National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for human remains process

  1. Hand-Held Analyzer Quickly Detects Buried Human Remains - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hand-Held Analyzer Quickly Detects Buried Human Remains Oak Ridge National Laboratory ... and auditory cues to quickly alert investigators to the presence of buried human remains. ...

  2. UC 9-8-309 - Human Remains | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9 - Human Remains Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: UC 9-8-309 - Human RemainsLegal Abstract Governs discovery of...

  3. RCW - 68.50 Human Remains | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    68.50 Human Remains Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: RCW - 68.50 Human RemainsLegal Published NA Year...

  4. Decontamination and Management of Human Remains Following Incidents of Hazardous Chemical Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauschild, Veronique; Watson, Annetta Paule; Bock, Robert Eldon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide specific procedural guidance and resources for identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of compounds that may contaminate human remains resulting from chemical attack or release. Design: A detailed technical, policy, and regulatory review is summarized. Setting: Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present. Settings would include sites of transportation accidents, natural disasters, terrorist or military operations, mortuary affairs or medical examiner processing and decontamination points, and similar. Patients, Participants: While recommended procedures have not been validated with actual human remains, guidance has been developed from data characterizing controlled experiments with fabrics, materiel, and laboratory animals. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presentation of logic and specific procedures for remains management, protection and decontamination of mortuary affairs personnel, as well as decision criteria for determining when remains are sufficiently decontaminated so as to pose no chemical health hazard. Results: Established procedures and existing equipment/materiel available for decontamination and verification provide appropriate and reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from remains. Extensive characterization of issues related to remains decontamination indicates that supra-lethal concentrations of liquid chemical warfare agent VX may prove difficult to decontaminate and verify in a timely fashion. Specialized personnel can and should be called upon to assist with monitoring necessary to clear decontaminated remains for transport and processing. Conclusions: Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for remains processing and transport to the decedent s family and the continental United States can be followed.

  5. Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Medical ExaminerCoroner on the Handling of a BodyHuman Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Medical ExaminerCoroner on the Handling of a BodyHuman Remains ...

  6. MCA 22-3-801 - Human Skeletal Remains and Burial Site Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    22-3-801 - Human Skeletal Remains and Burial Site Protection Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: MCA 22-3-801 -...

  7. Enhanced Contaminated Human Remains Pouch: initial development and preliminary performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iseli, A.M.; Kwen, H.D.; Ul-Alam, M.; Balasubramanian, M.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2011-11-07

    The objective is to produce a proof of concept prototype Enhanced Contaminated Human Remains Pouch (ECHRP) with self-decontamination capability to provide increased protection to emergency response personnel. The key objective was to decrease the concentration of toxic chemicals through the use of an absorbent and reactive nanocellulose liner. Additionally, nanomaterials with biocidal properties were developed and tested as a 'stand-alone' treatment. The setting was a private company research laboratory. The main outcome measures were production of a functional prototype. A functional prototype capable of mitigating the threats due to sulfur mustard, Soman, and a large variety of liquid and vapor toxic industrial chemicals was produced. Stand-alone biocidal treatment efficacy was validated. The ECHRP provides superior protection from both chemical and biological hazards to various emergency response personnel and human remains handlers.

  8. Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Model Procedure is to identify precautions and provide guidance to Medical Examiners/Coroners on the handling of a body or human remains that are potentially contaminated with...

  9. Three-dimensional Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells Remains Unchanged by X-ray and Carbon Ion Irradiation In Vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eke, Iris; Storch, Katja; Kaestner, Ina; Vehlow, Anne; Faethe, Christina; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Temme, Achim; Schackert, Gabriele; Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Cell invasion represents one of the major determinants that treatment has failed for patients suffering from glioblastoma. Contrary findings have been reported for cell migration upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, the migration and invasion capability of glioblastoma cells on and in collagen type I were evaluated upon irradiation with X-rays or carbon ions. Methods and Materials: Migration on and invasion in collagen type I were evaluated in four established human glioblastoma cell lines exposed to either X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, clonogenic radiation survival, proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine positivity), DNA double-strand breaks ({gamma}H2AX/53BP1-positive foci), and expression of invasion-relevant proteins (eg, {beta}1 integrin, FAK, MMP2, and MMP9) were explored. Migration and invasion assays for primary glioblastoma cells also were carried out with X-ray irradiation. Results: Neither X-ray nor carbon ion irradiation affected glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, a finding similarly observed in primary glioblastoma cells. Intriguingly, irradiated cells migrated unhampered, despite DNA double-strand breaks and reduced proliferation. Clonogenic radiation survival was increased when cells had contact with extracellular matrix. Specific inhibition of the {beta}1 integrin or proliferation-associated signaling molecules revealed a critical function of JNK, PI3K, and p38 MAPK in glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: These findings indicate that X-rays and carbon ion irradiation effectively reduce proliferation and clonogenic survival without modifying the migration and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells in a collagen type I environment. Addition of targeted agents against members of the MAPK and PI3K signaling axis to conventional chemoradiation therapy seems potentially useful to optimize glioblastoma therapy.

  10. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J..M.

    1996-08-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls.

  11. Remaining Challenges: Flicker

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Naomi J. Miller, FIES, FIALD November 2015 DesignerSenior Staff Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Remaining Challenges: Flicker DOE SSL Workshop - Portland OR Dr....

  12. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:12, 1.8-m (72-in.) Main Process Sewer Pipeline, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-034

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-04-29

    The 100-F-26:12 waste site was an approximately 308-m-long, 1.8-m-diameter east-west-trending reinforced concrete pipe that joined the North Process Sewer Pipelines (100-F-26:1) and the South Process Pipelines (100-F-26:4) with the 1.8-m reactor cooling water effluent pipeline (100-F-19). In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  13. Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From Acquisition Letter (Acquisition Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued Als have been superseded by a formal rule-making, incorporated into other guidance, and/or canceled.)

  14. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.

  15. Diesel prices remain fairly stable

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Diesel prices remain fairly stable The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel slightly fell to $3.85 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the New England region at 3.99 a gallon, down 7-tenths of a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Gulf Coast region at 3.74 a gallon, down 2.2 cents

  16. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutationmore » rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.« less

  17. Los Alamos supercomputer remains fastest in world

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputer remains fastest in world Los Alamos supercomputer remains fastest in world The latest list of the TOP500 computers in the world continued to place the Roadrunner supercomputer as fastest in the world running the LINPACK benchmark. November 18, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  18. The integration of Human Factors (HF) in the SAR process training course text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, T.G.

    1995-03-01

    This text provides the technical basis for a two-day course on human factors (HF), as applied to the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) process. The overall objective of this text and course is to: provide the participant with a working knowledge of human factors-related requirements, suggestions for doing a human safety analysis applying a graded approach, and an ability to demonstrate using the results of the human safety analysis, that human factors elements as defined by DOE (human factors engineering, procedures, training, oversight, staffing, qualifications), can support wherever necessary, nuclear safety commitments in the SAR. More specifically, the objectives of the text and course are: (1) To provide the SAR preparer with general guidelines for doing HE within the context of a graded approach for the SAR; (2) To sensitize DOE facility managers and staff, safety analysts and SAR preparers, independent reviewers, and DOE reviewers and regulators, to DOE Order 5480.23 requirements for HE in the SAR; (3) To provide managers, analysts, reviewers and regulators with a working knowledge of HE concepts and techniques within the context of a graded approach for the SAR, and (4) To provide SAR managers and DOE reviewers and regulators with general guidelines for monitoring and coordinating the work of preparers of HE inputs throughout the SAR process, and for making decisions regarding the safety relevance of HE inputs to the SAR. As a ready reference for implementing the human factors requirements of DOE Order 5480.22 and DOE Standard 3009-94, this course text and accompanying two-day course are intended for all persons who are involved in the SAR.

  19. A Framework for Geometric Reasoning About Human Figures and Factors in Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calton, Terri L.

    1999-07-20

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be perfectly valid operations, but in reality some operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. For example, the use of a ratchet may be reasoned feasible for an assembly operation; however, when a hand is placed on the tool the operation is no longer feasible, perhaps because of inaccessibility, insufficient strength or human interference with assembly components. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications, however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem, HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning which allows engineers to quickly verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. This paper presents a framework for integrating geometry-based assembly planning algorithms with commercially available human figure modeling software packages. Experimental results to selected applications along with lessons learned are presented.

  20. AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT Acquisition Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other...

  1. AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT Acquisition Letters (AL)...

  2. Acquisition Letters Remaining in Effect | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Effect Acquisition Letters Remaining in Effect PF2009-40.pdf (768.41 KB) PF2009-40a - Attachment-Acquisition Letter 2009-06 - Acquisition Letters Remaining in Effect (133.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect AL2007-05.doc� Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect

  3. A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Measurement and Verification Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: ...

  4. Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its field sites donated 53,630 pounds - or 27 tons - of non-perishable items to a

  5. Autophagy is the predominant process induced by arsenite in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Byrd, Randi M.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is a widespread environmental toxicant with a diverse array of molecular targets and associated diseases, making the identification of the critical mechanisms and pathways of arsenic-induced cytotoxicity a challenge. In a variety of experimental models, over a range of arsenic exposure levels, apoptosis is a commonly identified arsenic-induced cytotoxic pathway. Human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) have been used as a model system in arsenic toxicology for many years, but the exact mechanism of arsenic-induced cytotoxicity in LCL is still unknown. We investigated the cytotoxicity of sodium arsenite in LCL 18564 using a set of complementary markers for cell death pathways. Markers indicative of apoptosis (phosphatidylserine externalization, PARP cleavage, and sensitivity to caspase inhibition) were uniformly negative in arsenite exposed cells. Interestingly, electron microscopy, acidic vesicle fluorescence, and expression of LC3 in LCL 18564 identified autophagy as an arsenite-induced process that was associated with cytotoxicity. Autophagy, a cellular programmed response that is associated with both cellular stress adaptation as well as cell death appears to be the predominant process in LCL cytotoxicity induced by arsenite. It is unclear, however, whether LCL autophagy is an effector mechanism of arsenite cytotoxicity or alternatively a cellular compensatory mechanism. The ability of arsenite to induce autophagy in lymphoblastoid cell lines introduces a potentially novel mechanistic explanation of the well-characterized in vitro and in vivo toxicity of arsenic to lymphoid cells.

  6. 2013-07 "Realign Remaining Milestones in the Consent Order" | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 7 "Realign Remaining Milestones in the Consent Order" 2013-07 "Realign Remaining Milestones in the Consent Order" It is the intent of this NNMCAB recommendation to encourage LANL to review all remaining tasks of the Consent Order and formulate a "Path Forward" for completion of these tasks in a manner which is both timely and most protective of human health and environment. This Path Forward shall be presented to the NNMCAB, NMED and public for comment,

  7. U.S. gasoline prices remain steady (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    average retail price for regular gasoline remained unchanged this week at 2.78 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  8. ORISE: Study finds foreign doctorate recipients' stay rates remain...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States remains high No evidence that visa restrictions are reducing stay rates, according to report FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jan. 18, 2012 FY12-12 OAK RIDGE,...

  9. U.S. diesel fuel price remains stable

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    diesel fuel price remains stable The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel remained unchanged from a week ago at $2.43 a gallon on Monday. That's based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the West Coast states at 2.71 a gallon, up 7-tenths of a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Gulf Coast states at 2.29 a gallon, down 1.1 cents. This is Amerine Woodyard

  10. NNSA Partnership Successfully Removes All Remaining HEU from Uzbekistan |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Partnership Successfully Removes All Remaining HEU from Uzbekistan September 29, 2015 WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced the successful return of the final 5 kilograms (approximately 11 pounds) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the IIN-3M "Foton" research reactor in Tashkent, Uzbekistan to Russia. This is the eighth shipment of HEU from

  11. United States Collaborates with Switzerland to Remove Last Remaining

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Separated Plutonium | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) United States Collaborates with Switzerland to Remove Last Remaining Separated Plutonium March 03, 2016 (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), working in collaboration with the Government of Switzerland, announced that approximately 20 kilograms of separated plutonium have been transported from Switzerland to the United States. The successful transport of this

  12. Belarus ratifies START I pact; Ukraine remains last holdout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockwood, D.

    1993-03-01

    The Belarus Parliment ratified START I by a vote of 218 to 1 on February 4, 1993. The Parliment also voted to accede to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty as a non-nuclear weapon state. The Parliment also passed two companion accords with Russia to coordinate the withdrawal of the ICBMs now in Belarus and to define the legal states of those weapons. Ukraine remains the only party to START I that has not yet approved the treaty.

