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1

Green tea polyphenol, (?)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, induces toxicity in human skin cancer cells by targeting ?-catenin signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The green tea polyphenol, (?)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), has been shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects in several skin tumor models, and efforts are continued to investigate the molecular targets responsible for its cytotoxic effects to cancer cells. Our recent observation that ?-catenin is upregulated in skin tumors suggested the possibility that the anti-skin carcinogenic effects of EGCG are mediated, at least in part, through its effects on ?-catenin signaling. We have found that treatment of the A431 and SCC13 human skin cancer cell lines with EGCG resulted in reduced cell viability and increased cell death and that these cytotoxic effects were associated with inactivation of ?-catenin signaling. Evidence of EGCG-induced inactivation of ?-catenin included: (i) reduced accumulation of nuclear ?-catenin; (ii) enhanced levels of casein kinase1?, reduced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3?, and increased phosphorylation of ?-catenin on critical serine{sup 45,33/37} residues; and (iii) reduced levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, which are down-stream targets of ?-catenin. Treatment of cells with prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) enhanced the accumulation of ?-catenin and enhanced ?-catenin signaling. Treatment with either EGCG or an EP2 antagonist (AH6809) reduced the PGE{sub 2}-enhanced levels of cAMP, an upstream regulator of ?-catenin. Inactivation of ?-catenin by EGCG resulted in suppression of cell survival signaling proteins. siRNA knockdown of ?-catenin in A431 and SCC13 cells reduced cell viability. Collectively, these data suggest that induction of cytotoxicity in skin cancer cells by EGCG is mediated by targeting of ?-catenin signaling and that the ?-catenin signaling is upregulated by inflammatory mediators. - Highlights: • EGCG inhibits cancer cell viability through inactivation of ?-catenin signaling. • Inactivation of ?-catenin involves the downregulation of inflammatory mediators. • EGCG inactivates ?-catenin in skin cancer cells by inhibition of cAMP and PGE{sub 2}. • siRNA knockdown of ?-catenin or COX-2 reduces the viability of cancer cells.

Singh, Tripti [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ? Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ? Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ? IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ? Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Comparative DNA microarray analysis of human monocyte derived dendritic cells and MUTZ-3 cells exposed to the moderate skin sensitizer cinnamaldehyde  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The number of studies involved in the development of in vitro skin sensitization tests has increased since the adoption of the EU 7th amendment to the cosmetics directive proposing to ban animal testing for cosmetic ingredients by 2013. Several studies have recently demonstrated that sensitizers induce a relevant up-regulation of activation markers such as CD86, CD54, IL-8 or IL-1{beta} in human myeloid cell lines (e.g., U937, MUTZ-3, THP-1) or in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (PBMDCs). The present study aimed at the identification of new dendritic cell activation markers in order to further improve the in vitro evaluation of the sensitizing potential of chemicals. We have compared the gene expression profiles of PBMDCs and the human cell line MUTZ-3 after a 24-h exposure to the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde. A list of 80 genes modulated in both cell types was obtained and a set of candidate marker genes was selected for further analysis. Cells were exposed to selected sensitizers and non-sensitizers for 24 h and gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results indicated that PIR, TRIM16 and two Nrf2-regulated genes, CES1 and NQO1, are modulated by most sensitizers. Up-regulation of these genes could also be observed in our recently published DC-activation test with U937 cells. Due to their role in DC activation, these new genes may help to further refine the in vitro approaches for the screening of the sensitizing properties of a chemical.

Python, Francois [Experimental Product Safety, Procter and Gamble Co., Cosmital SA, Marly (Switzerland); Goebel, Carsten [Product Safety, Human Safety Assessment, Procter and Gamble Service GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Aeby, Pierre [Experimental Product Safety, Procter and Gamble Co., Cosmital SA, Marly (Switzerland)], E-mail: pierre_aeby@bluewin.ch

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Halin, Cornelia [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: cornelia.halin@pharma.ethz.ch

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flow-through diffusion cells, and radiolabeled bifenthrin, deltamethrin or cis-permethrin was applied in acetone to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid were collected every 4 h. At 24 h, the skins were washed with soap and water to remove unabsorbed chemical. The skin was then solubilized. Two additional experiments were performed after washing the skin; the first was tape-stripping the skin and the second was the collection of receptor fluid for an additional 24 h. Receptor fluid, skin washes, tape strips and skin were analyzed for radioactivity. For rat skin, the wash removed 53-71% of the dose and 26-43% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid ranged from 1 to 5%. For human skin, the wash removed 71-83% of the dose and 14-25% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid was 1-2%. Tape-stripping removed 50-56% and 79-95% of the dose in rat and human skin, respectively, after the wash. From 24-48 h, 1-3% and about 1% of the dose diffused into the receptor fluid of rat and human skin, respectively. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin penetrated rat and human skin following dermal application in vitro. However, a skin wash removed 50% or more of the dose from rat and human skin. Rat skin was more permeable to the pyrethroids than human skin. Of the dose in skin, 50% or more was removed by tape-stripping, suggesting that permeation of pyrethroids into viable tissue could be impeded. The percentage of the dose absorbed into the receptor fluid was considerably less than the dose in rat and human skin. Therefore, consideration of the skin type used and fractions analyzed are important when using in vitro dermal absorption data for risk assessment.

Hughes, Michael F., E-mail: hughes.michaelf@epa.go [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Edwards, Brenda C. [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged human skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin-color to track human body. In this paper, we discuss... on human faces. Using skin color as a feature ... Source: Yang, Jie - Human Computer Interaction Institute & School...

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging human skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin-color to track human body. In this paper, we discuss... on human faces. Using skin color as a feature ... Source: Yang, Jie - Human Computer Interaction Institute & School...

8

Low power cw-laser signatures on human skin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impact of cw laser radiation on autofluorescence features of human skin is studied. Two methods of autofluorescence detection are applied: the spectral method with the use of a fibreoptic probe and spectrometer for determining the autofluorescence recovery kinetics at a fixed skin area of {approx}12 mm{sup 2}, and the multispectral visualisation method with the use of a multispectral imaging camera for visualising long-term autofluorescence changes in a skin area of {approx}4 cm{sup 2}. The autofluorescence recovery kinetics after preliminary laser irradiation is determined. Skin autofluorescence images with visible long-term changes - 'signatures' of low power laser treatment are acquired. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

Lihachev, A; Lesinsh, J; Jakovels, D; Spigulis, J [Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

9

Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Sang Jun [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoon Taek, E-mail: htl3675@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

10

The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ? We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ? We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ? Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ? Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ? The method is suitable for evaluation of chemicals that are in contact with skin.

Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa [TNO Triskelion BV, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, Zeist (Netherlands)] [TNO Triskelion BV, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, Zeist (Netherlands); Krul, Cyrille A.M., E-mail: cyrille.krul@tno.nl [TNO, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A study of heat distribution in human skin: use of Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of heat distribution in human skin: use of Infrared Thermography Domoina Ratovoson, Franck of this study is to be able to act quickly on body burns, to avoid propagating lesions due to heat diffusion the temperature change using an infra-red camera. Blood circulation in the veins was seen to clearly influence

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 1. The luminance factor of reflected light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, we have studied the angular structure of the luminance factor of light reflected by the rough skin surface with large-scale relief elements, illuminated by a directed radiation beam incident at an arbitrary angle inside or outside the medium. The parameters of the surface inhomogeneities are typical of human skin. The calculated angular dependences are interpreted from the point of view of the angular distribution function of micro areas. The results obtained can be used for solving direct and inverse problems in biomedical optics, in particular for determining the depth of light penetration into a biological tissue, for studying the light action spectra on tissue chromophores under the in vivo conditions, for developing diagnostic methods of structural and biophysical parameters of a medium, and for optimising the mechanisms of interaction of light with biological tissues under their noninvasive irradiation through skin. (biomedical optics)

Barun, V V [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Minsk (Belarus); Ivanov, A P [B.I.Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Phosphoproteomics profiling of human skin fibroblast cells reveals pathways  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven AshbyDepartmentPersonnelAdams5EMSLBluetheoreticaland

15

A Probabilistic Model for the Human Skin Color T.S. Caetano and D.A.C. Barone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,barone}@inf.ufrgs.br _____________________________________________ Abstract We present a multivariate statistical model to represent the human skin color. In our approach part in a fully automated facial analysis system, the first important step in recognizing faces to detect faces [1-6]. However, it is a well-known fact that the majority of images acquired today

Caetano, Tiberio

16

Expression of human cytokines dramatically improves reconstitution of specific human-blood lineage cells in humanized mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adoptive transfer of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) into mice lacking T, B and natural killer (NK) cells leads to development of human-blood lineage cells in the recipient mice (humanized mice). Although human B ...

Chen, Qingfeng

17

Demonstration of tyrosinase in the vitiligo skin of human beings by a sensitive fluorometric method as well as by 14C(U)-L-tyrosine incorporation into melanin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tyrosinase activity (Monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.14.18.1) in vitiligo and normal epidermal homogenates of skin from human beings was measured by estimating beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) by a highly sensitive fluorometric method described in this paper. The tyrosine activity in the vitiligo skin was about 4 to 37% of corresponding normal skin. The activity of tyrosinase in normal human skin from different individuals and from different regions of the body was in the range of 4 to 140 picomoles of beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine formed per min/mg protein of epidermal homogenate. The enzyme from vitiligo and normal skin was severely inhibited by substance(s) of low molecular weight. The enzyme exhibits a lag of about 4 hr in the absence of added beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 1 hr in presence of 5 microM dopa. Tyrosinase from the normal and vitiligo skin was inhibited by excess concentration of tyrosine. The homogenates from vitiligo skin could synthesize melanin from C14(U)-L-Tyrosine. The rate of tyrosine incorporation into melanin by the epidermal homogenates is increased by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) disproportionate to its effect on tyrosinase activity. Based on the data presented in this paper it is concluded that melanocytes are present in the vitiligo skin. A tentative hypothesis is put forward to explain the lack of melanin synthesis by the vitiligo skin under in vivo conditions, although melanocytes are present.

Husain, I.; Vijayan, E.; Ramaiah, A.; Pasricha, J.S.; Madan, N.C.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Thermal Modeling and Experimental Validation of Human Hair and Skin Heated by Broadband Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution within the hair follicle is highly non-uniform: the minimum temperature occurs at the follicle Sun, PhD,1 Alex Chaney,1 Robert Anderson, PhD,2 and Guillermo Aguilar, PhD 1 * 1 Department:(a)determinetheoveralleffectofPPxonskinhumidi- tyandassociatedskinopticalproperties,and;(b)developaPT numerical model to study the spatial and temporal hair and skin temperature

Aguilar, Guillermo

19

Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesoderm and Cardiac Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesoderm and Cardiac Cells Using Size InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22065 ABSTRACT: The ability to generate human for the differentiation of pluripotent cells such as human embryonic stem cells (hESC) rely on the generation

Zandstra, Peter W.

20

Cadmium induces autophagy through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling in skin epidermal cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal which is environmentally and occupationally relevant. The mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced autophagy are not yet completely understood. The present study shows that cadmium induces autophagy, as demonstrated by the increase of LC3-II formation and the GFP-LC3 puncta cells. The induction of autophagosomes was directly visualized by electron microscopy in cadmium-exposed skin epidermal cells. Blockage of LKB1 or AMPK by siRNA transfection suppressed cadmium-induced autophagy. Cadmium-induced autophagy was inhibited in dominant-negative AMPK-transfected cells, whereas it was accelerated in cells transfected with the constitutively active form of AMPK. mTOR signaling, a negative regulator of autophagy, was downregulated in cadmium-exposed cells. In addition, cadmium generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) at relatively low levels, and caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) activation and ATP depletion. Inhibition of PARP by pharmacological inhibitors or its siRNA transfection suppressed ATP reduction and autophagy in cadmium-exposed cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced autophagy signaling was attenuated by either exogenous addition of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or by overexpression of these enzymes. Consequently, these results suggest that cadmium-mediated ROS generation causes PARP activation and energy depletion, and eventually induces autophagy through the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling and the down-regulation of mTOR in skin epidermal cells. - Highlights: > Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, induces autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling. > Cadmium generates intracellular ROS at low levels and this leads to severe DNA damage and PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, which are the upstream events of LKB1-AMPK-mediated autophagy. > This novel finding may contribute to further understanding of cadmium-mediated diseases.

Son, Young-Ok; Wang Xin; Hitron, John Andrew [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Zhang Zhuo [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Cheng Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Ding Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Skin flicks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The written and artistic part of this thesis are both separated into the two categories of "SKIN" and "FLICKS". The Artistic part of my thesis consists of five artificial skins made on my body, and a series of video tapes ...

Orth, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann), 1964-

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Vorozhko, Valeriya [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Cell Cycle and Cancer Biology Research Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (United States); Zuna, Rosemary E. [Department of Pathology, University of Oklahoma HSC (United States); Hanigan, Marie H. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Gorbsky, Gary J. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Cell Cycle and Cancer Biology Research Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (United States); Plafker, Scott M. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Angeletti, Peter C. [Nebraska Center for Virology (United States); Ceresa, Brian P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States)], E-mail: brian-ceresa@oushc.edu

2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

23

Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

Zhang Zhuo [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yao Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Li Wenqi [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Budhraja, Amit [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li Li [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, 2365 Harrodsburg Rd, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States); Arnold, Susanne M. [Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi Xianglin, E-mail: Xianglin.sh@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon...

25

Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

Timper, Katharina [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Seboek, Dalma [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Eberhardt, Michael [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Linscheid, Philippe [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam [Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Keller, Ulrich [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller, Beat [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Zulewski, Henryk [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland) and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

26

Evaluation of nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers in a human tumor cell line high in intracellular glutathione  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers were evaluated in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) whose GSH level was 8-fold higher than Chinese hamster V79 cells. One millimolar concentrations of Misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, RSU-1164, RSU-1172, and Ro-03-8799 sensitized hypoxic A549 cells to radiation, with Ro-03-8799 giving the highest sensitizer enhancement ration (SER) (2.3). However, MISO, SR-2508 and Ro-03-8799 were less effective in this cell line than in V79 cells, presumably due to higher GSH content of the A549 cells. Increased hypoxic radiosensitization was seen with 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 after GSH depletion by BSO as compared to 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 alone (SER-1.8 vs 1.3). The combination of GSH depletion and 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 was considerably more toxic than 0.1 mM or 1.0 mM Ro-03-8799 alone. This sensitivity was much greater than has been observed for SR-2508. These data show that Ro-03-8799 was the most efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer in a human tumor cell line considerably higher in GSH than the rodent cell lines often used in hypoxic radiosensitization studies. Thus, Ro-03-8799 may be a more effective hypoxic cell sensitizer in human tumors that are high in GSH.

DeGraff, W.G.; Russo, A.; Gamson, J.; Mitchell, J.B.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 ?M cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship between cadmium and lung cancer.

Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Working with Human Cells in Animals This cubicle is currently housing _____________ (animal species) that have been injected with human cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Animal Biosafety Level 2 (ABSL2). Personnel working on the protocols must be trained in the hazards) that have been injected with human cell lines. The protocol will be conducted at Biosafety Level 2 (BSL2 of as biological waste. After the completion of these procedures, personnel will remove all PPE and must wash his

Cui, Yan

29

Seamless Correction of the Sickle Cell Disease Mutation of the HBB Gene in Human Induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seamless Correction of the Sickle Cell Disease Mutation of the HBB Gene in Human Induced ABSTRACT: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common human genetic disease which is caused by a single effector nucleases; induced pluripotent stem cells; piggyBac transposon; sickle cell disease; gene therapy

Zhao, Huimin

30

Photosensitization of human leukemic cells by anthracenedione antitumor agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1,4-Diamino-substituted anthraquinone antitumor agents (mitoxantrone and ametantrone) and structurally related 1,5- and 1,8-diamino-substituted compounds (AM1 and AM2) were tested for their ability to photosensitize human leukemic cells in culture. Viability was measured using the 3,4,5-dimethylthiazol-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, and DNA and membrane damage were assessed. Following a 1-h exposure to AM2, a dose of drug required to give 50% loss of cell viability (53 microM) was obtained in the dark, which was reduced to approximately 2.4 microM following illumination for 2 min (lambda greater than 475 nm), a dose of light that was completely nontoxic to the cells in the absence of drug. A shift in the cell viability curve was also observed for AM1 but, under identical conditions, the dose modification was only 8.9. In contrast, neither ametantrone nor mitoxantrone gave a decreased viability upon illumination. DNA single-strand breaks as measured by alkaline elution correlated with cell viability. Frank DNA single-strand breaks were produced by AM2 and light, suggesting the production of free radicals. The strand breaks produced by AM2 in the dark and by mitoxantrone (with or without illumination) were protein concealed. No evidence of photo-induced membrane damage, as determined by transport of the model amino acid cycloleucine, could be observed even at supralethal doses.

Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L.; Reszka, K.; Lown, J.W. (University College and Middlesex School of Medicine, London (England))

1990-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Mechanisms of Telomere Protection and Deprotection in Human Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complex (ORC) subunits 1-6 binds origins of replication on chromosomes in the G1-phase of the cell cycle. The binding of ORC to replication origins mediates recruitment of other factors, including Cdc6, Cdc45, Cdt1, and MDM 2-7, which all work together... to license the replication origin for firing (reviewed in [90]). It is important to note that while budding yeast has sequence-specific recruitment of ORC to replication origins, ORC recruitment in humans appears to be sequence independent [90...

Sarthy, Jay Francis

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Measurement of Human Mobility Using Cell Phone Data: Developing Big Data for Demographic Science*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of Human Mobility Using Cell Phone Data: Developing Big Data for Demographic Science, cell phone call records and develop, test, and compare five measures of mobility. Cell phone data, test, and compare five measures of mobility derived from cell phone call record data. Cell phone data

Washington at Seattle, University of

33

Role of copper in the regulation of CU, ZN-superoxide dismutase in human K562 erythroleukemia cells and human fibroblasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activation of the enzyme CU2Zn2-SUperoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) by its copper cofactor was studied in K562 erythroleukemia cells and skin fibroblasts. K562 cells were incubated in medium supplemented with 0-50 IIM CUC12 or ZnCI2 for 24 h and extracts...

Yu, Dan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Friction Induced Skin Tags  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duplantis KL, Jones BH. Friction blisters. Pathophysiology,Friction Induced Skin Tags Francisco Allegue MD 1 , Carmenetiopathogenic role for friction. Introduction Skin tags (

Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cathepsin S regulates class II MHC processing in human CD4+ HLA-DR+ T cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although it has long been known that human CD4+ T cells can express functional class II MHC molecules, the role of lysosomal proteases in the T cell class II MHC processing and presentation pathway is unknown. Using CD4+ ...

Ploegh, Hidde

37

An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

Tiwari, Vaibhav [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States) [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R. [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States)] [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Shukla, Deepak, E-mail: dshukla@uic.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States) [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

38

Expression and rearrangement of the ROS1 gene in human glioblastoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human ROS1 gene, which possibly encodes a growth factor receptor, was found to be expressed in human tumor cell lines. In a survey of 45 different human cell lines, the authors found ROS1 to be expressed in glioblastoma-derived cell lines at high levels and not to be expressed at all, or expressed at very low levels, in the remaining cell lines. The ROS1 gene was present in normal copy numbers in all cell lines that expressed the gene. However, in one particular glioblastoma line, they detected a potentially activating mutation at the ROS1 locus.

Birchmeier, C.; Sharma, S.; Wigler, M.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Urocortin 3 Marks Mature Human Primary and Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Alpha and Beta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urocortin 3 Marks Mature Human Primary and Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Alpha and Beta (Ucn 3) is abundantly and exclusively expressed in mouse pancreatic beta cells where it regulates of mouse beta cells. These observations identify Ucn 3 as a potential beta cell maturation marker

Sander, Maike

40

Modeling Human Neural Development Using Pluripotent Stem Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jaenisch R. Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model withharboring the mutation for sickle cell disease 20 . Despite

Patterson, Michaela Cyr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH TOBACCO TREATED STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH TOBACCO TREATED STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS such as S. mutans treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and nicotine have on human umbilical vein and supernatants will then be used to treat HUVEC cells for 72 hours before the media is collected and analyzed

Zhou, Yaoqi

42

INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH TOBACCO TREATED STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS WITH TOBACCO TREATED STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS of S. mutans UA 159 has on binding to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) when treated to treat HUVECs for 72 hours and cytotoxicity was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays

Zhou, Yaoqi

43

Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotentSurface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined of Chemical Engineering, d David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, and e Harvard

Saha, Krishanu

44

Investigation of a suppression of asymmetric cell kinetics (SACK) approach for ex vivo expansion of human hematopoietic stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is a long-standing challenge faced by both researchers and clinicians. To date, no robust, efficient method for the pure, ex vivo expansion of human HSCs has been ...

Taghizadeh, Rouzbeh R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

PRECLINICAL STUDY Adult human mesenchymal stem cells enhance breast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- mary tumor growth of the estrogen receptor-positive, hormone-dependent breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7 in the presence or absence of estrogen in SCID/beige mice. We also show hormone-independent growth of MCF-7 cells. This increase in PgR expression indicates a link between MCF-7 cells and MSCs through ER-mediated signaling

McLachlan, John

46

Omalizumab may decrease IgE synthesis by targeting membrane IgE+ human B cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Omalizumab, is a humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibody used to treat allergic asthma. Decreased serum IgE levels, lower eosinophil and B cell counts have been noted as a result of treatment. In vitro studies and animal ...

Chan, Marcia A.; Gigliotti, Nicole M.; Dotson, Abby Louise; Rosenwasser, Lanny J.

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Fibroblasts by Defined Kazutoshi Takahashi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diabetes and spinal cord injury(Thomson et al., 1998). Use of human embryos, however, faces ethical transplanted into blastocysts, mouse iPS cells can give rise to adult chimeras, which are competent

Takada, Shoji

48

Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

Jian Li

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG B. M. F. Lau1 , D. Nikezic1,2 and K to inhaled radon progeny in the human lung. The present work uses the microdosimetric approach and determines- ratory tract (HRT) due to inhaled radon progeny, ICRP66(1) made use of the absorbed fraction (AF) which

Yu, K.N.

51

Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into dermal fibroblasts in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential seed cells for tissue-engineered skin. {yields} Tissue-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UCMSCs) can readily be isolated in vitro. {yields} We induce UCMSCs to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts via conditioned medium. {yields} Collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA level was higher in differentiated cells. {yields} UCMSCs-derived fibroblast-like cells strongly express fibroblast-specific protein. -- Abstract: Tissue-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) can be readily obtained, avoid ethical or moral constraints, and show excellent pluripotency and proliferation potential. UCMSCs are considered to be a promising source of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In this study, we collected newborn umbilical cord tissue under sterile conditions and isolated UCMSCs through a tissue attachment method. UCMSC cell surface markers were examined using flow cytometry. On the third passage, UCMSCs were induced to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts in conditioned induction media. The induction results were detected using immunofluorescence with a fibroblast-specific monoclonal antibody and real time PCR for type I and type III collagen. UCMSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and reached 90% confluency 14 to 18 days after primary culture. Cultured UCMSCs showed strong positive staining for CD73, CD29, CD44, CD105, and HLA-I, but not CD34, CD45, CD31, or HLA-DR. After differentiation, immunostaining for collagen type I, type III, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin, and desmin were all strongly positive in induced cells, and staining was weak or negative in non-induced cells; total transcript production of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA was higher in induced cells than in non-induced cells. These results demonstrate that UCMSCs can be induced to differentiate into fibroblasts with conditioned induction media and, in turn, could be used as seed cells for tissue-engineered dermis.

Han, Yanfu [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China)] [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Chai, Jiake, E-mail: cjk304@126.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China)] [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Sun, Tianjun; Li, Dongjie; Tao, Ran [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China)] [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China)

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

Reprogramming of murine and human somatic cells using a single polycistronic vector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the generation of patient-specific stem cells with the potential to bypass both the practical and ethical to form teratomas, generate chimeras, and contribute to the germline (1­8). This technology can be readily differentiated B cells (9­11). Without the ethical or practical concerns associated with human embryonic stem

Saha, Krishanu

53

Generation of functional hemangioblasts from human embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(hES) cells using an in vitro differentiation system. Blast cells expressed gene signatures or into mice with ischemia-reperfusion injury of the retina, they localized to the site of injury the mortality rate after myocardial infarction and restored blood flow in hind limb ischemia in mouse models

Cai, Long

54

Carrier-mediated transport of valproic acid in BeWo cells, a human trophoblast cell line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al., 1998), asymmetric transferrin transport (Van der Ende et al., 1990; Cerneus et al., 1993), asymmetric fatty acid transport (Liu et al., 1997), choline uptake (Eaton and Sooranna, 1998a), glucose modulation of arginine transport (Eaton... Costar Corporation for support of the Cellular and Molecular Biopharmaceutics Handling Laboratory. Utoguchi, N. and Audus, K.L. (2000) Carrier-mediated transport of valproic acid in BeWo cells, a human trophoblast cell line. Int. J. Pharm. 195, 115...

Utoguchi, Naoki; Audus, Kenneth L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan)] [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

Carrier-mediated transport of monocarboxylic acids in BeWo cell monolayers as a model of the human trophoblast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The monolayer-forming, human choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, was used to study the mechanisms of monocarboxylic acid transport across the human trophoblast. Benzoic acid, acetic acid, and lactic acid were used as markers ...

Utoguchi, Naoki; Magnusson, Malin; Audus, Kenneth L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mechanosensitivity of human osteosarcoma cells and phospholipase C {beta}2 expression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bone adapts to mechanical load by osteosynthesis, suggesting that osteoblasts might respond to mechanical stimuli. We therefore investigated cell proliferation and phospholipase C (PLC) expression in osteoblasts. One Hertz uniaxial stretching at 4000 {mu}strains significantly increased the proliferation rates of human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 and primary human osteoblasts. However, U-2/OS, SaOS-2, OST, and MNNG/HOS cells showed no significant changes in proliferation rate. We investigated the expression pattern of different isoforms of PLC in these cell lines. We were able to detect PLC {beta}1, {beta}3, {gamma}1, {gamma}2, and {delta}1 in all cells, but PLC {beta}2 was only detectable in the mechanosensitive cells. We therefore investigated the possible role of PLC {beta}2 in mechanotransduction. Inducible antisense expression for 24 h inhibited the translation of PLC {beta}1 in U-2/OS cells by 35% and PLC {beta}2 in MG-63 by 29%. Fluid shear flow experiments with MG-63 lacking PLC {beta}2 revealed a significantly higher level of cells losing attachment to coverslips and a significantly lower number of cells increasing intracellular free calcium.

Hoberg, M. [Department of Orthopaedics, University of Tuebingen (Germany)]. E-mail: Maik.Hoberg@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Gratz, H.-H. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany); Noll, M. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany); Jones, D.B. [Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Phillips-University of Marburg (Germany)

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Telomerase Regulation and Telomere Maintenance during Human T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Virus (HTLV-I) Transformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus (HTLV-I) is the etiological agent of the lymphoproliferative disorder, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and the neurodegenerative disease, tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated ...

