotoxicity effect. The imaging results demonstrate spatially-resolved cytotoxicity relationship between intracellular ZnO NPs, 40Ca/39K ratio, phosphocholine fragments, and glutathione fragments. The trend of change in TOF-SIMS spectra and images of ZnO \\{NPs\\} treated HaCaT cells demonstrate the possible mode of actions by ZnO NP involves cell membrane disruption, cytotoxic response, and ROS mediated apoptosis.

Pei-Ling Lee; Bo-Chia Chen; Ganesh Gollavelli; Sin-Yu Shen; Yu-Sheng Yin; Shiu-Ling Lei; Cian-Ling Jhang; Woan-Ruoh Lee; Yong-Chien Ling

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Cytoplasmic domain truncation enhances fusion activity by the exterior glycoprotein complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 in selected cell types.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the cytoplasmic domain on fusion activity in cell types other than Sup Ti, we again...more efficient at inducing fusion than wild-type ST, although compared with...more susceptible to wild-type ST fusion (Fig. SA). (a FIG. 3...

M J Mulligan; G V Yamshchikov; G D Ritter Jr; F Gao; M J Jin; C D Nail; C P Spies; B H Hahn; R W Compans

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Combined Inhibition of HER1/EGFR and RAC1 Results in a Synergistic Antiproliferative Effect on Established and Primary Cultured Human Glioblastoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Normalized wind-rose plots were...semiquantitative analysis of invasion...Express (Gibco, Life Technologies...bars, SEM. B, wind-rose plots displaying...subjected to further analysis. Only colonies...inhibitors: tissue analysis from North American...induces G1 cell cycle arrest or apoptosis...

Georg Karpel-Massler; M.-Andrew Westhoff; Shaoxia Zhou; Lisa Nonnenmacher; Annika Dwucet; Richard E. Kast; Max G. Bachem; Christian R. Wirtz; Klaus-Michael Debatin; and Marc-Eric Halatsch

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Combined Inhibition of HER1/EGFR and RAC1 Results in a Synergistic Antiproliferative Effect on Established and Primary Cultured Human Glioblastoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...determined by counting one high-power field (hpf) at 10 magnification...nih.gov/ij ). Normalized wind-rose plots were generated...conversion of these data into wind-rose diagrams, which depict...45 cells; bars, SEM. B, wind-rose plots displaying the...

Georg Karpel-Massler; M.-Andrew Westhoff; Shaoxia Zhou; Lisa Nonnenmacher; Annika Dwucet; Richard E. Kast; Max G. Bachem; Christian R. Wirtz; Klaus-Michael Debatin; and Marc-Eric Halatsch

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Requirement for an Intact T-Cell Actin and Tubulin Cytoskeleton for Efficient Assembly and Spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in which cells labeled with quantum dot-tagged MAb 50-69...result of photobleaching, since quantum dots are resistant to photobleaching...basic science as a passport to future therapy. Nat. Med. 8: 673-680...Roles of the cytoskeleton and motor proteins in endocytic sorting...

Clare Jolly; Ivonne Mitar; Quentin J. Sattentau

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Characterization of a Putative Ovarian Oncogene, Elongation Factor 1?, Isolated by Panning a Synthetic Phage Display Single-Chain Variable Fragment Library with Cultured Human Ovarian Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A synthetic scFv phage library is initially constructed...of synthetic phage scFv library with ovarian cancer cells. The synthetic phage scFv library (1 1013 transducing units...prepared from the periplasmic space of individual colonies...

Sameer Sharma; Jonathan Tammela; Xinhui Wang; Hilal Arnouk; Deborah Driscoll; Paulette Mhawech-Fauceglia; Shashikant Lele; A. Latif Kazim; and Kunle Odunsi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Anti-Gout Agent Allopurinol Exerts Cytotoxicity to Human Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Cells in Combination with Tumor Necrosis Factor–Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cycle, Cell Death, and Senescence Anti-Gout Agent Allopurinol Exerts Cytotoxicity to...Allopurinol has been used for the treatment of gout and conditions associated with hyperuricemia...cornerstone of the clinical management of gout and conditions associated with hyperuricemia...

Takashi Yasuda; Tatsushi Yoshida; Ahmed E. Goda; Mano Horinaka; Kimihiro Yano; Takumi Shiraishi; Miki Wakada; Yoichi Mizutani; Tsuneharu Miki; Toshiyuki Sakai

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Characterization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Gag-Specific Gamma Interferon-Expressing Cells following Protective Mucosal Immunization with Alphavirus Replicon Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Gag-expressing cells per high-power field SD for three mice per...intravenous and/or subcutaneous administration. Vaccine 16: 1257-1262...enhancement of resistance by local administration of IL-