  13. U.S. diesel fuel prices remain stable

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    diesel fuel prices remain stable The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell 6-tenths of a penny to $2.12 a gallon on Monday. That's based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the West Coast states at 2.32 a gallon, up 2-tenths of a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Gulf Coast states at 1.98 a gallon, down 1.8 cents. This is Amerine Woodyard

  14. Oil and gas resources remaining in the Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In this book the authors present a reevaluation of the oil and gas resource base remaining in existing Permian Basin reservoirs. The Permian Basin is one of the nation's premier sources of oil production, accounting for almost one quarter of the total domestic oil resource. The distribution and magnitude of oil and gas resources discovered in the basin are documented at the play and reservoir levels. Data on reservoir geology and volumetric analysis come from the oil and gas atlases published by the Bureau of Economic Geology, the Bureau's oil-reservoir data base, and NRG Associates Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the United States.

  15. Analysis of solids remaining following chemical cleaning in tank 6F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, Michael R.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Missimer, David M.; Summer, Michael E.; Fink, Samuel D.

    2010-02-05

    Following chemical cleaning, a solid sample was collected and submitted to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. SRNL analyzed this sample by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the composition of the solids remaining in Tank 6F and to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process.

  16. Hydrogen effect on remaining life of hydroprocessing reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwadate, T.; Nomura, T.; Watanabe, J.

    1988-02-01

    Old vintage 2.25Cr-1Mo steels used for high-temperature/pressure hydroprocessing reactors have a high potential for temper embrittlement. The cracks caused by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) have been experienced in a stainless steel overlay and base metal of hydroprocessing reactors. In this paper, the temper embrittlement behavior during long-term service is discussed using the results of isothermal temper embrittlement tests up to 30,000 h of exposure. HE susceptibility of base metals, i.e., the threshold stress intensity factor K/sub IH/ and hydrogen-assisted crack growth rate behavior are also discussed. Based on the experimental data obtained, the remaining life assessment of a 2.25Cr-1Mo steel hydroprocessing reactor is analyzed from knowledge of HE.

  17. A Prototyping Environment for Research on Human-Machine Interfaces in Process Control: Use of Microsoft WPF for Microworld and Distributed Control System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Thomas A. Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    Operators of critical processes, such as nuclear power production, must contend with highly complex systems, procedures, and regulations. Developing human-machine interfaces (HMIs) that better support operators is a high priority for ensuring the safe and reliable operation of critical processes. Human factors engineering (HFE) provides a rich and mature set of tools for evaluating the performance of HMIs, but the set of tools for developing and designing HMIs is still in its infancy. Here we propose that Microsoft Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is well suited for many roles in the research and development of HMIs for process control.

  18. mir-30d Regulates multiple genes in the autophagy pathway and impairs autophagy process in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaojun; Department of General Surgery, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou, Gansu 710000 ; Zhong, Xiaomin; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine Related Diseases, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200011 ; Tanyi, Janos L.; Shen, Jianfeng; Xu, Congjian; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Tim M.; DeMichele, Angela; Zhang, Lin

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ? Gene set enrichment analysis indicated mir-30d might regulate the autophagy pathway. ? mir-30d represses the expression of BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2. ? BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2 are direct targets of mir-30d. ? mir-30d inhibits autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. ? mir-30d regulates the autophagy process. -- Abstract: In human epithelial cancers, the microRNA (miRNA) mir-30d is amplified with high frequency and serves as a critical oncomir by regulating metastasis, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. Autophagy, a degradation pathway for long-lived protein and organelles, regulates the survival and death of many cell types. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagy plays an important function in epithelial tumor initiation and progression. Using a combined bioinformatics approach, gene set enrichment analysis, and miRNA target prediction, we found that mir-30d might regulate multiple genes in the autophagy pathway including BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5, and ATG2. Our further functional experiments demonstrated that the expression of these core proteins in the autophagy pathway was directly suppressed by mir-30d in cancer cells. Finally, we showed that mir-30d regulated the autophagy process by inhibiting autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the oncomir mir-30d impairs the autophagy process by targeting multiple genes in the autophagy pathway. This result will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of mir-30d in tumorigenesis and developing novel cancer therapy strategy.

  19. Prognostication of LED Remaining Useful Life and Color Stability in the Presence of Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lall, Pradeep; Zang, Hao; Davis, J Lynn

    2015-06-22

    The reliability of LED products may be affected by both luminous flux drop and color shift. Previous research on the topic focuses on either luminous maintenance or color shift. However, luminous flux degradation usually takes very long time to observe in LEDs under normal operating conditions. In this paper, the impact of a VOC (volatile organic compound) contaminated luminous flux and color stability are examined. As a result, both luminous degradation and color shift had been recorded in a short time. Test samples are white, phosphorconverted, high-power LED packages. Absolute radiant flux is measured with integrating sphere system to calculate the luminous flux. Luminous flux degradation and color shift distance were plotted versus aging time to show the degradation pattern. A prognostic health management (PHM) method based on the state variables and state estimator have been proposed in this paper. In this PHM framework, unscented kalman filter (UKF) was deployed as the carrier of all states. During the estimation process, third order dynamic transfer function was used to implement the PHM framework. Both of the luminous flux and color shift distance have been used as the state variable with the same PHM framework to exam the robustness of the method. Predicted remaining useful life is calculated at every measurement point to compare with the tested remaining useful life. The result shows that state estimator can be used as the method for the PHM of LED degradation with respect to both luminous flux and color shift distance. The prediction of remaining useful life of LED package, made by the states estimator and data driven approach, falls in the acceptable errorbounds (20%) after a short training of the estimator.

  20. UC 9-9-403 - Native American Remains | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9-403 - Native American Remains Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: UC 9-9-403 - Native American RemainsLegal...

  1. UC 9-9-405 - Native American Remains Review | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 - Native American Remains Review Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: UC 9-9-405 - Native American Remains...

  2. Microsoft Word - AL 2010-07 Acquistion Letters Remaining in Effect...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010-07 Acquistion Letters Remaining in Effect May 2010 revision 1 June 2010 Microsoft Word - AL 2010-07 Acquistion Letters Remaining in Effect May 2010 revision 1 June 2010...

  3. Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry ...

  4. Recommendation 215: Recommendation on Remaining Legacy Materials on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board approved the enclosed recommendation on remaining legacy materials on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  5. Mutation allele burden remains unchanged in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia responding to hypomethylating agents

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Merlevede, Jane; Droin, Nathalie; Qin, Tingting; Meldi, Kristen; Yoshida, Kenichi; Morabito, Margot; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Fenaux, Pierre; Braun, Thorsten; et al

    2016-02-24

    The cytidine analogues azacytidine and 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (decitabine) are commonly used to treat myelodysplastic syndromes, with or without a myeloproliferative component. It remains unclear whether the response to these hypomethylating agents results from a cytotoxic or an epigenetic effect. In this study, we address this question in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We describe a comprehensive analysis of the mutational landscape of these tumours, combining whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing. We identify an average of 14 ± 5 somatic mutations in coding sequences of sorted monocyte DNA and the signatures of three mutational processes. Serial sequencing demonstrates that the response to hypomethylating agents ismore » associated with changes in DNA methylation and gene expression, without any decrease in the mutation allele burden, nor prevention of new genetic alteration occurence. Lastly, our findings indicate that cytosine analogues restore a balanced haematopoiesis without decreasing the size of the mutated clone, arguing for a predominantly epigenetic effect.« less

  6. Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Company Industry | Department of Energy Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry "This report contains information on Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program."

  7. Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Company Industry | Department of Energy Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry The study analyzes the size, growth and trends in the U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry, drawing on information provided by industry executives and experts in 2012. The report also provides a preliminary estimate of remaining investment potential and annual blended

  8. Analysis of long-term impacts of TRU waste remaining at generator/storage sites for No Action Alternative 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, J.W.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Bergeron, M.P.; Streile, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    This report is a supplement to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal-Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II). Described herein are the underlying information, data, and assumptions used to estimate the long-term human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at major generator/storage sites after loss of institutional control under No Action Alternative 2. Under No Action Alternative 2, TRU wastes would not be emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) but would remain at generator/storage sites in surface or near-surface storage. Waste generated at smaller sites would be consolidated at the major generator/storage sites. Current TRU waste management practices would continue, but newly generated waste would be treated to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. For this alternative, institutional control was assumed to be lost 100 years after the end of the waste generation period, with exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in the TRU waste possible from direct intrusion and release to the surrounding environment. The potential human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in TRU waste were analyzed for two different types of scenarios. Both analyses estimated site-specific, human-health impacts at seven major generator/storage sites: the Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The analysis focused on these seven sites because 99 % of the estimated TRU waste volume and inventory would remain there under the assumptions of No Action Alternative 2.

  9. Severe Weather Update: JLab Remains in HPC-2 for Nor'easter ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Severe Weather Update: JLab Remains in HPC-2 for Nor'easter & Hurricane Jefferson Lab's Emergency Management Severe Weather Team continues monitoring the forecasts and conditions...

  10. Massively parallel processing on the Intel Paragon system: One tool in achieving the goals of the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecklund, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    A massively parallel computing system is one tool that has been adopted by researchers in the Human Genome Project. This tool is one of many in a toolbox of theories, algorithms, and systems that are used to attack the many questions posed by the project. A good tool functions well when applied alone to the problem for which it was devised. A superior tool achieves its solitary goal, and supports and interacts with other tools to achieve goals beyond the scope of any individual tool. The author believes that Intel`s massively parallel Paragon{trademark} XP/S system is a superior tool. This paper presents specific requirements for a superior computing tool for the Human Genome Project (HGP) and shows how the Paragon system addresses these requirements. Computing requirements for HGP are based on three factors: (1) computing requirements of algorithms currently used in sequence homology, protein folding, and database insertion/retrieval; (2) estimates of the computing requirements of new applications arising from evolving biological theories; and (3) the requirements for facilities that support collaboration among scientists in a project of this magnitude. The Paragon system provides many hardware and software features that effectively address these requirements.

  11. An Integrated Site-Wide Assessment of Nuclear Wastes to Remain at the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, J.G.; Bryce, R.W.; Hildebrand, R.D.; Kincaid, C.T.

    2004-10-06

    Since its creation in 1943 until 1988, the Hanford Site, a facility in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex was dedicated to the production of weapons grade plutonium and other special nuclear materials. The Hanford Site is located in eastern Washington State and is bordered on the north and east by the Columbia River. Decades of creating fuel, irradiating it in reactors, and processing it to recover nuclear material left numerous waste sites that involved the discharge of contaminated liquids and the disposal of contaminated solid waste. Today, the primary mission of the Hanford Site is to safely cleanup and manage the site's legacy waste. A site-wide risk assessment methodology has been developed to assist the DOE, as well as state and federal regulatory agencies, in making decisions regarding needed remedial actions at past waste sites, and safe disposal of future wastes. The methodology, referred to as the System Assessment Capability (SAC), utilizes an integrated set of models that track potential contaminants from inventory through vadose zone, groundwater, Columbia River and air pathways to human and ecological receptors.

  12. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  13. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-19

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  14. Italy makes U-turn on nuclear power, but hurdles remain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-15

    A consortium consisting of ENEL and EDF in partnership with others including Edison, a major generator, and possibly a number of heavy industrial electricity users could invest in nuclear plants. But many technical, political, regulatory, and financial hurdles remain.

  15. WPN 10-5: Grantee Performance Required to Release the Hold on Remaining 50%

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Obligated Funds under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 | Department of Energy 0-5: Grantee Performance Required to Release the Hold on Remaining 50% of Obligated Funds under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 WPN 10-5: Grantee Performance Required to Release the Hold on Remaining 50% of Obligated Funds under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Archived 09/30/15, ARRA Completion Provides guidance to Grantees under the Weatherization

  16. White House: D'Agostino To Remain as NNSA Administrator | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy House: D'Agostino To Remain as NNSA Administrator White House: D'Agostino To Remain as NNSA Administrator September 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, President Barack Obama announced that Thomas Paul D'Agostino, Under Secretary for Nuclear Security of the Department of Energy and Administrator for Nuclear Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, will continue serving in his current role. The following is a quote from the President included in today's

  17. A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential | Department of Energy A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required "Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response." The Implementation Proposal was for FERC's June 2010

  18. Energy Department Issues Remaining $1.8 Billion in Loan Guarantees for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vogtle Advanced Nuclear Energy Project | Department of Energy Issues Remaining $1.8 Billion in Loan Guarantees for Vogtle Advanced Nuclear Energy Project Energy Department Issues Remaining $1.8 Billion in Loan Guarantees for Vogtle Advanced Nuclear Energy Project June 24, 2015 - 9:20am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 To further support the construction of two advanced nuclear reactors at the Alvin W. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, the Department of Energy announced today it will

  19. Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating season Despite the jump in natural gas use to meet heating demand during the recent winter storm that walloped the East Coast, total U.S. natural gas inventories remain near 3 trillion cubic feet. That's about 20 percent higher than at this time last year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said that by the end of the winter heating season at the close of March, it expects natural gas inventories

  20. Evaluation of remaining life of the double-shell tank waste systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwenk, E.B.

