Sample records for human radiation experiments

  1. Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government`s role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future.

  2. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research.

  3. Human radiation experiments associated with the US Department of Energy and its predecessors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains a listing, description, and selected references for documented human radiation experiments sponsored, supported, or performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessors, including the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the Off ice of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). The list represents work completed by DOE`s Off ice of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) through June 1995. The experiment list is available on the Internet via a Home Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.ohre.doe.gov). The Home Page also includes the full text of Human Radiation Experiments. The Department of Energy Roadmap to the Story and the Records (DOE/EH-0445), published in February 1995, to which this publication is a supplement. This list includes experiments released at Secretary O`Leary`s June 1994 press conference, as well as additional studies identified during the 12 months that followed. Cross-references are provided for experiments originally released at the press conference; for experiments released as part of The DOE Roadmap; and for experiments published in the 1986 congressional report entitled American Nuclear Guinea Pigs: Three Decades of Radiation Experiments on US Citizens. An appendix of radiation terms is also provided.

  4. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This large document provides a catalog of the location of large numbers of reports pertaining to the charge of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Research and is arranged as a series of appendices. Titles of the appendices are Appendix A- Records at the Washington National Records Center Reviewed in Whole or Part by DoD Personnel or Advisory Committee Staff; Appendix B- Brief Descriptions of Records Accessions in the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Research Document Collection; Appendix C- Bibliography of Secondary Sources Used by ACHRE; Appendix D- Brief Descriptions of Human Radiation Experiments Identified by ACHRE, and Indexes; Appendix E- Documents Cited in the ACHRE Final Report and other Separately Described Materials from the ACHRE Document Collection; Appendix F- Schedule of Advisory Committee Meetings and Meeting Documentation; and Appendix G- Technology Note.

  5. Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department`s ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE`s historical records to independent research and analysis.

  6. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Final report, Supplemental Volume 2. Sources and documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume and its appendixes supplement the Advisory Committee`s final report by reporting how we went about looking for information concerning human radiation experiments and intentional releases, a description of what we found and where we found it, and a finding aid for the information that we collected. This volume begins with an overview of federal records, including general descriptions of the types of records that have been useful and how the federal government handles these records. This is followed by an agency-by-agency account of the discovery process and descriptions of the records reviewed, together with instructions on how to obtain further information from those agencies. There is also a description of other sources of information that have been important, including institutional records, print resources, and nonprint media and interviews. The third part contains brief accounts of ACHRE`s two major contemporary survey projects (these are described in greater detail in the final report and another supplemental volume) and other research activities. The final section describes how the ACHRE information-nation collections were managed and the records that ACHRE created in the course of its work; this constitutes a general finding aid for the materials deposited with the National Archives. The appendices provide brief references to federal records reviewed, descriptions of the accessions that comprise the ACHRE Research Document Collection, and descriptions of the documents selected for individual treatment. Also included are an account of the documentation available for ACHRE meetings, brief abstracts of the almost 4,000 experiments individually described by ACHRE staff, a full bibliography of secondary sources used, and other information.

  7. Understanding Human Experience Henry Kautz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kautz, Henry

    Understanding Human Experience Henry Kautz One of the earliest goals of research in artificial intelligence was to create systems that can interpret and understand day to day human experience. Early work on the goal of building systems that understand human experience. Each of the previous barriers is weakened

  8. The Human Plutonium Injection Experiments William Moss and Roger Eckhardt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    177 The Human Plutonium Injection Experiments William Moss and Roger Eckhardt T he human plutonium that was pertinent to those and LouisHempelmann #12;similar radiation experi- ments with humans. This article injection experiments carried out during and after the Manhattan Project have received tremendous noto

  9. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document.

  10. Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihovilovi?, M.; Merkel, H. [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on first findings of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome potential obstacles before running the full experiment in 2013.

  11. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Merril Eisenbud, January 26, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Merril Eisenbud was interviewed on January 26, 1995 by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Following a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Eisenbud relates his remembrances as the AEC`s first industrial hygienist, the setting up of AEC`s Health and Safety Laboratory, monitoring radioactive fallout, and use or exposure of humans to radiation.

  12. From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To ComputationalComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To Computational Experiments - 100% human 100% computational agents What is Agent-based Comp Econ (ACE)? - 100% computational://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/aexper.htm #12;3 Spectrum of Possible Experiments 100% human Humans with computer access Human

  13. From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To ComputationalComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To Computational: ACE Electricity Market ACE Human-Subject (HS) Experiments Proof-of-Concept Proposal (GMUComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments (And Everything In Between)(And Everything In Between) New Directions, IESA

  14. Dose-dependent misrejoining of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in human fibroblasts: Experimental and theoretical study for high and low LET radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rydberg, Bjorn; Cooper, Brian; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Holley, William; Chatterjee, Aloke

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Kim, and R. M. Myers. Radiation hybrid mapping: a somaticformulation of dual radiation action. Radiat. Res. 75: 471-High-Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in Human Fibroblasts.

  15. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auxier, J.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed. (ACR)

  16. CERN 6 Tesla superconducting persistent dipole/Filming an experiment/Synchrotron radiation from protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CERN 6 Tesla superconducting persistent dipole/Filming an experiment/Synchrotron radiation from protons

  17. The Chaotic Nature of Human Experience: An Alternative Approach to Determinacy in Understanding Emotions and Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Bilge

    The Chaotic Nature of Human Experience: An Alternative Approach to Determinacy in Understanding Nature of Human Experience: An Alternative Approach to Determinacy in Understanding Emotions and Experience Bilge Mutlu and Jodi Forlizzi School of Design & Human-Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie

  18. Optical Transition Radiation Monitor for the T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampa Bhadra; Mircea Cadabeschi; Patrick de Perio; Vyacheslav Galymov; Mark Hartz; Brian Kirby; Akira Konaka; Alysia D. Marino; John F. Martin; David Morris; Leif Stawnyczy

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An Optical Transition Radiation monitor has been developed for the proton beam-line of the T2K long base-line neutrino oscillation experiment. The monitor operates in the highly radioactive environment in proximity to the T2K target. It uses optical transition radiation, the light emitted from a thin metallic foil when the charged beam passes through it, to form a 2D image of a 30 GeV proton beam. One of its key features is an optical system capable of transporting the light over a large distance out of the harsh environment near the target to a lower radiation area where it is possible to operate a camera to capture this light. The monitor measures the proton beam position and width with a precision of better than 500 {\\mu}m, meeting the physics requirements of the T2K experiment.

  19. Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M., May 18, 2011 – New Mexico State University?s Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth?s surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project?s first two years of experimentation.

  20. RADIATION PERMIT APPLICATION Western Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    and Model of Radiation Device (if applicable) Experimental Protocol Describe in detail your experimental the aspects that pertain to safety issues, describe any special hazards, and include the following: 1. Brief will be performed 7. Provide a waste disposal flow chart indicating approx. activities (mCi or MBq) for each type

  1. Designing Human Benchmark Experiments for Testing Software Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    Designing Human Benchmark Experiments for Testing Software Agents Robert D. Grant, David De quizzes and tests and qualitative data through observation. Results: Though we collect quantitative data" curricula in controlled experi- ments. We aimed to produce lessons and tests on which human students who

  2. HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451DOE/SC0002390dVandHEATINGDOBEH -0454 HUMAN

  3. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Julie Langham Grilly, February 3, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Julie Langham Grilly was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) being the widow of Dr. Wright Langham, an investigator of principal interest of the committee. Her extensive experience with research at LANL was also of interest to the committee. Following a brief biographical sketch, Ms. Grilly relates her early postwar experience and her knowledge of Wright Langham`s involvement in animal research at Los Alamos, radiolanthanum tests on monkeys, Eniwetok tissue examinations, research on tritium uptake in humans, plutonium injections, tritium injections, EDTA, and etc. In addition to illuminating her former husband as a researcher and as an individual, she also relates her remembrances of Louis Hempelman, Enrico Fermi, Oppenheimer, Edward Teller, and many others.

  4. Dynamic social networks promote cooperation in experiments with humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rand, David G.

    Dynamic social networks promote cooperation in experiments with humans David G. Randa,b,1 , Samuel and highly organized. Human interactions are not random but rather are structured in social networks. Importantly, ties in these networks often are dynamic, changing in response to the behavior of one's social

  5. Evaluation of commercial ADC radiation tolerance for accelerator experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Chen; Hucheng Chen; James Kierstead; Helio Takai; Sergio Rescia; Xueye Hu; Hao Xu; Joseph Mead; Francesco Lanni; Marena Minelli

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic components used in high energy physics experiments are subjected to a radiation background composed of high energy hadrons, mesons and photons. These particles can induce permanent and transient effects that affect the normal device operation. Ionizing dose and displacement damage can cause chronic damage which disable the device permanently. Transient effects or single event effects are in general recoverable with time intervals that depend on the nature of the failure. The magnitude of these effects is technology dependent with feature size being one of the key parameters. Analog to digital converters are components that are frequently used in detector front end electronics, generally placed as close as possible to the sensing elements to maximize signal fidelity. We report on radiation effects tests conducted on 17 commercially available analog to digital converters and extensive single event effect measurements on specific twelve and fourteen bit ADCs that presented high tolerance to ionizing dose. Mitigation strategies for single event effects (SEE) are discussed for their use in the large hadron collider environment.

  6. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of physiologist Nello Pace, Ph.D., August 16, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Nello Pace was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). Dr. Pace was selected fro the interview because of the positions he held with the US Navy, at the University of California, Berkeley, and as Director of the White Mountain Research Station near Bishop, California. Following a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Pace related his remembrances concerning tritium injections experiments in animals and humans during World War II, the development of Medical Physics Degree Programs at UC Berkeley, conducting the first radiation survey at Nagasaki after the bomb, and the establishment of a research laboratory at White Mountain. He also offers reflections on Shields Warren and comments on the public`s attitudes towards radiation both then and now.

  7. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of biophysicist Cornelius A. Tobias, Ph.D., January 16, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Cornelius A. Tobias was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). He was chosen for this interview because of his extensive biophysics and medical physics research activities while he was employed by the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco and at the Donner Laboratory. He discusses his involvement in wartime studies of effects of high altitude on aviators, carbon monoxide with radioactive tracers, blood studies with radioactive iron, human use committees, heavy-ion research with the Bevatron, boron isotope research, classified research involving human subjects, heavy-particle radiography, heavy- particle beams and medical research, and pituitary irradiation studies,.