Bellon, Marcia Lynn

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

60

Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein and lipid transport in human intestinal epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a 14-15 kDa cytoplasmic molecule highly expressed in the enterocyte. Although different functions have been proposed for various FABP family members, the specific function of I-FABP in human intestine remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of I-FABP in molecularly modified normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC-6). cDNA transfection resulted in 90-fold I-FABP overexpression compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector. The high-resolution immunogold technique revealed labeling mainly in the cytosol and confirmed the marked phenotype abundance of I-FABP in cDNA transfected cells. I-FABP overexpression was not associated with alterations in cell proliferation and viability. Studies using these transfected cells cultured with [{sup 14}C]oleic acid did not reveal higher efficiency in de novo synthesis or secretion of triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector only. Similarly, the incubation with [{sup 35}S]methionine did not disclose a superiority in the biogenesis of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-IV, B-48, and B-100. Finally, cells transfected with I-FABP did not exhibit an increased production of chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Our observations establish that I-FABP overexpression in normal HIEC-6 is not related to cell proliferation, lipid esterification, apo synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly, and, therefore, exclude its role in intestinal fat transport.

Montoudis, Alain [Department of Nutrition, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Delvin, Edgard [Department of Biochemistry, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Canadian Institute of Health Research, Group of the Functional Development and Physiopathology of the Digestive Tract, and Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que., Canada J1H 5N4 (Canada); Menard, Daniel [Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Canadian Institute of Health Research, Group of the Functional Development and Physiopathology of the Digestive Tract, and Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que., J1H 5N4 (Canada)] (and others)

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300Aptamers and GraphenePhaseNews &InCell

62

Human T follicular helper and T follicular regulatory cell maintenance is independent of germinal centres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Arthritis Research & Therapy. 2013;15(Suppl1):S3. 15 53. Slocombe T, Brown S, Miles K, Gray M, Barr TA, Gray D. Plasma cell homeostasis: the effects of chronic antigen stimulation and inflammation. J Immunol. Sep... ;111(32):11792-11797. 58. Marinova E, Han S, Zheng B. Human germinal center T cells are unique Th cells with high propensity for apoptosis induction. Int Immunol. Aug 2006;18(8):1337-1345. 59. Kim CH, Rott LS, Clark-Lewis I, Campbell DJ, Wu L, Butcher EC...

Wallin, Elizabeth F.; Jolly, Elaine C.; Suchánek, Ond?ej; Bradley, J. Andrew; Espéli, Marion; Jayne, David R. W.; Linterman, Michelle A.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Neuron, Vol. 43, 897905, September 16, 2004, Copyright 2004 by Cell Press Extinction Learning in Humans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the mechanisms of extinction learning may be preserved across species. acquisition. However, when the rats wereNeuron, Vol. 43, 897­905, September 16, 2004, Copyright 2004 by Cell Press Extinction Learning in Humans: Role of the Amygdala and vmPFC CR). Extinction occurs when a CS is presented alone, without

Phelps, Elizabeth

64

Expression of Phospholipases A2 and C in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-healing pro- cesses in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs), expression of phospholipase A2s (PLA2s for RT-PCR amplifi- cation of the known secreted (s)PLA2, cytosolic (c)PLA2, and PLC mRNAs. Corresponding and Western blot analyses were used to detect the PLA2s and PLCs expressed by HCECs. RESULTS. The m

Gelb, Michael

65

SENSITIZATION OF HUMAN OSTEOSARCOMA CELL LINE 143B WITH CALCITRIOL FOR CISPLATIN THERAPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metalloproteins (MMPs) in migration/invasion. Design: Previous findings in our lab suggests, calcitriol act as differentiation agent in human osteosarcoma cell lines 143B and SaOS-2. The dose response of cisplatin with and without calcitriol (100nM) pretreatment...

Bhamidi Lakshmi, Surya Kameshwari Priyanka

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Understanding B Cell Kinetics in Humans via Heavy Water Labeling Using Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models and Stochastic Approximation EM algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding B Cell Kinetics in Humans via Heavy Water Labeling Using Nonlinear Mixed Effects, 2010 #12;Abstract Heavy water labeling is an endogenous labeling technique for measuring kinetics synthesized during cell division. Therefore, heavy water labeling is suitable for human studies and has been

Goldman, Steven A.

67

Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguish between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype.

Jensen, Ronald H. (Livermore, CA); Vanderlaan, Martin (San Ramon, CA); Bigbee, William L. (Livermore, CA); Stanker, Larry H. (Livermore, CA); Branscomb, Elbert W. (Walnut Creek, CA); Grabske, Robert J. (Berkeley, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguishing between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype. 4 figs.

Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.W.; Grabske, R.J.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expression by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.

Garcia-Becerra, Rocio [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, Lorenza, E-mail: lorenzadiaz@gmail.com [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Camacho, Javier [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barrera, David; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Morales, Angelica [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, Cindy Sharon [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Avila, Euclides [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bargallo, Enrique [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Arrecillas, Myrna [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cell, Vol. 75, 791-803, November 19, 1993, Copyright 0 1993 by Cell Press Cdil, a Human Gl and S Phase Protein Phosphatase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell, Vol. 75, 791-803, November 19, 1993, Copyright 0 1993 by Cell Press Cdil, a Human Gl, and Cdk3, but not with Ckd4. In HeLa cells, Cdil is expressed at the Gl to S transition, and the protein major checkpoints, one before the transition from Gl to S, the other before G2 to M. Many events

Brent, Roger

72

Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from a Bombay individual: Moving towards 'universal-donor' red blood cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bombay phenotype is one of the rare phenotypes in the ABO blood group system that fails to express ABH antigens on red blood cells. Nonsense or missense mutations in fucosyltransfrase1 (FUT1) and fucosyltransfrase2 (FUT2) genes are known to create this phenotype. This blood group is compatible with all other blood groups as a donor, as it does not express the H antigen on the red blood cells. In this study, we describe the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of a Bombay blood-type individual by the ectopic expression of established transcription factors Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc. Sequence analyses of fibroblasts and iPSCs revealed a nonsense mutation 826C to T (276 Gln to Ter) in the FUT1 gene and a missense mutation 739G to A (247 Gly to Ser) in the FUT2 gene in the Bombay phenotype under study. The established iPSCs resemble human embryonic stem cells in morphology, passaging, surface and pluripotency markers, normal karyotype, gene expression, DNA methylation of critical pluripotency genes, and in-vitro differentiation. The directed differentiation of the iPSCs into hematopoietic lineage cells displayed increased expression of the hematopoietic lineage markers such as CD34, CD133, RUNX1, KDR, {alpha}-globulin, and {gamma}-globulin. Such specific stem cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to produce a universal blood group donor, in-vitro, thus enabling cellular replacement therapies, once the safety issue is resolved.

Seifinejad, Ali; Taei, Adeleh [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Totonchi, Mehdi; Vazirinasab, Hamed [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hassani, Seideh Nafiseh [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghdami, Nasser [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Regenerative Biomedicine, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahbazi, Ebrahim [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdi, Reza Salman [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Genetics, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini, E-mail: Salekdeh@royaninstitute.org [Department of Molecular Systems Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Systems Biology, Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baharvand, Hossein, E-mail: Baharvand@royaninstitute.org [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, P.O. Box 19395-4644, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Regenerative Biomedicine, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Developmental Biology, University of Science and Culture, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effect of mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on steroid production of human granulosa cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phthalate ester mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) is the active metabolite of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, a high-production-volume chemical used as a plasticizer and solvent in numerous consumer products. MEHP has been demonstrated to be a reproductive toxicant in rodents decreasing estradiol and progesterone production in preovulatory granulosa cells. In the present study, we examined the effect of MEHP on steroid production of human granulosa-lutein (GL) cells. Human GL cells collected from women undergoing in vitro fertilization were cultured in medium containing FSH, hCG and 8-Br-cAMP, respectively, together with various concentrations of MEHP (0-500 {mu}mol L{sup -1}). After incubation for 48 h estradiol and progesterone were assayed in the spent culture medium. Furthermore, aromatase activity and mRNA levels of GL cells were determined. Basal as well as FSH-, hCG- and 8-Br-cAMP-stimulated estradiol production of GL cells was suppressed by MEHP in a dose-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 105 {mu}mol L{sup -1}, 138 {mu}mol L{sup -1}, 49 {mu}mol L{sup -1} and 78 {mu}mol L{sup -1}). Furthermore aromatase activity and mRNA levels were reduced in GL cells cultured with MEHP. In contrast, MEHP did not alter the production of progesterone up to a concentration of 167 {mu}mol L{sup -1}. The present data indicate that MEHP is a specific inhibitor of estradiol production in human GL cells with a post-cAMP site of action. The inhibition of estradiol production obviously results from a reduction of aromatase activity on the transcript level. As the in vitro effective doses of MEHP are within the range of real environmental exposure levels an inhibitory effect on estrogen production in vivo seems to be possi0009b.

Reinsberg, Jochen [Department of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)], E-mail: jochen.reinsberg@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Wegener-Toper, Petra [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Ven, Katrin van der; Ven, Hans van der [Department of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Klingmueller, Dietrich [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Differential expression of RANK on Langerhans cells and CD45RA and CD45RO/CLA on T cells in developing human skin after birth.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Die Haut, die Schnittstelle zwischen dem Körper und der Umgebung, ist das größte Organ des Körpers und hat zahlreiche Funktionen. Eine davon ist, dass die… (more)

Akguen, Johnnie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Uptake and cytotoxic effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in human bronchial epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are cytotoxic to several cell types. However, the mechanism of CNT toxicity has not been fully studied, and dosimetric analyses of CNT in the cell culture system are lacking. Here, we describe a novel, high throughput method to measure cellular uptake of CNT using turbimetry. BEAS-2B, a human bronchial epithelial cell line, was used to investigate cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and inflammatory effects of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT). The cytotoxicity of MWCNT was higher than that of crocidolite asbestos in BEAS-2B cells. The IC{sub 50} of MWCNT was 12 {mu}g/ml, whereas that of asbestos (crocidolite) was 678 {mu}g/ml. Over the course of 5 to 8 h, BEAS-2B cells took up 17-18% of the MWCNT when they were added to the culture medium at a concentration of 10 {mu}g/ml. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 2, 5, or 10 {mu}g/ml of MWCNT, and total RNA was extracted for cytokine cDNA primer array assays. The culture supernatant was collected for cytokine antibody array assays. Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 increased in a dose dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) also increased in the culture supernatant in response to MWCNT. A phosphokinase array study using lysates from BEAS-2B cells exposed to MWCNT indicated that phosphorylation of p38, ERK1, and HSP27 increased significantly in response to MWCNT. Results from a reporter gene assays using the NF-{kappa}B or AP-1 promoter linked to the luciferase gene in transiently transfected CHO-KI cells revealed that NF-{kappa}B was activated following MWCNT exposure, while AP-1 was not changed. Collectively, MWCNT activated NF-{kappa}B, enhanced phosphorylation of MAP kinase pathway components, and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines in human bronchial epithelial cells.

Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.j [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Kanno, Sanae [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower IC50 in colon cancer stem-like cells. In summary, our results indicate that STAT3 is a novel therapeutic target in colon cancer stem-like cells and inhibition of STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a potential treatment for colorectal cancer.

Lin, Li, E-mail: lin.796@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States) [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olson, Veronica [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)] [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Jiayuh, E-mail: lin.674@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)] [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

77

Biphasic hormonal responses to the adrenocorticolytic DDT metabolite 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE in human cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DDT metabolite 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE (3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE) has been proposed as a lead compound for an improved adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) treatment. ACC is a rare malignant disorder with poor prognosis, and the current pharmacological therapy o,p'-DDD (mitotane) has limited efficacy and causes severe adverse effects. 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 11B1 in mice and causes formation of irreversibly bound protein adducts, reduced glucocorticoid secretion, and cell death in the adrenal cortex of several animal species. The present study was carried out to assess similarities and differences between mice and humans concerning the adrenocorticolytic effects of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE. The results support previous indications that humans are sensitive to the adrenocorticolytic actions of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE by demonstrating protein adduct formation and cytotoxicity in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R. However, neither the irreversible binding nor the cytotoxicity of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE in H295R cells was inhibited by the CYP11B1 inhibitor etomidate. We also report biphasic responses to 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE in cortisol and aldosterone secretion as well as in mRNA levels of the steroidogenic genes StAR, CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. Hormone levels and mRNA levels were increased at lower concentrations of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE, while higher concentrations decreased hormone levels. These biphasic responses were not observed with o,p'-DDD or with the precursor DDT metabolite p,p'-DDE. Based on these results, 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE remains a viable lead compound for drug design, although the adrenocorticolytic effects of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE in human cells seem more complex than in murine cells.

Asp, Vendela [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18 A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Ulleras, Erik [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Lindstroem, Veronica; Bergstroem, Ulrika [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18 A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Oskarsson, Agneta [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Brandt, Ingvar, E-mail: ingvar.brandt@ebc.uu.s [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18 A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Chidamide induces apoptosis of human colon cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many studies have demonstrated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce various tumor cells to undergo apoptosis, and such inhibitors have been used in different clinical trials against different human cancers. In this study, we designed and synthesized a novel HDAC inhibitor, Chidamide. We showed that Chidamide was able to increase the acetylation levels of histone H3 and to inhibit the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Ras signaling pathways, which resulted in arresting colon cancer cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and promoting apoptosis. As a result, the proliferation of colon cancer cells was suppressed in vitro. Our data support the potential application of Chidamide as an anticancer agent in treating colon cancer. Future studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy.

Liu, Lin [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Baoan, E-mail: wenyu811@126.com [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Qin, Shukui [Chinese PLA Cancer Center, The 81st PLA Hospital, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu (China)] [Chinese PLA Cancer Center, The 81st PLA Hospital, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu (China); Li, Suyi; He, Xiangming [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Oncology, Zhong-Da Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Qiu, Shaomin; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Hong [Department of Internal Medicine, Nanjing Municipal Cancer Hospital, Nanjing 210003, Jiangsu (China)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Nanjing Municipal Cancer Hospital, Nanjing 210003, Jiangsu (China)

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

79

CDK-associated Cullin 1 promotes cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2 in human lung cancer A549 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) expression increases in human lung carcinoma. •CAC1 promotes the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells. •CAC1 promotes human lung cancer A549 cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) in lung cancer, the effect of CAC1 on the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells, and the activation of signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Results showed that CAC1 expression was higher levels in human lung carcinoma than normal lung tissue, and CAC1 siRNA reduced the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing cell activity and cell division in vitro. The proportion of cells treated with CAC1 siRNA increased in the G1 phase and decreased in the S and G2/M phase, indicative of G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the proportions of early/late apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells were enhanced with CAC1 siRNA treatment. It was also found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways were involved in the proliferation of A549 cells. After CAC1 siRNA treatment, p-ERK1/2 levels decreased, and meanwhile p-p38 level increased, A549 cell proliferation increased when ERK1/2 signaling is activated by PMA. Our findings demonstrated that CAC1 promoted the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential cure target for treatment of human lung cancer.

Chen, Tian Jun [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China); Gao, Fei [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xi’an, Xi’an 710043 (China)] [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xi’an, Xi’an 710043 (China); Yang, Tian; Thakur, Asmitanand; Ren, Hui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China); Chen, Ming Wei, E-mail: xjtucmw@163.com [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong [Department of Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a new approach to separate bacteria from human blood cells based on soft inertial force induced migration with flow defined curved and focused sample flow inside a microfluidic device. This approach relies on a combination of an asymmetrical sheath flow and proper channel geometry to generate a soft inertial force on the sample fluid in the curved and focused sample flow segment to deflect larger particles away while the smaller ones are kept on or near the original flow streamline. The curved and focused sample flow and inertial effect were visualized and verified using a fluorescent dye primed in the device. First the particle behavior was studied in detail using 9.9 and 1.0 {micro}m particles with a polymer-based prototype. The prototype device is compact with an active size of 3 mm{sup 2}. The soft inertial effect and deflection distance were proportional to the fluid Reynolds number (Re) and particle Reynolds number (Re{sub p}), respectively. We successfully demonstrated separation of bacteria (Escherichia coli) from human red blood cells at high cell concentrations (above 10{sup 8}/mL), using a sample flow rate of up to 18 {micro}L/min. This resulted in at least a 300-fold enrichment of bacteria at a wide range of flow rates with a controlled flow spreading. The separated cells were proven to be viable. Proteins from fractions before and after cell separation were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and staining to verify the removal of red blood cell proteins from the bacterial cell fraction. This novel microfluidic process is robust, reproducible, simple to perform, and has a high throughput compared to other cell sorting systems. Microfluidic systems based on these principles could easily be manufactured for clinical laboratory and biomedical applications.

Wu, Zhigang; Willing, Ben; Bjerketorp, Joakim; Jansson, Janet K.; Hjort, Klas

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nukbone® promotes proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from human amniotic membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Nukbone showed to be a good scaffold for adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. •Nukbone induced osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. •Results showed that Nukbone offer an excellent option for bone tissue regeneration due to properties. -- Abstract: Bovine bone matrix Nukbone® (NKB) is an osseous tissue-engineering biomaterial that retains its mineral and organic phases and its natural bone topography and has been used as a xenoimplant for bone regeneration in clinics. There are not studies regarding its influence of the NKB in the behavior of cells during the repairing processes. The aim of this research is to demonstrate that NKB has an osteoinductive effect in human mesenchymal stem cells from amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs). Results indicated that NKB favors the AM-hMSCs adhesion and proliferation up to 7 days in culture as shown by the scanning electron microscopy and proliferation measures using an alamarBlue assay. Furthermore, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, it was detected that two gene expression markers of osteoblastic differentiation: the core binding factor and osteocalcin were higher for AM-hMSCs co-cultured with NKB in comparison with cultivated cells in absence of the biomaterial. As the results indicate, NKB possess the capability for inducing successfully the osteoblastic differentiation of AM-hMSC, so that, NKB is an excellent xenoimplant option for repairing bone tissue defects.

Rodríguez-Fuentes, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana G. [Depto. Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Enríquez-Jiménez, Juana [Depto. Biología de la Reproducción, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ), México City 14000 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología de la Reproducción, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ), México City 14000 (Mexico); Alcántara-Quintana, Luz E. [Subd. de Investigación, Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico City 07370 (Mexico)] [Subd. de Investigación, Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico City 07370 (Mexico); Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth [Depto. Biología Molecular e Histocompatibilidad, Hospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, México City 4800 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología Molecular e Histocompatibilidad, Hospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, México City 4800 (Mexico); Piña-Barba, María C. [Depto. Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico); Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando [Depto. Biología Celular y Tisular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico)] [Depto. Biología Celular y Tisular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico); and others

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, Ren& #233; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

85

Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

Yin, Yuanqin [Cancer Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Yao, Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY (United States); Gao, Ning [Department of Pharmacognos, College of Pharmacy, 3rd Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The pyrimidine nucleotide carrier PNC1 and mitochondrial trafficking of thymidine phosphates in cultured human cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cycling cells cytosolic de novo synthesis of deoxynucleotides is the main source of precursors for mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis. The transfer of deoxynucleotides across the inner mt membrane requires protein carriers. PNC1, a SLC25 family member, exchanges pyrimidine nucleoside triphosphates in liposomes and its downregulation decreases mtUTP concentration in cultured cells. By an isotope-flow protocol we confirmed transport of uridine nucleotides by PNC1 in intact cultured cells and investigated PNC1 involvement in the mt trafficking of thymidine phosphates. Key features of our approach were the manipulation of PNC1 expression by RNA interference or inducible overexpression, the employment of cells proficient or deficient for cytosolic thymidine kinase (TK1) to distinguish the direction of flow of thymidine nucleotides across the mt membrane during short pulses with [{sup 3}H]-thymidine, the determination of mtdTTP specific radioactivity to quantitate the rate of mtdTTP export to the cytoplasm. Downregulation of PNC1 in TK1{sup -} cells increased labeled dTTP in mitochondria due to a reduced rate of export. Overexpression of PNC1 in TK1{sup +} cells increased mtdTTP pool size and radioactivity, suggesting an involvement in the import of thymidine phosphates. Thus PNC1 is a component of the network regulating the mtdTTP pool in human cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thymidine phosphates exchange between mitochondria and cytosol in mammalian cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNA-downregulation of PNC1 delays mitochondrial dTTP export in TK1{sup -} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PNC1 overexpression accumulates dTTP in mitochondria of TK1{sup +} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PNC1 exchanges thymidine nucleotides across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PNC1 participates in the regulation of the mtdTTP pool supporting mtDNA synthesis.

Franzolin, Elisa; Miazzi, Cristina; Frangini, Miriam; Palumbo, Elisa; Rampazzo, Chiara [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58B, I-35131 Padova (Italy)] [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58B, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bianchi, Vera, E-mail: vbianchi@bio.unipd.it [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58B, I-35131 Padova (Italy)] [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58B, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine inhibited cell viability of colon cancer in a time- and dose- dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine promoted apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorigenicity was inhibited by noscapine. -- Abstract: Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC{sub 50} = 75 {mu}M). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G{sub 2}/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China); Dong, Wei-Guo, E-mail: dongwg1966@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

88

CometChip: A High-throughput 96-Well Platform for Measuring DNA Damage in Microarrayed Human Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA damaging agents can promote aging, disease and cancer and they are ubiquitous in the environment and produced within human cells as normal cellular metabolites. Ironically, at high doses DNA damaging agents are also ...

Ge, Jing

89

Functional expression of P-glycoprotein in primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts and BeWo cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to investigate the functional expression of the efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), in primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts and BeWo cell monolayers. Uptake studies with primary ...

Utoguchi, Naoki; Chandorkar, Gurudatt A.; Avery, Michael; Audus, Kenneth L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Comparative Study on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Patent Law in the United States, the European Patent Organization, and China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the recent developments in biotechnology, associated patent law issues have been a growing concern since the 1980s. Among all the subcategories within the general field of biotechnology, human embryonic stem cell ...

Zhu, Huan

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Studies on Shiga toxin type 1 mediated tumor necrosis factor synthesis in a human monocytic cell line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDIES ON SHIGA TOXIN TYPE 1 MEDIATED TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR SYNTHESIS IN A HUMAN MONOCYTIC CELL LINE A Thesis by RAMESH SAKIRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AII M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1997 Major Subject: Biology STUDIES ON SHIGA TOXIN TYPE 1 MEDIATED TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR SYNTHESIS IN A HUMAN MONOCYTIC CELL LINE A Thesis by RAMESH SAKIRI Submitted to Texas A8M University in partial...

Sakiri, Ramesh

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Skin contamination dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

Hamby, David M. (Corvallis, OR); Farsoni, Abdollah T. (Corvallis, OR); Cazalas, Edward (Corvallis, OR)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 regulates decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Decidually produced PRL plays a key role during pregnancy. {yields} Overexpression of Nur77 increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter activity. {yields} Knockdown of Nur77 decreased decidual PRL secretion induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. {yields} Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression. -- Abstract: Prolactin (PRL) is synthesized and released by several extrapituitary tissues, including decidualized stromal cells. Despite the important role of decidual PRL during pregnancy, little is understood about the factors involved in the proper regulation of decidual PRL expression. Here we present evidence that the transcription factor Nur77 plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs). Nur77 mRNA expression in hESCs was significantly increased after decidualization stimulated by 8-Br-cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Nur77 in hESCs markedly increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter (dPRL/-332Luc) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, knockdown of Nur77 in hESCs significantly decreased decidual PRL promoter activation and substantially attenuated PRL mRNA expression and PRL secretion (P < 0.01) induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. These results demonstrate that Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that contributes significantly to the regulation of prolactin gene expression in human endometrial stromal cells.

Jiang, Yue; Hu, Yali; Zhao, Jing; Zhen, Xin [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)] [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yan, Guijun, E-mail: yanguijun33@gmail.com [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)] [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Sun, Haixiang, E-mail: stevensunz@163.com [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)] [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Chlorobenzene induces oxidative stress in human lung epithelial cells in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorobenzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is widely used as a solvent, degreasing agent and chemical intermediate in many industrial settings. Occupational studies have shown that acute and chronic exposure to chlorobenzene can cause irritation of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract and eyes. Using in vitro assays, we have shown in a previous study that human bronchial epithelial cells release inflammatory mediators such as the cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in response to chlorobenzene. This response is mediated through the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of monochlorobenzene on human lung cells, with emphasis on potential alterations of the redox equilibrium to clarify whether the chlorobenzene-induced inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells is caused via an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. We found that expression of cellular markers for oxidative stress, such as heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), glutathione S-transferase pi1 (GSTP1), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), were elevated in the presence of monochlorobenzene. Likewise, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased in response to exposure. However, in the presence of the antioxidants N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (MPG) or bucillamine, chlorobenzene-induced upregulation of marker proteins and release of the inflammatory mediator MCP-1 are suppressed. These results complement our previous findings and point to an oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response following chlorobenzene exposure.

Feltens, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.feltens@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Proteomics, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Moegel, Iljana, E-mail: iljana.moegel@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Roeder-Stolinski, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.roeder-stolinski@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Simon, Jan-Christoph, E-mail: Jan-Christoph.Simon@medizin.uni-leipzig.d [Leipzig University Medical Center, Clinic of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Philipp-Rosenthal-Str. 23-25, D-4103 Leipzig (Germany); Herberth, Gunda, E-mail: gunda.herberth@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lehmann, Irina, E-mail: irina.lehmann@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very rapid generation of human iPS cells under optimized conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five chemical inhibitors under hypoxia boosted reprogramming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. -- Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1 month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly generating bona fide human iPS cells and facilitates the application of iPS cell technology to biomedical research.

Shimada, Hidenori [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)] [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiya [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1, Hanazonocho, Kuzuha, Hirakatashi, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan)] [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1, Hanazonocho, Kuzuha, Hirakatashi, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Nakada, Akira; Shigeno, Keiji [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)] [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Tatsuo, E-mail: nakamura@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)] [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

96

The significance of the host inflammatory response on the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapies utilising human adult stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlling the fate of implanted hMSCs is one of the major drawbacks to be overcome to realize tissue engineering strategies. In particular, the effect of the inflammatory environment on hMSCs behaviour is poorly understood. Studying and mimicking the inflammatory process in vitro is a very complex and challenging task that involves multiple variables. This research addressed the questions using in vitro co-cultures of primary derived hMSCs together with human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs); the latter are key agents in the inflammatory process. This work explored the in vitro phenotypic changes of hMSCs in co-culture direct contact with monocytes and lymphocytes isolated from blood using both basal and osteogenic medium. Our findings indicated that hMSCs maintained their undifferentiated phenotype and pluripotency despite the contact with PBMCs. Moreover, hMSCs demonstrated increased proliferation and were able to differentiate specifically down the osteogenic lineage pathway. Providing significant crucial evidence to support the hypothesis that inflammation and host defence mechanisms could be utilised rather than avoided and combated to provide for the successful therapeutic application of stem cell therapies.