    1995-05-04

    A remaining life assessment of the DSTs (double-shell tanks) and their associated waste transfer lines, for continued operation over the next 10 years, was favorable. The DST assessment was based on definition of significant loads, evaluation of data for possible material degradation and geometric changes and evaluation of structural analyses. The piping assessment was based primarily on service experience.

  1. Grantee Performance Required to Release the Hold on Remaining 50% of Obligated Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization Assistance Program Notice 10-05 deals with performance requirements for program grantees„states and U.S. territories„to receive the remaining 50% of obligated funds under the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act.

  2. Method and apparatus to predict the remaining service life of an operating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Kangas, Lars J.; Terrones, Kristine M.; Maynard, Melody A.; Pawlowski, Ronald A. , Ferryman; Thomas A.; Skorpik, James R.; Wilson, Bary W.

    2008-11-25

    A method and computer-based apparatus for monitoring the degradation of, predicting the remaining service life of, and/or planning maintenance for, an operating system are disclosed. Diagnostic information on degradation of the operating system is obtained through measurement of one or more performance characteristics by one or more sensors onboard and/or proximate the operating system. Though not required, it is preferred that the sensor data are validated to improve the accuracy and reliability of the service life predictions. The condition or degree of degradation of the operating system is presented to a user by way of one or more calculated, numeric degradation figures of merit that are trended against one or more independent variables using one or more mathematical techniques. Furthermore, more than one trendline and uncertainty interval may be generated for a given degradation figure of merit/independent variable data set. The trendline(s) and uncertainty interval(s) are subsequently compared to one or more degradation figure of merit thresholds to predict the remaining service life of the operating system. The present invention enables multiple mathematical approaches in determining which trendline(s) to use to provide the best estimate of the remaining service life.

  3. Liquid ash corrosion, remaining life estimation and superheater/reheater replacement strategy in coal fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alice, J.A.; Janiszewski, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid ash corrosion of superheater and reheater tubing in coal fired boilers is commonly accepted to be caused by the action of liquid sodium and potassium iron trisulfates Na/sub 3/Fe(SO/sub 4/) and K/sub 3/Fe(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/. These species melt at temperatures between 1030/sup 0/F and 1160/sup 0/F (555-625/sup 0/C) depending on the relative amounts of sodium and potassium. Rapid tube wastage begins when the tube metal temperature reaches the trisulfate melting point. The key to improved availability in fossil boilers is to identify and replace, during a planned outage, tubes which are likely to fail before the next planned outage. The authors have developed a computerized method for estimating the remaining life of superheater/reheater tubes based on accelerated liquid ash corrosion. The scheme of analysis employs the following logic: (1) measurement of tube wastage from several removed samples, (2) estimation of tube metal temperature from I.D. scale thickness and thermocouple data, (3) estimation of trisulfate melting point from chemical analysis of the ash deposit and (4) using the computer model to calculate remaining life as a function of tube wastage rate metal temperature. The practical application of this strategy is presented for a coal fired boiler in the GPU system.

  4. Human-machine interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  5. Neutron measurements of the fuel remaining in the TMI II once-through steam generators (OTSG'S)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geelhood, B.D.; Abel, K.H.

    1989-02-01

    Polypropylene tubes containing a string of 18 copper rods were inserted into the lower head region and each J-leg of the two once-through steam generators (OTSG) of the unit two reactor at Three Mile Island. The object was to measure the neutron flux present in those regions and estimate the amount of residual fuel remaining in each OTSG. The neutron flux from any residual fuel induces a radioisotope, /sup 64/Cu, in the copper coupons. The /sup 64/Cu activity is detected by coincidence counting the two 511-keV gamma rays produced by the annihilation of the positron emitted in the decay of /sup 64/Cu. The copper coupons were placed between two 6-inch diameter, 6-inch long NaI(Tl) crystals and the electronics produced a coincidence count whenever the two gamma rays were uniquely detected. The net coincidence count is proportional to the amount of /sup 64/Cu activity in the coupon. This document discusses calculation methods, statistical methods, and results of this research. 3 figs., 30 tabs.

  6. Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants – Interim Study FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Pardini, Allan F.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Jones, Anthony M.

    2013-09-27

    The most important criterion for cable performance is its ability to withstand a design-basis accident. With nearly 1000 km of power, control, instrumentation, and other cables typically found in an NPP, it would be a significant undertaking to inspect all of the cables. Degradation of the cable jacket, electrical insulation, and other cable components is a key issue that is likely to affect the ability of the currently installed cables to operate safely and reliably for another 20 to 40 years beyond the initial operating life. The development of one or more nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and supporting models that could assist in determining the remaining life expectancy of cables or their current degradation state would be of significant interest. The ability to nondestructively determine material and electrical properties of cable jackets and insulation without disturbing the cables or connections has been deemed essential. Currently, the only technique accepted by industry to measure cable elasticity (the gold standard for determining cable insulation degradation) is the indentation measurement. All other NDE techniques are used to find flaws in the cable and do not provide information to determine the current health or life expectancy. There is no single NDE technique that can satisfy all of the requirements needed for making a life-expectancy determination, but a wide range of methods have been evaluated for use in NPPs as part of a continuous evaluation program. The commonly used methods are indentation and visual inspection, but these are only suitable for easily accessible cables. Several NDE methodologies using electrical techniques are in use today for flaw detection but there are none that can predict the life of a cable. There are, however, several physical and chemical ptoperty changes in cable insulation as a result of thermal and radiation damage. In principle, these properties may be targets for advanced NDE methods to provide early

  7. Report for Westinghouse Hanford Company: Makeup procedures and characterization data for modified DSSF and modified remaining inventory simulated tank waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    The majority of defense wastes generated from reprocessing spent reactor fuel at Hanford are stored in underground Double-Shell Tanks (DST) and in older Single-Shell Tanks (SST). The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program has the responsibility of safely managing and immobilizing these tank wastes for disposal. A reference process flowsheet is being developed that includes waste retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification. Melter technologies for vitrifying low-level tank wastes are being evaluated by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Chemical simulants are being used in the technology testing. For the first phase of low-level waste (LLW) vitrification simulant development, two waste stream compositions were investigated. The first waste simulant was based on the analyses of six tanks of double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) waste and on the projected composition of the wastes exiting the pretreatment operations. A simulant normalized to 6 M sodium was based on the anticipated chemical concentrations after ion exchange and initial separations. The same simulant concentrated to 10 M sodium would represent a waste that had been concentrated by evaporation to reduce the overall volume. The second LLW simulant, referred to as the remaining inventory (RI), included wastes not included in the DSSF tanks and the projected LLW fraction of single-shell tank wastes.

  8. Semisolid Metal Processing Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apelian,Diran

    2002-01-10

    Mathematical modeling and simulations of semisolid filling processes remains a critical issue in understanding and optimizing the process. Semisolid slurries are non-Newtonian materials that exhibit complex rheological behavior. There the way these slurries flow in cavities is very different from the way liquid in classical casting fills cavities. Actually filling in semisolid processing is often counter intuitive

  9. An overview of remaining life assessment methods for high temperature components operating in the power and petrochemical industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, C.J.; Townsend, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    The capability to assess the secure remaining life of components operating in the creep range, thereby assuring integrity between inspection intervals, has become a major factor in the economic operation of power and petrochemical plant which has passed the original design life, frequently by a considerable margin. An overview is given of the nature of remaining life assessment and examples given of methods developed for headers, seam-welded pipe and fired heaters. The more common problems associated with weldments are also reviewed.

  10. Microsoft Word - AL 2010-07 Acquistion Letters Remaining in Effect May 2010 revision 1 June 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    No. AL 2010-07 Rev. 1 Acquisition Regulation Date 06/01/2010 ACQUISITION LETTER This Acquisition Letter is issued under the authority of the DOE and NNSA Senior Procurement Executives. Acquisition Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued ALs have been superseded by a formal rule-making, incorporated into other guidance, and/or canceled. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT NUMBER DATE SUBJECT 93-4 04/07/1993 Displaced

  11. Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion, autocrine regulation of STAT3 signaling, and miR-21 expression, processes involved in the EMT and malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan; Ling, Min; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Liang, Xiao; Jiang, Rongrong; Wang, Bairu; Bian, Qian; Liu, Qizhan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenite is an established human carcinogen, and arsenite-induced inflammation contributes to malignant transformation of cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which cancers are produced remain to be established. The present results showed that, evoked by arsenite, secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, led to the activation of STAT3, a transcription activator, and to increased levels of a microRNA, miR-21. Blocking IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced miR-21 expression. For human bronchial epithelial cells, cultured in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody for 3 days, the arsenite-induced EMT and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates miR-21in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT induced by arsenite. These data define a link from inflammation to EMT in the arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for arsenite-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion. IL-6 autocrine mediates STAT3 signaling and up-regulates miR-21expression. Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced EMT.

  12. Apparatus for determining past-service conditions and remaining life of thermal barrier coatings and components having such coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok Mani; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Devitt, John William; Ruud, James Anthony; Brewer, Luke Nathaniel

    2004-05-04

    An apparatus for determining past-service conditions and/or remaining useful life of a component of a combustion engine and/or a thermal barrier coating ("TBC") of the component comprises a radiation source that provides the exciting radiation to the TBC to excite a photoluminescent ("PL") material contained therein, a radiation detector for detecting radiation emitted by the PL material, and means for relating a characteristic of an emission spectrum of the PL material to the amount of a crystalline phase in the TBC, thereby inferring the past-service conditions or the remaining useful life of the component or the TBC.

  13. Implementation of Remaining Useful Lifetime Transformer Models in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Lybeck, Nancy J.; Pham, Binh; Rusaw, Richard; Bickford, Randall

    2015-02-01

    Research and development efforts are required to address aging and reliability concerns of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants. As most plants continue to operate beyond the license life (i.e., towards 60 or 80 years), plant components are more likely to incur age-related degradation mechanisms. To assess and manage the health of aging plant assets across the nuclear industry, the Electric Power Research Institute has developed a web-based Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite for diagnosis and prognosis. FW-PHM is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases, comprised of the Diagnostic Advisor, the Asset Fault Signature Database, the Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and the Remaining Useful Life Database, that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The main focus of this paper is the implementation of prognostic models for generator step-up transformers in the FW-PHM Suite. One prognostic model discussed is based on the functional relationship between degree of polymerization, (the most commonly used metrics to assess the health of the winding insulation in a transformer) and furfural concentration in the insulating oil. The other model is based on thermal-induced degradation of the transformer insulation. By utilizing transformer loading information, established thermal models are used to estimate the hot spot temperature inside the transformer winding. Both models are implemented in the Remaining Useful Life Database of the FW-PHM Suite. The Remaining Useful Life Advisor utilizes the implemented prognostic models to estimate the remaining useful life of the paper winding insulation in the transformer based on actual oil testing and operational data.

  14. Molecular clocks control mutation rate in human cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All Issues submit Molecular clocks control mutation rate in human cells Mutational processes may be responsible for a large proportion of human cancer, contribute to human ...

  15. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2005-09-22

    Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  16. Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-03-04

    HFE-AT is a human factors engineering (HFE) software analysis tool (AT) for human-system interface design of process control systems, and is based primarily on NUREG-0700 guidance.

  17. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  18. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-24 Spillway, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-051

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-09-18

    The 100-B-24 Spillway is a spillway that was designed to serve as an emergency discharge point for the 116-B-7 outfall in the event that the 100-B-15 river effluent pipelines were blocked, damaged, or undergoing maintenance. The site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  19. Dependence of waterflood remaining oil saturation on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters in mixed wet, turbidite sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    The dependence of waterflood oil recovery on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters was investigated by numerical simulation. The relative permeability and capillary pressure curves were based on laboratory measurements on unconsolidated sands and were evaluated for water-wet and mixed wet states. The reservoir model was a prototype turbidite sand with a range of thickness and permeability values. The economic oil recovery was based on an economic limit water cut of 50%. The remaining oil saturation in the swept region for the water-wet cases was close to the residual oil saturation. The remaining oil saturation of the mixed wet cases ranged from low values near the residual oil saturation to far above the residual oil saturation. It is dependent on the reservoir parameters that govern: (1) the vertical {open_quotes}film surface drainage{close_quotes} of oil by gravity, (2) accumulation of a high oil saturation and thus a high relative permeability under the cap rock, (3) updip migration of the oil that accumulated under the cap rock. The dependence on the reservoir parameters can be summarized by dimensionless groups. There is a dimensionless time for the vertical displacement of oil by gravity. The accumulation of a high oil saturation under the cap rock is dependent on the ratio of the capillary transition zone and the sand thickness. The updip migration is dependent on a combination of the gravity number and the end point mobility ratio.