  8. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacobexposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Sinceto nuclear explo ions or medical radiation, describes the

  9. The Chaotic Nature of Human Experience: Insights on the Subject Matter of Design towards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Bilge

    The Chaotic Nature of Human Experience: Insights on the Subject Matter of Design towards," as Design has no fixed subject matter but the entire scope of human experience. I argue that human" of the subject matter of design that is #12;iv "human experience." My thesis essay is an attempt to explore

  10. Human Brain Imaging and Radiation Dosimetry of 11C-N-Desmethyl-Loperamide,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    Human Brain Imaging and Radiation Dosimetry of 11C-N-Desmethyl-Loperamide, a PET Radiotracer- tion of radioactivity in the entire body to estimate radiation expo- sure. Methods: Brain PET scans-body imaging, as a measure of radiation exposure to the entire body the effective dose of 11C-dLop was 7.8 6 0

  11. Guidance for Preparing Research Proposals Involving Diagnostic Use of Ionizing Radiation in Human Use Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Guidance for Preparing Research Proposals Involving Diagnostic Use of Ionizing Radiation in Human Use Research Introduction This guidance has been prepared by the Clinical Radiation Safety Committee of ionizing radiation. CRSCo serves under California Department of Health Services regulations and Nuclear

  12. University Studies Diversity of Human Experience Note: In this scoring guide, "diversity" refers to differences in ethnic, religious, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Studies Diversity of Human Experience Note: In this scoring guide, "diversity" refers within the broader context of human experience, demonstrating a sophisticated awareness · discusses personal experience within the broader context of human experience, demonstrating a working

  13. Experiment generates THz radiation 20,000 times brighter than...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    way for application development An experiment conducted with Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser (FEL) has shown how to make a highly useful form of light - called terahertz...

  14. THE GEOSTATIONARY EARTH RADIATION BUDGET (GERB) EXPERIMENT: SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    minute coverage over much of Europe, Africa and the Atlantic ocean and parts of Asia, South America of rapidly varying climate processes (e.g. diurnal convection over Africa) to be resolved. GERB data's Radiation Budget (ERB) is the balance between the incoming energy from the sun and the outgoing reflected

  15. Experiments on humans Tomasz Ciesielski, Line-Kristin Larsen, Claudia Melis, Chia-Wei Vivian Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bech, Claus

    Experiments on humans Tomasz Ciesielski, Line-Kristin Larsen, Claudia Melis, Chia-Wei Vivian Wang #12;Experiments on humans - Foersøkdyrelære ­ NTNU, November 2006 Page 1 of 21 Index 1. Historical issues and present status page 14 5. Behavioural research on humans page 15 5.1 The Milgram experiment

  16. Is the Human Amygdala Critical for the Subjective Experience of Emotion? Evidence of Intact Dispositional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Is the Human Amygdala Critical for the Subjective Experience of Emotion? Evidence of Intact & It is thought that the human amygdala is a critical component of the neural substrates of emotional experience experience following amygdala damage has been gathered in humans. In a preliminary test of the amygdala

  17. Estimating two-loop radiative effects in the MOLLER experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksejevs, A. G., E-mail: aaleksejevs@swgc.mun.ca [Grenfell Campus Memorial University (Canada); Barkanova, S. G., E-mail: svetlana.barkanova@acadiau.ca [Acadia University (Canada); Zykunov, V. A., E-mail: vladimir.zykunov@cern.ch [Belarussian State University of Transport (Belarus); Kuraev, E. A., E-mail: kuraev@theor.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the on-shell renormalization scheme, two-loop electroweak corrections to the parityviolating polarization asymmetry in the reaction e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}({gamma}, {gamma}{gamma}) were estimated for the MOLLER experiment at JLab. The infrared divergence and the imaginary part of the amplitude were taken completely under control. Relevant compact expressions obtained by using asymptotic methods are free from unphysical parameters and are convenient for analysis and for numerical estimations. A numerical analysis revealed a significant scale of two-loop effects and the need for taking them into account in the MOLLER experiment.

  18. Tryptophan Cluster Protects Human ?D-Crystallin from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Photoaggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafheimer, Steven Nathaniel

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a significant risk factor for age-related cataract, a disease of the human lens and the most prevalent cause of blindness in the world. Cataract pathology involves protein misfolding ...

  19. Radiation Protection lessonsRadiation Protection lessons Experiences with operating beams for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    closed-circuitThere was a continued inability to provide a correct closed circuit ventilation system rusting due to the build-up of humidity. CNGS The ventilation system is housed inside a `ventilation in a `low' radiation area. Separate ventilation system is for the target chamber/service gallery, the proton

  20. Using Information from Operating Experience to Inform Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; David I. Gertman; Julie Marble; Erasmia Lois; Nathan Siu

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on efforts being sponsored by the U.S. NRC and performed by INEEL to develop a technical basis and perform work to extract information from sources for use in HRA. The objectives of this work are to: 1) develop a method for conducting risk-informed event analysis of human performance information that stems from operating experience at nuclear power plants and for compiling and documenting the results in a structured manner; 2) provide information from these analyses for use in risk-informed and performance-based regulatory activities; 3) create methods for information extraction and a repository for this information that, likewise, support HRA methods and their applications.

  1. Dissociable substrates for body motion and physical experience in the human action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Antonia

    Dissociable substrates for body motion and physical experience in the human action observation with a human present, regardless of training experience. Conversely, the right ventral premotor cortex responds temporal sulcus Abstract Observation of human actions recruits a well-defined network of brain regions, yet

  2. A practical experiment with interactive humanoid robots in a human society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanda, Takayuki

    A practical experiment with interactive humanoid robots in a human society Takayuki Kanda1 a practical and long-term experiment with autonomous humanoid robots immersed in real human society. Students to identify individuals and adapt its behaviors to them. In this experiment, the robot spoke in English

  3. Two Experiments Comparing Reading with Listening for Human Processing of Conversational Telephone Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Two Experiments Comparing Reading with Listening for Human Processing of Conversational Telephone of no experiment that directly compares Switchboard and Fishertype CTS transcripts with audio in terms of human. Abstract We report on results of two experiments designed to compare subjects' ability to extract

  4. God and the Human Experience A physicist's case for a theistic world view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gea-Banacloche, Julio

    God and the Human Experience A physicist's case for a theistic world view Julio Gea-Banacloche 1, starting from the basic facts about the human experience of existence. For convenience (but also, when they, in turn, experience the need to look beyond the simple conception of God that saw them

  5. The rights, tensions, and ideas that inform the con-temporary human experience were explored by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The rights, tensions, and ideas that inform the con- temporary human experience were explored Trustee. Examining the Human Experience ANDREAKANE CLIFFMOORE #12;; and the conception and challenges of human rights from historical, philo- sophical, political, and sociological

  6. God and the human experience A physicist's case for a theistic world view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gea-Banacloche, Julio

    God and the human experience A physicist's case for a theistic world view Julio Gea-Banacloche 1 and--possibly--relate to that reality, by considering the various aspects of our (human beings') experience of existence. For convenience (but also with an ulterior theological purpose in mind

  7. Experiments investigating cooperative types in humans: A complement to evolutionary theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukas, Reuven

    Experiments investigating cooperative types in humans: A complement to evolutionary theory) Unlike other species, humans cooperate in large, distantly related groups, a fact that has long presented in humans remains a subject of vigorous debate. Results from theoretical analyses and agent

  8. Radiation Skyshine Calculation with MARS15 for the mu2e Experiment at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveling, A F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Antiproton source is to be repurposed to provide an 8 kW proton beam to the Mu2e experiment by 1/3 integer, slow resonant extraction. Shielding provided by the existing facility must be supplemented with in-tunnel shielding to limit the radiation effective dose rate above the shield in the AP30 service building. In addition to the nominal radiation shield calculations, radiation skyshine calculations were required to ensure compliance with Fermilab Radiological Control Manual. A complete model of the slow resonant extraction system including magnets, electrostatic septa, magnetic fields, tunnel enclosure with shield, and a nearby exit stairway are included in the model. The skyshine model extends above the beam enclosure surface to 10 km vertically and 5 km radially.

  9. A photoelectron velocity map imaging spectrometer for experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keeffe, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Coreno, M.; Avaldi, L. [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy); Moise, A.; Richter, R.; Cautero, G.; Stebel, L.; Sergo, R. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Pravica, L. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Ovcharenko, Y. [Institute of Electron Physics, 88017 Uzhgorod (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A velocity map imaging/ion time-of-flight spectrometer designed specifically for pump-probe experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations is described. The in-house built delay line detector can be used in two modes: the high spatial resolution mode and the coincidence mode. In the high spatial resolution mode a kinetic energy resolution of 6% has been achieved. The coincidence mode can be used to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the pump-probe experiments either by using a gate to count electrons only when the laser is present or by recording coincidences with the ion formed in the ionization process.

  10. Gravitational Hertz experiment with electromagnetic radiation in a strong magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. I. Kolosnitsyn; V. N. Rudenko

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief review of principal ideas in respect of the high frequency gravitational radiation generated and detected in the laboratory condition is presented. Interaction of electro-magnetic and gravitational waves into a strong magnetic field is considered as a more promising variant of the laboratory GW-Hertz experiment. The formulae of the direct and inverse Gertsenshtein-Zeldovich effect are derived. Numerical estimates are given and a discussion of a possibility of observation of these effects in a lab is carried out.

  11. Entrepreneurial experiments in science policy: Analyzing the Human Genome Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Kenneth G.

    We re-conceptualize the role of science policy makers, envisioning and illustrating their move from being simple investors in scientific projects to entrepreneurs who create the conditions for entrepreneurial experiments ...

  12. Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger. Part 2: Radiative fluxes and divergences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slingo, A.; White, H. E.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadband shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes observed both at the surface and from space during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger in 2006 are presented. The surface fluxes were measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport, while the fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on the Meteosat-8 satellite. The data are analyzed as daily averages, in order to minimise sampling differences between the surface and top of atmosphere instruments, while retaining the synoptic and seasonal changes that are the main focus of this study. A cloud mask is used to identify days with cloud from those with predominantly clear skies. The influence of temperature, water vapor, aerosols and clouds is investigated. Aerosols are ubiquitous throughout the year and have a significant impact on both the shortwave and longwave fluxes. The large and systematic seasonal changes in temperature and column integrated water vapor (CWV) through the dry and wet seasons are found to exert strong influences on the longwave fluxes. These influences are often in opposition to each other, because the highest temperatures occur at the end of the dry season when the CWV is lowest, while in the wet season the lowest temperatures are associated with the highest values of CWV. Apart from aerosols, the shortwave fluxes are also affected by clouds and by the seasonal changes in CWV. The fluxes are combined to provide estimates of the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere throughout 2006. The longwave divergence is remarkably constant through the year, because of a compensation between the seasonal variations in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and surface net longwave radiation. A simple model of the greenhouse effect is used to interpret this result in terms of the dependence of the normalized greenhouse effect at the TOA and of the effective emissivity of the atmosphere at the surface on the CWV. It is shown that, as the CWV increases, the atmosphere loses longwave energy to the surface with about the same increasing efficiency with which it traps the OLR, thus keeping the atmospheric longwave divergence roughly constant. The shortwave divergence is mainly determined by the CWV and aerosol loadings and the effect of clouds is much smaller than on the component fluxes.

  13. Tyrosine/Cysteine Cluster Sensitizing Human ?D-Crystallin to Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Photoaggregation in Vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafheimer, Steven Nathaniel

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is a major risk factor for age-related cataract, a protein-aggregation disease of the human lens often involving the major proteins of the lens, the crystallins. ?D-Crystallin (H?D-Crys) ...

  14. Application of synchrotron radiation computed microtomography for quantification of bone microstructure in human and rat bones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parreiras Nogueira, Liebert; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Braz, Delson; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Borba de Andrade, Cherley; Tromba, Giuliana [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Physics Institute / State University of Rio de Janeiro, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratory of Radiological Sciences / State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Strada Statale S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This work aims to evaluate histomorphometric quantification by synchrotron radiation computed microto-mography in bones of human and rat specimens. Bones specimens are classified as normal and pathological (for human samples) and irradiated and non-irradiated samples (for rat ones). Human bones are specimens which were affected by some injury, or not. Rat bones are specimens which were irradiated, simulating radiotherapy procedures, or not. Images were obtained on SYRMEP beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. The system generated 14 {mu}m tomographic images. The quantification of bone structures were performed directly by the 3D rendered images using a home-made software. Resolution yielded was excellent what facilitate quantification of bone microstructures.