Navarro, Melba, E-mail: mnavarro@ibecbarcelona.eu [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom) [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom); Biomaterials for Regenerative Therapies Group, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona, 08028 (Spain); Pu, Fanrong; Hunt, John A. [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom)] [UKCTE, The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA (United Kingdom)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Disrupting the wall accumulation of human sperm cells by artificial corrugation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamics in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Swimming along walls is beneficial for directing and sorting cells, but may be detrimental if homogeneous populations are desired, such as in counting microchambers. In this work, we characterize the motion of human sperm cells $\\sim$60$\\mu$m long, strongly confined to $\\sim$20$\\mu$m shallow chambers. We investigate the nature of the cell trajectories between the confining surfaces and their accumulation near the borders. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and bottom surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion in between the two surfaces. We show that the introduction of artificial petal-shaped corrugation in the lateral boundaries limits the accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. The steady state limit is achieved over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate based on the assumption that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our predictions also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the corrugated chambers than in the non-corrugated ones, which is another practical reason to prefer the former for microfluidic applications in biomedicine.

H. A. Guidobaldi; Y. Jeyaram; C. A. Condat; M. Oviedo; I. Berdakin; V. V. Moshchalkov; L. C. Giojalas; A. V. Silhanek; V. I. Marconi

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ?40 nm; intermediates ?40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ? First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ? Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in FEMX-I melanoma. ? Down-regulation of prominin-1 results in decreased nuclear localization of ?-catenin. ? Wnt signaling as mediator of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1.

Rappa, Germana [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Le, Thuc T. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Johlfs, Mary G. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Fiscus, Ronald R. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstr. 108, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Corbeil, Denis [Tissue Engineering Laboratories (BIOTEC) and DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Technische Universität Dresden, Tatzberg 47–49, 01307 Dresden, Germany Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lorico, Aurelio, E-mail: alorico@roseman.edu [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Use of human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes to examine sunitinib mediated cardiotoxicity and electrophysiological alterations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sunitinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stroma tumor, is associated with clinical cardiac toxicity. Although the precise mechanism of sunitinib cardiotoxicity is not known, both the key metabolic energy regulator, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and ribosomal S 6 kinase (RSK) have been hypothesized as causative, albeit based on rodent models. To study the mechanism of sunitinib-mediated cardiotoxicity in a human model, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) having electrophysiological and contractile properties of native cardiac tissue were investigated. Sunitinib was cardiotoxic in a dose-dependent manner with an IC{sub 50} in the low micromolar range, observed by a loss of cellular ATP, an increase in oxidized glutathione, and induction of apoptosis in iPSC-CMs. Pretreatment of iPSC-CMs with AMPK activators AICAR or metformin, increased the phosphorylation of pAMPK-T172 and pACC-S79, but only marginally attenuated sunitinib mediated cell death. Furthermore, additional inhibitors of AMPK were not directly cytotoxic to iPSC-CMs up to 250 {mu}M concentrations. Inhibition of RSK with a highly specific, irreversible, small molecule inhibitor (RSK-FMK-MEA) did not induce cytotoxicity in iPSC-CMs below 250 {mu}M. Extensive electrophysiological analysis of sunitinib and RSK-FMK-MEA mediated conduction effects were performed. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibition of AMPK and RSK are not a major component of sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity. Although the exact mechanism of cardiotoxicity of sunitinib is not known, it is likely due to inhibition of multiple kinases simultaneously. These data highlight the utility of human iPSC-CMs in investigating the potential molecular mechanisms underlying drug-induced cardiotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytoxic effect of sunitinib on human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sunitinib causes ATP depletion, LDH release, GSH oxidation, and apoptosis Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro effects of sunitinib include changes in beat rate and amplitude Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sunitinib inhibits hERG and Nav1.5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and RSK do not mediate sunitinib cardiotoxicity.

Cohen, J.D., E-mail: jennifer.cohen@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Babiarz, J.E., E-mail: joshua.babiarz@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Abrams, R.M., E-mail: rory.abrams@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Guo, L., E-mail: liang.guo@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Kameoka, S., E-mail: sei.kameoka@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Chiao, E., E-mail: eric.chiao@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States); Taunton, J., E-mail: taunton@cmp.ucsf.edu [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Kolaja, K.L., E-mail: kyle.kolaja@roche.com [Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche, 340 Kingsland Street, Nutley, NJ 07110 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher affinity than others for the virus. Within recent years, elucidation of the viral complex has identified additional HHV-6A and -6B specific glycoproteins. Thus, gH-gL associates with a gQ1-gQ2 dimer to form a heterotetrameric complex. In addition, a novel complex consisting of gH-gL-gO has been described that does not bind CD46. Accumulating evidence suggests that an additional HHV-6A and -6B receptor exists. The previous simple picture of HHV-6A/B-host cell contact therefore includes more layers of complexities on both the viral and the host cell side of the interaction.

Pedersen, Simon Metz [Institute of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, The Bartholin Building, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hoellsberg, Per [Institute of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, The Bartholin Building, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)]. E-mail: ph@microbiology.au.dk

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Nicotine prevents the apoptosis induced by menadione in human lung cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of long-term cigarette smokers die prematurely from the adverse effects of smoking, including on lung cancer and other illnesses. Nicotine is a main component in tobacco and has been implicated as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. However, the mechanism of nicotine action in the development of lung cancer remains largely unknown. In the present study, we designed a nicotine-apoptosis system, by pre-treatment of nicotine making lung cancer cell A549 to be in a physiological nicotine environment, and observed that nicotine promoted cell proliferation and prevented the menadione-induced apoptosis, and exerts its role of anti-apoptosis by shift of apoptotic stage induced by menadione from late apoptotic stage to early apoptotic stage, in which NF-{kappa}B was up-regulated. Interference analysis of NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells showed that knock down of NF-{kappa}B resulted in apoptosis promotion and counteracted the protective effect of nicotine. The findings suggest that nicotine has potential effect in lung cancer genesis, especially in patients with undetectable early tumor development and development of specific NF-{kappa}B inhibitors would represent a potentially exciting new pharmacotherapy for tobacco-related lung cancer.

Zhang Tao [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Lu Heng [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shang Xuan [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Tian Yihao [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zheng Congyi [Centre for Type Culture Collection, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang Shiwen [Institute of Geriatric Cardiology, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Cheng Hanhua [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: hhcheng@whu.edu.cn; Zhou Rongjia [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: rjzhou@whu.edu.cn

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

Human CD34+ CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells Cultured with Growth Factors Including Angptl5 Efficiently Engraft Adult NOD-SCID Il2r??/? (NSG) Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing demand for human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in clinical and research applications necessitates expansion of HSCs in vitro. Before these cells can be used they must be carefully evaluated to assess their ...

Drake, Adam

103

Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-{kappa}B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-{kappa}B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

Kwon, Hyeok-Ran [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Zigang [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States)] [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Lee, Kyung Bok [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang-Muk, E-mail: sangmuk_oh@konyang.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Effects of oxysterols on cell viability, inflammatory cytokines, VEGF and reactive oxygen species production on human retinal cells: cytoprotective effects and prevention of VEGF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production on human retinal cells: cytoprotective effects and prevention of VEGF secretion by resveratrol B Recherche INSERM 866 (Lipides, Nutrition, Cancer) ­ Equipe Biochimie Métabolique et Nutritionnelle, and IL-8 secretion. 7-OH enhanced VEGF secretion. No cytotoxic effects were identified with 25-OH which

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

105

Alzheimer's disease skin fibroblasts selectively express a bradykinin signaling pathway mediating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is generated under conditions known as risk factors for AD, including stroke and traumatic head injury. BK B2 increases I/L B2 BK receptors in AD skin fibroblasts In established human fetal lung fibroblast models of protein kinase C (PKC). We now show that skin fibro- blasts of patients with AD developing around age 35

Steinbach, Joe Henry

106

Viability of adult rat skin following 13 Mev proton irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

then removed from suspension by centrifugation and washed twice in Smith's chick heart growth media. 33 All cells removed from the biopsy by this enzyme dissection were placed in culture to check viability. Two Rose chambers con- taining the first scraping... Dissipation . Diagram ? Proton Energy Dissipation 17 17 Cell Suspension Filter Tube. Exploded View of Rose Chamber 24 Rat 822, Gross Appearance 37 SB. Rat 822, Skin Section. 38 Rat 771, Gross Appearance 37 Rat 771, Skin Section. 38 7A. 7B. Rat 835...

Caraway, Bobby Lamar

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on this data, GH could be a new therapeutic target in melanoma.

Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States) [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States)] [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mechanisms of Attachment of Tobacco-Treated Streptococcus mutans to Human Endothelial Cells Alyssa R. Miller1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanisms of Attachment of Tobacco-Treated Streptococcus mutans to Human Endothelial Cells Alyssa to atherosclerosis. S. mutans were treated with different concentrations of nicotine and cigarette smoke condensate reagents, enolase antibody and purified DnaK, were also used to treat the HUVEC to observe the effects

Zhou, Yaoqi

109

Mechanisms of hormonal regulation of CAD gene expression and inhibition by Aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist in human breast cancer cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mediated pathway. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands suppress several E2-induced responses in the rodent uterus and mammary tumors and in human breast cancer cells. TCDD inhibited hormone...

Khan, Shaheen Munawar Ali

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Neutron skins and neutron stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial and medical applications raises the urgent need for tools that can predict NP toxicity. Global transcriptome and proteome analyses were conducted on three human cell types, exposed to two high aspect ratio NP types, to identify patterns of expression that might indicate high versus low NP toxicity. Three cell types representing the most common routes of human exposure to NPs, including macrophage-like (THP-1), small airway epithelial and intestinal (Caco-2/HT29-MTX) cells, were exposed to TiO2 nanobelts (TiO2-NB; high toxicity) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT; low toxicity) at low (10 µg/mL) and high (100 µg/mL) concentrations for 1 and 24 h. Unique patterns of gene and protein expressions were identified for each cell type, with no differentially expressed (p < 0.05, 1.5-fold change) genes or proteins overlapping across all three cell types. While unique to each cell type, the early response was primarily independent of NP type, showing similar expression patterns in response to both TiO2-NB and MWCNT. The early response might, therefore, indicate a general response to insult. In contrast, the 24 h response was unique to each NP type. The most significantly (p < 0.05) enriched biological processes in THP-1 cells indicated TiO2-NB regulation of pathways associated with inflammation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA replication stress and genomic instability, while MWCNT-regulated pathways indicated increased cell proliferation, DNA repair and anti-apoptosis. These two distinct sets of biological pathways might, therefore, underlie cellular responses to high and low NP toxicity, respectively.

Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Tolic, Ana; Xie, Yumei; Lai, Xianyin; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Waters, Katrina M.; Holian, Andrij; Witzmann, Frank A.; Orr, Galya

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Mesh Resolution Augmentation using 3D Skin Bank Won-Sook Lee*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a 100-micron resolution scan of plaster cast molds of the actors' faces. Human skin was modeled using, as shown in Figure 1. Each individual is presented with closed eyes and mouth due to the use of plaster

Lee, WonSook

113

Sensitive skins and somatic processing for affective and sociable robots based upon a somatic alphabet approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sense of touch is one of the most important senses of the human body. This thesis describes the biologically inspired design of "sensitive skins" for two different robotic platforms: Leonardo, a high degree-of-freedom, ...

Stiehl, Walter Daniel, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Apoptosis induction by silica nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species in human liver cell line HepG2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silica nanoparticles are increasingly utilized in various applications including agriculture and medicine. In vivo studies have shown that liver is one of the primary target organ of silica nanoparticles. However, possible mechanisms of hepatotoxicity caused by silica nanoparticles still remain unclear. In this study, we explored the reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated apoptosis induced by well-characterized 14 nm silica nanoparticles in human liver cell line HepG2. Silica nanoparticles (25–200 ?g/ml) induced a dose-dependent cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Silica nanoparticles were also found to induce oxidative stress in dose-dependent manner indicated by induction of ROS and lipid peroxidation and depletion of glutathione (GSH). Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting results showed that both the mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle checkpoint gene p53 and apoptotic genes (bax and caspase-3) were up-regulated while the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated in silica nanoparticles treated cells. Moreover, co-treatment of ROS scavenger vitamin C significantly attenuated the modulation of apoptotic markers along with the preservation of cell viability caused by silica nanoparticles. Our data demonstrated that silica nanoparticles induced apoptosis in human liver cells, which is ROS mediated and regulated through p53, bax/bcl-2 and caspase pathways. This study suggests that toxicity mechanisms of silica nanoparticles should be further investigated at in vivo level. -- Highlights: ? We explored the mechanisms of toxicity caused by silica NPs in human liver HepG2 cells. ? Silica NPs induced a dose-dependent cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ? Silica NPs induced ROS generation and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner. ? Silica NPs were also modulated apoptosis markers both at mRNA and protein levels. ? ROS mediated apoptosis induced by silica NPs was preserved by vitamin C.

Ahmad, Javed [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ahamed, Maqusood, E-mail: maqusood@gmail.com [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)] [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Akhtar, Mohd Javed [Fibre Toxicology, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow-226001 (India)] [Fibre Toxicology, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow-226001 (India); Alrokayan, Salman A. [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)] [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Detecting pornographic images by localizing skin Sotiris Karavarsamisa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" / "porn" and "skin" / "non-skin", respectively. The extracted

Blekas, Konstantinos

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human dermis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 Developing a predictive model of human skin colouring Symon D'Oyly Cotton Summary: Developing a predictive model of human skin colouring Symon D'Oyly Cotton Ela...

117

MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

Sun, Jian-Yong [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China) [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Huang, Yi [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Li, Ji-Peng [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Meng, Yan-Ling [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Yan, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Bian, Yong-Qian [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Wang, Wei-Zhong, E-mail: weichang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); and others

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted {alpha}1 helix resulting in an open A pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-{angstrom} displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d-LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint on CD1d-LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3{alpha} loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3{beta} and J{beta} segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells.

López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V.; Kung, Jennifer E.; Gumperz, Jenny; Adams, Erin J. (UC); (UW-MED)

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Expression of a functional extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human aortic endothelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) regulates the functions of many cell types through a G protein-coupled [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}-sensing receptor (CaR). Whether the receptor is functionally expressed in vascular endothelial cells is largely unknown. In cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), RT-PCR yielded the expected 555-bp product corresponding to the CaR, and CaR protein was demonstrated by fluorescence immunostaining and Western blot. RT-PCR also demonstrated the expression in HAEC of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR lacking exon 5. Although stimulation of fura 2-loaded HAEC by several CaR agonists (high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}, neomycin, and gadolinium) failed to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), the CaR agonist spermine stimulated an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} that was diminished in buffer without Ca{sup 2+} and was abolished after depletion of an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} pool with thapsigargin or after blocking IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} release with xestospongin C and with high concentration ryanodine, respectively. Spermine stimulated an increase in DAF-FM fluorescence in HAEC, consistent with NO production. Both the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and in NO production were reduced or absent in HAEC transfected with siRNA specifically targeted to the CaR. HAEC express a functional CaR that responds to the endogenous polyamine spermine with an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, primarily due to release of IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores, leading to the production of NO. Expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR may result in the absence of a functional response to other known CaR agonists in HAEC.

Ziegelstein, Roy C. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780 (United States); Xiong Yali [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780 (United States); He Chaoxia [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780 (United States); Hu Qinghua [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780 (United States)]. E-mail: qinghuaa@jhmi.edu

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

A critical comparison of human face rendering techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human skin exhibits complex light reflectance properties that make it difficult to render realistically. In recent years, many techniques have been introduced to render skin, with varying degrees of complexity and realism. ...

Arizpe, Arturo Andrew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A novel synthetic analog of militarin, MA-1 induces mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by ROS generation in human lung cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synthetic Militarin analog-1[(2R,3R,4R,5R)-1,6-bis(4-(2,4,4-trimethylpentan-2-yl)phenoxy) hexane-2,3,4,5-tetraol] is a novel derivative of constituents from Cordyceps militaris, which has been used to treat a variety of chronic diseases including inflammation, diabetes, hyperglycemia and cancers. Here, we report for the first time the synthesis of Militarin analog-1 (MA-1) and the apoptotic mechanism of MA-1 against human lung cancer cell lines. Treatment with MA-1 significantly inhibited the viability of 3 human lung cancer cell lines. The inhibition of viability and growth in MA-1-treated A549 cells with an IC{sub 50} of 5 ?M were mediated through apoptosis induction, as demonstrated by an increase in DNA fragmentation, sub-G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-DNA fraction, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. The apoptotic cell death caused mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through regulation of expression of the Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the final stage of apoptosis, activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, was induced. Furthermore, A549 lung cancer cells were more responsive to MA-1 than a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B), involving the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation and JNK/p38 MAPK exhibited attenuated DNA fragmentation in MA-1-induced apoptosis. Oral administration of MA-1 also retarded growth of A549 orthotopic xenografts. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the new synthetic derivative MA-1 triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through ROS generation and regulation of MAPKs and may be a potent therapeutic agent against human lung cancer. - Highlights: • We report a novel synthesized derivative, militarin analog-1 (MA-1). • MA-1-induced cancer cell death was triggered by the ROS generation through MAPKs. • The MA-1-induced cell death was also modulated by the mitochondria-mediated pathway. • The apoptotic cancer cell death by MA-1 was also exhibited in orthotopic xenografts. • Our findings suggest MA-1 as a clinically useful agent for human lung cancer.

Yoon, Deok Hyo; Lim, Mi-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yu Ran [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi-Ho [Mushroom Research Division, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 404-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [R and D Center, Dong-A Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Yongin 446-905 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byeong Hwa [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Youl [Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Won O. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Park, Haeil [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sunga, E-mail: sachoi@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Woong, E-mail: tawkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Study the cytotoxicity of different kinds of water-soluble nanoparticles in human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Preparation of three kinds of water-soluble QDs: CdTe, CdTe@SiO{sub 2}, Mn:ZnSe. ? Evaluated the cytotoxicity qualitatively and quantitatively. ? Fluorescent staining. ? Detected the total intracellular cadmium in cells. -- Abstract: Quantum nanoparticles have been applied extensively in biological and medical fields, the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles becomes the key point we should concern. In this paper, the cytotoxicity of three kinds of water-soluble nanoparticles: CdTe, CdTe@SiO{sub 2} and Mn:ZnSe was studied. We evaluated the nanoparticles toxicity qualitatively by observing the morphological changes of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells at different incubation times and colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays were carried out to detect the cell viability quantitatively. The results showed that CdTe nanoparticles with high concentrations caused cells to die largely while CdTe@SiO{sub 2} and Mn:ZnSe nanoparticles had no obvious effect. For further study, we studied the relation between the cell viability and the total cadmium concentration in cells and found that the viability of cells treated with CdTe@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was higher than that treated with CdTe nanoparticles. We also discovered that the death rate of cells co-incubated with CdTe nanoparticles was proportional to the total intracellular cadmium concentrations.

Niu, Lu [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Yang; Li, Xiaojie [Department of Pathophysiology, Prostate Diseases Prevention and Treatment Research Centre, Norman Bethune Medical School, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Department of Pathophysiology, Prostate Diseases Prevention and Treatment Research Centre, Norman Bethune Medical School, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Gao, Xue [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

Tal, Tamara L. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Simmons, Steven O. [Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa [Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Cho, Seung-Hyun [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge (United States); Ramabhadran, Ram [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Linak, William [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A. [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Samet, James M., E-mail: samet.james@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Computational Model Incorporating Neural Stem Cell Dynamics Reproduces Glioma Incidence across the Lifespan in the Human Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert...

Bauer, Roman; Stoll, Elizabeth

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hair follicles are required for optimal growth during lateral skin expansion   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hair follicles and the interfollicular epidermis of intact mature skin are maintained by distinct stem cell populations. Upon wounding, however, emigration of hair follicle keratinocytes to the interfollicular epidermis plays a role in acute...

Heath, Jack; Langton, Abigail K.; Hammond, Nigel L.; Dixon, Michael J.; Overbeek, Paul A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Single-Cell Analysis of Ca ++ Changes in Human Lung Mast Cells: Graded vs. All-or-Nothing Elevations after IgE-mediated Stimulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. Human lung mast cells were examined by digital video microscopy for changes in cytosolic free ionized calcium ([Ca÷÷]~) after stimulation with anti-IgE antibody or specific antigens. These studies sought to determine whether the mast cell response resembled a graded or an all-or-nothing process. Preliminary experiments indicated that labeling mast cells with fura-2 did not alter their response to IgE-mediated stimulation. Subsequent experiments established that an IgEmediated stimulus evoked an elevation of [Ca÷+] ~ from a baseline value of 85 nM to an average of 190 nM (range 60--450 nM, n = 23), with an average histamine release of 26%. There was a good correlation (Rs = 0.67) between the average net [Ca÷÷] ~ change and the subsequent histamine release (regression equation:

Donald Macglashan

127

Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-?B, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPAR?/?-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, and NF-?B signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ? Chronic As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure to lung epithelial cells resulted in a cancer-like phenotype. ? Mice injected with arsenic transformed (B-As) cells displayed metastatic tumors. ? Microarray profiling revealed changes in mitochondrial metabolism and ROS response. ? p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, PPAR? and NF-?B networks promoted pro-cancer signaling. ? B-As cells represent a lung cancer model to explore As-associated carcinogenesis.

Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)] [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Sensitive Targeted Quantification of ERK Phosphorylation Dynamics and Stoichiometry in Human Cells without Affinity Enrichment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass spectrometry-based targeted quantification is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, a major constraint of most targeted MS approaches is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents to enrich specific PTMs. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometries using a highly sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides within a given fraction from complex biological matrix with minimal sample losses, followed by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) quantification. The PRISM-SRM approach enabled direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from as little as 25 µg tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided >10-fold improvement in signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM for handling small size samples. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of EGF at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). At 10 min, the maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 ng/mL dose, whereas the maximal steady state level of ERK activation at 2 h was at 3 ng/ml dose, corresponding to 1200 and 9000 occupied receptors, respectively. At 10 min, the maximally activated pTpY isoform represented ~40% of total ERK, falling to less than 10% at 2 h. The time course and dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated ERK isoforms indicated that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than distributed, model of ERK phosphorylation. The PRISM-SRM quantification of protein phosphorylation illustrates the potential for simultaneous quantification of multiple PTMs.

Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chrisler, William B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Liu, Tao; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. S.; Qian, Weijun

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

"Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Skin Cancer- What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf May 20, 2010 #12;Supporters for the Deaf ("REAP") #12;Overview Skin Overview What is skin cancer? Who is at risk? How common is skin cancer? Signs of skin cancer Prevention Treatments #12;Skin Overview Skin is the largest organ in your body

Goldman, Steven A.

130

Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is national interest in the development of sophisticated materials that can automatically detect and respond to chemical and biological threats without the need for human intervention. In living systems, cell membranes perform such functions on a routine basis, detecting threats, communicating with the cell, and triggering automatic responses such as the opening and closing of ion channels. The purpose of this project was to learn how to replicate simple threat detection and response functions within artificial membrane systems. The original goals toward developing 'smart skin' assemblies included: (1) synthesizing functionalized nanoparticles to produce electrochemically responsive systems within a lipid bilayer host matrices, (2) calculating the energetics of nanoparticle-lipid interactions and pore formation, and (3) determining the mechanism of insertion of nanoparticles in lipid bilayers via imaging and electrochemistry. There are a few reports of the use of programmable materials to open and close pores in rigid hosts such as mesoporous materials using either heat or light activation. However, none of these materials can regulate themselves in response to the detection of threats. The strategies we investigated in this project involve learning how to use programmable nanomaterials to automatically eliminate open channels within a lipid bilayer host when 'threats' are detected. We generated and characterized functionalized nanoparticles that can be used to create synthetic pores through the membrane and investigated methods of eliminating the pores either through electrochemistry, change in pH, etc. We also focused on characterizing the behavior of functionalized gold NPs in different lipid membranes and lipid vesicles and coupled these results to modeling efforts designed to gain an understanding of the interaction of nanoparticles within lipid assemblies.

Montano, Gabriel A.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Allen, Amy; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Wheeler, David Roger

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

LET dependence of radiation-induced bystander effects using human prostate tumor cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past fifteen years, evidence provided by many independent research groups have indicated higher numbers of cells exhibiting damage than expected based on the number of cells traversed by the radiation. This phenomenon ...

Anzenberg, Vered

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yi-Chuang [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wei-Chang [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yeou-Lih [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Yu, E-mail: mt037@mail.fy.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Interactions between ultraviolet light and interleukin-1 on MSH binding in both mouse melanoma and human squamous carcinoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interactions between beta-melanotropin (MSH), interleukin 1-a (IL-1), and ultraviolet light (UV) were examined in Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma and RHEK human squamous carcinoma cell lines. The following points were established: (1) both cell lines produced IL-1 and their production was stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV; (2) both cell lines possessed high affinity binding sites for MSH, and their ability to bind MSH was modulated by IL-1; (3) IL-1 exhibited both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on MSH binding to Cloudman cells; and (4) the stimulatory effect of IL-1 on MSH binding to melanoma cells was reflected in enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH regarding tyrosinase activity (E.C. 1.14.18.1) and melanin content. The findings raise the possibility that interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes may be regulated by IL-1 and MSH, and suggest a possible mechanism for stimulation of cutaneous melanogenesis by solar radiation: enhancement of MSH receptor activity by induction of IL-1.

Birchall, N.; Orlow, S.J.; Kupper, T.; Pawelek, J. (Univ. of Auckland, (New Zealand))

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

JBC/2012/413260 Revision Identification of Biologically Relevant Enhancers in Human Erythroid Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

erythroid cells, a highly specialized cell type evolved to provide adequate amounts of oxygen throughout cells that have evolved to efficiently carry out their primary functions of oxygen transport and Molecular Biology, Center for Comparative Genomics and Bioinformatics, the Pennsylvania State University

Hardison, Ross C.

135

Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and related nutrients on sebum lipids, and skin and hair coat condition in canines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 7 Table 1.1 Composition (wt%) of skin surface lipids in selected mammals. Although skin surface lipids have been analyzed in over 70 mammalian species, only data from humans and some domestic animals are presented here. Note the marked...