  20. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-44:2, Discovery Pipeline Near 108-F Building, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-05-30

    The 100-F-44:2 waste site is a steel pipeline that was discovered in a junction box during confirmatory sampling of the 100-F-26:4 pipeline from December 2004 through January 2005. The 100-F-44:2 pipeline feeds into the 100-F-26:4 subsite vitrified clay pipe (VCP) process sewer pipeline from the 108-F Biology Laboratory at the junction box. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  1. Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Speeding Up the Process of Gene Discovery Engineered Enzyme Accelerates DNA Sequencing Putting a Virus to Practical Use DOE Joint Genome Institute The Human Genome Project: ...

  2. Human Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources

  3. Finishing The Euchromatic Sequence Of The Human Genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel; Pennacchio, Len

    2004-09-07

    The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process.The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers {approx}99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of {approx}1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number,birth and death. Notably, the human genome seems to encode only20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead.

  4. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-54 Animal Farm Pastures, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-04-17

    The 100-F-54 waste site, part of the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, is the soil associated with the former pastures for holding domestic farm animals used in experimental toxicology studies. Evaluation of historical information resulted in identification of the experimental animal farm pastures as having potential residual soil contamination due to excrement from experimental animals. The 100-F-54 animal farm pastures confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  5. The mapping and differentiation of biological and environmental elemental signatures in the fossil remains of a 50 million year old bird

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egerton, Victoria M.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Norell, Mark A.; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Sellers, William I.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; van Veelen, Arjen; et al

    2015-01-22

    The preservation of fossils reflects the interplay of inorganic and organic chemical processes, which should be clearly differentiated to make interpretations about the biology of extinct organisms. A new coliiformes bird (mouse bird) from the ~50 million year old Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA) has here been analysed using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy with an attached X-ray energy dispersive system (ESEM-EDS). The concentration and distribution of 16 elements (Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mg, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Ba, Hg) has been mapped for individual points on the sample. S, Cu andmore » Zn map distinctly within visibly preserved feathers and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) shows that S and Cu within the feathers are organically bound in a similar manner to modern feathers. The morphological preservation of the feathers, on both macro- and microscopic scales, is variable throughout the fossil and the differences in the lateral microfacies have resulted in a morphological preservation gradient. This study clearly differentiates endogenous organic remains from those representing exogenous overprinted geochemical precipitates and illustrates the chemical complexity of the overall taphonomic process.« less

  6. The mapping and differentiation of biological and environmental elemental signatures in the fossil remains of a 50 million year old bird

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerton, Victoria M.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Norell, Mark A.; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Sellers, William I.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; van Veelen, Arjen; Anné, Jennifer; van Dongen, Bart; Knoll, Fabien; Manning, Phillip L.

    2015-01-22

    The preservation of fossils reflects the interplay of inorganic and organic chemical processes, which should be clearly differentiated to make interpretations about the biology of extinct organisms. A new coliiformes bird (mouse bird) from the ~50 million year old Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA) has here been analysed using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy with an attached X-ray energy dispersive system (ESEM-EDS). The concentration and distribution of 16 elements (Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mg, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Ba, Hg) has been mapped for individual points on the sample. S, Cu and Zn map distinctly within visibly preserved feathers and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) shows that S and Cu within the feathers are organically bound in a similar manner to modern feathers. The morphological preservation of the feathers, on both macro- and microscopic scales, is variable throughout the fossil and the differences in the lateral microfacies have resulted in a morphological preservation gradient. This study clearly differentiates endogenous organic remains from those representing exogenous overprinted geochemical precipitates and illustrates the chemical complexity of the overall taphonomic process.

  7. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-50 Stormwater Runoff Culvert, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-04-15

    The 100-F-50 waste site, part of the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, is a steel stormwater runoff culvert that runs between two railroad grades in the south-central portion of the 100-F Area. The culvert exiting the west side of the railroad grade is mostly encased in concrete and surrounded by a concrete stormwater collection depression partially filled with soil and vegetation. The drain pipe exiting the east side of the railroad grade embankment is partially filled with soil and rocks. The 100-F-50 stormwater diversion culvert confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to no action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  8. UPDATING THE NRC GUIDANCE FOR HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING REVIEWS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O HARA,J.M.; BROWN,W.S.; HIGGINS,J.C.; PERSENSKY,J.J.; LEWIS,P.M.; BONGARRA,J.

    2002-09-15

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear plants. NUREG-0800 (Standard Review Plan), Chapter 18, ''Human Factors Engineering,'' is the principal NRC staff guidance document. Two main documents provide the review criteria to support the evaluations. The HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711) addresses the design process from planning to verification and validation to design implementation. The Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700) provides the guidelines for the review of the HFE aspects of human-system interface technology, such as alarms, information systems, controls, and control room design. Since these documents were published in 1994 and 1996 respectively, they have been used by NRC staff, contractors, nuclear industry organizations, as well as by numerous organizations outside the nuclear industry. Using feedback from users and NRC research conducted in recent years, both documents have been revised and updated. This was done to ensure that they remain state-of-the-art evaluation tools for changing nuclear industry issues and emerging technologies. This paper describes the methodology used to revise and update the documents and summarizes the changes made to each and their current contents. Index Terms for this report are: Control system human factors, Ergonomics, Human factors, Nuclear power generation safety.

  9. Dependence of waterflood remaining oil saturation on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters in mixed-wet turbidite sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, G.J.

    1996-05-01

    The dependence of waterflood oil recovery on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters was investigated by numerical simulation. The relative permeability and capillary pressure curves were based on laboratory measurements on unconsolidated sands. The water-wet case is based on the assumption that the system is water-wet and measurements were made with refined oil. The mixed-wet case assumed that the system is mixed-wet and restored-state measurements were made with crude oil. The reservoir model was a prototype turbidite sand with a range of thickness and permeability values. The economic oil recovery was based on an economic limit water cut of 50%. The remaining oil saturation (ROS) in the swept region for the water-wet cases was close to the residual oil saturation. The ROS of the mixed-wet cases ranged from low values near the residual oil saturation to far above the residual oil saturation. It is dependent on the reservoir parameters that govern (1) the vertical film surface drainage of oil by gravity, (2) accumulation of a high oil saturation and thus a high relative permeability under the caprock, and (3) up-dip migration of the oil that accumulated under the caprock. The dependence on the reservoir parameters can be summarized by dimensionless groups. There is a dimensionless time for the vertical displacement of oil by gravity. The accumulation of a high oil saturation under the caprock is dependent on the ratio of the capillary transition zone and the sand thickness. The updip migration is dependent on a combination of the gravity number and the endpoint mobility ratio.

  10. Nucleic acid isolation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lewis, Annette K.; Hildebrand, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduce the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without affect on the protocol.

  11. Molecular clocks control mutation rate in human cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular clocks control mutation rate in human cells Molecular clocks control mutation rate in human cells These clock-like mutational processes could ultimately be responsible ...

  12. Models of human operators: Their need and usefulness for improvement of advanced control systems and control rooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knee, H.E.; Schryver, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Models of human behavior and cognition (HB C) are necessary for understanding the total response of complex systems. Many such model have come available over the past thirty years for various applications. Many potential model users remain skeptical about their practically, acceptability, and usefulness. Such hesitancy stems in part from disbelief in the ability to model complex cognitive processes, and a belief that relevant human behavior can be adequately accounted for through the use of common-sense heuristics. This paper will highlight several models of HB C and identify existing and potential applications in attempt to dispel such notions. 26 refs.

  13. Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2010-07 has been issued. It lists ALs currently in effect and the discontinued ALs along with the reason why the AL is no longer in effect.

  14. Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-01 has been issued. It lists ALs currently in effect and the discontinued ALs, along with the reason why the AL is no longer in effect.

  15. Biosphere Process Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Schmitt

    2000-05-25

    To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor

  16. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-C-9:2 Sanitary Sewer Pipelines, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-07-11

    The 100-C-9:2 sanitary sewer pipelines include the feeder pipelines associated with the 1607-B8, the 1607-B9, the 1607-B10 and the 1607-B11 septic systems. Contaminated soil and piping from the feeder lines to the septic systems were removed and disposed of. The remaining soil in the excavations has been shown to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  17. Hiring Process | Careers | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jobs Hiring Flexibilities NNSA supports hiring veterans and persons with disabilities for positions throughout our complex. Veterans Job Seekers with Disabilities Learn More Veterans Job Seekers with Disabilities Related Topics employment hr jobs Related News Human Resources NNSA Graduate Program Our Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Student Jobs

    Hiring Process We're always on the lookout for talented individuals who believe in our mission and support our values to join our team. From scientists and

  18. Mask fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks and reticles useful for projection lithography systems. An absorber layer is conventionally patterned using a pattern and etch process. Following the step of patterning, the entire surface of the remaining top patterning photoresist layer as well as that portion of an underlying protective photoresist layer where absorber material has been etched away is exposed to UV radiation. The UV-exposed regions of the protective photoresist layer and the top patterning photoresist layer are then removed by solution development, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plasma etch and strip and chances for damaging the surface of the substrate or coatings.

  19. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  20. Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Selection Process Fellowships will be awarded based on academic excellence, relevance of candidate's research to the laboratory mission in fundamental nuclear science and relevance to Global Security or Science of Campaign missions. Contacts Director Albert Migliori Deputy Franz Freibert 505 667-6879 Email Professional Staff Assistant Susan Ramsay 505 665 0858 Email The Seaborg internal advisory committee will judge applications based on academic excellence, relevance of the

  1. Proposal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposal Process Network R&D Software-Defined Networking (SDN) Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Testbed Description Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Test Circuit Service Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Previous Testbed Research Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Data for Researchers Partnerships Publications Workshops Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600

  2. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  3. Phased Construction Completion Report for Building K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland S.

    2008-03-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  4. FLUORINATION PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, T.S.

    1957-10-29

    A process for the fluorination of uranium metal is described. It is known that uranium will react with liquid chlorine trifluoride but the reaction proceeds at a slow rate. However, a mixture of a halogen trifluoride together with hydrogen fluoride reacts with uranium at a significantly faster rate than does a halogen trifluoride alone. Bromine trifluoride is suitable for use in the process, but chlorine trifluoride is preferred. Particularly suitable is a mixture of ClF/sub 3/ and HF having a mole ratio (moles

  5. Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2007-01-01

    This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

  6. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  7. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-1 Surface Chemical and Solid Waste Dumping Area, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-04-24

    The 100-B-1 waste site was a dumping site that was divided into two areas. One area was used as a laydown area for construction materials, and the other area was used as a chemical dumping area. The 100-B-1 Surface Chemical and Solid Waste Dumping Area site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations support future unrestricted land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  8. ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Human Subjects Protecting Human Subjects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Program exists to ensure that all research conducted at DOE ...

  9. Human Resources Specialist (Human Resources Development)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Leadership and Organizational Development group of Learning and Development (NHT), Human Capital Management (NH), Chief Administrative Officer (N). Human Capital...

  10. Process Monitor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-12-01

    This library is used to get process information (eg memory and timing). By setting an environment variable, the runtime system loads libprocmon.so while loading your executable. This library causes the SIGPROF signal to be triggered at time intervals. The procmon signal handler calls various system routines (eg clock_gettime, malinfo, getrusage, and ioctl {accessing the /proc filesystem}) to gather information about the process. The information is then printed to a file which can be viewed graphicallymore » via procmon_plot.pl. This information is obtained via a sampling approach. As with any sampling approach, the information it gathers will not be completely accurate. For example, if you are looking at memory high-water mark the memory allocation and freeing could have occurred between samples and thus would not be "seen" by this program. See "Usage" below for environment variables that affect this monitor (eg time between sampling).« less

  11. Process Limits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Records Management » Procedures and Instructions Procedures and Instructions keyboard-886462_960_720.jpg Records Management Processes Procedure for Conducting a Records Inventory (PDF) Procedure for Preparing a Records Inventory and Disposition Schedule (RIDS) (PDF) Instructions/Brochures Managing Social Media Records (PDF) Procedures for Departing Employees (PDF) Reminder for Senior Officials (PDF) Your Records Responsibility Pamphlet (PDF) Vital Records Pamphlet (PDF) Records Management

  12. Hydropyrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ullman, Alan Z.; Silverman, Jacob; Friedman, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for producing a methane-enriched gas wherein a hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrogen-containing pyrolysis gas at an elevated temperature and pressure to produce a product gas mixture including methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The improvement comprises passing the product gas mixture sequentially through a water-gas shift reaction zone and a gas separation zone to provide separate gas streams of methane and of a recycle gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane for recycle to the process. A controlled amount of steam also is provided which when combined with the recycle gas provides a pyrolysis gas for treatment of additional hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material. The amount of steam used and the conditions within the water-gas shift reaction zone and gas separation zone are controlled to obtain a steady-state composition of pyrolysis gas which will comprise hydrogen as the principal constituent and a minor amount of carbon monoxide, steam and methane so that no external source of hydrogen is needed to supply the hydrogen requirements of the process. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment, conditions are controlled such that there also is produced a significant quantity of benzene as a valuable coproduct.