  15. Climate change will bring economic, social and environmental costs at scales beyond any other human experience (IARU, 2009). Studies imply that humanity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    experience (IARU, 2009). Studies imply that humanity must reduce CO2 below its current atmosphericClimate change will bring economic, social and environmental costs at scales beyond any other human

  16. Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

  17. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of physician James S. Robertson, M.D., Ph.D., conducted January 20, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a transcript of in interview of Dr. James S. Robertson by representatives of the DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Robertson was chosen for this interview because of his research at Brookhaven National Laboratory, especially on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT); his work at the United States Naval Defense Laboratory; and his work at the Atomic Energy Commission. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Robertson discusses research on human subjects at Berkeley, his contributions to the beginnings of Neutron Capture Therapy at Brookhaven, his participation with the Brookhaven Human Use Committee, his involvement in the study of the effects of Castle Bravo event on the Marshallese, and his work with the Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory.

  18. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of cell biologist Don Francis Petersen, Ph.D., conducted November 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a transcript of an interview of Dr. Don Francis Petersen by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Petersen was selected for this interview because of his long research career at Los Alamos and his knowledge of the Atomic Energy Commission`s biomedical program. Dr. Petersen did not personally conduct research on human subjects. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Petersen discusses his remembrances of the early use of radionuclides as biological tracers, aspects of nuclear weapons testing in the 1940`s and 1950`s including fallout studies, the means by which research projects were approved, use of humans in the whole-body counter, and the Health Division Biomedical responsibilities.

  19. A Study of How Products Contribute to the Emotional Aspects of Human Experience Jodi Forlizzi, Assistant Professor, HCII and School of Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Bilge

    A Study of How Products Contribute to the Emotional Aspects of Human Experience Author 1 Jodi to the Emotional Aspects of Human Experience Jodi Forlizzi, Bilge Mutlu, and Carl DiSalvo Human the emotional aspects of products is of interest for any field concerned with human experience. The vast amount

  20. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  1. Human radiation dosimetry of 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG predicted from preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzic, Raymond F., E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Case Center for Imaging Research, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Chandramouli, Visvanathan; Hatami, Ahmad [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Wu, Chunying [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Case Center for Imaging Research, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Case Center for Imaging Research, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The authors are developing 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose (6-[{sup 18}F]FDG) as an in vivo tracer of glucose transport. While 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG has the same radionuclide half-life as 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-[{sup 18}F]FDG) which is ubiquitously used for PET imaging, 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG has special biologic properties and different biodistributions that make it preferable to 2-[{sup 18}F]FDG for assessing glucose transport. In preparation for 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG use in human PET scanning, the authors would like to determine the amount of 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG to inject while maintaining radiation doses in a safe range. Methods: Rats were injected with 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG, euthanized at specified times, and tissues were collected and assayed for activity content. For each tissue sample, the percent of injected dose per gram was calculated and extrapolated to that for humans in order to construct predicted time-courses. Residence times were calculated as areas under the curves and were used as inputs to OLINDA/EXM in order to calculate the radiation doses. Results: Unlike with 2-[{sup 18}F]FDG for which the urinary bladder wall receives the highest absorbed dose due to urinary excretion, with 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG there is little urinary excretion and osteogenic cells and the liver are predicted to receive the highest absorbed doses: 0.027 mGy/MBq (0.100 rad/mCi) and 0.018 mGy/MBq (0.066 rad/mCi), respectively. Also, the effective dose from 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG, i.e., 0.013 mSv/MBq (0.046 rem/mCi), is predicted to be approximately 30% lower than that from 2-[{sup 18}F]FDG. Conclusions: 6-[{sup 18}F]FDG will be safe for use in the PET scanning of humans.

  2. ACHI 2012, The Fifth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions, January 30 -February 4, 2012 -Valencia, Spain User Experience: Buzzword or New Paradigm?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the early days of ergonomics and HCI (Human- Computer Interaction), user experience really meant userACHI 2012, The Fifth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions, January 30 - February 4, 2012 - Valencia, Spain User Experience: Buzzword

  3. We're here to celebrate our colleagues and our work--of increasing understanding of the human experience. We do

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    as the record of human experience isbroadanddeep,bothbypreservationandworktobringinto view elements that might acknowledged here, increase our understanding of the human experience and encourage us to reflect critically `thank you' for the wonderful humanities education that I received at UCSC." "My experience

  4. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus in the pilot radiation observation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.; Patterson, G.R. [CSIRO, Victoria (Australia)] [and others

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a sensitive filter radiometer for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been reported. The aim was to develop a reliable and fast instrument that could be used alongside a lidar to obtain near realtime optical properties of clouds, particularly high ice clouds, as they drifted over an ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site allowing calculation of the radiation divergence in the atmosphere over the site. Obtaining cloud optical properties by the lidar/radiometer, or LIRAD, method was described by Platt et al.; the latter paper also describes a year`s data on mid-latitude cirrus. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus (i.e., cirrus within a few degrees of the equator) have hardly been studied at all. The same is true of tropical cirrus, although a few observations have been reported by Davis and Platt et al.This paper describes obersvations performed on cirrus clouds, analysis methods used, and results.

  5. Measurement and modeling of the Saharan dust radiative impact: Overview of the Saharan Dust Experiment (SHADE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Highwood, Ellie

    on Climate Change (IPCC), 2001]. Among the different aerosol types, mineral dust is one of the major to their scattering and absorbing properties that affect the solar radiation, they also perturb the terrestrial but they still represent one of the largest uncer- tainties in climate change studies [Intergovernmental Panel

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

  7. LET dependence of radiation-induced bystander effects using human prostate tumor cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anzenberg, Vered

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past fifteen years, evidence provided by many independent research groups have indicated higher numbers of cells exhibiting damage than expected based on the number of cells traversed by the radiation. This phenomenon ...

  8. Preparation and characterization of {sup 238}Pu-ceramics for radiation damage experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DM Strachan; RD Scheele; WC Buchmiller; JD Vienna; RL Sell; RJ Elovich

    2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of treaty agreements between Russia and the US, portions of their respective plutonium and nuclear weapons stockpiles have been declared excess. In support of the US Department of Energy's 1998 decision to pursue immobilization of a portion of the remaining Pu in a titanate-based ceramic, the authors prepared nearly 200 radiation-damage test specimens of five Pu- and {sup 238}Pu-ceramics containing 10 mass% Pu to determine the effects of irradiation from the contained Pu and U on the ceramic. The five Pu-ceramics were (1) phase-pure pyrochlore [ideally, Ca(U, Pu)Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}], (2) pyrochlore-rich baseline, (3) pyrochlore-rich baseline with impurities, (4) phase-pure zirconolite [ideally Ca(U, Pu)Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}], and (5) a zirconolite-rich baseline. These ceramics were prepared with either normal weapons-grade Pu, which is predominantly {sup 239}Pu, or {sup 238}Pu. The {sup 238}Pu accelerates the radiation damage relative to the {sup 239}Pu because of its much higher specific activity. The authors were unsuccessful in preparing phase-pure (Pu, U) brannerite, which is the third crystalline phase present in the baseline immobilization form. Since these materials will contain {approximately}10 mass% Pu and about 20 mass% U, radiation damage to the crystalline structure of these materials will occur overtime. As the material becomes damaged from the decay of the Pu and U, it is possible for the material to swell as both the alpha particles and recoiling atoms rupture chemical bonds within the solid. As the material changes density, cracking, perhaps in the form of microcracks, may occur. If cracking occurs in ceramic that has been placed in a repository, the calculated rate of radionuclide release if the can has corroded would increase proportionately to the increase in surface area. To investigate the effects of radiation damage on the five ceramics prepared, the authors are storing the specimens at 20, 125, and 250 C until the {sup 238}Pu specimens become metamict and the damage saturates. They will characterize and test these specimens every 6 months by (1) monitoring the dimensions, (2) monitoring the geometric and pycnometric densities, (3) monitoring the appearance, (4) determining the normalized amount leached during a 3-day, static, 90 C leach test in high purity water, and (5) monitoring the crystal structure with x-ray diffraction crystallography (XRD). In this paper, the authors document the preparation and initial characterization of the materials that were made in this study. The initial XRD characterizations indicate that the phase assemblages appear to be correct with the exception of the {sup 238}Pu-zirconolite baseline material. They made this latter material using too much Pu, so this material contains unreacted PuO{sub 2}. The characterization of the physical properties of these materials found that the densities for all but three materials appear to be > 94% of theoretical, and only a few of the specimens have significant cracking. Those with cracking were the {sup 239}Pu-zirconolite specimens, which were sintered with a heat-up rate of 5 C/min. They sintered the {sup 238}Pu-zirconolite specimens with a heat-up rate of 2.5 C/min and obtained specimens with only minor surface cracking. Elemental releases during the 3-day MCC leach tests show that the normalized elemental releases depend on (1) whether the Pu is {sup 239}Pu or {sup 238}Pu, (2) the material type, and (3) the identity of the constituent. The effect of the Pu isotope in the ceramic is most dramatic for Pu release, with nominally 50 to 100 times more Pu activity released from the {sup 238}Pu specimens. This is unlikely to be an early indicator of radiation damage, because of the short time between specimen preparation and testing. In contrast greater amounts of Mo are released from the {sup 239}Pu specimens. Of the contained constituents, Ca Al, Pu, and U are the species found at relatively higher levels in the leachates.

  9. Observations of tropical cirrus properties in the pilot radiation observation experiment using lidar and the CSIRO ARM filter radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.J.; Patterson, G.R. [CSIRO, Victoria (Australia)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A narrow beam fast filter radiometer has been developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The radiometer is intended to operate alongside a lidar at ARM sites in a lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) configuration. The radiometer detects in three narrow bands at 8.62-, 10.86-, and 12.04-m central wavelengths in the atmospheric window. In addition, it has a variable field aperture that varies the radiance incident on the detector and also allows the field of view to be tailored to that of a lidar used in the LIRAD technique. The radiometer was deployed in the ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment (PROBE) at Kavieng, Papua New Guinea in January-February 1993. The radiometer worked satisfactorily and appeared to be very stable. The radiometer was compared with a previous CSIRO radiometer and the improved performance of the ARM instrument was very evident. The ARM radiometer was also compared with a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratories (ETL) interferometer and gave closely equivalent radiances. The LIRAD method was used at Kavieng to obtain the optical properties of cirrus clouds. Continuous observations of water vapor path obtained by the NOAA ETL microwave radiometer were employed to allow for the strong tropical water vapor absorption and emission. Cirrus cells that developed on one morning, independent of other clouds, had measured infrared emittances varying from <0.1 to 1.0.