Kirby, Naomi Anne

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 28:113120 (2001) Inuence of Nozzle-to-Skin Distance in Cryogen Spray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of dis- tance from the nozzle tip. Results: Size of spray cones and sprayed areas vary with distanceLasers in Surgery and Medicine 28:113±120 (2001) In¯uence of Nozzle-to-Skin Distance in Cryogen, the optimal atomizing nozzle design and operating conditions for cooling human skin remain to be determined

Aguilar, Guillermo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates PAX3-FKHR-mediated cell proliferation in human alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patients with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) have poorer response to conventional chemotherapy and lower survival rates than those with embryonal RMS (ERMS). To identify compounds that preferentially block the growth of ARMS, we conducted a small-scale screen of 160 kinase inhibitors against the ARMS cell line Rh30 and ERMS cell line RD and identified inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), including TWS119 as ARMS-selective inhibitors. GSK3 inhibitors inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis more effectively in Rh30 than RD cells. Ectopic expression of fusion protein PAX3-FKHR in RD cells significantly increased their sensitivity to TWS119. Down-regulation of GSK3 by GSK3 inhibitors or siRNA significantly reduced the transcriptional activity of PAX3-FKHR. These results suggest that GSK3 is directly involved in regulating the transcriptional activity of PAX3-FKHR. Also, GSK3 phosphorylated PAX3-FKHR in vitro, suggesting that GSK3 might regulate PAX3-FKHR activity via phosphorylation. These findings support a novel mechanism of PAX3-FKHR regulation by GSK3 and provide a novel strategy to develop GSK inhibitors as anti-ARMS therapies.

Zeng, Fu-Yue; Dong, Hanqing; Cui, Jimmy; Liu, Lingling [Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States); Chen, Taosheng, E-mail: taosheng.chen@stjude.org [Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Comparison of the Effects of Carbon Ion and Photon Irradiation on the Angiogenic Response in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy resistance is a commonly encountered problem in cancer treatment. In this regard, stabilization of endothelial cells and release of angiogenic factors by cancer cells contribute to this problem. In this study, we used human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells to compare the effects of carbon ion and X-ray irradiation on the cells' angiogenic response. Methods and Materials: A549 cells were irradiated with biologically equivalent doses for cell survival of either carbon ions (linear energy transfer, 170 keV/{mu}m; energy of 9.8 MeV/u on target) or X-rays and injected with basement membrane matrix into BALB/c nu/nu mice to generate a plug, allowing quantification of angiogenesis by blood vessel enumeration. The expression of angiogenic factors (VEGF, PlGF, SDF-1, and SCF) was assessed at the mRNA and secreted protein levels by using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Signal transduction mediated by stem cell factor (SCF) was assessed by phosphorylation of its receptor c-Kit. For inhibition of SCF/c-Kit signaling, a specific SCF/c-Kit inhibitor (ISCK03) was used. Results: Irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays (6 Gy) but not carbon ions (2 Gy) resulted in a significant increase in blood vessel density (control, 20.71 {+-} 1.55; X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; carbon ion, 16.33 {+-} 1.03; number per microscopic field). Concordantly, irradiation with X-rays but not with carbon ions increased the expression of SCF and subsequently caused phosphorylation of c-Kit in endothelial cells. ISCK03 treatment of A549 cells irradiated with X-rays (6 Gy) resulted in a significant decrease in blood vessel density (X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; X-ray and ISCK03, 4.33 {+-} 0.71; number of microscopic field). These data indicate that irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays but not with carbon ions promotes angiogenesis. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that SCF is an X-ray-induced mediator of angiogenesis in A549 cells, a phenomenon that could not be observed with carbon ion irradiation. Thus, in this model system evaluating angiogenesis, carbon ion irradiation may have a therapeutic advantage. This observation should be confirmed in orthotopic lung tumor models.

Kamlah, Florentine, E-mail: Kamlah@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Haenze, Joerg [Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Arenz, Andrea [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Seay, Ulrike; Hasan, Diya [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Juricko, Janko; Bischoff, Birgit [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Gottschald, Oana R. [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Fournier, Claudia; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Scholz, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Seeger, Werner [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Rose, Frank [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low-dose responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in single living human cells measured by synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-dose responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in single living human cells measured, and reproductive defects in animals1-6 and humans.7-14 Among this family of pollutants, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

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141

Adenoviral Mediated Gene Delivery to Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Inner Ear Hair Cell Differentiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Sensory neural hearing loss (SNHL) is the most common form, which results from degeneration of inner ear sensory hair cells and auditory neurons in the cochlea. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in gene delivery to mesenchymal stem...

Devarajan, Keerthana

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Knockdown of human deubiquitinase PSMD14 induces cell cycle arrest and senescence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PSMD14 (POH1, also known as Rpn11/MPR1/S13/CepP1) protein within the 19S complex (19S cap; PA700) is responsible for substrate deubiquitination during proteasomal degradation. The role of PSMD14 in cell proliferation and senescence was explored using siRNA knockdown in carcinoma cell lines. Our results reveal that down-regulation of PSMD14 by siRNA transfection had a considerable impact on cell viability causing cell arrest in the G0-G1 phase, ultimately leading to senescence. The molecular events associated with decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and senescence include down-regulation of cyclin B1-CDK1-CDC25C, down-regulation of cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21{sup /Cip} and p27{sup /Kip1}. Most notably, phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein was markedly reduced in PSMD14 knockdown cells. A comparative study with PSMB5, a subunit of the 20S proteasome, revealed that PSMB5 and PSMD14 have different effects on cell cycle, senescence and associated molecular events. These data support the view that the 19S and 20S subunits of the proteasome have distinct biological functions and imply that targeting 19S and 20S would have distinct molecular consequences on tumor cells.

Byrne, Ann; McLaren, Rajashree P.; Mason, Paul; Chai, Lilly; Dufault, Michael R.; Huang, Yinyin; Liang, Beirong; Gans, Joseph D.; Zhang, Mindy; Carter, Kara; Gladysheva, Tatiana B.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Biemann, Hans-Peter N.; Booker, Michael; Goldberg, Mark A.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Lillie, James [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)] [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Madden, Stephen L., E-mail: steve.madden@genzyme.com [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Jiang, Yide, E-mail: yide.jiang@genzyme.com [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)] [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation1 Introduction Microfluidics has gained significant advancesof mammalian cells using microfluidics 3,4 , there have been

Wu, Zhigang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids cells humans Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the stomach... the effects of PPI action on acid levels 36. Our original gastric acid secretion model tracks four cell... popula- tions in the stomach considered critical for...

145

Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlight: •MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. •This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. •Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpxiong@medmail.com.cn

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Overexpression of IRS2 in isolated pancreatic islets causes proliferation and protects human {beta}-cells from hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies in vivo indicate that IRS2 plays an important role in maintaining functional {beta}-cell mass. To investigate if IRS2 autonomously affects {beta}-cells, we have studied proliferation, apoptosis, and {beta}-cell function in isolated rat and human islets after overexpression of IRS2 or IRS1. We found that {beta}-cell proliferation was significantly increased in rat islets overexpressing IRS2 while IRS1 was less effective. Moreover, proliferation of a {beta}-cell line, INS-1, was decreased after repression of Irs2 expression using RNA oligonucleotides. Overexpression of IRS2 in human islets significantly decreased apoptosis of {beta}-cells, induced by 33.3 mM D-glucose. However, IRS2 did not protect cultured rat islets against apoptosis in the presence of 0.5 mM palmitic acid. Overexpression of IRS2 in isolated rat islets significantly increased basal and D-glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as determined in perifusion experiments. Therefore, IRS2 is sufficient to induce proliferation in rat islets and to protect human {beta}-cells from D-glucose-induced apoptosis. In addition, IRS2 can improve {beta}-cell function. Our results indicate that IRS2 acts autonomously in {beta}-cells in maintenance and expansion of functional {beta}-cell mass in vivo.

Mohanty, S. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Spinas, G.A. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Maedler, K. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Zuellig, R.A. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Lehmann, R. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Donath, M.Y. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Trueb, T. [Universitaetsverwaltung, Stab fuer Sachmittel-Kredite, KUN110, Kuenstlergasse 15, 8001 Zurich (Switzerland); Niessen, M. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: markus.niessen@usz.ch

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [ENEA Laboratories, Rome (Italy); Dragani, Tommaso A. [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: tommaso.dragani@istitutotumori.mi.it

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Effects of FGF-2 on human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells morphology and chondrogenesis enhancement in Transwell culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated effects of FGF-2 on hADSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the level of gene expressions of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF-2 induces chondrogenesis in hADSCs, which Bullet Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result of this study may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering. -- Abstract: Injured cartilage is difficult to repair due to its poor vascularisation. Cell based therapies may serve as tools to more effectively regenerate defective cartilage. Both adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) are regarded as potential stem cell sources able to generate functional cartilage for cell transplantation. Growth factors, in particular the TGF-b superfamily, influence many processes during cartilage formation, including cell proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, and induction of MSCs towards chondrogenesis. In the current study, we investigated the effects of FGF-2 on hADSC morphology and chondrogenesis in Transwell culture. hADSCs were obtained from patients undergoing elective surgery, and then cultured in expansion medium alone or in the presence of FGF-2 (10 ng/ml). mRNA expression levels of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The morphology, doubling time, trypsinization time and chondrogenesis of hADSCs were also studied. Expression levels of SOX-9, collagen type II, and aggrecan were all significantly increased in hADSCs expanded in presence of FGF-2. Furthermore FGF-2 induced a slender morphology, whereas doubling time and trypsinization time decreased. Our results suggest that FGF-2 induces hADSCs chondrogenesis in Transwell culture, which may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering.

Kabiri, Azadeh, E-mail: z_kabiri@resident.mui.ac.ir [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esfandiari, Ebrahim, E-mail: esfandiari@med.mui.ac.ir [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemibeni, Batool, E-mail: hashemibeni@med.mui.ac.ir [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemi, Mohammad, E-mail: m_kazemi@med.mui.ac.i [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mardani, Mohammad, E-mail: mardani@med.mui.ac.ir [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Anatomical Sciences and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Abolghasem, E-mail: abesmaeili@yahoo.com [Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology Division, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology Division, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

149

Inhibiting the Aurora B Kinase Potently Suppresses Repopulation During Fractionated Irradiation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of molecular-targeted agents during radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising strategy to inhibit repopulation, thereby improving therapeutic outcome. We assessed the combined effectiveness of inhibiting Aurora B kinase and irradiation on human NSCLC cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: NSCLC cell lines were exposed to concentrations of AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (AZD1152-HQPA) inhibiting colony formation by 50% (IC50{sub clone}) in combination with single dose irradiation or different fractionation schedules using multiple 2-Gy fractions per day up to total doses of 4-40 Gy. The total irradiation dose required to control growth of 50% of the plaque monolayers (TCD50) was determined. Apoptosis, G2/M progression, and polyploidization were also analyzed. Results: TCD50 values after single dose irradiation were similar for the H460 and H661 cell lines with 11.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 10.7 {+-} 0.3 Gy, respectively. Fractionated irradiation using 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, and 1 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day schedules significantly increased TCD50 values for both cell lines grown as plaque monolayers with increasing radiation treatment time. This could be explained by a repopulation effect per day that counteracts 75 {+-} 8% and 27 {+-} 6% of the effect of a 2-Gy fraction in H460 and H661 cells, respectively. AZD1152-HQPA treatment concomitant to radiotherapy significantly decreased the daily repopulation effect (H460: 28 {+-} 5%, H661: 10 {+-} 4% of a 2-Gy fraction per day). Treatment with IC50{sub clone} AZD1152-HPQA did not induce apoptosis, prolong radiation-induced G2 arrest, or delay cell cycle progression before the spindle check point. However, polyploidization was detected, especially in cell lines without functional p53. Conclusions: Inhibition of Aurora B kinase with low AZD1152-HQPA concentrations during irradiation of NSCLC cell lines affects repopulation during radiotherapy. Thus, concomitant Aurora B kinase inhibition and irradiation may be a promising strategy for fast repopulating tumors, which are difficult to cure by dose escalation based on conventional fractionation.

Sak, Ali, E-mail: ali.sak@uni-due.de [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Stuschke, Martin; Groneberg, Michael; Kuebler, Dennis; Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E. [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Confocal Microscopy for Modeling Electron Microbeam Irradiation of Skin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For radiation exposures employing targeted sources such as particle microbeams, the deposition of energy and dose will depend on the spatial heterogeneity of the spample. Although cell structural variations are relatively minor for two-dimensional cell cultures, they can vary significantly for fully differential tissues. Employing high-resolution confocal microscopy, we have determined the spatial distribution, size, and shape of epidermal kerantinocyte nuclei for the full-thickness EpiDerm skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). Application of these data to claculate the microdosimetry and microdistribution of energy deposition by an electron microbeam is discussed.

Miller, John H.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Sowa, Marianne B.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Could the gene coding for human uteroglobin (clara cell 10 kDa protein) be a candidate gene for atopy?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been proposed that human immune response to allergens is genetically determined. Most of these allergic responses are directed to environmental proteins and are mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE). These allergic disorders (eg. allergic asthma) are commonly known as atopy. IgE activates phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) which hydrolyzes cell membrane phospholipids generating free fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid (AA). AA is utilized as the substrate for the generation of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and platelet activating factor (PAF). These agents can cause inflammation as well as bronchoconstriction, hallmarks of asthma. IgE-induced mast cell degranulation and accumulation of basophils and eosinophils in the lung are also characteristic immunological processes commonly found in atopic asthma. Recent investigations suggest that a group I PLA{sub 2} may be associated with the secretory granules of these cells. An inverse relationship between the levels of eicosanoids and hUG has been found in the nasopharyngeal lavage fluid of children with viral infections of the upper respiratory tract, often a precipitating factor in asthma. Results of genetic linkage studies mapped a putative atopy gene in human chromosome 11q{sup 13}, the same region in which we localized the hUG gene. Moreover, a genetic linkage between atopic IgE responses and chromosome 11q{sup 13} has been reported. In addition, hUG is: (i) a potent inhibitor of PLA{sub 2} activity, (ii) a potent antiinflammatory/immunomodulatory and antichemotactic protein and has a hitherto undetermined receptor-mediated activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that a mutation either in the hUG or its receptor genes may manifest symptoms characteristic of atopy. Hence, we raise the question whether hUG is a candidate gene for this disease.

Mukherjee, A.B.; Peri, A.; Miele, L. [SDG, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Stationary turbine component with laminated skin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Basic FGF and suppression of BMP signaling sustain undifferentiated proliferation of human ES cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JAK/Stat3 signaling, and activated Stat3 is sufficient to sustain undifferentiated proliferation synergize with LIF to maintain self-renewal of mouse ES cells by inducing expression of Id genes7. Addition of LIF to culture medium1 or activation of Stat3 (ref. 8) does not sustain hESCs in conditions that would

Cai, Long

155

Correlation and comparison of Nb/sub 2/ lymphoma cell bioassay with radioimmunoassay for human prolactin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serum samples from groups of men and women with normal and elevated prolactin (PRL) levels were assayed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and by Nb/sub 2/ lymphoma cell bioassay (BA) for the presence of PRL. Because the Nb/sub 2/ lymphoma cells respond to both PRL and growth hormone, BA for PRL activity was carried out before and after neutralization of growth hormone in the serum samples. There were excellent correlations between RIA and BA both in euprolactinemic and hyperprolactinemic subjects. On an absolute basis, RIA and BA values were similar in the euprolactinemic group (6.6 +/- 0.8 versus 6.2 +/- 1.0), whereas in the hyperprolactinemic group, RIA values were significantly higher than the BA results. The two assay systems also appeared to correlate better in women who were hyperprolactinemic, with obvious menstrual cycle disturbances, than in hyperprolactinemic women without menstrual cycle disturbances.

Subramanian, M.G.; Spirtos, N.J.; Moghissi, K.S.; Magyar, D.M.; Hayes, M.F.; Gala, R.R.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in commercial products, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, and clothing industries. For example, pants and shirts are routinely manufactured with silver nanoparticles to render them 'wrinkle-free.' Despite the growing applications, the associated environmental health and safety (EHS) impacts are completely unknown. The significance of this problem became pervasive within the general public when Prince Charles authored an article in 2004 warning of the potential social, ethical, health, and environmental issues connected to nanotechnology. The EHS concerns, however, continued to receive relatively little consideration from federal agencies as compared with large investments in basic nanoscience R&D. The mounting literature regarding the toxicology of ENMs (e.g., the ability of inhaled nanoparticles to cross the blood-brain barrier; Kwon et al., 2008, J. Occup. Health 50, 1) has spurred a recent realization within the NNI and other federal agencies that the EHS impacts related to nanotechnology must be addressed now. In our study we proposed to address critical aspects of this problem by developing primary correlations between nanoparticle properties and their effects on cell health and toxicity. A critical challenge embodied within this problem arises from the ability to synthesize nanoparticles with a wide array of physical properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, surface chemistry, etc.), which in turn creates an immense, multidimensional problem in assessing toxicological effects. In this work we first investigated varying sizes of quantum dots (Qdots) and their ability to cross cell membranes based on their aspect ratio utilizing hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy. We then studied toxicity of epithelial cell lines that were exposed to different sized gold and silver nanoparticles using advanced imaging techniques, biochemical analyses, and optical and mass spectrometry methods. Finally we evaluated a new assay to measure transglutaminase (TG) activity; a potential marker for cell toxicity.

Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Brozik, Susan Marie; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Bachand, George David; Bachand, Marlene; Aaron, Jesse S.; Allen, Amy; Seagrave, Jean-Clare

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Overexpression of the human BCL-2 gene product results in growth enhancement of Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological activity of the human BCL-2 gene product was analyzed in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected human lymphoblastoid B-cell line transfected with BCL-2 sequences driven by the simian virus 40 promoter and enhancer. Overproduction of the BCL-2 protein conferred a selective growth advantage to the EBV-infected B cells as compared with control transfectants in low-serum medium and also after seeding at limiting dilution but did not render the cells tumorigenic in athymic nude mice. This growth enhancement was also seen in cells transfected with the BCL-2 gene with its own promoter juxtaposed to the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene enhancer, which represents the translocated form of the BCL-2 gene observed in follicular lymphomas with the t(14;18) translocation. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B cells overproducing the BCL-2 protein is neither due to the enhanced growth factor production nor due to an enhanced sensitivity of the BCL-2 transfectants to interleukins 1 or 6, although both lymphokines are known to stimulate proliferation of EBV-infected B-cell lines. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B-cell lines. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B cells by overproduction of the BCL-2 protein suggests the direct involvement of the BCL-2 gene product in the pathogenesis of follicular lymphoma.

Tsujimoto, Yoshihide (Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

FGF signaling via MAPK is required early and improves Activin A-induced definitive endoderm formation from human embryonic stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep study the FGF signaling role during DE specification in the context of hESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DE differentiation from hESCs has an early dependence on FGF signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A serum-free DE protocol is developed based on the findings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DE cells showed potential to differentiate into pancreatic progenitor cells. -- Abstract: Considering their unlimited proliferation and pluripotency properties, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) constitute a promising resource applicable for cell replacement therapy. To facilitate this clinical translation, it is critical to study and understand the early stage of hESCs differentiation wherein germ layers are defined. In this study, we examined the role of FGF signaling in Activin A-induced definitive endoderm (DE) differentiation in the absence of supplemented animal serum. We found that activated FGF/MAPK signaling is required at the early time point of Activin A-induced DE formation. In addition, FGF activation increased the number of DE cells compared to Activin A alone. These DE cells could further differentiate into PDX1 and NKX6.1 positive pancreatic progenitors in vitro. We conclude that Activin A combined with FGF/MAPK signaling efficiently induce DE cells in the absence of serum. These findings improve our understanding of human endoderm formation, and constitute a step forward in the generation of clinical grade hESCs progenies for cell therapy.

Sui, Lina, E-mail: linasui@vub.ac.be [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)] [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Mfopou, Josue K. [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)] [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Geens, Mieke; Sermon, Karen [Department of Embryology and Genetics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)] [Department of Embryology and Genetics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Bouwens, Luc [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)] [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

Neurotensin-induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation and growth of human colonic cancer cells are independent from growth factors receptors activation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} We compare intracellular pathways of NT and EGF in HT29 cells. {yields} NT does not transactivate EGFR. {yields} Transactivation of EGFR is not a general rule in cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Neurotensin (NT) promotes the proliferation of human colonic cancer cells by undefined mechanisms. We already demonstrated that, in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29, the effects of NT were mediated by a complex formed between the NT receptor-1 (NTSR1) and-3 (NTSR3). Here we examined cellular mechanisms that led to NT-induced MAP kinase phosphorylation and growth factors receptors transactivation in colonic cancer cells and proliferation in HT29 cells. With the aim to identify upstream signaling involved in NT-elicited MAP kinase activation, we found that the stimulatory effects of the peptide were totally independent from the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) both in the HT29 and the HCT116 cells. NT was unable to promote phosphorylation of EGFR and to compete with EGF for its binding to the receptor. Pharmacological approaches allowed us to differentiate EGF and NT signaling in HT29 cells since only NT activation of Erk1/2 was shown to be sensitive to PKC inhibitors and since only NT increased the intracellular level of calcium. We also observed that NT was not able to transactivate Insulin-like growth factor receptor. Our findings indicate that, in the HT29 and HCT116 cell lines, NT stimulates MAP kinase phosphorylation and cell growth by a pathway which does not involve EGF system but rather NT receptors which transduce their own intracellular effectors. These results indicate that depending on the cell line used, blocking EGFR is not the general rule to inhibit NT-induced cancer cell proliferation.

Massa, Fabienne; Tormo, Aurelie; Beraud-Dufour, Sophie; Coppola, Thierry [Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS UMR 6097, 660 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France)] [Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS UMR 6097, 660 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Mazella, Jean, E-mail: mazella@ipmc.cnrs.fr [Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS UMR 6097, 660 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France)] [Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS UMR 6097, 660 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France)

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

A noninvasive skin imaging system Symon Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A noninvasive skin imaging system Symon Cotton School of Computer Science, University Of Birmingham arriving at a diagnosis. A previous paper [Cotton and Claridge 1996] presented a model of colour formation­dimensional colour space, is limited to a curved surface [Cotton and Claridge 1996]. As abnormal skin often has a di

Claridge, Ela

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161

Dominant negative and loss of function mutations of the c-kit (mast/stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene in human piebaldism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development and is characterized by congenital white parches of skin and hair from which melanocytes are completely absent. A similar disorder of the mouse, 'dominant white spotting' (W), results from mutations of the c-kit proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular tyrosine kinases receptor for the mast/stem cell growth factor. The authors have identified c-kit gene mutations in three patients with piebaldism. A missense substitution (Phe[r arrow]Leu) at codon 584, within the tyrosine kinases domain, is associated with a severe piebald phenotype, whereas two different frameshifts, within codons 561 and 642, are both associated with a variable and relatively mild piebald phenotype. This is consistent with a possible 'dominant negative' effect of missense c-kit polypeptides on the function of the dimeric receptor.

Spritz, R.A.; Giebel, L.B.; Holmes, S.A. (University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

How do microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work? Bacteria need energy to survive, in the same way that humans need food to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

much does it cost to treat wastewater? In the U.S. alone, the cost of treating 33 billion gallonsHow do microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work? Bacteria need energy to survive, in the same way that humans need food to live. Bacteria get this energy in a two-step process. The first step requires

Lee, Dongwon

163

Nuclear Factor-KB Dimer Exchange Promotes a p21waf1/cip1 Superinduction Response in Human T Leukemic Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Factor-KB Dimer Exchange Promotes a p21waf1/cip1 Superinduction Response in Human ability to induce p21waf1/cip1 . Here, we provide evidence that sequential NF-KB-activating signals induce heightened NF-KB DNA binding and p21waf1/cip1 induction in CEM and additional T leukemic cell lines

Miyamoto, Shigeki

164

Chemical Data Mining of the NCI Human Tumor Cell Line Database Huijun Wang, Jonathan Klinginsmith, Xiao Dong, Adam C. Lee, Rajarshi Guha, Yuqing Wu,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Data Mining of the NCI Human Tumor Cell Line Database Huijun Wang, Jonathan Klinginsmith resource particularly for testing data mining methods that bridge chemical, biological, and genomic information. In this paper we describe a formal knowledge discovery approach to characterizing and data mining

Wu, Yuqing Melanie

165

The TAL1 complex targets the FBXW7 tumor suppressor by activating miR-223 in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in 60% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and initiates T-ALL in mouse models. By performing global microRNA (miRNA) expression ...

Mansour, Marc R.

166

The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/[mu]), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of [sup 14]C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ([sup 3]H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The [sup 14]C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with [sup 14]C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Efficient elasticity for character skinning with contact and collisions Aleka McAdams1,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-level character skinning system. CR Categories: I.6.8 [Simulation and Modeling]: Types of Simulation--Animation aspect is the production of life-like deformations for soft tissues comprising both humans and animals Animation Studios 2 PDI/DreamWorks 3 University of California, Los Angeles 4 University of Wisconsin

Liblit, Ben

168

autologous serum skin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

169

alter skin microcirculation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

170

ameliorate genetic skin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

171

An Examination of the Effect of Decaying Exponential Pulse Electric Fields on Cell Mortality in Murine Spleenocytes, Hybridomas, and Human Natural Killer Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have also been used for production of monoclonal antibodies [6], cell-tissue fusion [3], and cell and the pellet was re- suspended at 3 x 105 cells/ml o

Stryker, Gabrielle A.

172

First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a biologic model and could be useful for future experimental studies for the application of BNCT to colon carcinoma.

Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra, E-mail: dagrosa@cnea.gov.a [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Crivello, Martin [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires(Argentina); Perona, Marina [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto [Department of Instrumentation and Control, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano [Argentina Reactor, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Casal, Mariana [Institute of Oncology 'Angel H. Roffo', University of Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kahl, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Juvenal, Guillermo Juan [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Pisarev, Mario Alberto [Department of Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); National Research Council (Argentina); Department of Human Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Beyond the skin bag: on the moral responsibility of extended agencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and extended agency The view of the subject as only the human individual is known as methodological individualism. This theory holds that subjects are human beings entirely contained in their “skin bags” (Clark 2003), that maintain their identity... to ride a bicycle. “Be careful not to run into people or things, don’t crash your bike or hurt yourself, and especially don’t ride into the street without looking.” Her responsibility with the bicycle is, however, considerably less momentous than...

Hanson, F. Allan

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Novel small molecule induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using high-throughput screening with small-molecule libraries, we identified a compound, KCG165 [(2-(3-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)ethoxy)-1,10b-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c] quinazolin-5(6H)-one)], which strongly activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity. KCG165-induced phosphorylations of p53 at Ser{sup 6}, Ser{sup 15}, and Ser{sup 20}, which are all key residues involved in the activation and stabilization of p53. Consistent with these findings, KCG165 increased level of p53 protein and led to the accumulation of transcriptionally active p53 in the nucleus with the increased occupancy of p53 in the endogenous promoter region of its downstream target gene, p21{sup WAF1/CIP}. Notably, KCG165-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Furthermore, we suggested topoisomerase II as the molecular target of KCG165. Together, these results indicate that KCG165 may have potential applications as an antitumor agent.