  13. SEPARATION PROCESS USING COMPLEXING AND ADSORPTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spedding, J.H.; Ayers, J.A.

    1958-06-01

    An adsorption process is described for separating plutonium from a solution of neutron-irradiated uranium containing ions of a compound of plutonium and other cations. The method consists of forming a chelate complex compound with plutoniunn ions in the solution by adding a derivative of 8- hydroxyquinoline, which derivative contains a sulfonic acid group, and adsorbing the remaining cations from the solution on a cation exchange resin, while the complexed plutonium remains in the solution.

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

    2012-09-14

    The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, K.L.; Ramuhali, P.; Brenchley, D.L.; Coble, J.B.; Hashemian, H.M.; Konnick, R.; Ray, S.

    2012-09-01

    Executive Summary [partial] The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, and NDE instrumentation development from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), universities, commercial NDE service vendors and cable manufacturers, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  16. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-10

    The 100-D-9 site is the former location of an underground storage tank used for holding fuel for the 184-DA Boiler House. Results of soil-gas samples taken from six soil-gas probes in a rectangle around the site the tank had been removed from concluded that there were no volatile organic compounds at detectable levels in the area. The 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  17. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of California: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of California. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. Several major technical insights for state and Federal policymakers and regulators can be reached from this analysis. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to the nation`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, California oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase and improvement in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit both the state of California and the nation as a whole.

  18. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of California. Volume 2, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As a part of this larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of California. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to California`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technology, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could have even greater benefits to the state and the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, California oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, and energy security will benefit both the state of California and the nation as a whole.

  19. Ceramic Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  20. Process for fabrication of cermets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, Richard L.

    2011-02-01

    Cermet comprising ceramic and metal components and a molten metal infiltration method and process for fabrication thereof. The light weight cermets having improved porosity, strength, durability, toughness, elasticity fabricated from presintered ceramic powder infiltrated with a molten metal or metal alloy. Alumina titanium cermets biocompatible with the human body suitable for bone and joint replacements.

  1. FORTRAN Extensions for Modular Parallel Processing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-01-12

    FORTRAN M is a small set of extensions to FORTRAN that supports a modular approach to the construction of sequential and parallel programs. FORTRAN M programs use channels to plug together processes which may be written in FORTRAN M or FORTRAN 77. Processes communicate by sending and receiving messages on channels. Channels and processes can be created dynamically, but programs remain deterministic unless specialized nondeterministic constructs are used.

  2. WELDING PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  3. Oligomerization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1991-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  4. Etherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  5. Crystallization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, Robert J.; Brown, William R.; Auyang, Lun; Liu, Yin-Chang; Cook, W. Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    An improved crystallization process is disclosed for separating a crystallizable material and an excluded material which is at least partially excluded from the solid phase of the crystallizable material obtained upon freezing a liquid phase of the materials. The solid phase is more dense than the liquid phase, and it is separated therefrom by relative movement with the formation of a packed bed of solid phase. The packed bed is continuously formed adjacent its lower end and passed from the liquid phase into a countercurrent flow of backwash liquid. The packed bed extends through the level of the backwash liquid to provide a drained bed of solid phase adjacent its upper end which is melted by a condensing vapor.

  6. Etherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1990-08-21

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figs.

  7. Oligomerization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1991-03-26

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figures.

  8. Linking Humans and Systems in Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo

    2013-02-01

    Traditional engineering methods do not make provision for the integration of human considerations, while traditional human factors methods do not scale well to the complexity of large-scale nuclear power plant projects. Although the need for up-to-date human factors engineering processes and tools is recognised widely in industry, so far no formal guidance has been developed. This article proposes such a framework.

  9. Corrective Measures Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corrective Measures Process Corrective Measures Process We follow a stringent corrective measures process for legacy cleanup. August 1, 2013 Corrective measures process Corrective measures process

  10. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  11. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maa, Peter S.

    1978-01-01

    A process for liquefying a particulate coal feed to produce useful petroleum-like liquid products which comprises contacting; in a series of two or more coal liquefaction zones, or stages, graded with respect to temperature, an admixture of a polar compound; or compounds, a hydrogen donor solvent and particulate coal, the total effluent being passed in each instance from a low temperature zone, or stage to the next succeeding higher temperature zone, or stage, of the series. The temperature within the initial zone, or stage, of the series is maintained about 70.degree. F and 750.degree. F and the temperature within the final zone, or stage, is maintained between about 750.degree. F and 950.degree. F. The residence time within the first zone, or stage, ranges, generally, from about 20 to about 150 minutes and residence time within each of the remaining zones, or stages, of the series ranges, generally, from about 10 minutes to about 70 minutes. Further steps of the process include: separating the product from the liquefaction zone into fractions inclusive of a liquid solvent fraction; hydrotreating said liquid solvent fraction in a hydrogenation zone; and recycling the hydrogenated liquid solvent mixture to said coal liquefaction zones.

  12. HUMAN FACTORS GUIDANCE FOR CONTROL ROOM EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHARA,J.; BROWN,W.; STUBLER,W.; HIGGINS,J.; WACHTEL,J.; PERSENSKY,J.J.

    2000-07-30

    The Human-System Interface Design Review Guideline (NUREG-0700, Revision 1) was developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide human factors guidance as a basis for the review of advanced human-system interface technologies. The guidance consists of three components: design review procedures, human factors engineering guidelines, and a software application to provide design review support called the ``Design Review Guideline.'' Since it was published in June 1996, Rev. 1 to NUREG-0700 has been used successfully by NRC staff, contractors and nuclear industry organizations, as well as by interested organizations outside the nuclear industry. The NRC has committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool in the face of emerging and rapidly changing technology. This paper addresses the current research to update of NUREG-0700 based on the substantial work that has taken place since the publication of Revision 1.

  13. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:14, 116-F-5 Influent Pipelines, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-029

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-02-29

    The 100-F-26:14 waste site includes underground pipelines associated with the 116-F-5 Ball Washer Crib and remnants of process pipelines on the west side of the 105-F Building. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  14. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-22:1 Pipelines and Associated Soils, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-042

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-09-12

    The 100-B-22:1 pipelines and associated soils were part of the 100-B Area water treatment facilities. The 100-B-22:1 waste site is limited to those pipelines that interconnected the 185-B Filter House, the 126-B-2 Clearwells, the 185-B Deaeration Plant, and the 190-B Process Pumphouse. None of the 100-B-22:1 pipelines carried environmentally significant contamination. In accordance with the historical information and field observations of this evaluation, the results support a reclassification of this site to No Action required to meet future rural-residential uses and be protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  15. The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, D.C.; Scandrol, R.O.; Statnick, R.M.; Stouffer, M.R.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Wu, M.M.; Yoon, H. )

    1992-02-01

    The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration met the program objectives which were to determine Coolside SO[sub 2] removal performance, establish short-term process operability, and evaluate the economics of the process versus a limestone wet scrubber. On a flue gas produced from the combustion of 3% sulfur coal, the Coolside process achieved 70% SO[sub 2] removal using commercially-available hydrated lime as the sorbent. The operating conditions were Ca/S mol ratio 2.0, Na/Ca mol ratio 0.2, and 20[degree]F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature ([del]T). During tests using fresh plus recycle sorbent, the recycle sorbent exhibited significant capacity for additional SO[sub 2] removal. The longest steady state operation was eleven days at nominally Ca/S = 2, Na/Ca = 0.22, [del]T = 20--22[degree]F, and 70% SO[sub 2] removal. The operability results achieved during the demonstration indicate that with the recommended process modifications, which are discussed in the Coolside process economic analysis, the process could be designed as a reliable system for utility application. Based on the demonstration program, the Coolside process capital cost for a hypothetical commercial installation was minimized. The optimization consisted of a single, large humidifier, no spare air compressor, no isolation dampers, and a 15 day on-site hydrated lime storage. The levelized costs of the Coolside and the wet limestone scrubbing processes were compared. The Coolside process is generally economically competitive with wet scrubbing for coals containing up to 2.5% sulfur and plants under 350 MWe. Site-specific factors such as plant capacity factor, SO[sub 2] emission limit, remaining plant life, retrofit difficulty, and delivered sorbent cost affect the scrubber-Coolside process economic comparison.

  16. The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, D.C.; Scandrol, R.O.; Statnick, R.M.; Stouffer, M.R.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Wu, M.M.; Yoon, H.

    1992-02-01

    The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration met the program objectives which were to determine Coolside SO{sub 2} removal performance, establish short-term process operability, and evaluate the economics of the process versus a limestone wet scrubber. On a flue gas produced from the combustion of 3% sulfur coal, the Coolside process achieved 70% SO{sub 2} removal using commercially-available hydrated lime as the sorbent. The operating conditions were Ca/S mol ratio 2.0, Na/Ca mol ratio 0.2, and 20{degree}F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature ({del}T). During tests using fresh plus recycle sorbent, the recycle sorbent exhibited significant capacity for additional SO{sub 2} removal. The longest steady state operation was eleven days at nominally Ca/S = 2, Na/Ca = 0.22, {del}T = 20--22{degree}F, and 70% SO{sub 2} removal. The operability results achieved during the demonstration indicate that with the recommended process modifications, which are discussed in the Coolside process economic analysis, the process could be designed as a reliable system for utility application. Based on the demonstration program, the Coolside process capital cost for a hypothetical commercial installation was minimized. The optimization consisted of a single, large humidifier, no spare air compressor, no isolation dampers, and a 15 day on-site hydrated lime storage. The levelized costs of the Coolside and the wet limestone scrubbing processes were compared. The Coolside process is generally economically competitive with wet scrubbing for coals containing up to 2.5% sulfur and plants under 350 MWe. Site-specific factors such as plant capacity factor, SO{sub 2} emission limit, remaining plant life, retrofit difficulty, and delivered sorbent cost affect the scrubber-Coolside process economic comparison.

  17. Process development for biomass liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The biomass liquefaction processes (Bureau of Mines and LBL) in use at DOE's experimental facility in Albany, Oregon are described. The chemical composition of the distillate fractions is given. An economic analysis of the 2 processes showed that the LBL process requires less capital investment but the operational costs are very similar. When considered for use as a substitute fuel oil, wood oil as produced at Albany by the LBL process appears qualitatively to fall somewhere between petroleum derived number 6 Fuel Oil and the synthetic oil derived from the Occidental Flash Pyrolysis process. Wood oil falls nearly half way between the other two oils in nearly all categories except that wood oil is very low in sulfur content. This comparison is valid on a chemical basis, however, the use of wood oil purely as a substitute fuel is not currently economically attractive. Despite the large amount of resources already expended on research of this process, it remains in a developmental stage and new technology could have a significant impact on the process economics. The alternate use of wood oil as a chemical feedstock is also being studied.

  18. ORISE: Human Subjects Protection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Subjects Protection The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) ... U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories involved in human subjects research projects. ...

  19. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources The Human Resources team is fully integrated with Jefferson Lab's mission, committed to providing quality customer service based on expertise, innovation and ...

  20. Human Reliability Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Signup SlideShare Human Reliability Assessment HomeStationary PowerNuclear EnergyNuclear Energy Safety TechnologiesRisk and Safety AssessmentHuman Reliability Assessment ...

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:13, 108-F Drain Pipelines, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-03-03

    The 100-F-26:13 waste site is the network of process sewer pipelines that received effluent from the 108-F Biological Laboratory and discharged it to the 188-F Ash Disposal Area (126-F-1 waste site). The pipelines included one 0.15-m (6-in.)-, two 0.2-m (8-in.)-, and one 0.31-m (12-in.)-diameter vitrified clay pipe segments encased in concrete. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  2. Corrective Measures Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corrective Measures Process Corrective Measures Process We follow a stringent corrective measures process for legacy cleanup. August 1, 2013 Corrective measures process Corrective...