  10. Effects of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} on human melanocytes and regulation of the FP receptor by ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Glynis [Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Box 697, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)]. E-mail: Glynis_Scott@urmc.rochester.edu; Jacobs, Stacey [Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Box 697, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Leopardi, Sonya [Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Box 697, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Anthony, Frank A. [Schering-Plough HealthCare Products Inc., Memphis TN (United States); Learn, Doug [Charles River DDS, Argus Division, Horsham, PA (United States); Malaviya, Rama [University of Medicine and Dentistry, RWJMS, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Pentland, Alice [Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Box 697, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prostaglandins are potent lipid hormones that activate multiple signaling pathways resulting in regulation of cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the skin, prostaglandins are rapidly released by keratinocytes following ultraviolet radiation and are chronically present in inflammatory skin lesions. We have shown previously that melanocytes, which provide photoprotection to keratinocytes through the production of melanin, express several receptors for prostaglandins, including the PGE{sub 2} receptors EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} and the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor FP, and that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates melanocyte dendricity. We now show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates the activity and expression of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. Analysis of FP receptor regulation showed that the FP receptor is regulated by ultraviolet radiation in melanocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. We also show that ultraviolet irradiation stimulates production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} by melanocytes. These results show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} binding to the FP receptor activates signals that stimulate a differentiated phenotype (dendricity and pigmentation) in melanocytes. The regulation of the FP receptor and the stimulation of production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} in melanocytes in response to ultraviolet radiation suggest that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} could act as an autocrine factor for melanocyte differentiation.

  11. Human-automation task allocation in lunar landing: simulation and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Hui Ying

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Task allocation, or how tasks are assigned to the human operator(s) versus to automation, is an important aspect of designing a complex vehicle or system for use in human space exploration. The performance implications of ...

  12. Assessment of the Technologies for Molecular Biodosimetry for Human Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew A. Coleman Ph.D.; Narayani Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.; Sally A. Amundson; James D. Tucker, Ph.D.; Stephen D. Dertinger, Ph.D.; Natalia I. Ossetrova, Ph.D.; Tao Chen

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to ionizing radiation produces few immediate outwardly-visible clinical signs, yet, depending on dose, can severely damage vital physiological functions within days to weeks and produce long-lasting health consequences among survivors. In the event of a radiological accident, the rapid evaluation of the individual absorbed dose is paramount to discriminate the worried but unharmed from those individuals who must receive medical attention. Physical, clinical and biological dosimetry are usually combined for the best dose assessment. However, because of the practical limits of physical and clinical dosimetry, many attempts have been made to develop a dosimetry system based on changes in biological parameters, including techniques for hematology, biochemistry, immunology, cytogenetics, etc. Lymphocyte counts and chromosome aberrations analyses are among the methods that have been routinely used for estimating radiation dose. However, these assays require several days to a week to be completed and therefore cannot be used to obtain a fast estimate of the dose during the first few days after exposure when the information would be most critical for identifying victims of radiation accidents who could benefit the most by medical intervention. The steadily increasing sophistication in our understanding of the early biochemical responses of irradiated cells and tissues provides the opportunity for developing mechanism-based biosignatures of exposure. Compelling breakthroughs have been made in the technologies for genome-scale analysis of cellular transcriptional and proteomic profiles. There have also been major strides in the mechanistic understanding of the early events in DNA damage and radiation damage products, as well as in the cellular pathways that lead to radiation injury. New research with genomic- and proteomic-wide tools is showing that within minutes to hours after exposure to ionizing radiation protein machines are modified and activated, and large-scale changes occur in the gene expression profile involving a broad variety of cell-process pathways after a wide range of both low (<10 cGy) and high dose (>10 cGy) exposures. Evaluation of these potential gene and protein biomarkers for early and late diagnostic information will be critical for determining the efficacy of the signatures to both low and high dose IR exposures. Also needed are approaches that enable rapid handling and processing for mass-casualty and population triage scenarios. Development of in vivo model system will be crucial for validating both the biological and the instrumentation for biodosimetry. Such studies will also help further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the biological effects of radiation and the differences of responses due to individual genetic variation.

  13. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of radiologist Earl R. Miller, M.D., August 9 and 17, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Earl R. Miller was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Research (OHRE). The interview covers Dr. Miller`s involvement with the Manhattan Engineer District, with total body irradiation, and heavy-ion therapy. Dr. Miller`s remembrances include wartime work on radiation exposure, Joe Hamilton, Neutron Therapy research, means of obtaining isotopes, consent forms, infinite laminograms, invention of a baby holder to alleviate exposure of radiological technicians in diagnostic procedures involving infants, and several personages.

  14. A revised model for radiation dosimetry in the human gastrointestinal tract 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhuiyan, Md. Nasir Uddin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents...

  15. Gschwind B., Mnard L., Albuisson M., Wald L., 2005. Three years of experience with the SoDa web service delivering solar radiation information: lessons learned and perspectives. In Proceedings of the 19th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    service delivering solar radiation information: lessons learned and perspectives. In Proceedings of the 19 of experience with the SoDa web service delivering solar radiation information: lessons learned and perspectives Benoît Gschwind, Lionel Ménard, Michel Albuisson and Lucien Wald1 Abstract Information on solar radiation

  16. Whole-body radiation dosimetry of 2-[F-18]fluoro-A-85380 in human PET imaging studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obrzut, S L; Koren, A O; Mandelkern, M A; Brody, A L; Hoh, C K; London, E D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    body biodistribution, radiation absorbed dose, and brainM. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of 18 F-fluoro-A-Whole-Body Radiation Dosimetry of 2-[ 18 F]Fluoro-A-85380 in

  17. THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR RADIOECOLOGY: A NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND HUMAN RADIATION RISK REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950s when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a graduate education training program for radioecology. Recently, NCoRE hosted a workshop to identify the immediate needs for science-driven discoveries, tool development and the generation of scientific data to support the legislative decision-making process for remediation strategies, long-term monitoring of radiologically-contaminated sites and protection of human health and the environment. Some of the immediate strategic research needs were identified in the fields of functional genomics for determining low-dose effects, improved low-level dosimetry, and mixed (radiological and chemical) contaminant studies. Longer term strategic research and tool development areas included development of radioecology case study sites, comprehensive decision-making tools, consequence response actions, and optimized scenario based ecosystem modeling. A summary of the NCoRE workshop findings related to waste management needs and priority areas will be presented in this paper.

  18. Ideal Observers for Detecting Human Motion: Correspondence Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HongJing Lo; Alan Yuille

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    psychophysical experiments showed that human performance waspsychophysics experiments to determine how humans performedpsychophysical experiments which are consistent with humans

  19. Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves hematologic toxicity in particular. Although the long-term efficacy of current treatment options remains disappointing, the improved therapeutic index of IMRT may aid in generalizing its use and allowing the addition of novel approaches such as intraperitoneal immunotherapy.

  20. Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatron oscillations, and beam steering in a plasma wakefield experiment at 30 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catravas, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Assmann, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Whittum, D.; Blue, B.; Clayton, C.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K.; Mori, W.B.; Wang, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for using Cerenkov radiation near atomic spectral lines to measure plasma source properties for plasma wakefield applications has been discussed and experimentally verified. Because the radiation co-propagates with the electron beam, the radiation samples the source properties exactly along the path of interest with perfect temporal synchronization. Observation wavelengths were chosen with respect to the atomic resonances of the plasma source, where the relative change in the index of refraction strongly affects the Cerenkov cone angle, and permits flexible diagnostic design. The Cerenkov spatial profiles were systematically studied for a Lithium heat pipe oven as a function of oven temperature and observation wavelength. Neutral densities and plasma densities were extracted from the measurements.

  1. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  2. Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

  3. Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Nishida, Shohei; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

  4. Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Hideyuki Kawai; Shohei Nishida; Takayuki Sumiyoshi

    2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

  5. Correlation of radiation absorbed dose to the human thyroid using the FBX dosimeter and external probe techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Sarah Caroline Louisa

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calculational dose response. 25 9 Counts per minute of "'I as obtained using a 1" x 1" Nal external probe bioassay system as a function of '"I activity present. 26 INTRODUCTION The objective of this research is to measure the radiation absorbed dose from... dosimeter system, the energy imparted by radiation causes the ferrous ions present in the solution to be converted to ferric ions, so that the number of iona converted is proportional to the radiation absorbed dose (Gu78a). However in the FBX dosimeter...

  6. Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selection, to a human experiment that employed pretraining (group (white) in human experiment by Beckers et al. (2005).set used for the human experiments, we increased the

  7. Sequential Causal Learning in Humans and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongjing Lu; Randall R. Rojas; Tom Beckers; Alan Yuille

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selection, to a human experiment that employed pretraining (group (white) in human experiment by Beckers et al. (2005).set used for the human experiments, we increased the

  8. Silica aerogel radiator for use in the A-RICH system utilized in the Belle II experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Hamada, Nao; Hara, Koji; Iijima, Toru; Iwata, Shuichi; Kakuno, Hidekazu; Kawai, Hideyuki; Korpar, Samo; Križan, Peter; Kumita, Tetsuro; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, Satoru; Pestotnik, Rok; Šantelj, Luka; Seljak, Andrej; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki; Tahirovi?, Elvedin; Yoshida, Keisuke; Yusa, Yosuke

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents recent progress in the development and mass production of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter, which will be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector. The proximity-focusing A-RICH system is especially designed to identify charged kaons and pions. The refractive index of the installed aerogel Cherenkov radiators is approximately 1.05, and we aim for a separation capability exceeding 4$\\sigma $ at momenta up to 4 GeV/$c$. Large-area aerogel tiles (over 18 $\\times $ 18 $\\times $ 2 cm$^3$) were first fabricated in test productions by pin drying in addition to conventional methods. We proposed to fill the large end-cap region (area 3.5 m$^2$) with 124 water-jet-trimmed fan-shaped dual-layer-focusing aerogel combinations of different refractive indices (1.045 and 1.055). Guided by the test production results, we decided to manufacture aerogels by the conventional method and are currently procee...

  9. Silica aerogel radiator for use in the A-RICH system utilized in the Belle II experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Nao Hamada; Koji Hara; Toru Iijima; Shuichi Iwata; Hidekazu Kakuno; Hideyuki Kawai; Samo Korpar; Peter Križan; Tetsuro Kumita; Shohei Nishida; Satoru Ogawa; Rok Pestotnik; Luka Šantelj; Andrej Seljak; Takayuki Sumiyoshi; Elvedin Tahirovi?; Keisuke Yoshida; Yosuke Yusa

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents recent progress in the development and mass production of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter, which will be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector. The proximity-focusing A-RICH system is especially designed to identify charged kaons and pions. The refractive index of the installed aerogel Cherenkov radiators is approximately 1.05, and we aim for a separation capability exceeding 4$\\sigma $ at momenta up to 4 GeV/$c$. Large-area aerogel tiles (over 18 $\\times $ 18 $\\times $ 2 cm$^3$) were first fabricated in test productions by pin drying in addition to conventional methods. We proposed to fill the large end-cap region (area 3.5 m$^2$) with 124 water-jet-trimmed fan-shaped dual-layer-focusing aerogel combinations of different refractive indices (1.045 and 1.055). Guided by the test production results, we decided to manufacture aerogels by the conventional method and are currently proceeding with mass production. In an electron beam test undertaken at the DESY, we confirmed that the $K$/$\\pi $ separation capability of a prototype A-RICH counter exceeded 4$\\sigma $ at 4 GeV/$c$.