Park, Sang Eun [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Yong Ki [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jae Du [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bum Tae [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Ghil [Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: bigguy@krict.re.kr

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Impaired NFAT and NF?B activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by ?{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4{sup +} T cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously reported that ?{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (?{sup 9}-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4{sup +} T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of ?{sup 9}-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with ?{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4{sup +} T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that ?{sup 9}-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NF?B to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of ?{sup 9}-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLC?1/2, Akt, and GSK3?. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NF?B signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which ?{sup 9}-THC suppresses human T cell function. - Highlights: • ?{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in activated human CD4+ T cells. • ?{sup 9}-THC suppressed DNA-binding activity of NFAT and NF?B. • ?{sup 9}-THC impaired elevation of intracellular Ca2+. • ?{sup 9}-THC did not affect phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLC?1/2, Akt, and GSK3?.

Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Kaplan, Barbara L.F. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Neuroscience Program, Michigan State University (United States); Kaminski, Norbert E., E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Skin friction for steel piles in sand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SkiN FRICTION FOR STEZL PIIZS IN SAND A Theeia by I. H. Sulaiman Submittei io the graduate College of t, he Texan AAB Univen-ity in Ixantial fulfil. ment of bhe zequiremenbu for the degree of NASTZR 0F SCISNCZ May 196'7 bsrjor Subject...: Civil Engineering SKIN FRICTION FOR STEEL PILES IN SAND A Thesis by I. H. Sulaiman Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C mmittee Head of Department Memb Member 111 Skin Friction For Steel Piles in Sand (May 1967) Ibr shim Hikmat...

Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Proc. 3rd International Conference on Networked Sensing Systems (INSS 2006), pp. 55-60, Rosemont, Illinois (USA), May, 2006. A Whole Body Artificial Skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are required to be more cautious about surrounding environments than robots in industrial factories because a tactile sensor skin as one of applications of the system. In this application, the cells are not only within its sensing area. The resulting robot skin is soft, stretchable, and able to cover a large area

Shinoda, Hiroyuki

179

A novel peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine of human telomerase reverse transcriptase induces a potent cytotoxic T-cell response in vivo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is highly expressed in over 85% of human cancers, which makes it a broadly applicable molecular target for cancer therapy. Several groups have demonstrated that hTERT can efficiently evoke specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses for malignant tumors. In the present study, we developed a novel virus-like particulate peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine (PNDV) of hTERT, which was composed of a low-affinity epitope variant with encoding full-length gene in the same virus-size particulate. We verified the formation of PNDV by DNA retarding assay, DNase I protection assay and transmission electron microscopy, and confirmed its immunogenicity and transfection activities in mammalian cells. Furthermore, in vivo immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice generated efficient IFN-{gamma} secretion and hTERT-specific CTLs which are known to cause selective cell death of telomerase positive gastrointestinal cancer cells. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on collocating a low-affinity epitope variant with a full-length hTERT gene for anti-cancer vaccine design. This novel strategy for vaccine design not only enables enhanced immunity to a universal tumor antigen, but also has the potential to generate CTLs effective in telomerase-positive tumor cells of diverse tissue origins. Therefore, our findings bear significant implications for immunotherapy of human cancers.

Guo, Hong [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Hao, Jia [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wu, Chao [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Shi, Yun [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Zhao, Xiao-yan [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Fang, Dian-chun [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)]. E-mail: fandianchun@hotmail.com

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Pancreatic beta cell failure in obese mice with human-like CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase deficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Igf-1 receptor-mediated beta-cell development and peripheralGerich, J. (1995) Pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction as theC. , and Bodkin, N. L. (1990) Beta-cell hyperresponsiveness:

Kavaler, Sarah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Interleukin-6 triggers human cerebral endothelial cells proliferation and migration: The role for KDR and MMP-9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is involved in angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Using human cerebral endothelial cell (HCEC), we report for First time that IL-6 triggers HCEC proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner, specifically associated with enhancement of VEGF expression, up-regulated and phosphorylated VEGF receptor-2 (KDR), and stimulated MMP-9 secretion. We investigated the signal pathway of IL-6/IL-6R responsible for KDR's regulation. Pharmacological inhibitor of PI3K failed to inhibit IL-6-mediated VEGF overexpression, while blocking ERK1/2 with PD98059 could abolish IL-6-induced KDR overexpression. Further, neutralizing endogenous VEGF attenuated KDR expression and phosphorylation, suggesting that IL-6-induced KDR activation is independent of VEGF stimulation. MMP-9 inhibitor GM6001 significantly decreases HCEC proliferation and migration (p < 0.05), indicating the crucial function of MMP-9 in promoting angiogenic changes in HCECs. We conclude that IL-6 triggers VEGF-induced angiogenic activity through increasing VEGF release, up-regulates KDR expression and phosphorylation through activating ERK1/2 signaling, and stimulates MMP-9 overexpression.

Yao, Jianhua S. [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Zhai Wenwu [Department of Lung Biology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Young, William L. [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Yang Guoyuan [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States) and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States)]. E-mail: gyyang@anesthesia.ucsf.edu

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hypoxia reduces constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human proximal renal tubular cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic hypoxia has been reported to be associated with macrophage infiltration in progressive forms of kidney disease. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of hypoxia on constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-stimulated expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in cultured human proximal renal tubular cells (HPTECs). Hypoxia reduced constitutive MCP-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent fashion for up to 48 h. Hypoxia also inhibited MCP-1 up-regulation by TNF-{alpha}. Treatment with actinomycin D showed that hypoxic down-regulation of MCP-1 expression resulted mainly from a decrease in the transcription but not the mRNA stability. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that treatment with hypoxia or an iron chelator, desferrioxamine, induced nuclear accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in HPTECs. Desferrioxamine mimicked hypoxia in the reduction of MCP-1 expression. However, overexpression of a dominant negative form of HIF-1{alpha} did not abolish the hypoxia-induced reduction of MCP-1 expression in HPTECs. These results suggest that hypoxia is an important negative regulator of monocyte chemotaxis to the renal inflamed interstitium, by reducing MCP-1 expression partly via hypoxia-activated signals other than the HIF-1 pathway.

Li Xuan [Division of Nephrology, Department of General Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Kimura, Hideki [Division of Nephrology, Department of General Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)]. E-mail: hkimura@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Hirota, Kiichi [Department of Anesthesia, Tazuke Kofukai Medical Research Institute Kitano Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Department of Anesthesia, School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Sugimoto, Hidehiro [Division of Nephrology, Department of General Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Yoshida, Haruyoshi [Division of Nephrology, Department of General Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

Michael Cornforth

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

DU145 human prostate cancer cells express functional Receptor Activator of NF-B: New insights in the prostate cancer bone metastasis process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DU145 human prostate cancer cells express functional Receptor Activator of NF-B: New insights in the prostate cancer bone metastasis process. Mori K.1, 2, * , Le Goff B. 1, 2 , Charrier C. 1, 2 , Battaglia S;40(4):981-90" DOI : 10.1016/j.bone.2006.11.006 #12;2 Abstract Prostate cancer metastases to bone are observed

Boyer, Edmond

185

Assignment of the human RT6 gene to 11q13 by PCR screening of somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RT6 is a T cell membrane protein that has attracted interest because a defect in RT6 expression is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune type I diabetes in DP-BB rats and NOD mice. Using PCR screening of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization, the authors have determined that the gene for the human RT6 homologue is located at 11q13, centromeric to the gene for tyrosinase (TYR, albino locus) and telomeric to that for fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4). The data suggest that the human RT6 gene constitutes a new linkage group with TYR and the gene for olfactory marker protein (OMP) on 11q, which has a counterpart in mouse chromosome 7. Thus, in the human, the RT6 locus is dissociated from the hemoglobin [beta] chain locus (HBB) and its neighboring conserved linkage group at 11q15, in contrast to the mouse, in which RT6 shows a tighter linkage to Hbb than to Tyr. The results support the conclusion that there has been considerable intrachromosomal reshuffling of linked genes since the divergence of primates and rodents. 9 refs., 1 fig.

Koch-Nolte, F.; Haag, F.; Kuehl, M.; Thiele, H.G.; Singh, S. (Univ. Hospital, Hamburg (Germany)); Van Heyningen, V. (Medical Research Council, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Hoovers, J. (Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Grzeschik, K.H. (Univ. of Marburg (Germany))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Negative skin friction at Keehi interchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is assumed to be the sum of the structural load, gt, a drag force, F'n, due to the fill within the pile group and a drag force F'n due to the negative skin friction of the soft layer. F = ()t + F'n + F"n (2. 1) where F'n is the weight of fill carried... of this method for an actual case. 2. 2. 3 Brome Brome (1969) describes the state of the practice in Sweden for the calculation of drag forces on piles due to negative skin friction. In Sweden most piles are driven to rock. The compression of the pile...

Porwoll, Hubert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. •MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. •p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

Wu, Huijuan [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Xiao, ZhengHua [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China)] [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China); Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Hao, Quan, E-mail: quanhao2002@163.com [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer {gamma}-Radiation-Induced NF{kappa}B-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NF{kappa}B regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NF{kappa}B-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNF{kappa}B-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-I{kappa}B{alpha}-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NF{kappa}B activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NF{kappa}B. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NF{kappa}B becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the {kappa}B-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NF{kappa}B-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NF{kappa}B by the I{kappa}B{alpha} mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NF{kappa}B overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced the IR-induced inhibition of cell survival. Conclusions: These results strongly suggest that curcumin inhibits IR-induced TA in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner in human neuroblastoma cells.

Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

Eum, Sung Yong [Molecular Neuroscience and Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)], E-mail: sungyong.eum@uky.edu; Andras, Ibolya [Molecular Neuroscience and Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Hennig, Bernhard [College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Toborek, Michal [Molecular Neuroscience and Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Active skin for turbulent drag reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pursued is "micro" in the sense that only micro-scale wave amplitudes (order of 30[]m) and energy inputs are sufficient to produce significant benefits. Two actuation principles are proposed and analyzed and different skin designs based on these two...

Mani, Raghavendran

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Preventive Skin Care Fact or Fiction?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and colors Many are birthmarks http://www.skinsight.com/images/dx/webInfant/congenitalMelanocyticNevus_33234 by skin biopsy to make sure not cancer http://www.skinsight.com/images/dx/webInfant/congenital://www.skincancer.org/understanding-uva-and-uvb.html #12;Practice GOOD habits! · Reapply sunscreen if: ­ Sweating ­ Swimming in water ­ Doing any activity

Goldman, Steven A.

192

Skin Bleaching in Jamaica: A Colonial Legacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Eurocentric values and a denigration of Afrocentric values in many facets of life, specifically in the promotion of light skin as an indicator of beauty and social status. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological and socio-cultural factors...

Robinson, Petra Alaine

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); Ivanov, Ilia N. (Knoxville, TN); Shibata, Jason (Manhattan Beach, CA)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

Vaccine delivery with microneedle skin patches in nonhuman primates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transcutaneous drug delivery from planar skin patches is effective for small-molecule drugs and skin-permeable vaccine adjuvants. However, to achieve efficient delivery of vaccines and other macromolecular therapeutics ...

Li, Adrienne V

195

Development of quantitative real time PCR to assess human brain microvascular endothelial cell susceptibility to HIV -1 infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Laboratories, Carlsbad, CA) 10% heat inactivatedfrom Invitrogen Corp. (Carlsbad, CA) and propagated asInvitrogen Corp. , Carlsbad, CA). Cells were maintained in a

Chao, Ying Sheng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The study of skin permeation mechanism and terpene-skin lipid interaction via nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, lipid extraction, etc. In our case, the interaction between a terpene and a lipid was examinedwith nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which aims to provide some insight to enhancement in skin permeation. Palmitic acid (Fig 1), a 16-carbon fatty acid... and oxides were able to producea greater ??. National University of Singapore, 2006 PS77 -The Study of Skin Permeation Mechanism and Terpene-Lipid Interaction via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Perry Fung Chye Lim a, Xiang Yang Liu b, Meng Huang a, Paul Chi...

Lim, P. F. C.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Huang, Meng; Ho, P. C. L.; Chan, S. Y.

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

Effects of oncogenic Ras and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase on the adhesion of normal human cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activating mutations in RAS oncogenes commonly arise in human cancers. However, in experimental settings, oncogenic RAS has most often been studied at supraphysiological levels of expression. Importantly, work by others ...

Waldman, Lynne K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

absorption skin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

absorption skin First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Healthy Skin Matters Normal Skin...

199

Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

Deng, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Department of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710038 (China); Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Fan, Daiming, E-mail: daimingfan@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Guo, Xuegang, E-mail: xuegangguo@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

Maturation of the viral core enhances the fusion of HIV-1 particles with primary human T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HIV-1 infection requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes in a reaction catalyzed by the viral envelope proteins gp120 and gp41. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 particle fusion with target cells is linked to maturation of the viral core by an activity of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that maturation enhances the fusion of a variety of recombinant viruses bearing primary and laboratory-adapted Env proteins with primary human CD4{sup +} T cells. Overall, HIV-1 fusion was more dependent on maturation for viruses bearing X4-tropic envelope proteins than for R5-tropic viruses. Fusion of HIV-1 with monocyte-derived macrophages was also dependent on particle maturation. We conclude that the ability to couple fusion to particle maturation is a common feature of HIV-1 Env proteins and may play an important role during HIV-1 replication in vivo.

Jiang Jiyang [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, A-5301 Medical Center North, Nashville, TN 37232-2363 (United States); Aiken, Christopher [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, A-5301 Medical Center North, Nashville, TN 37232-2363 (United States)]. E-mail: chris.aiken@vanderbilt.edu

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Inactivation of human osteosarcoma cells in vitro by {sup 211}At-TP-3 monoclonal antibody: Comparison with astatine-211 and external-beam X rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential usefulness of {alpha}-particle radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of osteosarcoma was studied in vitro by using the monoclonal antibody TP-3 and cells of three human osteosarcoma cell lines (OHS, SAOS and KPDX) differing in antigen expression. Cell survival curves were established after treatment with (a) {sup 211}At-TP-3 of different specific activities, (b) {sup 211}At-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA), (c) free {sup 211}At and (d) external-beam X rays. The three osteosarcoma cell lines showed similar survival curves, whether treated with external-beam X rays, {sup 211}At-BSA or free {sup 211}At. The D{sub o}`s were lower for free {sup 211}At than for {sup 211}At-BSA. The survival curves for {sup 211}At-TP-3 treatment, on the other hand, differed significantly among the cell lines, suggesting that sensitivity to {sup 211}At-TP-3 treatment was governed by cellular properties other than sensitivity to external-beam X rays. The cellular property most important for sensitivity to {sup 211}At-TP-3 treatment was the antigen expression. Cell inactivation after {sup 211}At-TP-3 treatment increased substantially with increasing specific activity of the {sup 211}At-TP-3. At high specific activities, the cytotoxic effect of {sup 211}At-TP-3 was significantly higher than that of {sup 211}At-BSA. In conclusion, {sup 211}At-TP-3 has the potential to give clinically favorable therapeutic ratios in the treatment of osteosarcoma. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Larsen, R.H. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)]|[Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway); Bruland, O.S. [Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway); Hoff, P.; Alstad, J. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Lindmo, T. [Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway); Rofstad, E.K. [Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Isolation and effects of citrus limonoids on cytochrome p450 inhibition, apoptotic induction and cytotoxicity on human cancer cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2) cells. The first study developed a bulk purification method for limonoids, from seeds and molasses of citrus fruits, using a combination of chromatographic techniques. This also resulted in an efficient purification method for naringin...

Poulose, Shibu M.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

203

Changes in gene expression in human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to low concentrations of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epidemiology studies suggest that there may be a weak association between high level exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and renal tubule cell carcinoma. Laboratory animal studies have shown an increased incidence of renal tubule carcinoma in male rats but not mice. TCE can undergo metabolism via glutathione (GSH) conjugation to form metabolites that are known to be nephrotoxic. The GSH conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione (DCVG), is processed further to the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. We have cultured human renal tubule cells (HRPTC) in serum-free medium under a variety of different culture conditions and observed growth, respiratory control and glucose transport over a 20 day period in medium containing low glucose. Cell death was time- and concentration-dependent, with the EC{sub 5} for DCVG being about 3 {mu}M and for DCVC about 7.5 {mu}M over 10 days. Exposure of HRPTC to sub-cytotoxic doses of DCVC (0.1 {mu}M and 1 {mu}M for 10 days) led to a small number of changes in gene expression, as determined by transcript profiling with Affymetrix human genome chips. Using the criterion of a mean 2-fold change over control for the four samples examined, 3 genes at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC increased, namely, adenosine kinase, zinc finger protein X-linked and an enzyme with lyase activity. At 1 {mu}M DCVC, two genes showed a >2-fold decrease, N-acetyltransferase 8 and complement factor H. At a lower stringency (1.5-fold change), a total of 63 probe sets were altered at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC and 45 at 1 {mu}M DCVC. Genes associated with stress, apoptosis, cell proliferation and repair and DCVC metabolism were altered, as were a small number of genes that did not appear to be associated with the known mode of action of DCVC. Some of these genes may serve as molecular markers of TCE exposure and effects in the human kidney.

Lock, Edward A. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 280 Calhoun Street, PO Box 250140, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)]. E-mail: e.lock@ljmu.ac.uk; Barth, Jeremy L. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, 173 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Argraves, Scott W. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, 173 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Schnellmann, Rick G. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 280 Calhoun Street, PO Box 250140, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evaluation of the sensitizing potential of antibiotics in vitro using the human cell lines THP-1 and MUTZ-LC and primary monocyte?derived dendritic cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 7th amendment to the EU cosmetics directive foresees a complete ban on animal testing, alternative in vitro methods have been established to evaluate the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight compounds. To find out whether these novel in vitro assays are also capable to predict the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs, model compounds such as beta-lactams and sulfonamides – which are the most frequent cause of adverse drug reactions – were co-incubated with THP-1, MUTZ-LC, or primary monocyte?derived dendritic cells for 48 h and subsequent expression of selected marker genes (IL-8, IL-1?, CES1, NQO1, GCLM, PIR and TRIM16) was studied by real time PCR. Benzylpenicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin were recognized as sensitizing compounds because they are capable to induce the mRNA expression of these genes in moDCs and, except for IL-8, in THP-1 cells but not in MUTZ-LC. Ampicillin stimulated the expression of some marker genes in moDCs and THP-1 cells. SMX did not affect the expression of these genes in THP-1, however, in moDCs, at least PIR was enhanced and there was an increase of the release of IL-8. These data reveal that novel in vitro DC based assays might play a role in the evaluation of the allergenic potential of novel drug compounds, but these systems seem to lack the ability to detect the sensitizing potential of prohaptens that require metabolic activation prior to sensitization and moDCs seem to be superior with regard to the sensitivity compared with THP-1 and MUTZ-3 cell lines. -- Highlights: ? We tested the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs in vitro. ? In vitro assays were performed with moDCs and THP-1 cells. ? Beta-lactam antibiotics can be recognized as sensitizing compounds. ? They affect the expression of metabolic enzymes, cytokines and transcription factors. ? Sulfamethoxazole has no measurable effect on THP-1 cells and moDCs.

Sebastian, Katrin, E-mail: ksebastian@ukaachen.de [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Ott, Hagen [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele [IZKF (BIOMAT), RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [IZKF (BIOMAT), RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Merk, Hans F.; Baron, Jens Malte [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Diospyrin derivative, an anticancer quinonoid, regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondria by modulating cytosolic calcium in human breast carcinoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diospyrin diethylether (D7) caused oxidative stress-dependent activation of PC-PLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated PC-PLC induced a sustained-release of Ca{sup 2+} from endoplasmic reticulum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The elevated cytosolic Ca{sup +2} led to the calpain-caspase12 dependent apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D7-Induced Ca{sup +2} also found to accentuate the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Diospyrin diethylether (D7), a bisnaphthoquinonoid derivative, exhibited an oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis in several human cancer cells and tumor models. The present study was aimed at evaluation of the increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} leading to the apoptotic cell death triggered by D7 in MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. A phosphotidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, viz. U73122, and an antioxidant, viz. N-acetylcysteine, could significantly prevent the D7-induced rise in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} and PC-PLC activity. Using an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Ca{sup 2+} mobilizer (thapsigargin) and an ER-IP3R antagonist (heparin), results revealed ER as a major source of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} which led to the activation of calpain and caspase12, and cleavage of fodrin. These effects including apoptosis were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of Bapta-AM (a cell permeable Ca{sup 2+}-specific chelator), or calpeptin (a calpain inhibitor). Furthermore, D7-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} was found to alter mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by either Bapta-AM or ruthenium red (an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter). Thus, these results provided a deeper insight into the D7-induced redox signaling which eventually integrated the calcium-dependent calpain/caspase12 activation and mitochondrial alterations to accentuate the induction of apoptotic cell death.

Kumar, Binod [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India) [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Amit [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghosh, Subhalakshmi [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: bnp@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, Kaushala P. [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Hazra, Banasri, E-mail: banasrihazra@yahoo.co.in [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma via downregulation of FOXO4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •miR-421 is upregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. •FOXO4 is a direct and functional target of miR-421. -- Abstract: microRNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in cancer development and progression. Hence, identifying functional microRNAs and better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would provide new clues for the development of targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we reported that a microRNA, miR-421 played an oncogenic role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Upregulation of miR-421 induced, whereas inhibition of miR-421 repressed cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, we found that upregulation of miR-421 inhibited forkhead box protein O4 (FOXO4) signaling pathway following downregulation of p21, p27, Bim and FASL expression by directly targeting FOXO4 3?UTR. Additionally, we demonstrated that FOXO4 expression is critical for miR-421-induced cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Taken together, our findings not only suggest that miR-421 promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, but also uncover a novel regulatory mechanism for inactivation of FOXO4 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

Chen, Liang [Neurosurgery Institute, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of Guangdong, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China) [Neurosurgery Institute, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of Guangdong, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Tang, Yanping [Neurosurgery Institute, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of Guangdong, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China)] [Neurosurgery Institute, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of Guangdong, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Wang, Jian [Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Yan, Zhongjie [Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA,The Bayi Clinical Medical Institute of Southern Medical University, Beijing 100700 (China)] [Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA,The Bayi Clinical Medical Institute of Southern Medical University, Beijing 100700 (China); Xu, Ruxiang, E-mail: RuxiangXu@yahoo.com [Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA,The Bayi Clinical Medical Institute of Southern Medical University, Beijing 100700 (China)] [Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA,The Bayi Clinical Medical Institute of Southern Medical University, Beijing 100700 (China)

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKC? mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ju, Tsai-Kai [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yuan-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Ming-Shyue [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jiun-Hong [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Hsinyu, E-mail: hsinyu@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Center for Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Help:Skins | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance Jump737002°,HavanaElorblocks JumpSkins

209

Overexpression of the JmjC histone demethylase KDM5B in human carcinogenesis: involvement in the proliferation of cancer cells through the E2F/RB pathway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expression and cell growth. Results KDM5B expression is up-regulated in clinical cancer tissues We first examined expression levels of five jumonji his- tone demethylase genes included in JARID family, KDM5A (JARID1A), KDM5B (JARID1B), KDM5C (JAR- ID1C), KDM5... - ment in many types of human cancer (see Additional files 4 and 5). Growth regulation of cancer cells by KDM5B To investigate the role of KDM5B in human carcinogen- esis, we performed a knockdown experiment using two independent siRNAs against KDM5B (si...

Hayami, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Masanori; Veerakumarasivam, Abhimanyu; Unoki, Motoko; Iwai, Yukiko; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Field, Helen I; Kelly, John D; Neal, David E; Yamaue, Hiroki; Ponder, Bruce AJ; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

2010-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Skin temperature of the sea as determined by radiometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Differences Temperature Vapor Press Skin Skin Bkt Skin Bkt -Bkt -Air -Air -Air -Air 120100 120200 120400 120500 1 20600 1 20700 1 20800 1 20900 1 21000 130100 130200 130300 130400 130500 130600 130700 130800 131000 131100 . 6235 . 6732.... FORTRAN program. 57 6. Stepwise analysis of error in radiation temperature of the sea. 65 LIST OF FIGURES Number Page 1. Tracks of Cruise 62 -H-10 along which radiation data were obtained, 2. Comparison of i. nfrared emissivities of water vapor. 14...

Boudreau, Robert Donald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

Marra, John J

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

allotransplanted vascularized skin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Optimum pulse duration and radiant exposure for vascular laser therapy of dark port-wine skin: a theoretical study Engineering Websites Summary: Optimum pulse duration and...

213

analyzing skin conductance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coupling between each tactile sensing chip and a ground Shinoda, Hiroyuki 8 HandWave: Design and Manufacture of a Wearable Wireless Skin Conductance Computer Technologies and...

214

Inhibition of KCa3.1 by depolarisation and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) during Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) entry in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells: Implications for the interpretation of 2-APB inhibition of CRAC entry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mediated Ca2+ oscillations and oscillations in KCa3.1 activity [30,31,32]. Following transition to the whole cell configuration the cell was held at -80 mV and 200 ms voltage ramps from -100 to +100 mV 18 administered every three seconds. The magnitude... ], voltage-gated K+ channels [10], the non-selective cation channel TRPM7 [11], a Mg2+-inhibited K+ conductance described in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells [12] and mitochondrial Ca2+ release [7]. Although it is well established to block CRAC currents...

Littlechild, Robert; Zaidman, Nathalie; Khodaverdi, Darren; Mason, Michael James

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

allergic skin test: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

allergic skin test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The Skin Microbiome in Healthy and...

216

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with neutron star observations K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro as varying the neutron radius of 208Pb. The neutron skin thickness Sn is determined in the comparison with the astronomical observations of massive neutron stars (NSs), the standard scenario of NS cooling

217

Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Mechanistic investigation of skin barrier perturbation induced by surfactants in the presence of humectants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stratum corneum (SC) of the skin functions as a barrier between the body and the environment. Surfactants such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) are used in skin cleansers and in skin-care formulations because of their ...

Ghosh, Saswata

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoidable skin cancers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: avoidable skin cancers Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 "Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Summary: "Skin Cancer- What to Look For"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Skin Disease In Dermatomyositis -- What Patients And Their Families Often Want To Know  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the upper eyelids (heliotrope erythema), the cheeks ofcharacteristic violet (heliotrope) skin color seen in whitecharacteristic violet (heliotrope) skin color seen in white

Sontheimer, Richard D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

autologous fibrin-based skin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

223

atopic dermatitis-like skin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

224

acinetobacter baumannii-associated skin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences Websites Summary: specialized sub- classes, namely "bikini" "porn" and "skin" "non-skin", respectively. The extracted pornographic image classifiers....

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous skin effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AT 35 GHZ Summary: us well into the anomalous skin effect regime. To facilitate comparison with the static resistivity... , we have used the the anomalous skin effect formula...