  3. Task Decomposition in Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Joe, Jeffrey Clark

    2014-06-01

    In the probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) used in the nuclear industry, human failure events (HFEs) are determined as a subset of hardware failures, namely those hardware failures that could be triggered by human action or inaction. This approach is top-down, starting with hardware faults and deducing human contributions to those faults. Elsewhere, more traditionally human factors driven approaches would tend to look at opportunities for human errors first in a task analysis and then identify which of those errors is risk significant. The intersection of top-down and bottom-up approaches to defining HFEs has not been carefully studied. Ideally, both approaches should arrive at the same set of HFEs. This question remains central as human reliability analysis (HRA) methods are generalized to new domains like oil and gas. The HFEs used in nuclear PSAs tend to be top-down— defined as a subset of the PSA—whereas the HFEs used in petroleum quantitative risk assessments (QRAs) are more likely to be bottom-up—derived from a task analysis conducted by human factors experts. The marriage of these approaches is necessary in order to ensure that HRA methods developed for top-down HFEs are also sufficient for bottom-up applications.

  4. HUMAN MACHINE COOPERATIVE TELEROBOTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William R. Hamel; Spivey Douglass; Sewoong Kim; Pamela Murray; Yang Shou; Sriram Sridharan; Ge Zhang; Scott Thayer; Rajiv V. Dubey

    2003-06-30

    The remediation and deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear waste storage tanks using telerobotics is one of the most challenging tasks faced in environmental cleanup. Since a number of tanks have reached the end of their design life and some of them have leaks, the unstructured, uncertain and radioactive environment makes the work inefficient and expensive. However, the execution time of teleoperation consumes ten to hundred times that of direct contact with an associated loss in quality. Thus, a considerable effort has been expended to improve the quality and efficiency of telerobotics by incorporating into teleoperation and robotic control functions such as planning, trajectory generation, vision, and 3-D modeling. One example is the Robot Task Space Analyzer (RTSA), which has been developed at the Robotics and Electromechanical Systems Laboratory (REMSL) at the University of Tennessee in support of the D&D robotic work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This system builds 3-D models of the area of interest in task space through automatic image processing and/or human interactive manual modeling. The RTSA generates a task plan file, which describes the execution of a task including manipulator and tooling motions. The high level controller of the manipulator interprets the task plan file and executes the task automatically. Thus, if the environment is not highly unstructured, a tooling task, which interacts with environment, will be executed in the autonomous mode. Therefore, the RTSA not only increases the system efficiency, but also improves the system reliability because the operator will act as backstop for safe operation after the 3-D models and task plan files are generated. However, unstructured conditions of environment and tasks necessitate that the telerobot operates in the teleoperation mode for successful execution of task. The inefficiency in the teleoperation mode led to the research

  5. Towards A Unified HFE Process For The Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    As nuclear power utilities embark on projects to upgrade and modernize power plants, they are likely to discover that traditional engineering methods do not typically make provision for the integration of human considerations. In addition, human factors professionals will find that traditional human performance methods such as function allocation, task analysis, human reliability analysis and human-machine interface design do not scale well to the complexity of a large-scale nuclear power upgrade project. Up-to-date human factors engineering processes, methods, techniques and tools are required to perform these kinds of analyses. This need is recognized widely in industry and an important part of the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program deals with identifying potential impacts of emerging technologies on human performance and the technical bases needed to address them. However, so far no formal initiative has been launched to deal with the lack of integrated processes. Although human factors integration frameworks do exist in industries such as aviation or defense, no formal integrated human factors process exists in the nuclear industry. As a first step towards creating such a process, a “unified human factors engineering process” is proposed as a framework within which engineering organizations, human factors practitioners and regulatory bodies can ensure that human factors requirements are embedded in engineering activities throughout the upgrade project life cycle.

  6. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  7. SCAVENGER AND PROCESS OF SCAVENGING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, C.M.

    1960-04-26

    Carrier precipitation processes are given for the separation and recovery of plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions containing plutonium and fission products. Bismuth phosphate is precipitated in the acidic solution while plutonlum is maintained in the hexavalent oxidation state. Preformed, uncalcined, granular titanium dioxide is then added to the solution and the fission product-carrying bismuth phosphate and titanium dioxide are separated from the resulting mixture. Fluosilicic acid, which dissolves any remaining titanium dioxide particles, is then added to the purified plutonium-containing solution.

  8. FHR Process Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactors (FHRs) are entering into early phase engineering development. Initial candidate technologies have been identified to measure all of the required process variables. The purpose of this paper is to describe the proposed measurement techniques in sufficient detail to enable assessment of the proposed instrumentation suite and to support development of the component technologies. This paper builds upon the instrumentation chapter of the recently published FHR technology development roadmap. Locating instruments outside of the intense core radiation and high-temperature fluoride salt environment significantly decreases their environmental tolerance requirements. Under operating conditions, FHR primary coolant salt is a transparent, low-vapor-pressure liquid. Consequently, FHRs can employ standoff optical measurements from above the salt pool to assess in-vessel conditions. For example, the core outlet temperature can be measured by observing the fuel s blackbody emission. Similarly, the intensity of the core s Cerenkov glow indicates the fission power level. Short-lived activation of the primary coolant provides another means for standoff measurements of process variables. The primary coolant flow and neutron flux can be measured using gamma spectroscopy along the primary coolant piping. FHR operation entails a number of process measurements. Reactor thermal power and core reactivity are the most significant variables for process control. Thermal power can be determined by measuring the primary coolant mass flow rate and temperature rise across the core. The leading candidate technologies for primary coolant temperature measurement are Au-Pt thermocouples and Johnson noise thermometry. Clamp-on ultrasonic flow measurement, that includes high-temperature tolerant standoffs, is a potential coolant flow measurement technique. Also, the salt redox condition will be monitored as an indicator of its corrosiveness. Both

  9. The DOE NEPA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Ooteghem, S.A.

    1993-09-01

    A brief overview indicating the types Of NEPA documents that are produced by the Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with NEPA is shown in the figure. This figure indicates that the level of NEPA documentation required for any given project is graded and dependent on that project`s size, complexity, and potential consequences to health and the human environment. More complex projects with potentially greater environmental impacts require a much more in-depth analysis to ensure that these potential consequences can be managed and/or mitigated, so that the proposed project can proceed in compliance with NEPA. It is important to keep in mind the following points when conducting any project that involves Federal land, Federal monies, or Federal permits: Under these conditions (involvement of Federal lands, use of Federal monies, or requirement for Federal permits), some level of NEPA analysis and documentation is required. The NEPA process must be completed and a decision favorable to the proposed project must be supported by the NEPA analysis before that proposed project can fully expend Federal funds. Activities that cannot proceed until the NEPA analysis and decision-making process is completed are those that: Result in an adverse environmental impact and/or limit the choice of reasonable alternatives.

  10. Well Placement Decision Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Placement Decision Process Well Placement Decision Process Determining where to place a well is a multi-step process. August 1, 2013 Investigation process for determining where to place a sentinel well Investigation process for determining where

  11. Monitoring microstructural evolution of alloy 617 with non-linear acoustics for remaining useful life prediction; multiaxial creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lissenden, Cliff; Hassan, Tasnin; Rangari, Vijaya

    2014-10-30

    application of the harmonic generation method to tubular mechanical test specimens and pipes for nondestructive evaluation. Tubular specimens and pipes act as waveguides, thus we applied the acoustic harmonic generation method to guided waves in both plates and shells. Magnetostrictive transducers were used to generate and receive guided wave modes in the shell sample and the received signals were processed to show the sensitivity of higher harmonic generation to microstructure evolution. Modeling was initiated to correlate higher harmonic generation with the microstructure that will lead to development of a life prediction model that is informed by the nonlinear acoustics measurements.

  12. Extensible packet processing architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Perry J.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.; Chun, Guy D.

    2013-08-20

    A technique for distributed packet processing includes sequentially passing packets associated with packet flows between a plurality of processing engines along a flow through data bus linking the plurality of processing engines in series. At least one packet within a given packet flow is marked by a given processing engine to signify by the given processing engine to the other processing engines that the given processing engine has claimed the given packet flow for processing. A processing function is applied to each of the packet flows within the processing engines and the processed packets are output on a time-shared, arbitered data bus coupled to the plurality of processing engines.

  13. ARM - Human Causes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Human Causes Some of the human activities which can cause ...

  14. Human Genome: DOE Origins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Genome Research: DOE Origins Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi Charles DeLisi The genesis of the Department of Energy (DOE) human genome project took place ...

  15. Updating Human Factors Engineering Guidelines for Conducting Safety Reviews of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger - NRC

    2011-09-19

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. This paper describes the role of HFE guidelines in the safety review process and the content of the key HFE guidelines used. Then we will present the methodology used to develop HFE guidance and update these documents, and describe the current status of the update program.

  16. A human reliability analysis of a nuclear explosives dismantlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bott, T.F.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in a human reliability analysis (HRA) conducted during a quantitative hazard assessment of a nuclear weapon disassembly process performed at the Pantex plant. The probability of human errors during the disassembly process is an extremely important aspect of estimating accident-sequence frequency for nuclear weapons processing. The methods include the systematic identification of potential human-initiated or enabled accident sequences using an accident-sequence fault tree, the extensive use of walkthroughs and videotaping of the disassembly process, and hands-on testing of postulated human errors. THERP modeling of rule-based behavior and operational data analysis of errors in skill-based behavior are described. A simple method for evaluating the approximate likelihood of nonmalevolent violations of procedures was developed and used to examine the process. The HRA occurred concurrently with process design, so considerable interaction between the analysts and designers occurred and resulted in design changes that are discussed in the paper.

  17. EEO Complaint Process EEO Complaint Process INFORMAL PROCESS-COUNSELING

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EEO Complaint Process EEO Complaint Process INFORMAL PROCESS-COUNSELING National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Civil Rights Equal Employment Opportunity: Collaborating For Mission Success EEO POLICY The Department of Energy (DOE) does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, race, disability (physical or mental), national origin, reprisal, religion, sex (including sexual harassment), sexual orientation, genetic information or any other non-merit factor. DOE is committed to equal

  18. Report: EM Human Capital Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HUMAN CAPITAL September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Human Capital Subcommittee Background: The enhancement of the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) human capital has ...

  19. Remaining Barriers to LED Street Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ownership, involving multiple decision-makers * Utilities own 60-70% of street lighting inventory in U.S. * Sometimes more than one utility present in a given metro area * Often...

  20. Geothermal developers remain optimistic | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    conventional fossil fuel generation closer to or above the ... Hurdles such as capital intensive technology also will need ... the primary energy supply mix of the U.S. For U.S. ...

  1. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  2. The human factors of quality and QA in R D environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    Achieving quality is a human activity. It is therefore important to consider the human in the design, development and evaluation of work processes and environments in an effort to enhance human performance and minimize error. It is also important to allow for individual differences when considering human factors issues. Human Factors is the field of study which can provide information on integrating the human into the system. Human factors and quality are related for the customer of R D work, R D personnel who perform the work, and the quality professional who overviews the process of quality in the work. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capitol Management | Department of Energy Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management (80.67 KB) More Documents & Publications MOX Services Unclassified

  4. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylatedmore » CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.« less

  5. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, Sasha K.; Gardner, Shea N.; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R.; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2015-04-29

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-free human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. In conclusion, left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected.

  6. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ames, Sasha K.; Gardner, Shea N.; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R.; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2015-04-29

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-freemore » human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. In conclusion, left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected.« less

  7. Corrective Actions Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distributed in the environment) of the contamination. Conduct risk assessments-human health and ecological-if necessary Determine and complete appropriateapproved cleanup...

  8. PROCESS OF DECONTAMINATING MATERIAL CONTAMINATED WITH RADIOACTIVITY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overholt, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.; Acken, M.F.

    1958-09-16

    A process is described for decontaminating metallic objects, such as stainless steel equipment, which consists in contacting such objects with nltric acid in a concentration of 35 to 60% to remove the major portion of the contamination; and thereafter contacting the partially decontaminated object with a second solution containing up to 20% of alkali metal hydroxide and up to 20% sodium tartrate to remove the remaining radioactive contaminats.

  9. FLUORINE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF MATERIALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.; Brown, H.S.

    1958-05-01

    A process is described for separating plutoniunn from neutron-irradiated uranium, which consists of reacting the irradiated uranium mass with HF to form the tetrafluorides of U, Pu, and Np, and then reacting this mixture of tetrafluorides with fiuorine at temperature between 140 and 315 d C. This causes volatile hexafluorides of U and Np to form while at the temperature employed the Pu tetrafluoride is unaffected and remains as a residue.