  10. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop ...

  11. Experiences in the Performance Analysis and Optimization of a Deterministic Radiation Transport Code on the Cray SV1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Cebull

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Attila radiation transport code, which solves the Boltzmann neutron transport equation on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes, was ported to a Cray SV1. Cray's performance analysis tools pointed to two subroutines that together accounted for 80%-90% of the total CPU time. Source code modifications were performed to enable vectorization of the most significant loops, to correct unfavorable strides through memory, and to replace a conjugate gradient solver subroutine with a call to the Cray Scientific Library. These optimizations resulted in a speedup of 7.79 for the INEEL's largest ATR model. Parallel scalability of the OpenMP version of the code is also discussed, and timing results are given for other non-vector platforms.

  12. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  13. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  14. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conard, R.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  15. A Challenge to Control Gravity via Applying Electromagnetic Low-Frequency Radiation - Theory and Proposed Model Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julius Vanko; Miroslav Sukenik; Jozef Sima

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Including Vaidya metric into the model of Expansive Nondecelerative Universe allows to localize the energy of gravitational field. A term of effective gravitational range is introduced and classic Newton potential is substituted for Yukawa-type potential. It allows to allocate a typical frequency value to each gravitational field. Derived theoretical conclusions led us to investigate the effect of electromagnetic field with a precisely predetermined frequency and intensity on iron. We believe that under certain circumstances a decrease in iron gravitational mass should be observed. Two model experiments verifying the theoretical conclusions are proposed.

  16. The Microwave Air Yield Beam Experiment (MAYBE): measurement of GHz radiation for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Monasor; M. Bohacova; C. Bonifazi; G. Cataldi; S. Chemerisov; J. R. T. De Mello Neto; P. Facal San Luis; B. Fox; P. W. Gorham; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; R. Meyhandan; L. C. Reyes; B. Rouille D'Orfeuil; E. M. Santos; J. Pochez; P. Privitera; H. Spinka; V. Verzi; C. Williams; J. Zhou

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first measurements by MAYBE of microwave emission from an electron beam induced air plasma, performed at the electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Coherent radio Cherenkov, a major background in a previous beam experiment, is not produced by the 3 MeV beam, which simplifies the interpretation of the data. Radio emission is studied over a wide range of frequencies between 3 and 12 GHz. This measurement provides further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  17. Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The {sup 237}Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination.

  18. The Impact of New Technologies on Radiation Oncology Events and Trends in the Past Decade: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, Margie A., E-mail: huntm@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pastrana, Gerri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Amols, Howard I. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Killen, Aileen [Quality of Care Initiative, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Quality of Care Initiative, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review the type and frequency of patient events from external-beam radiotherapy over a time period sufficiently long to encompass significant technology changes. Methods and Materials: Ten years of quality assurance records from January 2001 through December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed to determine the frequency of events affecting patient treatment from four radiation oncology process steps: simulation, treatment planning, data entry/transfer, and treatment delivery. Patient events were obtained from manual records and, from May 2007 onward, from an institution-wide database and reporting system. Events were classified according to process step of origination and segregated according to the most frequently observed event types. Events from the institution-wide database were evaluated to determine time trends. Results: The overall event rate was 0.93% per course of treatment, with a downward trend over time led by a decrease in treatment delivery events. The frequency of certain event types, particularly in planning and treatment delivery, changed significantly over the course of the study, reflecting technologic and process changes. Treatments involving some form of manual intervention carried an event risk four times higher than those relying heavily on computer-aided design and delivery. Conclusions: Although the overall event rate was low, areas for improvement were identified, including manual calculations and data entry, late-day treatments, and staff overreliance on computer systems. Reducing the incidence of pretreatment events is of particular importance because these were more likely to occur several times before detection and were associated with larger dosimetric impact. Further improvements in quality assurance systems and reporting are imperative, given the advent of electronic charting, increasing reliance on computer systems, and the potentially severe consequences that can arise from mistakes involving complex intensity-modulated or image-guided treatments.

  19. The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma—Experience From the SEER Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stessin, Alexander M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Sison, Cristina [Department of Biostatistics, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States); Nieto, Jaime; Raifu, Muri [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York (United States); Li, Baoqing, E-mail: bal9018@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) on cause-specific survival in patients with meningeal hemangiopericytomas. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1990-2008 was queried for cases of surgically resected central nervous system hemangiopericytoma. Patient demographics, tumor location, and extent of resection were included in the analysis as covariates. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to analyze cause-specific survival. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine which factors were associated with cause-specific survival. Results: The mean follow-up time is 7.9 years (95 months). There were 76 patients included in the analysis, of these, 38 (50%) underwent gross total resection (GTR), whereas the other half underwent subtotal resection (STR). Postoperative RT was administered to 42% (16/38) of the patients in the GTR group and 50% (19/38) in the STR group. The 1-year, 10-year, and 20-year cause-specific survival rates were 99%, 75%, and 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, postoperative RT was associated with significantly better survival (HR = 0.269, 95% CI 0.084-0.862; P=.027), in particular for patients who underwent STR (HR = 0.088, 95% CI: 0.015-0.528; P<.008). Conclusions: In the absence of large prospective trials, the current clinical decision-making of hemangiopericytoma is mostly based on retrospective data. We recommend that postoperative RT be considered after subtotal resection for patients who could tolerate it. Based on the current literature, the practical approach is to deliver limited field RT to doses of 50-60 Gy while respecting the normal tissue tolerance. Further investigations are clearly needed to determine the optimal therapeutic strategy.

  20. SR-2508 plus buthionine sulfoximine or SR-2508 alone: effects on the radiation response and the glutathione content of a human tumor xenograft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lespinasse, F.; Biscay, P.; Malaise, E.P.; Guichard, M.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study determined the radiosensitivity of the human tumor xenograft HT29 and its glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (CYS) contents after treatment with both buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and SR-2508 or SR-2508 alone. Tumor radiosensitivity was assessed by the in vitro colony assay and thiol content was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The radiosensitizing effect of SR-2508 is dose dependent and increases when higher doses of radiation are given. SR-2508 given alone does not modify GSH and CYS content; however, when given with BSO, the GSH level is significantly reduced, yet radiosensitivity of the HT29 tumor is only slightly increased. These results have been compared to our previously observed results of HT29 treatment with misonidazole (MISO), BSO, or MISO + BSO.

  1. Correlation of radiation absorbed dose to the human thyroid using the FBX dosimeter and external probe techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Sarah Caroline Louisa

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Nuclear Regulatory Commission provides the criteria under which an in-vivo external probe bioassay program for those occupationally exposed to '- I and '" I should be implemented (USNRC79). This is the basis for the Texas A&M University bioassay program... present in the thyroid. Determination of the radiation absorbed dose to the thyroid gland from a known activity of radioiodine present in the thyroid is necessary from both a safety and regulatory standpoint. Regulatory Guide 8. 20, issued by the U. S...

  2. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 419 (1998) 556--569 Radiation damage of silicon strip detectors in the NA50 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramello, Luciano

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 419 (1998) 556--569 Radiation damage and Nuclear Techniques, Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, PL-30-059, Krakow, Poland to 20 Mrad, with a very non-uniform radiation spatial distribution. Radiation effects in the detectors

  3. Prediction of human observer performance in a 2-alternative forced choice low-contrast detection task using channelized Hotelling observer: Impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Lifeng; Leng Shuai; Chen Lingyun; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey E. [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Efficient optimization of CT protocols demands a quantitative approach to predicting human observer performance on specific tasks at various scan and reconstruction settings. The goal of this work was to investigate how well a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can predict human observer performance on 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) lesion-detection tasks at various dose levels and two different reconstruction algorithms: a filtered-backprojection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) method. Methods: A 35 Multiplication-Sign 26 cm{sup 2} torso-shaped phantom filled with water was used to simulate an average-sized patient. Three rods with different diameters (small: 3 mm; medium: 5 mm; large: 9 mm) were placed in the center region of the phantom to simulate small, medium, and large lesions. The contrast relative to background was -15 HU at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times using automatic exposure control each at 60, 120, 240, 360, and 480 quality reference mAs on a 128-slice scanner. After removing the three rods, the water phantom was again scanned 100 times to provide signal-absent background images at the exact same locations. By extracting regions of interest around the three rods and on the signal-absent images, the authors generated 21 2AFC studies. Each 2AFC study had 100 trials, with each trial consisting of a signal-present image and a signal-absent image side-by-side in randomized order. In total, 2100 trials were presented to both the model and human observers. Four medical physicists acted as human observers. For the model observer, the authors used a CHO with Gabor channels, which involves six channel passbands, five orientations, and two phases, leading to a total of 60 channels. The performance predicted by the CHO was compared with that obtained by four medical physicists at each 2AFC study. Results: The human and model observers were highly correlated at each dose level for each lesion size for both FBP and IR. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients were 0.986 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.958-0.996] for FBP and 0.985 (95% CI: 0.863-0.998) for IR. Bland-Altman plots showed excellent agreement for all dose levels and lesions sizes with a mean absolute difference of 1.0%{+-} 1.1% for FBP and 2.1%{+-} 3.3% for IR. Conclusions: Human observer performance on a 2AFC lesion detection task in CT with a uniform background can be accurately predicted by a CHO model observer at different radiation dose levels and for both FBP and IR methods.

  4. Humans, Robots and Market Crashes: A Laboratory Study ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Todd; Friedman, Daniel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based Models and Human Subject Experiments. Handbook of Com-data from our experiments combining humans and robots, usingbetween laboratory experiment with human subjects and agent

  5. The National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE): A Network of Excellence for Environmental and Human Radiation Risk Reduction - 13365

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhne, W.W.; Jannik, G.T.; Farfan, E.B.; Knox, A.S.; Mayer, J.J.; Murray, A.M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950's when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a graduate education training program for radioecology. Recently, NCoRE hosted a workshop to identify the immediate needs for science-driven discoveries, tool development and the generation of scientific data to support the legislative decision-making process for remediation strategies, long-term monitoring of radiologically- contaminated sites and protection of human health and the environment. Some of the immediate strategic research needs were identified in the fields of functional genomics for determining low-dose effects, improved low-level dosimetry, and mixed (radiological and chemical) contaminant studies. Longer term strategic research and tool development areas included development of radioecology case study sites, comprehensive decision-making tools, consequence response actions, and optimized scenario based ecosystem modeling. A summary of the NCoRE workshop findings related to waste management needs and priority areas will be presented in this paper. (authors)

  6. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhijian, Chen [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China) [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Xiaoxue, Li [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Wei, Zheng [Zhejiang International Travel Healthcare Center, 230 Zhonghezhong Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China)] [Zhejiang International Travel Healthcare Center, 230 Zhonghezhong Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Jiliang, He, E-mail: he_jiliang@hotmail.com [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Protein microarray shows the differential expression of 27 proteins induced by RFR. ? RPA32 related to DNA repair is down-regulated in Western blot. ? p73 related to cell genome stability and apoptosis is up-regulated in Western blot. -- Abstract: In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P < 0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P < 0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis.