226

Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXR?) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXR? mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXR? binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXR? plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ? Liver X receptor ? mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ? LXR? and RXR? dimerization further activated this induction. ? Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ? LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ? ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXR? binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Zhou, Tianyan [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Chen, Guangping, E-mail: guangping.chen@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - apoptotic cells extrude Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the frozen skin layer of the extrudate and the suppression of cell... using a single-screw extruder. J Cell Plast 41:169 12;... reports that the swelling of the extrudate...

228

THE DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LANGERHANS CELLS AND INTRAEPIDERMAL NERVE FIBERS IN THE MOUSE AND RAT FOOTPAD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin disorders are often associated with immune and nervous system dysfunction. Intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) detect mechanical, thermal, and noxious stimuli. Although immune cells such as mast and T cells can alter ...

Doss, Argenia Lanisha Necole

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

OSU-A9 inhibits angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via disrupting Akt–NF-?B and MAPK signaling pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the introduction of angiogenesis as a useful target for cancer therapy, few agents have been approved for clinical use due to the rapid development of resistance. This problem can be minimized by simultaneous targeting of multiple angiogenesis signaling pathways, a potential strategy in cancer management known as polypharmacology. The current study aimed at exploring the anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol-derived pleotropic agent that targets mainly Akt–nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling which regulates many key players of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of OSU-A9 on several key steps of angiogenesis. Results showed that OSU-A9 effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HUVECs. Besides, OSU-A9 inhibited angiogenesis as evidenced by abrogation of migration/invasion and Matrigel tube formation in HUVECs and attenuation of the in vivo neovascularization in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. Mechanistically, Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the ability of OSU-A9 to inhibit MMP-2 production and VEGF expression induced by hypoxia or phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Akt–NF-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the key regulators of angiogenesis, was observed. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, at least in part through the inhibition of Akt–NF-?B and MAPK signaling and their consequent inhibition of VEGF and MMP-2. These findings support OSU-A9's clinical promise as a component of anticancer therapy. - Highlights: • The antiangiogenic activity of OSU-A9 in HUVECs was explored. • OSU-A9 inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. • OSU-A9 targeted signaling pathways mediated by Akt-NF-kB, VEGF, and MMP-2. • The anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9 supports its clinical promise.

Omar, Hany A. [Division of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Arafa, El-Shaimaa A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Salama, Samir A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11511 (Egypt); Arab, Hany H. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11562 (Egypt); Wu, Chieh-Hsi, E-mail: chhswu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Weng, Jing-Ru, E-mail: columnster@gmail.com [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China)] [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China)] [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China)] [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China)] [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China)] [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China)] [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China)] [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China)] [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China) [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

The critical roles of pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) component, Cdc6, in DNA replication and checkpoint response in human cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognition complex (ORC)………………………………………5 B. Cell division231 Breast cancer cell type ORC Origin Recognition Complexby the timely arrival of the ORC complex proteins that bind

Lau, Eric Kirk

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Effects of Low-Dose Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Human Cells: The Role of Induced Genes and the Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report (9/15/1998-5/31/2005)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant was designed to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bystander effect of radiation (initially described in this laboratory) whereby damage signals are passed from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in a population. These signals induce genetic effects including DNA damage, mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the nonirradiated cells. Experiments were carried out in cultured mammalian cells, primarily human diploid cells, irradiated with alpha particles. This research resulted in 17 publications in the refereed literature and is described in the Progress Report where it is keyed to the publication list. This project was initiated at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and continued in collaboration with students/fellows at Colorado State University (CSU) and the New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

Little, John B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

233

allergic skin disease: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the microbiome...The Skin Microbiome in Healthy and Allergic Dogs Aline Rodrigues Hoffmann1*, Adam P. Patterson2, Alison Diesel2, Sara D. Lawhon4, Hoai Jaclyn Ly1, Christine...

234

allergic skin diseases: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the microbiome...The Skin Microbiome in Healthy and Allergic Dogs Aline Rodrigues Hoffmann1*, Adam P. Patterson2, Alison Diesel2, Sara D. Lawhon4, Hoai Jaclyn Ly1, Christine...

235

SLUG TESTING IN WELLS WITH FINITE-THICKNESS SKIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the slug test in a well surrounded by an annulus of altered material, which is treated as a skin of finite thickness. By assuming the skin has a thickness, the storage capacity of the altered material is included in the analysis. The problem is solved in the Laplace domain. The solution is found in terms of well-bore storage and the thickness, hydraulic conductivity, and specific storage of the skin. Type curves are generated by numerical inversion of the Laplace transform solution. We find that standard methods of analysis, involving a skin of infinitesimal thickness, are adequate for open-well or drill-stem tests. However, for pressurized tests the response may differ markedly from standard slug-test solutions.

Moench, A.F.; Hsieh

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Second Skin : motion capture with actuated feedback for motor learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Second Skin aims to combine three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking with tactile feedback for the purpose of improving users' motor-learning ability. Such a system would track a user's body and limb movements as he or she ...

Miaw, Dennis (Dennis R.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

acute skin reaction: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from a complex reaction induced by plant pigments exposed to ultraviolet (UV) wave length sunlight in the skin of animals that have eaten certain plants 1-3. This reaction is...

238

attenuate skin dryness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice. Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun 2013-10-03 9 Journal...

239

artificial skin applications: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice. Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun 2013-10-03 117 An...

240

Involvement of TGF-beta in skin photoaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this thesis study was to understand the role of TGF-[beta] in skin photoaging, especially in solar elastosis. Solar elastosis, the accumulation of elastotic material in the dermal extracelluar matrix, is a major ...

Choi, Won Seon, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear skin emergence in Skyrme deformed Hartree-Fock calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of the charge and matter densities and the corresponding rms radii for even-even isotopes of Ni, Kr, and Sn has been performed in the framework of deformed self-consistent mean field Skyrme HF+BCS method. The resulting charge radii and neutron skin thicknesses of these nuclei are compared with available experimental data, as well as with other theoretical predictions. The formation of a neutron skin, which manifests itself in an excess of neutrons at distances greater than the radius of the proton distribution, is analyzed in terms of various definitions. Formation of a proton skin is shown to be unlikely. The effects of deformation on the neutron skins in even-even deformed nuclei far from the stability line are discussed.

Sarriguren, P; de Guerra, E Moya; Antonov, A N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mpemba paradox: Hydrogen bond memory and water-skin supersolidity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical reproduction of measurements, experimental evidence for skin super-solidity and hydrogen-bond memory clarified that Mpemba paradox integrates the heat emission-conduction-dissipation dynamics in the source-path-drain cycle system.

Chang Q Sun

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep Stephen W. Carmichael Mayo Clinic. Coming Events 2011 EMAS 2011 May 15­19, 2011 Angers, France www.emas-web.net IUMAS-V May 22­27, 2011

Heller, Eric

244

Fluorescent silica colloids for study and visualization of skin care products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to long exposures to cold and dry air (7). Different skin care products are used to hy- drate dryFluorescent silica colloids for study and visualization of skin care products Swaminathan Iyer: The efficacy of skin care products depends on the time and dynamics of their absorbance by the skin, and its

Sokolov, Igor

245

Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Human hybrid hybridoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

1987-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Supersolid Skin Covering both Water and Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mysterious nature and functionality of water and ice skins remain baffling to the community since 1859 when Farady firstly proposed liquid skin lubricating ice. Here we show the presence of supersolid phase that covers both water and ice using Raman spectroscopy measurements and quantum calculations. In the skin of two molecular layers thick, molecular undercoordination shortens the H-O bond by ~16% and lengthens the OH nonbond by ~25% through repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent O atoms, which depresses the density from 0.92 for bulk ice to 0.75 gcm-3. The O:H-O cooperative relaxation stiffens the H-O stretching phonon from 3200/3150 cm-1 to the same value of 3450 cm-1 and raises the melting temperature of both skins by up to ~310 K. Numerical derivatives on the viscosity and charge accumulation suggests that the elastic, polarized, and thermally stable supersolid phase makes the ice frictionless and water skin hydrophobic and ice like at room temperature.

Sun, Chang Q

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

(4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone inhibits tubulin polymerization, induces G{sub 2}/M arrest, and triggers apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

(4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone (PHT) is a known cytotoxic compound belonging to the phenstatin family. However, the exact mechanism of action of PHT-induced cell death remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying PHT-induced cytotoxicity. We found that PHT displayed potent cytotoxicity in different tumor cell lines, showing IC{sub 50} values in the nanomolar range. Cell cycle arrest in G{sub 2}/M phase along with the augmented metaphase cells was found. Cells treated with PHT also showed typical hallmarks of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine exposure, increase of the caspase 3/7 and 8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. Studies conducted with isolated tubulin and docking models confirmed that PHT binds to the colchicine site and interferes in the polymerization of microtubules. These results demonstrated that PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization, arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle, and induces their apoptosis, exhibiting promising anticancer therapeutic potential. - Highlights: • PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization. • PHT arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle. • PHT induces caspase-dependent apoptosis.

Magalhães, Hemerson I.F. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Wilke, Diego V. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Bezerra, Daniel P., E-mail: danielpbezerra@gmail.com [Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Cavalcanti, Bruno C. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Rotta, Rodrigo; Lima, Dênis P. de; Beatriz, Adilson [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas (Laboratório LP4), Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Moraes, Manoel O.; Diniz-Filho, Jairo [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Pessoa, Claudia, E-mail: c_pessoa@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

2-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (HKL-1) induces G2/M arrest and mitotic catastrophe in human leukemia HL-60 cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (HKL-1), a 2-phenyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4-one (2-PN) derivative, was synthesized and evaluated as an effective antimitotic agent in our laboratory. However, the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. In this study, HKL-1 was demonstrated to induce multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Western blotting showed that HKL-1 induces mitotic catastrophe in HL-60 cells through regulating mitotic phase-specific kinases (down-regulating CDK1, cyclin B1, CENP-E, and aurora B) and regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins (down-regulating Bcl-2 and up-regulating Bax and Bak), followed by caspase-9/-3 cleavage. These findings suggest that HKL-1 appears to exert its cytotoxicity toward HL-60 cells in culture by inducing mitotic catastrophe. Highlights: ? HKL-1 is a potential antimitotic agent against HL-60 cells. ? HKL-1 induces spindle disruption and sustained resulted in mitotic catastrophe. ? CENP-E and aurora B protein expressions significantly reduced. ? Bcl-2 family protein expressions altered and caspase-9/-3 activation. ? HKL-1 is an attractive candidate for possible use as a novel antimitotic agent.

Hsu, Mei-Hua; Liu, Chin-Yu; Lin, Chiao-Min; Chen, Yen-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jen; Lin, Yu-Fu; Huang, Li-Jiau [Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Kuo-Hsiung [Natural Products Research Laboratories, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States) [Natural Products Research Laboratories, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Chinese Medicine Research and Development Center, China Medical University and Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Sheng-Chu, E-mail: sckuo@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Differential expression of intronless carcinoma-associated antigen GA733-1 in two distinct classes of human breast cancer cell lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using differential hybridization, we have isolated a 0.8-kb GA733-1 cDNA clone which was selectively expressed in the MCF-7 and Au565 breast cancer cell lines but not in MB231 cells. Subsequent studies with 10 additional breast cancer cell lines have allowed us to identify two classes of breast cancer cell lines that display distinct expression of the GA733-1 antigen as well as other cellular parameters. The six GA733-1{sup +} cell lines (MCF-7, ZR75-1, MB468, Au565, BJ015, and MB453) exhibit a spherical or cuboidal shape. These cells tend to grow in clusters and display extensive cell-cell connections. In contrast, all GA733-1{sup -} cells (MB435s, MB231, MB436, MB157, BT549, and Hs578T) assume a more elongated, fibroblast-like morphology and grow in a discrete, uniform pattern. These results are consistent with previous findings suggesting the GA733 gene products function as cell-cell adhesion molecules. Generally, the GA733-1{sup -} cells actively produce lipid vesicles, whereas the GA733-1{sup +} cells are virtually inactive in lipid production. In addition, all six GA733-1{sup +} cell lines express keratin 19, which is only weakly expressed or not detectable in the GA733-1{sup -} cells. Comparative analysis of our results with previous studies has shown that GA733-1 expression is inversely related to vimentin expression and that the GA733-1{sup -}/VIM{sup +} cells display a much higher invasive propensity than the GA733-1{sup +}/VIM{sup -} lines in both in vitro and in vivo assays. However, there seems no obvious correlation of GA733-1 expression with that of estrogen receptor (ER) except that no GA733-1{sup -} cell lines express the receptor. The combination of these four parameters (ER, GA733-1, vimentin, and keratin 19), should contribute to the reliability of the histological grading of breast cancer and may provide a basis for improved treatment of breast cancer.

Xie, Bei; Horio, Murao; Collart, F.R. [and others

1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

252

The PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 triad in human breast cancer: Functional link between elevated Sac3 phosphatase and enhanced proliferation of triple negative cell lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We assess PAS complex proteins and phosphoinositide levels in breast cancer cells. •Sac3 and ArPIKfyve are markedly elevated in triple-negative breast cancer cells. •Sac3 silencing inhibits proliferation in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. •Phosphoinositide profiles are altered in breast cancer cells. •This is the first evidence linking high Sac3 with breast cancer cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The phosphoinositide 5-kinase PIKfyve and 5-phosphatase Sac3 are scaffolded by ArPIKfyve in the PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 (PAS) regulatory complex to trigger a unique loop of PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} synthesis and turnover. Whereas the metabolizing enzymes of the other 3-phosphoinositides have already been implicated in breast cancer, the role of the PAS proteins and the PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} conversion is unknown. To begin elucidating their roles, in this study we monitored the endogenous levels of the PAS complex proteins in cell lines derived from hormone-receptor positive (MCF7 and T47D) or triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) (BT20, BT549 and MDA-MB-231) as well as in MCF10A cells derived from non-tumorigenic mastectomy. We report profound upregulation of Sac3 and ArPIKfyve in the triple negative vs. hormone-sensitive breast cancer or non-tumorigenic cells, with BT cell lines showing the highest levels. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Sac3, but not that of PIKfyve, significantly inhibited proliferation of BT20 and BT549 cells. In these cells, knockdown of ArPIKfyve had only a minor effect, consistent with a primary role for Sac3 in TNBC cell proliferation. Intriguingly, steady-state levels of PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} in BT20 and T47D cells were similar despite the 6-fold difference in Sac3 levels between these cell lines. However, steady-state levels of PtdIns3P and PtdIns5P, both regulated by the PAS complex, were significantly reduced in BT20 vs. T47D or MCF10A cell lines, consistent with elevated Sac3 affecting directly or indirectly the homeostasis of these lipids in TNBC. Together, our results uncover an unexpected role for Sac3 phosphatase in TNBC cell proliferation. Database analyses, discussed herein, reinforce the involvement of Sac3 in breast cancer pathogenesis.

Ikonomov, Ognian C., E-mail: oikonomo@med.wayne.edu; Filios, Catherine, E-mail: cfilios@med.wayne.edu; Sbrissa, Diego, E-mail: dsbrissa@med.wayne.edu; Chen, Xuequn, E-mail: xchen@med.wayne.edu; Shisheva, Assia, E-mail: ashishev@med.wayne.edu

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

253

EGF-receptor phosphorylation and downstream signaling are activated by benzo[a]pyrene 3,6-quinone and benzo[a]pyrene 1,6-quinone in human mammary epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is activated by xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes to highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolites. Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that benzo[a]pyrene quinones (BPQs), 1,6-BPQ and 3,6-BPQ, are able to induce epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cell signaling through the production of reactive oxygen species. Recently, we have reported that BPQs have the potential to induce the expression of genes involved in numerous pathways associated with cell proliferation and survival in human mammary epithelial cells. In the present study we demonstrated that BPQs not only induced EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation, but also induced EGFR-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 and several signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). The effects of BPQs were evaluated in a model of EGF withdrawal in MCF10-A cells. We found that BPQs (1 {mu}M), induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation at positions Y845, Y992, Y1068, and Y1086. PLC-{gamma}1 phosphorylation correlated with the phosphorylation of tyrosine-Y992, a proposed docking site for PLC-{gamma}1 on the EGFR. Additionally, we found that BPQs induced the activation of STAT-1, STAT-3, STAT-5a and STAT-5b. STAT5 was shown to translocate to the nucleus following 3,6-BPQ and 1,6-BPQ exposures. Although the patterns of phosphorylation at EGFR, PLC-{gamma}1 and STATs were quite similar to those induced by EGF, an important difference between BPQ-mediated signaling of the EGFR was observed. Signaling produced by EGF ligand produced a rapid disappearance of EGFR from the cell surface, whereas BPQ signaling maintained EGFR receptors on the cell membrane. Thus, the results of these studies show that 1,6-BPQ and 3,6-BPQ can produce early events as evidenced by EGFR expression, and a prolonged transactivation of EGFR leading to downstream cell signaling pathways.

Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes [Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Avenida Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca 62210, Morelos (Mexico); Melendez, Karla; Hudson, Laurie G.; Lauer, Fredine T. [University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy Toxicology Program, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Burchiel, Scott W. [University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy Toxicology Program, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)], E-mail: sburchiel@salud.unm.edu

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

The human genome project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

Bell, G.I.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.B. Mikkelsen, Ionizing radiation-induced, mitochondria-W.K. Rorrer, P.B. Chen, Radiation-induced proliferation ofresponse genes to ionizing radiation in human lymphoblastoid

Wyrobek, A. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Subclonal variation and skin russeting in potato, (Solanum tuberosum L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of subclonal selection for putative russet skin mutations of 'Century Russet' was conducted in Texas and Colorado to improve the russeting character in 'Century Russet'. RAPD analysis of a segregating F I family derived from a russet x white cross and of three...

Oehlke, Leslie Lashaun

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

PASSAGE OF FISSION PRODUCTS THROUGH THE SKIN OF TUNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Presumably, radio- active materials contaminating the skin of such fish could enter and spread through the tissues thus contaminating the whole fish. The present study intended to test this assump- tion, considers, resulting in small quantities in the tissues of tuna held in cold brine for as long as almost two months

258

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies...

259

HandWave : design and manufacture of a wearable wireless skin conductance sensor and housing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis report details the design and manufacture of HandWave, a wearable wireless Bluetooth skin conductance sensor, and dedicated housing. The HandWave collects Electrodermal Activity (EDA) data by measuring skin ...

Strauss, Marc D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Design of a thermal diffusion sensor for noninvasive assessment of skin surface perfusion and endothelial dysfunction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The skin microcirculation performs a range of vital functions, such as maintaining nutritional perfusion to the tissues and overall thermoregulation. Not only does impairment to the skin blood supply lead to tissue necrosis ...

Li, Vivian V. (Vivian Victoria)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - age gender skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kings Cross, London. 19 March 2011. 1 A Paper Negotiating with Skin BY YU-CHIEN WU The French... , there are also misgivings in response to her claim that 'skin is a mask of...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing skin dose Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by adding up all expo- Summary: or other sources. Most food is, in fact, free of dioxins and furans. 12;29 Estimating Skin Exposure Doses... and for children. Skin Exposure...

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - argentine peanut skins Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are fed. Molasses are often used to enhance palatability. Both peanut skins... and bakery waste can be difficult to feed. Peanut skins are fluffy and nutrient content varies with...

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human neural Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of adult human stem cells from the adult neural retina, as well as the standardization of methods... cell lines derived from adult human retina exhibit neural stem cell...

265

The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin. Final progress report, May 1, 1990--April 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/{mu}), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of {sup 14}C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ({sup 3}H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The {sup 14}C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with {sup 14}C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Exploring Novel Properties of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli: Msi1-Knockout Mice Display Alterations in APC and Intestinal Cell Homeostasis; Topoisomerase IIa Binds to Truncated APC in Human Colon Cancer Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulation. Our lab showed an interaction between the central portion of the APC protein and topoisomerase II?, which led to G2 cell cycle arrest. However, whether truncated APC and topo II? interact in colon cancer cells remained unknown. Here I present data...

Ernlund, Amanda Weis

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Skin tone of targets, lineup type, and confidence levels in cross-racial identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current experiment investigated facial recognition memory for own and other-race faces. Two variations (light-skin and dark-skin) were presented for the Black targets. The purpose of this experiment was to observe the effect of skin variations...

Williamson, Jessica Lynne

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Skin cancer is the most com-mon form of cancer in the United  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin cancer is the most com- mon form of cancer in the United States. Excessive and unprotected exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation (UV light) is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. Howev- er, skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer! The damaging and cumulative effects

269

Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14 is that this behavior is extremely unhealthy and risky for their bodies, specifically their skin. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer found in young adults and second most common cancer found in adolescents

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

270

The Effect of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin. PLoS ONE 7(2): e31203

Elias, Damian Octavio

271

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of cell biologist Don Francis Petersen, Ph.D., conducted November 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a transcript of an interview of Dr. Don Francis Petersen by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Petersen was selected for this interview because of his long research career at Los Alamos and his knowledge of the Atomic Energy Commission`s biomedical program. Dr. Petersen did not personally conduct research on human subjects. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Petersen discusses his remembrances of the early use of radionuclides as biological tracers, aspects of nuclear weapons testing in the 1940`s and 1950`s including fallout studies, the means by which research projects were approved, use of humans in the whole-body counter, and the Health Division Biomedical responsibilities.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Meeting Report. Assessing Human Germ-Cell Mutagenesis in the Post-Genome Era: A Celebration of the Legacy of William Lawson (Bill) Russell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 20 years after Chernobyl. Boice JD Jr, Tawn EJ, Winther2006. Cancer risk among Chernobyl cleanup workers in EstoniaDNA Germ-Cell Mutagenesis in Chernobyl, Japanese, and Animal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Control of mammalian cell mutagenesis and differentiation by chemicals which initiate or promote tumor formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was developed to predict the potential carcinogenic hazard of some environmental chemicals. In this assay, Chinese hamster V79 cells, which are susceptible to mutagenesis, are co-cultivated with cells capable of metabolizing chemical carcinogens. Use of this assay made it possible to demonstrate a relationship between the degree of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of a series of polycyclic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines and to study the organ specificity exhibited by some chemical carcinogens. However, most short-term in vitro assays are designed to detect mutagenic activity and therefore do not detect tumor promoting agents which are devoid of this activity. By analyzing various markers of terminal differentiation in cultured human melanoma and myeloid leukemia cells, we have established a relationship between the activity of a series of tumor promoting phorbol diesters in the mouse skin and their ability to induce terminal differentiation. We suggest that measuring alterations in the differentiation characteristics of some cultured cells may represent an approach by which environmental tumor promoting agents can be studied and detected.

Jones, C.A.; Huberman, E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Int. J. Cancer: 92, 63-69 (2001) Author Version Cytostatic effect of polyethylene-glycol on human colonic adenocarcinoma cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Int. J. Cancer: 92, 63-69 (2001) Author Version Cytostatic effect of polyethylene-glycol on human Sécurité des Aliments, INRA, ENVT, 23 Ch. des Capelles, 31076 Toulouse, France Polyethylene glycol (PEG agent, polyethylene- glycol, against rat colonic carcinogenesis (Corpet and Parnaud, 1999, Parnaud et al

Boyer, Edmond

275

Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have emerged as a leading candidate for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes. However, the low electrical conductivity of Si requires the use of conductive additives in the anode film. Here we report a solution-based synthesis of Si nanowires with a conductive carbon skin. Without any conductive additive, the Si nanowire electrodes exhibited capacities of over 2000 mA h g-1 for 100 cycles when cycled at C/10 and over 1200 mA h g-1 when cycled more rapidly at 1C against Li metal.. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation reveals that the carbon skin performs dual roles: it speeds lithiation of the Si nanowires significantly, while also constraining the final volume expansion. The present work sheds light on ways to optimize lithium battery performance by smartly tailoring the nanostructure of composition of materials based on silicon and carbon.

Bogart, Timothy D.; Oka, Daichi; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

Abbas, G., E-mail: gohar.abbas@gcu.edu.pk; Sarfraz, M. [Department of Physics, GC University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Forman Christian College University, Farozpur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Skin effect with arbitrary specularity in Maxwellian plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of skin effect with arbitrary specularity in maxwellian plasma with specular--diffuse boundary conditions is solved. A new analytical method is developed that makes it possible to to obtain a solution up to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The method is based on the idea of symmetric continuation not only the electric field, but also electron distribution function. The solution is obtained in a form of von Neumann series.

Anatoly V. Latyshev; Alexander A. Yushkanov

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Production and Analysis of Biodiesel from Waste Chicken Skin and Pork Skin Fat and a Comparison of Fuel Properties to Petroleum Derived Diesel Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—People today are increasingly health conscious and therefore shopkeepers tend to dispose of fatty chicken and pork skin. Chicken and pork skins thus are sources of solid waste that are usually not utilized. This paper deals with the production of useful biodiesel from utilizing the waste chicken and pork skins. Fat from the waste chicken and pork skins (sourced from local shops), was first extracted and subjected to transesterification. The products of transesterification were FAME (Fatty acid methyl esters) and glycerol. The FAME produced was tested for five parameters namely calorific value, pour point and cloud point when compared to ASTM E2515-11 standard values. Comparison of the obtained values of the five parameters with the standard values for diesel was performed to determine the viability of the biodiesel produced. The results of this experiment showed that the calorific values of FAME produced from chicken skin and pork skin fat were close to that of petroleum derived diesel. However, two test parameters namely kinematic viscosity and pour point differed when compared to diesel; this problem can be circumvented by modifying an automobile’s internal combustion engine. Due to the relatively high yield value of biodiesel, it is feasible to utilize chicken skin and pork skin fat at a rural level to produce FAME that can be an alternative to diesel in this time of acute fuel scarcity.

Krish T Bharat; Agni Bhattacharya

279

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

de la Chapelle, Albert (Helsingfors, FI); Vogelstein, Bert (Baltimore, MD); Kinzler, Kenneth W. (Baltimore, MD)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

THERMAL INTERACTION OF CRYOGEN SPRAY WITH HUMAN SKIN UNDER VACUUM PRESSURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks laser energy is irradiated at appropriate Riverside, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA. gaguilar@engr.ucr.edu Abstract. Clinical results of port wine stain of this procedure is that laser energy is also absorbed by epidermal melanin, causing localized heating therein

Aguilar, Guillermo

282

Metabolomic Response of Human Skin Tissue to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergy Storage EnergyLaboratoryPortalTapping Into

283

Probing of a human proteome microarray with a recombinant pathogen protein reveals a novel mechanism by which hookworms suppress B cell receptor signaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Darren Pickering Severine Navarro Denise Doolan Angela Trieu Huang Fei Yang Chao Andreas Hofmann Robin Gasser Paul Giacomin Alex Loukas Order of Authors Secondary Information: Manuscript Region of Origin: AUSTRALIA Abstract: Na-ASP-2 is an efficacious... proteome microarray with a recombinant pathogen protein reveals a 1 novel mechanism by which hookworms suppress B cell receptor signaling 2 3 Leon Tribolet1, Cinzia Cantacessi1,2, Darren A. Pickering1, Severine Navarro1, Denise L. Doolan3, 4 Angela...