  10. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR THORIUM SALTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bridger, G.L.; Whatley, M.E.; Shaw, K.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process is described for the separation of uranium, thorium, and rare earths extracted from monazite by digesting with sulfuric acid. By carefully increasing the pH of the solution, stepwise, over the range 0.8 to 5.5, a series of selective precipitations will be achieved, with the thorium values coming out at lower pH, the rare earths at intermediate pH and the uranium last. Some mixed precipitates will be obtained, and these may be treated by dissolving in HNO/sub 3/ and contacting with dibutyl phosphate, whereby thorium or uranium are taken up by the organic phase while the rare earths preferentially remain in the aqueous solution.

  11. Human Genome: DOE Origins

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the Department of Energy; DOE Technical Report; 1988 Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome; DOE Technical Report; 1988 Understanding our Genetic Inheritance: The U.S....

  12. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sponsor click on this link to nominate a student: SPONSOR NOMINATION FORM If you have any questions please contact: Human Resources Jefferson Science Associates 628 Hofstadter Rd., ...

  13. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab Diversity Policies 200 Human Resources 202 Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action 203 Employment 208 Employee Performance and Conduct 209 Staff Development 210 ...

  14. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources Consultants Cassandra Andrews, HR Consultant, Employee Relations & Recruitment (757) 269-7068, candrews@jlab.org Kelly Allmon, HR Consultant, Recruitment & ...

  15. Desalination processes and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, L. J.

    1995-06-01

    Different desalination processes are evaluated for feed, capacity, performance, energy requirements, and cost. These include distillation, reverse osmosis, or electrodialysis. Detailed information is given on distillation processes and membrane processes.

  16. Special parallel processing workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    This report contains viewgraphs from the Special Parallel Processing Workshop. These viewgraphs deal with topics such as parallel processing performance, message passing, queue structure, and other basic concept detailing with parallel processing.

  17. ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

    1961-07-11

    Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

  18. Hydropower Process Improvements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Improvements William J. Palmer Hydropower Program Manager South Atlantic Division 2 April 2015 BUILDING STRONG Focus Areas For Process Improvements InspectionsCondition ...

  19. Next Generation Manufacturing Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New process technologies can rejuvenate U.S. manufacturing. Novel processing concepts can open pathways to double net energy productivity, enabling rapid manufacture of energy-efficient, high...

  20. Salt Waste Processing Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 ...

  1. Thermochemical Processes | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processes NREL is developing gasification and pyrolysis processes for the cost effective thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels and biofuel intermediaries. In our ...

  2. Biochemical Processes | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biochemical Processes NREL is developing biochemical conversion processes to generate sugars and sugars-derived intermediates for upgrading to biofuels and bioproducts. We develop ...

  3. Human Reliability Considerations for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, H.; DAgostino, A.; Erasmia, L.

    2012-01-27

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) are a promising approach to meeting future energy needs. Although the electrical output of an individual SMR is relatively small compared to that of typical commercial nuclear plants, they can be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands. Furthermore, SMRs can be used for other purposes, such as producing hydrogen and generating process heat. The design characteristics of many SMRs differ from those of current conventional plants and may require a distinct concept of operations. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted research to examine the human factors engineering and the operational aspects of SMRs. The research identified thirty potential human-performance issues that should be considered in the NRC's reviews of SMR designs and in future research activities. The purpose of this report is to illustrate how the issues can support SMR probabilistic risk analyses and their review by identifying potential human failure events for a subset of the issues. As part of addressing the human contribution to plant risk, human reliability analysis practitioners identify and quantify the human failure events that can negatively impact normal or emergency plant operations. The results illustrated here can be generalized to identify additional human failure events for the issues discussed and can be applied to those issues not discussed in this report.

  4. Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P.; Watson, Patrick; McDaniel, Mark A.; Eichenbaum, Howard B.; Cohen, Neal J.; Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

    2009-10-01

    Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

  5. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20

    The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

  6. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-05-15

    To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

  7. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yager, T.D.; Zewert, T.E.; Hood, L.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a coordinated worldwide effort to precisely map the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. The first explicit proposal for this project dates from 1985 although its foundations (both conceptual and technological) can be traced back many years in genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The HGP has matured rapidly and is producing results of great significance.

  8. A vibro-haptic human-machine interface for structural health monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mascarenas, David; Plont, Crystal; Brown, Christina; Cowell, Martin; Jameson, N. Jordan; Block, Jessica; Djidjev, Stephanie; Hahn, Heidi A.; Farrar, Charles

    2014-11-01

    The structural health monitoring (SHM) community’s goal has been to endow physical systems with a nervous system not unlike those commonly found in living organisms. Typically the SHM community has attempted to do this by instrumenting structures with a variety of sensors, and then applying various signal processing and classification procedures to the data in order to detect the presence of damage, the location of damage, the severity of damage, and to estimate the remaining useful life of the structure. This procedure has had some success, but we are still a long way from achieving the performance of nervous systems found in biology. This is primarily because contemporary classification algorithms do not have the performance required. In many cases expert judgment is superior to automated classification. This work introduces a new paradigm. We propose interfacing the human nervous system to the distributed sensor network located on the structure and developing new techniques to enable human-machine cooperation. Results from the field of sensory substitution suggest this should be possible. This study investigates a vibro-haptic human-machine interface for SHM. The investigation was performed using a surrogate three-story structure. The structure features three nonlinearity-inducing bumpers to simulate damage. Accelerometers are placed on each floor to measure the response of the structure to a harmonic base excitation. The accelerometer measurements are preprocessed. As a result, the preprocessed data is then encoded encoded as a vibro-tactile stimulus. Human subjects were then subjected to the vibro-tactile stimulus and asked to characterize the damage in the structure.

  9. A vibro-haptic human-machine interface for structural health monitoring

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mascarenas, David; Plont, Crystal; Brown, Christina; Cowell, Martin; Jameson, N. Jordan; Block, Jessica; Djidjev, Stephanie; Hahn, Heidi A.; Farrar, Charles

    2014-11-01

    The structural health monitoring (SHM) community’s goal has been to endow physical systems with a nervous system not unlike those commonly found in living organisms. Typically the SHM community has attempted to do this by instrumenting structures with a variety of sensors, and then applying various signal processing and classification procedures to the data in order to detect the presence of damage, the location of damage, the severity of damage, and to estimate the remaining useful life of the structure. This procedure has had some success, but we are still a long way from achieving the performance of nervous systemsmore » found in biology. This is primarily because contemporary classification algorithms do not have the performance required. In many cases expert judgment is superior to automated classification. This work introduces a new paradigm. We propose interfacing the human nervous system to the distributed sensor network located on the structure and developing new techniques to enable human-machine cooperation. Results from the field of sensory substitution suggest this should be possible. This study investigates a vibro-haptic human-machine interface for SHM. The investigation was performed using a surrogate three-story structure. The structure features three nonlinearity-inducing bumpers to simulate damage. Accelerometers are placed on each floor to measure the response of the structure to a harmonic base excitation. The accelerometer measurements are preprocessed. As a result, the preprocessed data is then encoded encoded as a vibro-tactile stimulus. Human subjects were then subjected to the vibro-tactile stimulus and asked to characterize the damage in the structure.« less

  10. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griebenow, B.

    1996-03-01

    In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond.

  11. ARM - Process Configuration Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FormsProcess Configuration Manager Ingest Ingest Workflow Graphic Supporting Workflow Documentation Supporting Tools and Forms Process Configuration Manager (PCM) Metadata Management Tool (MMT) ARM Data Integrator (ADI) Ingest Readiness Form Associated Status Reports Contacts Engineering Processes Engineering Home Workflow Graphic Engineering Workflow Document Tools for Workflow ECR ECO BCR Ingests Value-Added Products Reprocessing Instruments Data System Elements Field Campaign Startup Process

  12. Working testing process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparkman, D.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the process of testing security and intrusion detection software.

  13. Deputy Secretary Memo on Improving Headquarters' Hiring Processes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memorandum for Improving DOE HQ Recruitment and Hiring Processes (1.96 MB) Responsible Contacts Kenneth Venuto Director, Office of Human Capital Management E-mail kenneth.venuto@hq...

  14. Chief Human Capital Officer Memo on Improving DOE Recruitment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Improving DOE Recruitment and Hiring Processes (540.02 KB) Responsible Contacts Kenneth Venuto Director, Office of Human Capital Management E-mail kenneth.venuto@hq.doe.gov More ...

  15. Femtosecond laser processing of fuel injectors - a materials processing evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, B C; Wynne, A

    2000-12-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a new laser-based machining technology that utilizes ultrashort-pulse (0.1-1.0 picosecond) lasers to cut materials with negligible generation of heat or shock. The ultrashort pulse laser, developed for the Department of Energy (Defense Programs) has numerous applications in operations requiring high precision machining. Due to the extremely short duration of the laser pulse, material removal occurs by a different physical mechanism than in conventional machining. As a result, any material (e.g., hardened steel, ceramics, diamond, silicon, etc.) can be machined with minimal heat-affected zone or damage to the remaining material. As a result of the threshold nature of the process, shaped holes, cuts, and textures can be achieved with simple beam shaping. Conventional laser tools used for cutting or high-precision machining (e.g., sculpting, drilling) use long laser pulses (10{sup -8} to over 1 sec) to remove material by heating it to the melting or boiling point (Figure 1.1a). This often results in significant damage to the remaining material and produces considerable slag (Figure 1.2a). With ultrashort laser pulses, material is removed by ionizing the material (Figure 1.1b). The ionized plasma expands away from the surface too quickly for significant energy transfer to the remaining material. This distinct mechanism produces extremely precise and clean-edged holes without melting or degrading the remaining material (Figures 1.2 and 1.3). Since only a very small amount of material ({approx} <0.5 microns) is removed per laser pulse, extremely precise machining can be achieved. High machining speed is achieved by operating the lasers at repetition rates up to 10,000 pulses per second. As a diagnostic, the character of the short-pulse laser produced plasma enables determination of the material being machined between pulses. This feature allows the machining of multilayer materials, metal on metal or metal on

  16. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compensation Online Forms Salary Ranges Intern Rates Classification Matrices Annual Promotion Process TRC Membership Promotion Forms...

  17. Image processing applied to laser cladding process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meriaudeau, F.; Truchetet, F.

    1996-12-31

    The laser cladding process, which consists of adding a melt powder to a substrate in order to improve or change the behavior of the material against corrosion, fatigue and so on, involves a lot of parameters. In order to perform good tracks some parameters need to be controlled during the process. The authors present here a low cost performance system using two CCD matrix cameras. One camera provides surface temperature measurements while the other gives information relative to the powder distribution or geometric characteristics of the tracks. The surface temperature (thanks to Beer Lambert`s law) enables one to detect variations in the mass feed rate. Using such a system the authors are able to detect fluctuation of 2 to 3g/min in the mass flow rate. The other camera gives them information related to the powder distribution, a simple algorithm applied to the data acquired from the CCD matrix camera allows them to see very weak fluctuations within both gaz flux (carriage or protection gaz). During the process, this camera is also used to perform geometric measurements. The height and the width of the track are obtained in real time and enable the operator to find information related to the process parameters such as the speed processing, the mass flow rate. The authors display the result provided by their system in order to enhance the efficiency of the laser cladding process. The conclusion is dedicated to a summary of the presented works and the expectations for the future.

  18. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  19. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #15 Processing Personnel Actions for Details |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5 Processing Personnel Actions for Details POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #15 Processing Personnel Actions for Details The Office of Personnel Management (OPM), effective September 12, 2010, requires agencies to officially document detail actions. As a result, all Servicing Human Resources Offices (SHROs) are now required to document, process, and file certain specific detail actions in CHRIS. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #15 Processing Personnel Actions for Details (69.77 KB)

  20. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20

    The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

  1. Protection of Human Subjects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-05-15

    The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

  2. Human Resource Management Delegation

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-06-28

    The notice is to clarifies and updates existing Human Resource Management Delegation Authorities and the levels to which they are delegated. Expired 6-28-97. Does not cancel any directives.

  3. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beranich, S.; Berger, N.; Bierley, D.; Bond, T.M.; Burt, C.; Caldwell, J.A.; Dery, V.A.; Dutcher, A.; Glover, W.A.; Heydenburg, R.J.; Larson, N.B.; Lindsey, G.; Longley, J.M.; Millard, J.B.; Miller, M.; Peel, R.C.; Persson-Reeves, C.H.; Titus, F.B.; Wagner, L.