  7. The NCI Radiation Research Program: Grant portfolio and radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models (89 animals no human subject material, 21 use both) ­ 109 utilize rodent models ­ 2 have canine and R37s). Of those that utilize radiation: · 6 use tissue culture models only · 110 utilize animal subjects · 39 use human subjects or human subject materials only. #12;Dose and Dosimetry · The majority

  8. Can biophysics tell us something about the weak equivalence principle vis a vis the thought experiment of Einstein involving human subjects?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred H. Thaheld

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Over a period of several decades it has been noticed that most astronauts, either orbiting the earth or on trips to the moon, have observed phosphenes or light flashes (LF) including streaks, spots and clouds of light when their eyes are closed or they are in a darkened cabin. Scientists suspect that two separate components of cosmic rays cause these flashes due to direct interaction with the retina. This phenomenon is not noticed on the ground because of cosmic ray interaction with the atmosphere. The argument is advanced that this effect may provide us with a new method of exploring the weak equivalence principle from the standpoint of Einstein's original thought experiment involving human subjects. This can be done, utilizing the retina only, as an animate quantum mechanical measuring device or, in conjunction with the Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts (ALTEA) facility.

  9. Acute radiation syndrones and their management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation syndromes produced by large doses of ionizing radiation are divided into three general groups depending on dose of radiation and time after exposure. The CNS syndrome requires many thousands of rad, appears in minutes to hours, and kills within hours to days. The GIS appears after doses of a few hundred to 2000 rad. It is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and disturbances of water and electrolyte metabolism. It has a high mortality in the first week after exposure. Survivors will then experience the HS as a result of marrow aplasia. Depending on dose, survival is possible with antibiotic and transfusion therapy. The relationship of granulocyte depression to mortality in dogs and human beings is illustrated. The role of depth dose pattern of mortality of radiation exposure is described and used as an indication of why air exposure doses may be misleading. The therapy of radiation injury is described based on antibiotics, transfusion therapy, and use of molecular regulators. The limited role of matched allogenic bone marrow transplants is discussed. 52 refs., 13 figs.

  10. Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

  11. Radiation effects testing at the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Koga, Rokotura

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IEEE Nucl & Space Radiation Effects Conf. , Williamsburg,Radiation Effects Testing at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL*Understanding the effects of radiation on human cells is an

  12. advanced space radiators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about the space radiation impacts on the human body and defend the space radiation damage. This paper designed a prototype of the space radiation detector for SJ-10 and...

  13. Human and Artificial Agents in a Crash-Prone Financial Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Todd; Friedman, Daniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based models and human subject experiments. Handbook ofout that labo- ratory experiments with human subjects oftenas a laboratory experiment with human subjects, and Sect. 4

  14. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Progress report, July 1992--August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in identification of chromosomal transformations associated with leukemogenesis is described. In particular progress in DNA cloning of chromosomal break points in human cancer patients is described.

  15. MiTF links Erk1/2 kinase and p21CIP1/WAF1 activation after UVC radiation in normal human melanocytes and melanoma cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Feng; Singh, Amarinder; Yang, Zhen; Garcia, Angela; Kong, Yu; Meyskens, Frank L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human melanocytes and melanoma cells. Molecular Cancer 2010Transcriptional regulation in melanoma. Hematol Oncol Clinamplified in malignant melanoma. Nature 4. Joo A, et al:

  16. MiTF links Erk1/2 kinase and p21 CIP1/WAF1 activation after UVC radiation in normal human melanocytes and melanoma cells.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Feng; Singh, Amarinder; Yang, Zhen; Garcia, Angela; Kong, Yu; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human melanocytes and melanoma cells. Molecular Cancer 2010Transcriptional regulation in melanoma. Hematol Oncol Clinamplified in malignant melanoma. Nature 4. Joo A, et al:

  17. Smith Purcell radiation from femtosecond electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korbly, Stephen E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present theoretical and experimental results from a Smith-Purcell radiation experiment using the electron beam from a 17 GHz high gradient accelerator. Smith- Purcell radiation occurs when a charged particle travels ...

  18. Experiments: Preparation and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    the experimental set­up und the results of performing the experiment. Again, this is part of human cultureExperiments: Preparation and Measurement by Arnold Neumaier, Vienna March 1996 Abstract Introduction Experiments, properly arranged, provide information about a physical system by suitable

  19. Interleukin-1?-induced barrier dysfunction is signaled through PKC-? in human brain microvascular endothelium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Robert R Ph.D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ZO-1 (9). In parallel experiments with human umbilical veinHUMAN BBB DYSFUNCTION more, immunoprecipitation experiments

  20. The Impact of Abrupt Suspension of Solar Radiation Management (Termination Effect) in Experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew; Haywood, J.; Alterskjaer, Kari; Boucher, Olivier; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Robock, Alan; Schmidt, Hauke; Singh, Balwinder; Tilmes, S.; Watanabe, Shingo; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined changes in climate which result from the sudden termination of geoengineering after 50 years of offsetting a 1% per annum increase in CO2 concentra- tions as simulated by 11 different climate models in experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. The models agree on a rapid rate of global-mean warming following termination, accompanied by increases in global-mean precipitation rate and in plant net primary productivity, and decreases in sea-ice cover. While there is a considerable degree of consensus for the geographical distribution of warming, there is much less of an agreement regarding the patterns of change in the other quantities.

  1. CRYOPUMP BEHAVIOR IN THE PRESENCE OF BEAM OR NUCLEAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Law, P.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor Experiment In order to ascertain the effect of fast neutrons and gamma radiation on the absorbed deuterium gas

  2. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operating Experience Program, requires collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. DOE System of...

  3. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  4. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  5. Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Carl [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Bai, Harrison [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Neboori, Hanmanth [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Takita, Cristiane [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Motwani, Sabin [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Jones, Tiffanie [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Goyal, Sharad [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

  6. Radiation trapping in coherent media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Matsko; I. Novikova; M. O. Scully; G. R. Welch

    2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the effective decay rate of Zeeman coherence, generated in a Rb87 vapor by linearly polarized laser light, increases significantly with the atomic density. We explain this phenomenon as the result of radiation trapping. Our study shows that radiation trapping must be taken into account to fully understand many electromagnetically induced transparency experiments with optically thick media.

  7. Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget JIAN YUAN, DENNIS L. HARTMANN, AND ROBERT WOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget JIAN YUAN, DENNIS L to isolate the effect of large-scale dynamics on the observed radiation budget and cloud properties the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) show that the net radiative effect of clouds on the earth

  8. Dispatcher Reliability Analysis : SPICA-RAIL Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    consider that humans are fully reliable. But experience shows that many accidents involve human failuresDispatcher Reliability Analysis : SPICA-RAIL Experiments Fabien Belmonte, Jean-Louis Boulanger of scenarios and evaluate the behaviour of human operators. A state of the art in human reliability is pre

  9. On the Difficulty of Replicating Human Subjects Studies in Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easterbrook, Steve

    a literal replication of a human subjects experiment that examined the relationship between a simple test: MISCELLANEOUS General Terms: Experimentation Keywords experience report, empirical, human subjects, replication with replication for experiments involving human subjects. Such experi- ments are increasingly important

  10. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  11. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  12. Radiation effects testing at the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Koga, Rokotura

    2001-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of ionizing particles on sensitive microelectronics is an important component of the design of systems as diverse as satellites and space probes, detectors for high energy physics experiments and even internet server farms. Understanding the effects of radiation on human cells is an equally important endeavor directed towards future manned missions in space and towards cancer therapy. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Berkeley Laboratory, facilities are available for radiation effects testing (RET) with heavy ions and with protons. The techniques for doing these measurements and the advantages of using a cyclotron will be discussed, and the Cyclotron facilities will be compared with other facilities worldwide. RET of the same part at several facilities of varying beam energy can provide tests of the simple models used in this field and elucidate the relative importance of atomic and nuclear effects. The results and implications of such measurements will be discussed.

  13. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  14. Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    current produced the "bays" (decreases in the ground-level geomagnetic field) measured in magnetogram current" around Earth and its association with geomagnetic storms began in the early days of the twentieth Storm Probes (RBSP) spacecraft is the magnetosphere ring current instrument that will provide data

  15. RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. OVERVIEW OF REGULATIONS, PROTECTION STANDARDS, AND RADIATION SAFETY ORGANIZATION.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 V. BASIC RADIATION PROTECTION PRINCIPLES

  16. Radiation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal Regulation

  17. Sustainability at the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station The challenges facing our planet are daunting. The human population is predicted to surpass nine billion by 2050;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wh/year, and constructing a new combined heating and power plant that eliminates the on-site use of coal and shrinks materials. · Implement sustainable forest management practices and reforest marginal land to help reduceSustainability at the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station The challenges facing our

  18. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  19. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  20. Gravitational Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard F Schutz

    2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity is one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and it is the dominant force in most astronomical systems. In common with all other phenomena, gravity must obey the principles of special relativity. In particular, gravitational forces must not be transmitted or communicated faster than light. This means that when the gravitational field of an object changes, the changes ripple outwards through space and take a finite time to reach other objects. These ripples are called gravitational radiation or gravitational waves. This article gives a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational radiation, including technical material suitable for non-specialist scientists.

  1. atmospheric cherenkov radiation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. J. Voelk 2002-07-04 34 Optical and radiographical characterization of silica aerogel for Cherenkov radiator Nuclear Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We present optical and...

  2. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  3. The visible Smith-Purcell radiation search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Ulc, S. Wang, X.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here the results of an experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to search for the production of visible radiation from the Smith-Purcell effect using a 3 MeV electron beam. After running the experiment under a variety of conditions we were unable to isolate a definite signal from Smith-Parcell effect. Any Smith-Purcell signal present in the measured radiation was less than 10% of the background signal.

  4. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  5. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  6. Human-Driven Spatial Language for Human-Robot Interaction Marjorie Skubic and Zhiyu Huo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    to comprehend spatial descriptions. As a first step, a series of human subject experiments is being conducted adults. Based on the results of these human subject experiments, algorithms will be developed for robot will ultimately be tested in future human subject experiments using both virtual and physical robots. Thus

  7. IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting Magnet). Current user: LBNE ­ materials for Project X. · Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment ­ Abandoned gold mine

  8. Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

  9. DEVELOPING VISUALIZATION TOOLS FOR THE DESIGN OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    for those human factors researchers and practitioners designing experiments. Designing an experimentDEVELOPING VISUALIZATION TOOLS FOR THE DESIGN OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL EXPERIMENTS ABSTRACT While, little attention has been paid to developing visualization tools for human factors researchers designing

  10. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  11. Intelligent Escort Robot Moving together with Human Methods for Human Position Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    : Light-emitting device used in the experiments. robot is able to know the distance to the human thanksIntelligent Escort Robot Moving together with Human ­ Methods for Human Position Recognition in everyday life by interacting with humans. In order to escort a human, the robot needs to know the position

  12. Radiation dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoelsher, James W. (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  13. Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel Cerenkov Radiator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belle Preprint; Sahu Wang; M. Z. Wang; R. Suda; R. Enomoto; K. C. Peng; C. H. Wang; I. Adachi; M. Amami

    We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the B-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8 MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3% and 0.001 at 90% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed. 1 Introduction Silica aerogels(aerogels) are a colloidal form of glass, in which globules of silica are connected in three dimensional networks with siloxan bonds. They are solid, very light, transparent and their refractive index can be controlled in the production process. Many high energy and nuclear physics experiments have used aerogels instead of pressurized gas for their Cerenkov coun...