Tribolet, Leon; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Pickering, Darren; Navarro, Severine; Doolan, Denise; Trieu, Angela; Fei, Huang; Chao, Yang; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin; Giacomin, Paul; Loukas, Alex

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Apparatus for testing skin samples or the like  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for testing the permeability of living skin samples has a flat base with a plurality of sample-holding cavities formed in its upper surface, the samples being placed in counterbores in the cavities with the epidermis uppermost. O-rings of Teflon washers are respectively placed on the samples and a flat cover is connected to the base to press the rings against the upper surfaces of the samples. Media to maintain tissue viability and recovery of metabolites is introduced into the lower portion of the sample-holding cavities through passages in the base. Test materials are introduced through holes in the cover plate after assembly of the chamber.

Holland, J.M.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-related skin lesions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 | July 2002 729 Family Correlations of Arsenic Methylation Patterns in Children and Parents Summary: various health effects, including can- cers of the bladder, skin, and...

286

Management of Pediatric Skin Abscesses in Pediatric, General Academic and Community Emergency Departments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in skin abscesses presentingmeeting on management of MRSA in Conflicts of Interest: Byfor clinical management of MRSA in the community: Summary of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Mechanisms of NDV-3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infectionFig. 1) and suppression of MRSA proliferation (Fig. 2). Eachseverity and suppression of MRSA bioluminescence (Figs. 1

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic skin lesions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

who had a substantially increased risk of stillbirth... concentrations greater than 400 lgliter and also showed signs of arsenic-caused skin lesions were se- lected......

289

Radiation port dermatophytosis: Tinea corporis occurring at the site of irradiated skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M, Huang J, Arous E: Radiation therapy toxicity to the skin.Radiation port dermatophytosis: Tinea corporis occurring atHouston, Texas Abstract Radiation port dermatophytosis is

Casamiquela, Kathleen M; Cohen, Philip R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - amphibian skin exposed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 6 Global biodiversity loss and the emergence of infec-tious diseases are two of the most pressing environ- Summary: ). Amphibians have permeable skin,...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute skin toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... skin Reproductive effects of not seen with glycols...

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - amphibian skin epithelium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ulcers & bloating are keySkin... AmphibiansInfections in Wild Amphibians D. Earl Green, DVMD. Earl Green, DVM Department of Interior... % of larvae -- Onset is sudden...

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial skin construct Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and applications, computer vision, adult-content detection, skin color detection Abstract: As more... a tremendous amount of manual work to construct (either directly, or...

294

Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'.

Cornforth, Michael N. [The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX (United States)

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

a549 human lung: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human (more) Weems, Jessica Marie 2010-01-01 26 KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG Physics Websites Summary: to the epidemiologically derived value...

296

Effect of Insulators on the Expression of betaAS3 in Lentiviral Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. (2001). Correction of sickle cell disease in transgenicto human bone marrow for sickle cell disease. Journal ofal. (2011). Correction of sickle cell disease in adult mice

Wherley, Jennifer Patricia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Recently, doctors in Texas have been seeing an increasing number of patients with skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that kill bacteria), also called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-- "MRSA." The Texas Department this is happening and how to prevent antibiotic (drug) resistant Staph/MRSA skin infections from spreading. What is a Staph/MRSA skin infection? It can be a pimple, rash, boil, or an open wound. Staph/MRSA is often

298

HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters

Boyer, Edmond

299

Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M. [Departament d'Estructura i Conastituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano , Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Katedra Fizyki Teoretycznej, Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skodowskiej ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

300

Automatic Skin Enhancement with Visible and Near-Infrared Image Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic Skin Enhancement with Visible and Near-Infrared Image Fusion Sabine Süsstrunk School and hemo- globin, the key components of skin color, have little absorp- tion in the near-infrared (NIR to the incident light's wavelength, we show that near-infrared images provide information that can be used

Salvaggio, Carl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Towards a Minimal Architecture for a Printable, Modular, and Robust Sensing Skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bachrach, and R.S. Fearing Abstract-- This work presents a low-complexity modular sensor grid architecture to provide a smart skin to non-convex shapes, such as a robot body and legs. To configure a sensing skin shaped by arbitrary cuts and rapid changes in designs, we use a wavefront planning approach to generate

Fearing, Ron

302

Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in Bangladesh Graziano, PhD The present study examined the associations between drinking water and urinary arsenic levels currently drinking water containing concentrations of arsenic 50 g/L. The risk for skin lesions in relation

van Geen, Alexander

303

Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India Reina Haque the dose-re- sponse relation between low arsenic concentrations in drinking water and arsenic-induced skin peak arsenic concentration in drinking water was 325 g/liter for cases and 180 g/liter for controls

California at Berkeley, University of

304

Modelling and simulation of skin-stretch-caused motion artefacts in single-channel ECG signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling and simulation of skin-stretch-caused motion artefacts in single-channel ECG signal in better understanding of artefacts in ECG and in developing model-based techniques for cleaning or interpreting noisy ECG signals. This work com- bines existing experimental results from the field of skin

Hamburg,.Universität

305

Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities Noah Fierera,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forensic identification using skin bacterial communities Noah Fierera,b,1 , Christian L. Lauberb are personalized, we hypothesized that we could use the residual skin bacteria left on objects for forensic approach, this series ofstudies introducesa forensics approach that could eventually be used

Fierer, Noah

306

ageing human fibroblasts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STUDY OF DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS IN BYSTANDER PRIMARY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS L. B. Smilenov-or-nothing manner(7) . Bystander cells exhibit a variety of characteristics of...

307

ancient human dna: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STUDY OF DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS IN BYSTANDER PRIMARY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS L. B. Smilenov-or-nothing manner(7) . Bystander cells exhibit a variety of characteristics of...

308

acid induces human: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STUDY OF DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS IN BYSTANDER PRIMARY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS L. B. Smilenov-or-nothing manner(7) . Bystander cells exhibit a variety of characteristics of...

309

Nuclear localization of pyrroleimidazole polyamidefluorescein conjugates in cell culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- jugates were synthesized and assayed for cellular localization. Thirteen cell lines, representing 11 human cancers, one human transformed kidney cell line, and one murine leukemia cell line, were treated with 5 M cell lines tested. The localization profiles of several other conjugates suggest that pyrrole

Dervan, Peter B.

310

Activation of ROS/NF-{kappa}B and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1{beta}-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1{beta} enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKC{alpha} (Goe6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-{kappa}B (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKC{alpha}, Src, p47{sup phox}, p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1{beta} stimulated NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKC{alpha}/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca{sup 2+}/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1{beta} induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

Luo, S.-F. [Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, C.-C.; Lee, I-T. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, C.-W. [Department of Nursing, Division of Basic Medical Sciences, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Chia-Yi, Taiwan (China); Lin, W.-N. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-C. [Department of Anesthetics, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Yang, C.-M. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chuenmao@mail.cgu.edu.tw

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Enhancers and super-enhancers in human disease and therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human body is made up of a diverse array of cell types, each with specialized properties and functions that support the organism as a whole. Despite this variability, with few exceptions, these cells contain the same ...

Hoke, Heather Ashley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (?-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ? 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ? This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ? 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ? This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

Boulware, Stephen [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Vasquez, Karen M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Channel, Latin America. STUDIOS Architecture. #12;HUMAN ECOLOGY · APRIL 2005 1 Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph Frey spins a green alternative for textiles. Fibers from rapidly renewable materials

Wang, Z. Jane

314

Deep Beams and Slabs The purpose of skin reinforcement in a deep beam is to limit the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Beams and Slabs Deep Beams The purpose of skin reinforcement in a deep beam is to limit require different amounts of skin reinforcement. The purpose of our experiment is to compare beams designed with the different amounts of skin reinforcement required by these codes. 3 deep beams following

Barthelat, Francois

315

Combining visible and near-infrared images for realistic skin Clement Fredembach, Nathalie Barbuscia and Sabine Susstrunk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combining visible and near-infrared images for realistic skin smoothing Cl´ement Fredembach components of skin colour, have little absorption in the near-infrared part of the spectrum propose that near-infrared images provide information that can be used to automatically smooth skin tones

Salvaggio, Carl

316

Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

Gerecke, Donald R. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), a Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: gerecke@eohsi.rutgers.edu; Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Tong Weida [US FDA, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AK (United States); Androulakis, Ioannis P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Georgopoulos, Panos G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

The second skin approach : skin strain field analysis and mechanical counter pressure prototyping for advanced spacesuit design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the theory of advanced locomotion mechanical counter pressure (MCP) spacesuits by studying the changes in the human body shape during joint motion. Two experiments take advantage ...

Bethke, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and dermatological disorders : focus on their role in autoimmunity and tumors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in autoimmunity and tumors Short title : PDC and skin Charles Julie 1,2,3 , Chaperot Laurence 2,3 , Salameire dendritic cells (PDC). The presence of PDC, cells capable of producing large quantities of interferon alpha conditions. Thereby, PDC have been observed in inflammatory immunoallergic dermatological disorders

Boyer, Edmond

319

A common supersolid low-density skin sliperizing ice and toughening water surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skins of water and ice share the same attribute of supersolidity characterized by the identical H-O vibration frequency of 3450 cm-1. Molecular undercoordination and inter-electron-pair repulsion shortens the H-O bond and lengthen the O:H nonbond, leading to a dual process of nonbonding electron polarization. This relaxation-polarization process enhances the dipole moment, elasticity,viscosity, thermal stability of these skins with 25% density loss, which is responsible for the hydrophobicity and toughness of water skin and for the slippery of ice.

Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Weitao Zheng; Ji Zhou; Chang Q. Sun

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Sensitivity of the electric dipole polarizability to the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The static dipole polarizability, {alpha}{sub D}, in {sup 208}Pb has been recently measured with highresolution via proton inelastic scattering at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) [1]. This observable is thought to be intimately connected with the neutron skin thickness, r{sub skin}, of the same nucleus and, more fundamentally, it is believed to be associated with the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of r{sub skin} on {alpha}{sub D} in {sup 208}Pb is investigated and discussed on the basis of a large and representative set of relativistic and non-relativistic nuclear energy density functionals (EDF) [2].

Roca-Maza, X.; Agrawal, B. K.; Colo, G.; Nazarewicz, W.; Paar, N.; Piekarewicz, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Vretenar, D. [INFN, sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Simulation of Electron-Beam Irradiation of Skin Tissue Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulation of electrons stopping in liquid water was used to model the penetration and dose distribution of electron beams incident on the full-thickness EpiDermTM skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). This 3D tissue model has a fully developed basement membrane separating an epidermal layer of keratinocytes in various stages of differentiation from a dermal layer of fibroblast embedded in collagen. The simulations were motivated by a desire to selectively expose the epidermal layer to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation in the presence of a non-irradiated dermal layer. Using the variable energy electron microbeam at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a model of device characteristics and irradiation geometry, we find that at the highest beam energy available (90 keV), the estimated 90th percentile of penetration remains in the epidermal layer. To investigate the depth-dose distribution, we calculated lineal energy spectra for 10um thick layers near the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile of penetration by the 90 keV electron beam. Biphasic spectra showed an increasing component of "stoppers" with increasing depth. Despite changes in the lineal energy spectra, the main effect on dose deposition with increasing depth is the screening effect of tissue above the layer of interest.

Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

322

Human dopamine receptor and its uses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

Civelli, Olivier (Portland, OR); Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie (Toronto, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

In Vivo characterization of skin using a weiner nonlinear stochastic identification method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes an indentometer device used to identify the linear dynamic and nonlinear properties of skin and underlying tissue using an in vivo test. The device uses a Lorentz force actuator to apply a dynamic force ...

Chen, Yi

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic skin inflammation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tetrakis(dimethylamino)hafnium P-6280-B Date: February 2005 Copyright 2002, 2004-2005, Praxair Technology, Inc. Page 1 of 8 Summary: dermatitis (inflammation of the skin). With...

325

Is the duration of skin disease visits decreasing in the united states?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on fridays. J Dermatolog Treat 2013 Dec;24(6):405-7. [PMID:treatment. J Dermatolog Treat 2014 Dec;25(6):453-8. [PMID:Although non-dermatologists treat about half of all skin

Davis, Scott A; Feldman, Steven R; Fleischer Jr., Alan B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

FATIGUE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FATIGUE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES by Robert B in the Instron and Composite Laboratories toward the end of the experimental research. Finally, special thanks

327

Meeting report for the 1st skin microbiota workshop, Boulder, CO October 15-16 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report details the outcome of the 1st Skin Microbiota Workshop, Boulder, CO, held on October 15th-16th 2012. The workshop was arranged to bring Department of Defense personnel together with experts in microbial ecology, ...

Gilbert, Jack A

328

A Systematic Study of Matrix Acidizing Treatments Using Skin Monitoring Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this work was to evaluate matrix acidizing treatments of vertical and horizontal wells in carbonate reservoirs. Twenty field cases for acidizing treatments were analyzed by evaluating the skin factor evolution from on-site rate...

Pandya, Nimish

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Symmetry energy, neutron skin, and neutron star radius from chiral effective field theory interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss neutron matter calculations based on chiral effective field theory interactions and their predictions for the symmetry energy, the neutron skin of 208 Pb, and for the radius of neutron stars.

K. Hebeler; A. Schwenk

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

330

FRACTURE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTURE OF SKIN-STIFFENER INTERSECTIONS IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES by Darrin John to the other graduate students in the composite materials group for your smiles and friendships over the past Material .........................................................................................10

331

Design and fabrication of an optical pressure micro sensor for skin mechanics studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanics of skin is as central to touch as optics is to vision and acoustics is to hearing. With the advent of novel imaging technologies such as the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), we are now able to view structures ...

Kumar, Siddarth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development and Construction of Bioclimatic Double Skin Active Facade for Hot and Humid Climate of UAE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracking venetian blinds, LED (light emitting diodes) lighting and Building Management system. 1.01 Modeling And Simulation Of Double Skin Active Facade The modeling and simulation of the Double Skin Fa?ade Cavity is a complicated task, since... sweating/condensation on the water coil. 3.06 LED (Light Emitting Diode) Lighting The building is illuminated using extremely energy efficient LED?s which last 5 times as long as fluorescents and 50 times longer than typical incandescent. So...

Karbor, R. G.; Mohamed, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Structural/functional relationships between internal and external MSH receptors: modulation of expression in Cloudman melanoma cells by UVB radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expression of internal receptors for MSH is an important criterion for responsiveness to MSH by Cloudman melanoma cells. Here, we show that internal and external receptors for MSH are of identical molecular weights (50-53 kDa) and share common antigenic determinants, indicating a structural relationship between the 2 populations of molecules. The internal receptors co-purified with a sub-cellular fraction highly enriched for small vesicles, many of which were coated. Ultraviolet B light (UVB) acted synergistically with MSH to increase tyrosinase activity and melanin content of cultured Cloudman melanoma cells, consistent with previous findings in the skin of mice and guinea pigs. Preceding the rise in tyrosinase activity in cultured cells, UVB elicited a decrease in internal MSH binding sites and a concomitant increase in external sites. The time frame for the UVB effects on MSH receptors and melanogenesis, 48 hours, was similar to that for a response to solar radiation in humans. Together, the results indicate a key role for MSH receptors in the induction of melanogenesis by UVB and suggest a potential mechanism of action for UVB: redistribution of MSH receptors with a resultant increase in cellular responsiveness to MSH.

Chakraborty, A.K.; Orlow, S.J.; Bolognia, J.L.; Pawelek, J.M. (Department of Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 and 19 (K18–K19), vimentin (vim) and ?-sm actin (ASMA) inDako), and vimentin (VIM; MEDAC, GmbH). Other antibodiesa mAb against vimentin (VIM, IgG1). The secondary antibodies

Pechoux, Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Relevance of in vivo models in melanoma skin cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discussion of possible wavelength dependence of induction of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is provided. Strengths and weaknesses of various experimental approaches to better understanding of the prevalence of CMM in different human populations including latitude effects are compared. Further the advantages and limitations of the use of the laboratory opossum (Monodelphis domestic), transgenic mice containing SV40 ongogene sequences under tyrosinase promoter control, and a backcross hybrid fish of the genus Xenophorus are contrasted.

Setlow, R.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Monochromosomal hybrids for the analysis of the human genome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this research project the authors proposed to develop rodent/human hybrid cell lines each containing a single different human chromosome. The human chromosomes will be marked with Ecogpt and stably maintained by selection in the hybrid cells. The experimental approach to produce the proposed cell lines involve the following: they will first transfer a cloned selectable marker, Ecogpt (an E. coli gene for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase: XGPRT) to normal diploid human cells using a retroviral vector. The transferred gene will integrate at random into multiple sites in the recipient cell genome. Clonal cell lines from independent transgenotes will each carry the selectable marker integrated into a different site and perhaps a different chromosome. The chromosome carrying the selectable marker will then be transferred further to mouse cells by microcell fusion. In addition they also use directed integration of Ecogpt into the chromosome present in rodent cells, otherwise not marked with a selectable marker. This allows them to complete the bank of proposed cell line. The human chromosome, since it will be marked with a selectable marker, can be transferred to any other cell line of interest for complementation analysis. Clones of each cell line, containing varying size segments of the same chromosome produced by selection for the retention or loss of the selectable marker following x-irradiation or by metaphase chromosome transfer method will facilitate physical mapping and determination of gene order on a chromosome. 1 fig.

Athwal, R.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA); Weaver, Valerie M. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electrochemical treatment of human waste coupled with molecular hydrogen production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a hydrogen fuel cell. Herein, we report on the efficacy of a laboratory-scale wastewater electrolysis cell an electrolysis cell for on-site wastewater treatment coupled with molecular hydrogen production for useElectrochemical treatment of human waste coupled with molecular hydrogen production Kangwoo Cho

Heaton, Thomas H.

340

Influence of neutron-skin thickness on $?^{-}/?^{+}$ ratio in Pb+Pb collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model IBUU11 using as an input nucleon density profiles from Hartree-Fock calculations based on a modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we study the influence of the uncertainty of the neutron skin thickness on the $\\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+}$ ratio in both central and peripheral Pb+Pb collisions at beam energies of 400 MeV/nucleon and 1000 MeV/nucleon. Within the current experimental uncertainty range of neutron skin in $^{208}$Pb, while the neutron skin effect on the \\rpi ratio is negligible in central reactions at both energies, it increases gradually with increasing impact parameter and becomes comparable with or even larger than the symmetry energy effect in peripheral collisions especially at 400 MeV/nucleon. Moreover, we found that while the \\rpi ratio is larger with a softer \\esym in central collisions, above certain impact parameters depending on the size of the neutron skin, a stiffer \\esym can lead to a larger \\rpi ratio as most of the pions are produced at densities below the saturation density in these peripheral reactions. Thus, a clear impact parameter selection is important to extract reliable information about the \\esym at suprasaturation densities (size of neutron skin) from the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio in central (peripheral) heavy-ion collisions.

Gao-Feng Wei; Bao-An Li; Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transgene Excision Has No Impact on In Vivo Integration of Human iPS Derived Neural Precursors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The derivation of induced human pluripotent stem cells (hiPS) has generated significant enthusiasm particularly for the prospects of cell-based therapy. But there are concerns about the suitability of iPS cells for in vivo ...

Major, Tamara

342

Illusory Sense of Human Touch from a Warm and Soft Artificial Hand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To touch and be touched are vital to human development, well being, and relationships. However, to those who have lost their arms and hands due to accident or war, touching becomes a serious concern that often leads to psychosocial issues and social stigma. In this paper, we demonstrate that the touch from a warm and soft rubber hand can be perceived by another person as if the touch were coming from a human hand. We describe a three step process toward this goal. First, we made participants select artificial skin samples according to their preferred warmth and softness characteristics. At room temperature, the preferred warmth was found to be 28.4 deg C at the skin surface of a soft silicone rubber material that has a Shore durometer value of 30 at the OO scale. Second, we developed a process to create a rubber hand replica of a human hand. To compare the skin softness of a human hand and artificial hands, a robotic indenter was employed to produce a softness map by recording the displacement data when const...

Cabibihan, John-John; Srinivasa, Yeshwin Mysore; Chan, Mark Aaron; Muruganantham, Arrchana

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about ?3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than ?1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet ?3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were ?7% for {sup 60}Co, ?0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and ?2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For lower energy radionuclides like {sup 169}Yb, bolus may be needed; and (iii) for the interstitial case, at least a 0.1 cm bolus is advised for {sup 60}Co to avoid underdosing superficial target layers. For {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb, no bolus is needed. For those cases where no bolus is needed, its use might be detrimental as the lack of radiation scatter may be beneficial to the patient, although the 2% tolerance for dose calculation accuracy recommended in the AAPM TG-56 report is not fulfilled.

Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain)] [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain)] [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Chronic cellular responses of rat skin to 13 Mev proton irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AErM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject: Laboratory Animal Medicine CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial...

Hinkle, Donald King

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Detecting and molecular profiling cancer cells in patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although tumor cells obtained from human patients by surgical biopsy, image-guided intervention, blood draws or fluid drainage (paracentesis, thoracentesis) are a valuable source for analyzing tumor cells, conventional ...

Peterson, Vanessa M. (Vanessa Marie)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

In vitro models for airway epithelial cell culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is about the development of a physiologically relevant model of the human airway. Various factors such as the cell model, physiochemical factors such as the cell substrate properties including its stiffness, shear ...

Sivathanu, Vivek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

HER receptor-mediated dynamic signalling in breast cancer cells   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of cell signalling are critical to cell fate decisions. Human Epidermal growth factor Receptors (HERs)-mediated Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signalling cascades relay extracellular signals from the plasma ...

Hu, Huizhong

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin -Heart Rate Monitors -Popular Mechanics http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/breakthroughs/new-electronic-sensors-stick-to-your-skin?click=pm_latest[8/14/2011 5:59:45 AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Electronic Sensors Stick to Your Skin - Heart Rate Monitors - Popular Mechanics http://www Electronic Sensors That Stick to Your Skin Like Temporary Tattoos Nice tattoo. Or is it a heart-rate monitor to measure the electrical activity of the heart, muscles and brain. And using the same principles behind

Rogers, John A.

349

Generation of Isogenic Pluripotent Stem Cells Differing Exclusively at Two Early Onset Parkinson Point Mutations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells provide a unique tool for the study of human disease, as well as a promising source for cell replacement therapies. One crucial limitation ...

Soldner, Frank

350

Host-defense peptides isolated from the skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Host-defense peptides isolated from the skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora J. Michael Conlona,*, Agnes Sonnevendb , Carlos Davidsonc , Anni Demandtd , Thierry Jouennee-stimulated skin secretions of the Northern red-legged frog Rana aurora aurora and their primary structures

Davidson, Carlos

351

Evidence from peptidomic analysis of skin secretions that the red-legged frogs, Rana aurora draytonii and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence from peptidomic analysis of skin secretions that the red-legged frogs, Rana aurora draytonii and Rana aurora aurora, are distinct species J. Michael Conlon a, *, Nadia Al-Ghafari a , Laurent peptides Rana aurora Rana draytonii Skin secretions a b s t r a c t The northern red-legged frog Rana

Davidson, Carlos

352

Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Capture and Cross-Present Viral Antigens from Influenza-Virus Exposed Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, France Abstract Among the different subsets of dendritic cells (DC), plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC, with human primary blood PDC and with a PDC cell line, that PDC display poor endocytic capacity for soluble or cellular antigens when compared to monocyte-derived myeloid DC. However, immature PDC efficiently take up

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Human-machine interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

E-Print Network 3.0 - antral human follicles Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

human follicle... (2006) 132-148 12;to the formation of primordial ... Source: Mayo, Kelly E. - Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology, Northwestern...

355

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human ovaries Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fetus 34. Furthermore, recent research on the human fetal ... Source: Mayo, Kelly E. - Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology, Northwestern...

356

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human intervertebral Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Moore KC. Ultrastructure of human intervertebral disc. II. Cells... pulposus a solid or a fluid? Mechanical behaviors of the nucleus pulposus of the ... Source: Bonassar, Larry -...

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human endothelial Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B, Hering TM, Caplan AI... . Adult human mesenchymal stem cell differentia- ... Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

358

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult human keratinocytes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Washington at Seattle Collection: Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 28 Genome-wide comparison of human keratinocyte and squamous cell carcinoma responses to UVB irradiation:...

359

Evaluation and design of double-skin facades for office buildings in hot climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficient strategy and also the factors that affected this efficiency. The simulations were done using the building simulation software, Ener-Win. The double skin was simulated as per an approximate and simplistic calculation of the u-value, solar heat gain...

Yellamraju, Vijaya

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

The average person sheds 40 pounds of skin during his or her lifetime. That's the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q: MSU N 19 o. The average person sheds 40 pounds of skin during his or her lifetime. That whether they are facts or opinions. Fact or opinion? A fact is something that can be tested. An opinion is something that someone thinks or believes. 1. Wooly mammoths are extinct. fact opinion 2. Ear wax can

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Have we observed the skin vibration of realistic strange stars (ReSS) ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin vibration of ReSS and consequent resonance absorption can account for the absorption lines in the spectrum of X-ray emission from many compact stellar objects and in particular, the stars J1210$-$5226 and RXJ1856$-$3754. Observations of the X-ray spectrum of these stars is difficult to explain, if they are neutron stars.

Monika Sinha; Jishnu Dey; Mira Dey; Subharthi Ray; Siddhartha Bhowmick

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Water skin anomalies: density, elasticity, hydrophobicity, thermal stability, interface repulsivity, etc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular undercoordination induced O:H-O bond relaxation and dual polarization dictates the supersolid behavior of water skins interacting with other substances such as flowing in nanochannels, dancing of water droplets, floating of insects. The BOLS-NEP notion unifies the Wenzel-Cassie-Baxter models and explains controllable transition between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity.

Chang Q. Sun

2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE INFLUENCE OF THE GEOMETRY ON SKIN EFFECT IN ELECTROMAGNETISM GABRIEL CALOZ, MONIQUE DAUGE, ERWAN FAOU, VICTOR P´ERON ABSTRACT. We consider the equations of electromagnetism set on a domain made in electromagnetism. This effect describes the rapid decay of electromagnetic fields with depth inside a metallic

Dauge, Monique

364

CancerTherapy Skin Cooling Anthony Alleman, Duane Bywaters, David Chadburn, Drew Sparks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

printed cooling pad with 9 ports, the final cooling pad is ABS 3D printed with a curved surface and 11 ports. ABS 3D printed CP with inner channel and 9 ports, vertical flow. 11 ports angled towards membrane ultrasound procedure to concentrate acoustic energy beneath the skin's Required heat transfer coefficients

Provancher, William

365

Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions, 2006. Millions of persons around the world are exposed to low doses of arsenic through drinking water from drinking water over a significant period of time. The authors evaluated dose-response relations

van Geen, Alexander

366

Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 38:137141 (2006) Thermal Responses of Ex Vivo Human Skin During Multiple  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Departamento de Optica, Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Puebla, Mexico 3 Department

Aguilar, Guillermo

367

Transport Pathways and Enhancement Mechanisms within Localized and Non-Localized Transport Regions in Skin Treated with Low-Frequency Sonophoresis and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent advances in transdermal drug delivery utilizing low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) have revealed that skin permeability enhancement is not homogenous across the skin surface. Instead, ...