    1989-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to clean up the Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, uraniferous lignite processing sites to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at these sites. Remedial action at these sites must be performed in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standards promulgated for the remedial action and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The inactive Belfield uraniferous lignite processing site is one mile southeast of Belfield, North Dakota. The inactive Bowman uraniferous lignite processing site at the former town of Griffin, is seven miles northwest of Bowman, North Dakota and 65 road miles south of Belfield. Lignite ash from the processing operations has contaminated the soils over the entire 10.7-acre designated Belfield site and the entire 12.1-acre designated Bowman site. Dispersion of the ash has contaminated an additional 20.6 acres surrounding the Belfield processing site and an additional 59.2 acres surrounding the Bowman processing site. The proposed remedial action is to relocate the contaminated materials at the Belfield processing site to the Bowman processing/disposal site for codisposal with the Bowman contaminated soils. The environmental impacts assessed in this EA were evaluated for the proposed remedial action and the no action alternative and demonstrate that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment and would be performed in compliance with applicable environmental laws. The no action alternative would not be consistent with the intent of Public Law 95-604 and would not comply with the EPA standards. 48 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Waste processing air cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-07-27

    Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

  5. Risk Management Process Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline has two primary components: the risk management model and the the risk management cycle.

  6. Gas-separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toy, Lora G.; Pinnau, Ingo; Baker, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

  7. Direct process for explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akst, I.B.; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1982-10-12

    A direct process of making ethylenediamine dinitrate through the reaction of ethylenediamine and ammonium nitrate is described.

  8. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  9. Corrective Actions Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment » Environmental Stewardship » Environmental Cleanup » Corrective Actions Corrective Actions Process The general process for evaluating and remediating potential release sites is called the corrective action process. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Corrective actions The Laboratory's corrective actions process refers to the way in which the Laboratory investigates, stabilizes,

  10. Lessons Learned Concerning the Human Element in Events and Training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Sandvig

    2006-02-01

    As the number and complexity of responses to hazardous material incidents have increased, government regulators have implemented a national incident command system, bolstered by a host of protective measures and response equipment. Special advanced technical equipment has also been developed and made available to on-scene responders and command staff. Yet with all the investment in organizational and technical advance, the human element of emergency response remains critical and also needs our continued attention to ensure effective operation and success. This paper focuses on lessons learned from radiological events and training exercises that pertain to these human elements.

  11. Innovative Process Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative Process Technologies Research Team Members Key Contacts Innovative Process Technologies Innovative Process Technologies is concerned with the development of innovative costeffective technologies that promote efficiency, environmental performance, availability of advanced energy systems, and the development of computational tools that shorten development timelines of advanced energy systems. NETL, working with members of the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), will focus on

  12. Fifty Years of THERP and Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-06-01

    In 1962 at a Human Factors Society symposium, Alan Swain presented a paper introducing a Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP). This was followed in 1963 by a Sandia Laboratories monograph outlining basic human error quantification using THERP and, in 1964, by a special journal edition of Human Factors on quantification of human performance. Throughout the 1960s, Swain and his colleagues focused on collecting human performance data for the Sandia Human Error Rate Bank (SHERB), primarily in connection with supporting the reliability of nuclear weapons assembly in the US. In 1969, Swain met with Jens Rasmussen of Risø National Laboratory and discussed the applicability of THERP to nuclear power applications. By 1975, in WASH-1400, Swain had articulated the use of THERP for nuclear power applications, and the approach was finalized in the watershed publication of the NUREG/CR-1278 in 1983. THERP is now 50 years old, and remains the most well known and most widely used HRA method. In this paper, the author discusses the history of THERP, based on published reports and personal communication and interviews with Swain. The author also outlines the significance of THERP. The foundations of human reliability analysis are found in THERP: human failure events, task analysis, performance shaping factors, human error probabilities, dependence, event trees, recovery, and pre- and post-initiating events were all introduced in THERP. While THERP is not without its detractors, and it is showing signs of its age in the face of newer technological applications, the longevity of THERP is a testament of its tremendous significance. THERP started the field of human reliability analysis. This paper concludes with a discussion of THERP in the context of newer methods, which can be seen as extensions of or departures from Swain’s pioneering work.

  13. ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects Website

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Human Subjects Website Institutions that engage in human subjects research are required by federal policy to establish an institutional review board (IRB) to ensure that ...

  14. Human Resources | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources The mission of the Human Resource Department is to support the goals of The Ames Laboratory by providing support services which promote a work environmnent ...

  15. Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi ... role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. ...

  16. ORISE: Human Subjects Research Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Subjects Research Database Section 10, Part 745 of the Code of Federal Regulations ... on all research projects that involve human subjects and that are funded by DOE, ...

  17. New light on human evolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    light on human evolution New light on human evolution Scientists recently unearthed 8 million-year-old gorilla fossils from the Chorora Formation in Ethiopia, which indicate the ...

  18. Evaluation of steelmaking processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Objective of the AISI Direct Steelmaking Program is to develop a process for producing steel directly from ore and coal; the process should be less capital intensive, consume less energy, and have higher productivity. A task force was formed to examine available processes: trough, posthearth, IRSID, Electric Arc Furnace, energy optimizing furnace. It is concluded that there is insufficient incentive to replace a working BOF with any of these processes to refine hot metal; however, if new steelmaking capacity is required, IRSID and EOF should be considered. A fully continuous process should not be considered until direct ironmaking and continuous refining are perfected.

  19. Biomass process handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Descriptions are given of 42 processes which use biomass to produce chemical products. Marketing and economic background, process description, flow sheets, costs, major equipment, and availability of technology are given for each of the 42 processes. Some of the chemicals discussed are: ethanol, ethylene, acetaldehyde, butanol, butadiene, acetone, citric acid, gluconates, itaconic acid, lactic acid, xanthan gum, sorbitol, starch polymers, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, glycerol, soap, azelaic acid, perlargonic acid, nylon-11, jojoba oil, furfural, furfural alcohol, tetrahydrofuran, cellulose polymers, products from pulping wastes, and methane. Processes include acid hydrolysis, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation, Purox process, and anaerobic digestion.

  20. EVALUATION OF ACTIVATION PRODUCTS IN REMAINING IN REMAINING K-, L- AND C-REACTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.; Webb, R.

    2010-09-30

    An analytic model and calculational methodology was previously developed for P-reactor and R-reactor to quantify the radioisotopes present in Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor tanks and the surrounding structural materials as a result of neutron activation of the materials during reactor operation. That methodology has been extended to K-reactor, L-reactor, and C-reactor. The analysis was performed to provide a best-estimate source term input to the Performance Assessment for an in-situ disposition strategy by Site Decommissioning and Demolition (SDD). The reactor structure model developed earlier for the P-reactor and R-reactor analyses was also used for the K-reactor and L-reactor. The model was suitably modified to handle the larger Creactor tank and associated structures. For all reactors, the structure model consisted of 3 annular zones, homogenized by the amount of structural materials in the zone, and 5 horizontal layers. The curie content on an individual radioisotope basis and total basis for each of the regions was determined. A summary of these results are provided herein. The efficacy of this methodology to accurately predict the radioisotopic content of the reactor systems in question has been demonstrated and is documented in Reference 1. As noted in that report, results for one reactor facility cannot be directly extrapolated to other SRS reactors.

  1. Human Capital - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Capital by Website Administrator Back

  2. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Roger W.; Neff, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

  3. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

    1992-05-12

    A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

  4. Future Steelmaking Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. R. J. Fruehan

    2004-09-20

    There is an increasing demand for an ironmaking process with lower capital cost, energy consumption and emissions than a blast furnace. It is the hypothesis of the present work that an optimized combination of two reasonable proven technologies will greatly enhance the overall process. An example is a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) linked to a smelter (e.g., AISI, HIsmelt). The objective of this research is to select promising process combinations, develop energy, materials balance and productivity models for the individual processes, conduct a limited amount of basic research on the processes and evaluate the process combinations. Three process combinations were selected with input from the industrial partners. The energy-materials and productivity models for the RHF, smelter, submerged arc furnace and CIRCOFER were developed. Since utilization of volatiles in coal is critical for energy and CO{sub 2} emission reduction, basic research on this topic was also conducted. The process models developed are a major product developed in this research. These models can be used for process evaluation by the industry. The process combinations of an RHF-Smelter and a simplified CIRCOFER-Smelter appear to be promising. Energy consumption is reduced and productivity increased. Work on this project is continuing using funds from other sources.

  5. Some aspects of statistical modeling of human-error probability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prairie, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Human reliability analyses (HRA) are often performed as part of risk assessment and reliability projects. Recent events in nuclear power have shown the potential importance of the human element. There are several on-going efforts in the US and elsewhere with the purpose of modeling human error such that the human contribution can be incorporated into an overall risk assessment associated with one or more aspects of nuclear power. An effort that is described here uses the HRA (event tree) to quantify and model the human contribution to risk. As an example, risk analyses are being prepared on several nuclear power plants as part of the Interim Reliability Assessment Program (IREP). In this process the risk analyst selects the elements of his fault tree that could be contributed to by human error. He then solicits the HF analyst to do a HRA on this element.

  6. Human MSH2 protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  7. Human MSH2 protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  8. Petroleum processing handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKetta, J.J. )

    1992-01-01

    It is time that many of the petroleum processes currently in use be presented in a well-organized, easy-to-read and understandable manner. This handbook fulfills this need by covering up-to-date processing operations. Each chapter is written by a world expert in that particular area, in such a manner that it is easily understood and applied. The handbook is conveniently divided into four sections: products, refining, manufacturing processes, and treating processes. Each of the processing chapters contain information on plant design as well as significant chemical reactions. Wherever possible, shortcut methods of calculations are included along with nomographic methods of solution. In the front of the book are two convenient sections that will be very helpful to the reader. These are (1) conversion to and from SI units, and (2) cost indexes that will enable the reader to update any cost information. Sections have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. Process for LPG recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Sh. A.; Haliburton, J.

    1985-03-26

    An improved process is described for the separation and recovery of substantially all the propane and heavier hydrocarbon components in a hydrocarbon gaseous feedstream. In this process, the vapor stream from a deethanizer is cooled to liquefaction and contacted with a vapor phase from the hydrocarbon gaseous feedstream. The contact takes place within a direct heat exchanger, and the resulting vapor fraction, which is essentially ethane and methane, is the gaseous product of the process.

  10. Colorado, Processing Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 LMS/RFO-RFN/S11940 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFO-RFN/S11940 2014 Verification Monitoring Report for the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2014 Verification Monitoring Report for the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 Doc. No. S11940 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  11. Undergraduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Undergraduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0987 Email Student hiring process Once an application is submitted online, it is made available for all interested Laboratory hiring officials to view. Hiring officials are Laboratory employees who have the funding and work

  12. TEP process flow diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilms, R Scott; Carlson, Bryan; Coons, James; Kubic, William

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes the development of the proposed Process Flow Diagram (PFD) for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP) of ITER. A brief review of design efforts leading up to the PFD is followed by a description of the hydrogen-like, air-like, and waterlike processes. Two new design values are described; the mostcommon and most-demanding design values. The proposed PFD is shown to meet specifications under the most-common and mostdemanding design values.

  13. Graduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Graduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0987 Email The student hiring process Thank you for your interest in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Student Programs. Once an application is submitted online, it is available for all interested Laboratory hiring officials to view.

  14. Earth System Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earth system processes Earth System Processes Cosmogenic isotopes are rare isotopes created when a high-energy cosmic ray interacts with the nucleus of an atom, causing cosmic ray spallation. These isotopes are produced within earth materials such as rocks or soil, in Earth's atmosphere, and in extraterrestrial items such as meteorites. By measuring cosmogenic isotopes, scientists are able to gain insight into a range of geological and astronomical processes. Cosmogenic nuclides can provide a

  15. Silica Scaling Removal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles....

  16. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  17. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  18. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R. (Winchester, MA); Baumann, Robert (Cambridge, MA)

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  19. Graduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email The student hiring process Thank you for your interest in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Student...

  20. Abstract Submission Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract Submission Process Focusing on methods and computational tools used to help sequence, assemble, and finish genomes, including new sequencing technologies. Contact Shannon...

  1. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

    1998-06-09

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

  2. ARM - Engineering Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processes Workflow Graphic Engineering Workflow Document Tools for Workflow ECR ECO BCR Ingests Value-Added Products Reprocessing Instruments Data System Elements Field...

  3. Unit Process Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... from the combustion of stemwood burned in slash piles DS DF LNG Liquefaction, Construction - 6132013 This process encompasses the construction of a LNG liquefaction facility. ...

  4. Undergraduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Student hiring process Once an application is submitted online, it is made available for all interested Laboratory...

  5. Energy Process Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced multiphase reactor concepts and designs and performing validation studies. Research includes the areas of hydrodynamics and kinetics as well as reactor and process ...

  6. Industrial Process Surveillance System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    2001-01-30

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  7. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  8. Methods and Process Stewardship

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Project Management Coordination Office (PMCO) leads the development of policies, processes and reporting for project and risk management, including Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) and...

  9. NNMCAB Processes and Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the January 8, 2014 Committee meeting NNMCAB Staff, Covered the Procedures and Processes that are used in Running the Board.

  10. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.