  14. Soliton molecules: Experiments and optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitschke, Fedor [Universität Rostock, Institut für Physik, Universitätsplatz 3, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable compound states of several fiber-optic solitons have recently been demonstrated. In the first experiment their shape was approximated, for want of a better description, by a sum of Gaussians. Here we discuss an optimization strategy which helps to find preferable shapes so that the generation of radiative background is reduced.

  15. environmental management radiation protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    EHS environmental management biosafety radiation protection industrial hygiene safety Working: Biosafety, Environmental Management, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection and Safety. Each specialized Management Program, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection Program, and the Safety Program. (http

  16. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (NewSons, Inc. from "Radiation Detection and Measurement," G. F.

  17. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Effects on Rat Bones Using Synchrotron Radiation Computed Microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogueira, Liebert Parreiras; Braz, Delson [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Barroso, Regina Cely [Physics Institute / State University of Rio de Janeiro, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Andrade, Cherley Borba [Laboratory of Radiological Sciences / State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tromba, Giuliana [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Strada Statale S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we investigated the consequences of irradiation in the femora and ribs of rats submitted to radiation doses of 5 Gy. Three different sites in femur specimens (head, distal metaphysis and distal epiphysis) and one in ribs (ventral) were imaged using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography to assess trabecular bone microarchitecture. Histomorphometric quantification was calculated directly from the 3D microtomographic images using synchrotron radiation. The 3D microtomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. A better understanding of the biological interactions that occur after exposure to photon radiation is needed in order to optimize therapeutic regimens and facilitate development and strategies that decrease radiation-induced side effects in humans. Results showed significant differences between irradiated and non-irradiated specimens, mostly in head and distal metaphysis bone sites.

  18. RADIATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY | ROTARY WING AIRCRAfT | SANITARY -ENVIRONMENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY | ROTARY WING AIRCRAfT | SANITARY - ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Computational Genomics & Proteomics 2008 Wearable Intelligent Devices for Human Health and Protection 2009

  19. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheek, Gregory [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with intensified treatment.

  20. Courses on Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

  1. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  2. Radiation Control (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

  3. Denoising solar radiation data using coiflet wavelets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul, E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my; Janier, Josefina B., E-mail: josefinajanier@petronas.com.my; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram, E-mail: mohana.muthuvalu@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Information Technology, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Hasan, Mohammad Khatim, E-mail: khatim@ftsm.ukm.my [Jabatan Komputeran Industri, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, Jumat, E-mail: jumat@ums.edu.my [Program Matematik dengan Ekonomi, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Beg Berkunci 2073, 88999 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia); Ismail, Mohd Tahir [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM Minden, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Signal denoising and smoothing plays an important role in processing the given signal either from experiment or data collection through observations. Data collection usually was mixed between true data and some error or noise. This noise might be coming from the apparatus to measure or collect the data or human error in handling the data. Normally before the data is use for further processing purposes, the unwanted noise need to be filtered out. One of the efficient methods that can be used to filter the data is wavelet transform. Due to the fact that the received solar radiation data fluctuates according to time, there exist few unwanted oscillation namely noise and it must be filtered out before the data is used for developing mathematical model. In order to apply denoising using wavelet transform (WT), the thresholding values need to be calculated. In this paper the new thresholding approach is proposed. The coiflet2 wavelet with variation diminishing 4 is utilized for our purpose. From numerical results it can be seen clearly that, the new thresholding approach give better results as compare with existing approach namely global thresholding value.

  4. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy Social & Economic Research Group #12;Wildlife) · Human-dimensions of species management (HDSM) Research Projects #12;Collaborative Frameworks for Land of woodland landscapes ­ discussion groups, · Choice experiments, · Fellowships / Placements, · Newsletters

  5. Dynamics of a bouncing ball in human performance Dagmar Sternad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sternad, Dagmar

    of a dynamically stable period-one regime. In a series of experiments, human subjects bounced a ball rhythmically human movement and physical experi- mental systems is that while the variables and parameters of physical experiments are under the experimenter's control, human subjects when bouncing a ball have

  6. Bayesian optimization explains human active search Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itti, Laurent

    , predicts human per- formance and searched locations better. In 6 follow-up controlled experiments over 76 literature, we design and conduct a series of experiments to understand human search and active learning;2 Experiments and Results We seek to study human search behavior directly on 1D function optimization

  7. Radiation stability of graphene under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sunil, E-mail: kumar.sunil092@gmail.com; Tripathi, Ambuj; Khan, Saif A.; Pannu, Compesh; Avasthi, Devesh K. [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we report radiation stability of graphene under extreme condition of high energy density generated by 150?MeV Au ion irradiation. The experiment reveals that graphene is radiation resistant for irradiation at 10{sup 14?}ions/cm{sup 2} of 150?MeV Au ions. It is significant to note that annealing effects are observed at lower fluences whereas defect production occurs at higher fluences but significant crystallinity is retained. Our results demonstrate applicability of graphene based devices in radiation environment and space applications.

  8. Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

  9. Radiation associated malignancies of the esophagus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherrill, D.J.; Grishkin, B.A.; Galal, F.S.; Zajtchuk, R.; Graeber, G.M.

    1984-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the experience of the authors with two patients who had received thoracic radiation for disseminated teratocarcinomas of the testis, survived their malignancies, and subsequently developed squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus. To the authors knowledge, only 11 other cases of esophageal malignancies arising in patients who had received previous mediastinal irradiation have been reported in the world literature. With increasingly successful mediastinal radiation for malignant disease resulting in prolonged patient survival, an increasing number of such patients with subsequent esophageal malignancies can be anticipated. Close follow-up of patients receiving radiation therapy to periesophageal tissues is recommended, and prompt evaluation of any symptoms of esophageal dysfunction is indicated.

  10. Ferromagnetic Antenna and its Application to Generation and Detection of Gravitational Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fran De Aquino

    2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of antenna, which we have called Ferromagnetic Antenna, has been considered for Generation and Detection of Gravitational Radiation. A simple experiment, in which gravitational radiation at 10 GHz can be emitted and received in laboratory, is presented.

  11. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro [Service of General Surgery, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Gómez-Espí, Marina [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Blanco, Jose [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  12. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mc Fee, Matthew C. (New Ellenton, SC); Kirkham, Tim J. (Beech Island, SC); Johnson, Tippi H. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

  13. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

  14. Crawling Waves from Radiation Force Excitation ZAEGYOO HAH,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Kevin J.

    Crawling Waves from Radiation Force Excitation ZAEGYOO HAH,1 CHRISTOPHER HAZARD,2 YOUNG THUNG CHO1 from focused beams that produce radiation force excitation within the tissue. Some examples are also radiofrequency ablated hepatic lesions in vitro 6,7 to characterize human skeletal muscle in vivo 8, 9

  15. CognitiveEngineeringinRadiationScreeningfor HomelandSecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parasuraman, Raja

    areas through work domain analysis, signal detection modeling, design of displays for radiation threatCognitiveEngineeringinRadiationScreeningfor HomelandSecurity Thomas F. Sanquist Brian Minsk Pacific for illicit radioactive material involves substantial staff, technology, and human operator decision making

  16. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  17. Ris National Laboratory DTU Radiation Research Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the atmosphere to the human thyroid via the food chain and inhalation, and found that the radiation dose of 131 I can not only cause external irradiation of the skin, but also an internal irradiation of the thyroid and whole body. In addition, radioiodine deposited on clothes and hair can also cause skin irradiation

  18. Status of radiation detector and neutron monitor technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Y K; Ha, J H; Han, S H; Hong, S B; Hwang, I K; Lee, W G; Moon, B S; Park, S H; Song, M H

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we describe the current states of the radiation detection technology, detectors for industrial application, and neutron monitors. We also survey the new technologies being applied to this field. The method to detect radiation is the measurement of the observable secondary effect from the interaction between incident radiation and detector material, such as ionization, excitation, fluorescence, and chemical reaction. The radiation detectors can be categorized into gas detectors, scintillation detectors, and semiconductor detectors according to major effects and main applications. This report contains the current status and operational principles of these detectors. The application fields of radiation detectors are industrial measurement system, in-core neutron monitor, medical radiation diagnostic device, nondestructive inspection device, environmental radiation monitoring, cosmic-ray measurement, security system, fundamental science experiment, and radiation measurement standardization. The st...

  19. X-ray mammography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E. (CNR and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy)); Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Rimondi, O. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)); Indovina, P.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Napoli, Naples (Italy)); Pocek, M.; Simonetti, G. (Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale Sant'Eugenio, Universita di Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)); Benassi, M.; Tirelli, C. (Istituto Nazionale del Cancro, Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Passariello, R. (Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita dell'Aquila, L'Aquila (Italy))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time in the literature, radiographs of breast phantoms were obtained using several monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-ray beams of selected energy in the range from 14 to 26 keV. In addition, after optimization of the photon energy as a function of the phantom thickness, several mammographs were obtained on surgically removed human breast specimens containing cancer nodules. Comparison between radiographs using a conventional x-ray unit and those obtained of the same specimens utilizing synchrotron monochromatic beams clearly shows that higher contrast and better resolution can be achieved with synchrotron radiation. These results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining radiographs of excised human breast tissue containing a greater amount of radiological information using synchrotron radiation.

  20. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  1. DarkLight radiation backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalantarians, N. [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton VA 23668 (United States); Collaboration: DarkLight Collaboration

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

  2. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

  3. CANDU human performance analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, I.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of human performance is presented in this paper in the context of the operational safety management system. To focus on problems, an experience review program has been developed to establish trends, demonstrate the degree of compliance with standards, and determine the causes of poor performance. The primary method by which the experience review takes place is significant event reporting (SER). A significant event is an incident that causes an undesirable effect on safety, product quality, environmental protection, or product cost. In spite of advanced technology and the degree of automation of the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) design, mistakes and malfunctions to occur. Considerable effort has been made to prevent or reduce the incidence of error. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations developed a system to analyze human error, called the Human Performance Evaluation System (HPES). To encourage an open exchange of information, the system is anonymous and nonpunitive. All data gathered during HPES evaluations are kept confidential.

  4. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  5. Repression of ATR pathway by miR-185 enhances radiation-induced apoptosis and proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    of miR-34a expression may be responsible for important protective mechanisms counteracting radiationOPEN Repression of ATR pathway by miR-185 enhances radiation-induced apoptosis and proliferation of a human microRNA (miRNA), hsa-miR-185, is downregulated in response to ionizing radiation. Elevation of mi

  6. RADIATION RESEARCH 169, 2837 (2008) 0033-7587/08 $15.00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields for 72 Hours. Radiat. Res. 169, 2828 RADIATION RESEARCH 169, 28­37 (2008) 0033-7587/08 $15.00 2008 by Radiation Research Society. All In Vitro Exposure of Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields for 72

  7. Has Hawking radiation been measured?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Unruh

    2014-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that Hawking radiation has indeed been measured and shown to posses a thermal spectrum, as predicted. This contention is based on three separate legs. The first is that the essential physics of the Hawking process for black holes can be modelled in other physical systems. The second is the white hole horizons are the time inverse of black hole horizons, and thus the physics of both is the same. The third is that the quantum emission, which is the Hawking process, is completely determined by measurements of the classical parameters of a linear physical system. The experiment conducted in 2010 fulfills all of these requirements, and is thus a true measurement of Hawking radiation.