Polat, Baris E.

368

How are pluripotent cells captured in culture?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

morphogenetic 4 proteins induce germ cell differentiation from human embryonic stem 5 cells. Stem Cells Dev 2006; 15:831-837 6 30. Tilgner K, Atkinson SP, Golebiewska A, Stojkovic M, Lako M, 7 Armstrong L. Isolation of primordial germ cells from differentiating... :281-292 13 47. Ogawa K, Matsui H, Ohtsuka S, Niwa H. A novel mechanism for 14 regulating clonal propagation of mouse ES cells. Genes Cells 2004; 15 9:471-477 16 48. Nichols J, Jones K, Phillips JM, Newland SA, Roode M, Mansfield W, 17 et al. Validated...

Kinoshita, Masaki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Structural studies of the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, pIgR, is a glycosylated type I transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral surface of secretory epithelial cells. pIgR plays a key role in mucosal immunity and, together ...

Hamburger, Agnes Eva, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Perlecan regulation of sonic hedgehog signaling: from drosophila to humans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neural stem cells. In collaboration with others, I have shown that the human homolog of Trol, PERLECAN, regulates SONIC HEDGEHOG-dependent proliferation in advanced prostate cancer by two different mechanisms. This makes PERLECAN a potential drug target...

Hernandez, Ana Maria

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Introduction Uniform Estimates for Transmission Problems 3D Multiscaled Asymptotic Expansion Numerical Simulations Skin-Effect Description in Electromagnetism with a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Simulations Skin-Effect Description in Electromagnetism with a Scaled Asymptotic Expansion Gabriel.08.2009 V. P´eron Skin-Effect Description in Electromagnetism with a Scaled Asymptotic Expansion 1 / 32 and Electromagnetism MONIQUE DAUGE, ERWAN FAOU, VICTOR P ´ERON (2009) Asymptotic Behavior at High Conductivity of Skin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

372

Cognitive Science (Humanities)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive Science (Humanities) The University of Edinburgh College of Humanities and Social Science: Cognitive Science (Humanities) BSc Honours in: Cognitive Science Please see separate information sheets the disciplines that contribute to the study of human cognition. The Cognitive Science programme at Edinburgh

Schnaufer, Achim

373

Regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in Ah responsive and Ah nonresponsive human breast cancer cells by 17 B-estradiol and 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cell proliferation and tumor promotion by TCDD may also be associated with alteration of receptors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), estrogen receptor (ER) (Whysner and Williams, 1996, DeVito et al. , 1992) and perhaps the glucocorticoid receptor... responses were observed (Shiverick and Muther, 1982, DeVito et al. , 1992). Many antiestrogenic responses induced by Ah-receptor agonists in MCF-7 cells occur at concentrations that do not cause induction of CYPIAI (Tiwari et al. , 1994; Liu et al. , 1994...

Schrope, Katherine Eillene

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy-dependence of skin-mode fraction in $E1$ excitations of neutron-rich nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have extensively investigated characters of the low-energy $E1$ strengths in $N>Z$ nuclei, by analyzing the transition densities obtained by the HF+RPA calculations with several effective interactions. Crossover behavior has been confirmed, from the skin mode at low energy to the $pn$ mode at higher energy. Decomposing the $E1$ strengths into the skin-mode, $pn$-mode and interference fractions, we show that the ratio of the skin-mode strength to the full strength may be regarded as a generic function of the excitation energy, insensitive to nuclides and effective interactions, particularly beyond Ni.

Nakada, H; Sawai, H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Proliferative and toxic effects of ultraviolet light and inflammation on epidermal pigment cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ear of the mouse is useful for studying the effects of ultraviolet light on epidermal pigment cells. The quantity of light penetrating into the skin causing an inflammatory response can be assessed easily by measuring with an engineering calipers the swelling of the ear. The inflammatory response of the ear exhibits a linear relationship to the dose of light delivered. We observed that doses of shortwave ultraviolet light which are noninflammatory when repeated at daily intervals induce moderate to severe inflammation. Small doses of psoralen and prolonged exposure to UVA (PUVA) were more inflammatory than larger amounts of psoralen and short exposure to light. Doses of shortwave ultraviolet light and PUVA which produce only a minimal inflammation of the skin stimulate the proliferation of epidermal melanocytes. In contrast, PUVA in doses sufficiently large to cause a marked inflammatory reaction in the skin seems injurious to pigment cells and kills them or causes only a minimal proliferative response. The inflammatory reaction itself does not seem to stimulate or inhibit the proliferation of melanocytes. Prostaglandins A, E, and F2 alpha have no effect on the proliferation of epidermal pigment cells. In contrast, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and allergic contact dermatitis increase the numerical density of pigment cells. Steroids may block the function of the enzyme tyrosinase. Our experiments indicate that pigment cells, like many other varieties of cells, are susceptible to injury and can be killed at least by large doses of PUVA.

Nordlund, J.J.; Ackles, A.E.; Traynor, F.F.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny in the human Abstract To calculate the absorbed dose in the human lung due to inhaled radon progeny, ICRP focussed and secretory cells). The absorbed energy for alpha particles emitted by radon progeny in the human respiratory

Yu, K.N.

377

Influence of the single-particle structure on the nuclear surface and the neutron skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the influence of the single-particle structure on the neutron density distribution and the neutron skin in Ca, Ni, Zr, Sn, and Pb isotopes. The nucleon density distributions are calculated in the Hartree-Fock+BCS approach with the SLy4 Skyrme force. A close correlation is found between the quantum numbers of the valence neutrons and the changes in the position and the diffuseness of the nuclear surface, which in turn affect the neutron skin thickness. Neutrons in the valence orbitals with low principal quantum number and high angular momentum mainly displace the position of the neutron surface outwards, while neutrons with high principal quantum number and low angular momentum basically increase the diffuseness of the neutron surface. The impact of the valence shell neutrons on the tail of the neutron density distribution is discussed.

M. Warda; M. Centelles; X. Vinas; X. Roca-Maza

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

An evaluation of floor surfaces on the basis of skin temperature during constrained standing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

popliteal fossa (popliteal region), and the medial side of abductor hallucis on the non-load bearing region of the foot (near the intersection of the top of the arch and the instep) or the foot region. All thermistors were located on the left leg... between an average ending temperature and an average start-up temperature. The foot skin temperature region was the only temperature region to indicate statistically significant results between the floor surfaces. The other two lower leg temperature...

Monford, Leo Gabriel

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Vaccination with human anti-trastuzumab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

viability of SK-OV-3 cells, a HER2-positive cancer cell line, in nude mice. MMTV.f.huHER2(Fo5) transgenicRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Vaccination with human anti-trastuzumab anti-idiotype scFv reverses relapses in HER2-expressing breast cancer. Here, we tested whether trastuzumab-selected single-chain Fv (sc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

380

Transport and Metabolism of Opioid Peptides across BeWo Cells, An In Vitro Model of the Placental Barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In keeping with the advance of biotechnology, cell culture becomes an important tool for investigating the transport and the metabolism phenomena. A cell line of human origin, the BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line, was used ...

Ampasavate, Chadarat; Chandorkar, Gurudatt A.; Velde, David Vande; Stobaugh, John F.; Audus, Kenneth L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Asymmetric cancer cell division regulated by AKT Ipsita Dey-Guhaa,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer Cells in Vitro. We began by studying MCF7, a highly proliferative, aneuploid, ER+ /HER2- human that slowly pro- liferating MCF7 cells might produce low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS stem cells and cancer stem cells produce low levels of ROS (5­7). We stained MCF7 cells with 5-(and-6

Albeck, John

382

Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid and related nutrients on plasma lipids, and skin and hair coat condition in canines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phospholipid fatty acids were determined at each collection period. Serum zinc concentrations were analyzed on wk 12, 14, and 24. The hypothesis was that a diet containing increased LA, ALA, and zinc concentrations (diet C) would show improvements of skin...

Hester, Shaleah Lynnae

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Quantitative studies of rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox: venom, venom fractions, and rabbit antivenom: Lethality, skin sensitivity, and antibody characterization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF RATTLESNAKE (CROTALUS ATROX) VENOM, VENOM FRACTIONS, AND RABBIT ANTIVENOM: LETHALITY, SKIN SENSITIVITY, AND ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION A Thesis By RICHARD PATTON BRADBURY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas...: LETHALITY, SKIN SENSITIVITY, AND ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION A Thesis By RICHARD PATTON BRADBURY Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Q(cf f. 4&a (Member) (Coordinator, Space Medicine (Member) Program and Member) August 1967...

Bradbury, Richard Patton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

Relationships among antioxidants, phenolics, and specific gravity in potato cultivars, and evaluation of wild potato species for antioxidants, glycoalkaloids, and anti-cancer activity on human prostate and colon cancer cells in vitro.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and significance of cultivar, location, year, and interaction effects for antioxidant activity, phenolic content, and specific gravity of four potato cultivars grown in five locations during the 2005, 2006, and 2007 growing seasons...; Giovannelli et al., 2000; Rodriguez et al., 2007; Shahidi, 2002), modulation of detoxifying enzymes, stimulation of the immune system, regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis (Kern et al., 2007; Kim et al., 2006; Reddivari et al., 2007b...

Nzaramba, Magnifique Ndambe

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Human Resources Assistant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is located in the Headquarters (HQ) Operations Division of the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer in Washington, DC. The Division provides a full range of human capital...

386

Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

Nicolay, Nils H., E-mail: n.nicolay@dkfz.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute [Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Trinh, Thuy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Sisombath, Sonevisay [Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Gq protein mediates UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by stimulating HB-EGF secretion from HaCaT human keratinocytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression to produce cellular responses including aging and carcinogenesis in skin. We hypothesised that heterotrimeric G proteins mediate UV-induced COX-2 expression by stimulating secretion of soluble HB-EGF (sHB-EGF). In this study, we aimed to elucidate the role and underlying mechanism of the {alpha} subunit of Gq protein (G{alpha}q) in UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion and COX-2 induction. We found that expression of constitutively active G{alpha}q (G{alpha}qQL) augmented UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion, which was abolished by knockdown of G{alpha}q with shRNA in HaCaT human keratinocytes. G{alpha}q was found to mediate the UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion by sequential activation of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), and matrix metaloprotease-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, G{alpha}qQL mediated UVB-induced COX-2 expression in an HB-EGF-, EGFR-, and p38-dependent manner. From these results, we concluded that G{alpha}q mediates UV-induced COX-2 expression through activation of EGFR by HB-EGF, of which ectodomain shedding was stimulated through sequential activation of PLC, PKC{delta} and MMP-2 in HaCaT cells.

Seo, MiRan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Juhnn, Yong-Sung, E-mail: juhnn@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

388

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

Rambaut, Andrew

389

Human Research ProgramHuman Research Program Human System Risk in Exploration and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human System Risks in Exploration Missions 21SEP10 2HRP Risk Process ­ D.Grounds Presentation contentsHuman Research ProgramHuman Research Program Human System Risk in Exploration and the Human Research Program 21SEP10 1HRP Risk Process ­ D Grounds #12;Human Research ProgramHuman Research Program

Waliser, Duane E.

390

Method for restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA); Weaver, Valerie M. (Oakland, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection in the Zebrafish Lateral Line Rubel,1,2 and David W. Raible1,4 Abstract In humans, most hearing loss results from death of hair cells, the mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear. Two goals of current hearing research are to protect hair cells from

Rubel, Edwin

392

The effect of Stromal cell Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) and collagen-GAG (Glycosaminoglycan) scaffold on skin wound healing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wound healing is an intricate biological process requiring the appropriate balance of matrix and growth factors. Apart from causing physical deformity, adult wound healing results in the formation of scar tissue, which can ...

Sarkar, Aparajita

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dose profiles through the dermis for on and off-skin hot particle exposures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compared to gamma-rays. Gamma-rays are monoenergetic photons with energies ranging from a few keV to several MeV. Unlike beta particles, gamma-rays are indirectly ionizing radiation. Because a gamma-ray is uncharged, it undergoes no direct ionization... detailed data on dose profiles This thesis follows the format of Radiation Protection Dosimetry. through the dermis from fuel fragments or from mixed beta-gamma activation products. The effects of beta-emitting hot particles suspended above skin without...

Shaw, Kimberly Rochelle

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Constraining the symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of Tin isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. Using this correlation analysis to existing data on the neutron skin thickness of Sn isotopes, we find important constraints on the value E_{sym}(rho_0) and density slope L of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density. Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and double neutron/proton ratio in heavy ion collisions leads to a value of L=58\\pm 18 MeV approximately independent of E_{sym}(\\rho_0).

Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Jun Xu; Bao-An Li

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

E-Print Network 3.0 - adenocarcinoma ht-29 cells Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science 2 Int. J. Cancer: 92, 63-69 (2001) Author Version Cytostatic effect of polyethylene-glycol on human colonic adenocarcinoma cells Summary: ). In this study, we...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - adenocarcinoma caco-2 cells Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 4 Int. J. Cancer: 92, 63-69 (2001) Author Version Cytostatic effect of polyethylene-glycol on human colonic adenocarcinoma cells Summary: -confluent intestinal-liked...

397

acid-induced fibroblast cell: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STUDY OF DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS IN BYSTANDER PRIMARY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS L. B. Smilenov-or-nothing manner(7) . Bystander cells exhibit a variety of characteristics of...

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - adenocarcinoma cells induced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

further confirmed by our results with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced... cells. The comparison between murine and human adenocarcinomas was intriguing. By in situ hybridization......

399

The effect of weightlessness on cytoskeleton architecture and proliferation of human breast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was kept in a 1g centrifuge (1g in-flight control). Human breast cancer cells MCF-7, flown in space launching), cells were more fully spread in 1g in-flight control than in g. The fraction of cycling MCF-7. Finally, MCF-7 cell proliferation was reduced in g. 3. Some MCF-7 clusters showed altered microtubules (MT

Portet, Stéphanie

400

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobically-poised hepg2 cells Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a distinct manner Summary: (ERh) transfected into the human HepG2 hepatoma cell line and expanded the study in vivo to examine... -estrogen; Receptor; Bisphenol A; HepG2 cells;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mechanical stiffness-defined matrices for stem cell research and drug screening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthetic polymer matrices or subtrata with tailored elastic properties provide a powerful method to direct biological cell' differentiation and foster cell multiplication. By changing the stiffness of the substrate, human ...

Ha, Vu Nguyen Tuan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Mutations in Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Stem Cells Unmask Latent Malignancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neoplastic epithelia may remain dormant and clinically unapparent in human patients for decades. Multiple risk factors including mutations in tumor cells or the stromal cells may affect the switch from dormancy to malignancy. ...

Houghton, JeanMarie

403

Constraints on neutron skin thickness in 208Pb and density-dependent symmetry energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate knowledge about the neutron skin thickness $\\Delta R_{np}$ in $^{208}$Pb has far-reaching implications for different communities of nuclear physics and astrophysics. Yet, the novel Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) did not yield stringent constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$ recently. We employ a more practicable strategy currently to probe the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb based on a high linear correlation between the $\\Delta R_{np}$ and $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$, where $J$ and $a_{\\text{sym}}$ are the symmetry energy (coefficient) of nuclear matter at saturation density and of $^{208}$Pb. An accurate $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ thus places a strong constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$. Compared with the parity-violating asymmetry $A_{\\text{PV}}$ in the PREX, the reliably experimental information on the $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ is much more easily available attributed to a wealth of measured data on nuclear masses and on decay energies. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is also well constrained with the $J-a_{\\...

Dong, Jianmin; Gu, Jianzhong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

Skin cancer in albinos at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the human P gene in tyrosinase positive oculocutaneousJenkins T, Ramsay M. The tyrosinase positive oculocutaneousrecessive forms involves the tyrosinase gene (OCA1), whereas

Asuquo, M E; Otei, O O; Omotoso, J; Bassey, E E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE Human Resources | One Washington Square | San José, CA 95192-0046 | 408-924-2250 408-924-2284 (fax) SUBJECT: STUDENT EMPLOYMENT DATE: March 2007 I. PURPOSE / DESCRIPTION Student employees are defined as matriculated students that work part-time in any

Gleixner, Stacy

409

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

Rambaut, Andrew

410

Beliefs about Human Extinction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm[sup 3]; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6[times]10[sup 4] cm[sup 2]/g of Ni. 8 figures.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Percutaneous absorption of ( sup 14 C)DDT and ( sup 14 C)benzo(a)pyrene from soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective was to determine percutaneous absorption of DDT and benzo(a)pyrene in vitro and in vivo from soil into and through skin. Soil (Yolo County 65-California-57-8; 26% sand, 26% clay, 48% silt) was passed through 10-, 20-, and 48-mesh sieves. Soil then retained by 80-mesh was mixed with (14C)-labeled chemical at 10 ppm. Acetone solutions at 10 ppm were prepared for comparative analysis. Human cadaver skin was dermatomed to 500 microns and used in glass diffusion cells with human plasma as the receptor fluid (3 ml/hr flow rate) for a 24-hr skin application time. With acetone vehicle, DDT (18.1 +/- 13.4%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less DDT (1.0 +/- 0.7%) penetrated into human skin from soil. DDT would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). With acetone vehicle, benzo(a)pyrene (23.7 +/- 9.7%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less benzo(a)pyrene (1.4 +/- 0.9%) penetrated into human skin from soil. Benzo(a)pyrene would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). Substantivity (skin retention) was investigated by applying 14C-labeled chemical to human skin in vitro for only 25 min. After soap and water wash, 16.7 +/- 13.2% of DDT applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.25 +/- 0.11% of DDT remained absorbed to skin. After soap and water wash 5.1 +/- 2.1% of benzo(a)pyrene applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.14 +/- 0.13% of benzo(a)pyrene remained absorbed to skin.

Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Bucks, D.A.; Sedik, L.; Melendres, J.; Liao, C.; DiZio, S. (Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Highly conductive thermoplastic composites for rapid production of fuel cell bipolar plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low cost method of fabricating bipolar plates for use in fuel cells utilizes a wet lay process for combining graphite particles, thermoplastic fibers, and reinforcing fibers to produce a plurality of formable sheets. The formable sheets are then molded into a bipolar plates with features impressed therein via the molding process. The bipolar plates formed by the process have conductivity in excess of 150 S/cm and have sufficient mechanical strength to be used in fuel cells. The bipolar plates can be formed as a skin/core laminate where a second polymer material is used on the skin surface which provides for enhanced conductivity, chemical resistance, and resistance to gas permeation.

Huang, Jianhua [Blacksburg, VA; Baird, Donald G [Blacksburg, VA; McGrath, James E [Blacksburg, VA

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

414

Deformability of Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The biophysical properties of the human red blood cell (RBC) permit large deformations required for passage through narrow capillaries and spleen sinusoids. Several pathologic conditions alter RBC deformability that can ...

Mills, John Philip, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences Kyoto University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

succeeded in generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from human broblasts in November 2007. In order of November 1, 2008). Prof. Norio Nakatsuji (former director of the Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences

Takada, Shoji

416

ISSUE 1 | SPRING 2014 BRINGING CUTTING-EDGE SCIENCE INTO THE CLASSROOM UNDER YOUR SKIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more resources at www. wellcome.ac.uk/bigpicture/ proteins. inSide PROBING PROTEINS A numerical look to www.wellcome.ac.uk/bigpicture/ proteins for more teaching resources, including extra articles, useful. Mitochondrion Human egg Globular protein Uk argentina Bangladesh in human proteins are essential

Rambaut, Andrew

417

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Humanities Academic Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Humanities Academic Human Resources VOLUNTARY WORKLOAD/or Spring ____ Quarter(s) Funding Source: ________________________________________ (Salary adjustments

California at Santa Cruz, University of

418

Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits be obtained from the Public Health Agency Canada (PHAC) to facilitate customs clearance. 2) If a permit

419

Division of Human Resources Human Resources / Attendance and Leave Philosophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources PHILOSOPHY Human Resources / Attendance and Leave Philosophy Form Leave Act (FMLA). USF augments these provisions with local processes and philosophies and, in some cases

Meyers, Steven D.

420

Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Associate Vice President Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associate Vice President Human Resources Enjoy Athens! Great schools Affordable housing Eclectic Vice President for Human Resources. This position reports directly to the Vice President for Finance and Administration and provides leadership for the University's human resources programs and services

Arnold, Jonathan

422

Human Resources Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Resources Simon Fraser University Administrative and Professional Staff Job Description A. Identification Position Number: 31482 Position Title: Administrative Assistant (Human Resources Liaison) Name guidance, direction, coordination and effective management and implementation of SFU's Human Resources

Kavanagh, Karen L.

423

Special Issue on Human Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

Nijholt, Anton

424

Effect of temperature on the effective mass and the neutron skin of nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the finite temperature Hartree-Fock-BCS approximation for selected stable Sn nuclei with zero-range Skyrme forces. Hartree Fock BCS approximation allows for a straightforward interpretation of the results since it involves u and v's which are not matrices as in HFB. Pairing transitions from superfluid to the normal state are studied with respect to the temperature. The temperature dependence of the nuclear radii and neutron skin are also analyzed. An increase of proton and neutron radii is obtained in neutron rich nuclei especially above the critical temperature. Using different Skyrme energy functionals, it is found that the correlation between the effective mass in symmetric nuclear matter and the critical temperature depends on the pairing prescription. The temperature dependence of the nucleon effective mass is also investigated, showing that proton and neutron effective masses display different behavior below and above the critical temperature, due to the small temperature dependence of the density.

E. Yüksel; E. Khan; K. Bozkurt; G. Colò

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

The neutron skin in neutron-rich nuclei at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Jefferson Lab program to measure the symmetry energy of neutron-rich nuclear matter, using precision electroweak methods, is progressing well. The initial measurement by the PREX experiment, leading to a 2-sigma determination of the 'neutron skin' in {sup 208}Pb, has been published. Design and preparation for a further, more-precise measurement on {sup 208}Pb is progressing well and there is general acceptance of the great advantage to a further measurement on {sup 48}Ca. The surprising ancillary result that the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry for {sup 208}Pb is consistent with zero is also now in the literature. This paper will discuss the current experimental situation of the program.

Dalton, Mark M. [University of Virginia (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A. [Inst. of Nucl. Res. of the Hungarian Acad. of Sci. (ATOMKI), H-4001 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); and others

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

Landau damping and anomalous skin effect in low-pressure gas discharges: Self-consistent treatment of collisionless heatinga...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. This system was applied to the calculation of collisionless heating electric field anomalous skin effect . Also for inhomogeneous electric fields another mechanism of heating density profile and a Maxwellian EEDF. In the present study a self-consistent system of equations

Kaganovich, Igor

428

322 IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 37, NO. 3, MARCH 2001 Mechanism Study of Porcine Skin Ablation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, biomedical applica- tions of optical radiation, biological tissues, laser ablation, neodymium:YAG lasers identified the Na spectral line at 589 nm in the secondary radiation from the ablated skin sample, spectral analysis. I. INTRODUCTION IN THE progression of less-damaging surgical laser proce- dures

429

Proper Setup of HVAC System in Conjunction with Sound Building 'Skin' Design for Alleviation of IAQ and Energy Performance Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climates, not only because of the loss of energy, but also because of damage that can result to insulation, drywall, and structure in addition to promotion of mold and mildew growth. Proper setup of the HVAC system, in conjunction with sound building “skin...

Rosenberg, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Surgical technique, using skin, for repair of simultaneously ruptured anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments of the canine femorotibial articulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texan In Partial Fulfillnent of the !Iequireaents for the Degree Meeter of Science in Veterinary Medicine and Surgery by Janie Neal Chaetain January 1&359 SURGICAL TECHNI((UE ~ USIN'G SKIN ~ FOR REPAIR...

Chastain, Jamie Neal

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Viscoelastic Analysis of Sandwich Beams Having Aluminum and Fiber-reinforced Polymer Skins with a Polystyrene Foam Core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sandwich beams are composite systems having high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios and are used as light weight load bearing components. The use of thin, strong skin sheets adhered to thicker, lightweight core materials has allowed...

Roberts-Tompkins, Altramese L.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

Human Reliability | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Reliability SHARE Human Reliability The Structured Trusted Employee Program (STEP) Evaluation is an example of a method for identifying, assessing, and retaining reliable and...

433

Human Reliability Program Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

Bodin, Michael

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

434

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Human Resource Management Delegation  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The notice is to clarifies and updates existing Human Resource Management Delegation Authorities and the levels to which they are delegated. Expired 6-28-97. Does not cancel any directives.

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE Workforce Planning | One Washington Square | San José of the Request for Temporary Support, Workforce Planning will make a determination of the type of temporary

Su, Xiao

439

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

440

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved secondary electrochemical cell is disclosed having a negative electrode of lithium aluminum, a positive electrode of iron sulfide, a molten electrolyte of lithium chloride and potassium chloride, and the combination that the fully charged theoretical capacity of the negative electrode is in the range of 0.5-1.0 that of the positive electrode. The cell thus is negative electrode limiting during discharge cycling. Preferably, the negative electrode contains therein, in the approximate range of 1-10 volume % of the electrode, an additive from the materials of graphitized carbon, aluminum-iron alloy, and/or magnesium oxide.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human skin cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The immunology of Human cytomegalovirus latency: could latent infection be cleared by novel immunotherapeutic strategies?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Wilkinson GW, Tomasec P, Stanton RJ, Armstrong M, Prod'homme V, Aicheler R, et al. Modulation of natural killer cells by human cytomegalovirus. Journal of clinical virology : the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology. 2008...

Wills, M. R.; Poole, Emma; Lau, Betty; Krishna, Ben; Sinclair, John

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

442

Stability, unfolding, and aggregation of the gamma D and gamma S human eye lens crystallins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transparency of the human eye lens depends on the properties of the a- crystallin and py-crystallin families of proteins, which accumulate to very high concentrations in mature lens fiber cells. The 0- and y-crystallins ...

Mills-Henry, Ishara Amenti Rakem

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Systematic dissection of regulatory motifs in 2000 predicted human enhancers using a massively parallel reporter assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome-wide chromatin annotations have permitted the mapping of putative regulatory elements across multiple human cell types. However, their experimental dissection by directed regulatory motif disruption has remained ...

Kheradpour, Pouya

444

Developing Human Performance Measures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human pe