  8. experiment, collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Departamento Energias Renovables, Plataforma Solar de Almeria, E-04080 Almeria, Spain Departamento de Lenguajes y ca. factor 10 less complex then imaging solar Cerenkov exp.:smaller cost, fewer systematic errors #12; 5 Rainer Plaga The GRAAL experiment, ECRS Lodz July 2000 Location of GRAAL " Plataforma Solar de

  9. Radiation Protection Guidance Hospital Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Page 1 Radiation Protection Guidance For Hospital Staff Prepared for Stanford ..................................................................................................................... 17 The Basic Principles of Radiation Protection........................................................... 17 Protection against Radiation Exposure

  10. Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

  11. WI Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

  12. Principles of longitudinal beam diagnostics with coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    problems and experiments are listed. After a brief introduction in Sect. 1, the radiation spectrum emitted bunch compressor. The form factors are computed according to Eq. (5). The coherence effect

  13. Reception of longitudinal vector potential radiation with a plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Robert K. Jr. [Sigma Space Corporation, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Sigma Space Corporation, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To help resolve the long-running debate between physicists and engineers regarding the existence of the magnetic vector potential, herewith we describe an experiment demonstrating reception of time-harmonic vector potential radiation at 1.3 GHz.

  14. Radiation protection at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

  15. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briesmeister, L.; Ellington, Y.; Hollis, R.; Kunzman, J.; McNaughton, M.; Ramsey, G.; Somers, B.; Turner, A.; Finn, J.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions.

  16. Gravitational Radiation from Oscillating Gravitational Dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fran De Aquino

    2002-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of Gravitational Dipole is introduced starting from the recent discovery of negative gravitational mass (gr-qc/0005107 and physics/0205089). A simple experiment, a gravitational wave transmitter, to test this new concept of gravitational radiation source is presented.

  17. Magnetic monopole searches in the cosmic radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan De Mitri

    2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a big effort in the past twenty years with at least a couple of generations of experiments which searched for supermassive GUT magnetic monopoles in the cosmic radiation. Here a short review of these searches is given, together with a brief description of the theoretical framework and of the detection techniques.

  18. JOSA COMMUNICATIONS Terahertz radiation from magnetoresistive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    the output THz radiation power, whereas the effect of the co- planar transmission lines should be considered experiments, coplanar transmission lines with the bow-tie antenna are mainly used to take out THz ra- diation strong electric fields Noriaki Kida and Masayoshi Tonouchi Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka

  19. RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2002 D. Delacroix* J. P. Guerre** P. Leblanc'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

  20. Radiation Processing -an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of radiation · Facilities ­ Gamma ­ electrons ­ X-ray ­ Safety · Sterilisation of medical devices · Food irradiation · Material modification #12;3 Content ­ Part 2 · Environmental applications · Other applications Radiation · Energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles Irradiation · Exposure to radiation

  1. A Natural Experiment on Innovation Without Patents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    experiment to take place in which innovation may operate without interference from new patent rights. Far from a desire to foster user and open innovation in human-related biotechnology, the primary rationale for this amendment to the Patent Act was strong... repugnance to biological research leading to, and the possibility of resultant ownership interests in, inventions involving human beings. Rather, it is incidental that this natural experiment may provide valuable insight into how patents affect innovation...

  2. Human Computation Must Be Reproducible Praveen Paritosh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    and evaluation of experiments. We argue that human computation has similar properties, and that the resultsHuman Computation Must Be Reproducible Praveen Paritosh Google 345 Spear St, San Francisco, CA 94105. pkp@google.com ABSTRACT Human computation is the technique of performing a com- putational

  3. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  4. TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Emily B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

  5. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  6. The majorana experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rielage, Keith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boswell, Melissa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gehman, Victor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kidd, Mary F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Roque, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ronquest, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Harry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steele, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, MAJORANA aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype DEMONSTRATOR module are presented. Our proposed method uses the well-established technique of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in high purity Ge-diode radiation detectors that play both roles of source and detector. The use of P-PC Ge detectors present advances in background rejection and a Significantly lower energy threshold than conventional Ge detector technologies. The lower energy threshold opens up a broader and exciting physics program including searches for dark matter and axions concurrent with the double-beta decay search. The DEMONSTRATOR should establish that the backgrounds are low enough to justify scaling to tonne-scale experiment, probe the neutrino effective mass region above 100 meV, and search the low energy region with a sensitivity to dark matter. The DEMONSTRATOR will be sited at the 4850-ft level (4200 m.w.e) of the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake and preparations for construction are currently underway.

  7. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  8. analysis babar experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We search for a new light non-Standard Model CP-odd Higgs boson, A0, decaying to tau+tau-, mu+mu-, and invisible in radiative...

  9. Solar radiation intensity calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

  10. The HERMES Experiment I. Analyzing Powers in Pion Electroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES Experiment I. Analyzing Powers in Pion Electroproduction II. The Aerogel Radiator for traveling to DESY and installing hundreds of aerogel tiles. I am indebted to countless members of the HERMES aerogel and C 4 F 10 radiators. The use of aerogel in a RICH is a novel technique that requires a detailed

  11. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upton, NY 11973, USA Abstract Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) effects in bunch compressors are analyzed. Schemes for reducing the CSR effects are presented. 1 INTRODUCTION...

  12. Atomic Radiation (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

  13. Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

  14. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Brent J. (West Richland, WA); Coomes, Edmund P. (West Richland, WA)

    1988-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  15. Issues and test requirements in radiation shielding of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, M.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation shield issues for fusion reactors have been investigated and the experiments and facilities required to resolve the issues have been identified and characterized as part of the FINESSE program. This paper summarizes the recommended approach to fusion shield research and development, provides a summary of the necessary experiments and facilities, and presents the results of technical analyses involved.

  16. Issues and test requirements in radiation shielding of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, M.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation shield issues for fusion reactors have been investigated and the experiments and facilities required to resolve the issues have been identified and characterized as part of the FINESSE program. This paper summarizes the recommended approach to fusion shield R and D, provides a summary of the necessary experiments and facilities, and presents the results of technical analyses involved.

  17. Single electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Asner; R. F. Bradley; L. de Viveiros; P. J. Doe; J. L. Fernandes; M. Fertl; E. C. Finn; J. A. Formaggio; D. Furse; A. M. Jones; J. N. Kofron; B. H. LaRoque; M. Leber; E. L. McBride; M. L. Miller; P. Mohanmurthy; B. Monreal; N. S. Oblath; R. G. H. Robertson; L. J Rosenberg; G. Rybka; D. Rysewyk; M. G. Sternberg; J. R. Tedeschi; T. Thummler; B. A. VanDevender; N. L. Woods

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta elec- tron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

  18. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  19. Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

  20. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/..mu..m to over 1000 keV/..mu..m. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/..mu..m. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  1. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation doseCOLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 regulations of the Rules of the City of New York, Article 175, Radiation Control, there is a requirement

  2. Neutralizing Polyclonal IgG Present during Acute Infection Prevents Rapid Disease Onset in Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIVSF162P3-Infected Infant Rhesus Macaques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human NMAbs with potent, broad activity to be used along with antiretroviral therapy (ART). Such experiments

  3. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  4. Nonclassicality of Thermal Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars M. Johansen

    2004-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that thermal radiation of small occupation number is strongly nonclassical. This includes most forms of naturally occurring radiation. Nonclassicality can be observed as a negative weak value of a positive observable. It is related to negative values of the Margenau-Hill quasi-probability distribution.

  5. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  6. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  7. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  8. Zi-Wei Lin Oct 5, 2004 UAH / NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MS Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zi-wei

    Zi-Wei Lin Oct 5, 2004 UAH / NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MS Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations Why do we need to study? Conclusions Zi-Wei Lin University of Alabama in Huntsville/ NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MSFC #12

  9. An Agent-Based System Assisting Humans in Complex Tasks by Analysis of a Human's State and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treur, Jan

    becomes too high, the agent can assist the human in a number of ways. Experiments show that the supportAn Agent-Based System Assisting Humans in Complex Tasks by Analysis of a Human's State, michael}@forcevisionlab.nl Abstract Human task performance varies depending on the task, environment

  10. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  11. Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Slifer

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

  12. RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR RADIATION PROTECTION AT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY................................................................................................................I-1 B. Radiation Protection Program...............................................................................I-3 D. Radiation Safety Management

  13. Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Aihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeV. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeapproximation for solar radiation in the NCAR Community

  14. Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergy Online Classified orOnlineOokieOperated|

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment - AWARE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Macquarie Island Cloud and Radiation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) Campaign Links M-PACEgovCampaignsMWR

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - The ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer Single Column Model IOP ARM(PROBE) govCampaignsThe

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational ManagementDemand Module ThisAtAugust2Tropical Warm

  19. Space Radiation and Cataracts (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Blakely, Eleanor

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Eleanor Blakely, radiation biologist of the Life Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has been a scientist at Berkeley Lab since 1975. She is studying the effect of radiation on cataracts which concerns not only cancer patients, but also astronauts. As astronauts spend increasingly longer time in space, the effects of cosmic radiation exposure will become an increasingly important health issue- yet there is little human data on these effects. Blakely reviews this emerging field and the contributions made at Berkeley Lab

  20. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 Psychiatric Institute Radiation Safety Office (Please complete this form within 24 hours and send a copy to your supervisor and The Radiation Safety Office) Your Name

  1. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212: _______________ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Radiation Safety Office Approval: ______________________ Date: ________________________ Waste containers in place: Yes ___ No ___ Radiation signage on door: Yes ___ No ___ Room monitoring: Dates

  2. Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    to Workers; Inspections 27 10 CFR Part 20Standards for Protection Against Radiation 28 10 CFR Part 35Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated

  3. Metrology of reflection optics for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have seen an almost explosive growth in the number of beam lines on new and existing synchrotron radiation facilities throughout the world. The need for optical components to utilize the unique characteristics of synchrotron radiation has increased accordingly. Unfortunately, the technology to manufacture and measure the large, smooth, exotic optical surfaces required to focus and steer the synchrotron radiation beam has not progressed as rapidly as the operational demands on these components. Most companies do not wish to become involved with a project that requires producing a single, very expensive, aspheric optic with surface roughness and figure tolerances that are beyond their capabilities to measure. This paper will review some of the experiences of the National Synchrotron Light Source in procuring grazing incidence optical components over the past several years. We will review the specification process - how it is related to the function of the optic, and how it relates to the metrology available during the manufacturing process and after delivery to the user's laboratory. We will also discuss practical aspects of our experience with new technologies, such as single point diamond turning of metal mirrors and the use of SiC as a mirror material. Recent advances in metrology instrumentation have the potential to move the measurement of surface figure and finish from the research laboratory into the optical shop, which should stimulate growth and interest in the manufacturing of optics to meet the needs of the synchrotron radiation user community.

  4. Evaluating Software Agents Using Human Robert D. Grant, Dewayne E. Perry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    the way for rigorous experiments comparing their performance with human benchmarks. Method: Little agents with human benchmarks. We hope future researchers will be able to perform controlled experiments performance with human performance on "identical" curricula in controlled experiments. This paper is a more

  5. Integrating human and robot decision-making dynamics with feedback: Models and convergence analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    , a well-studied decision-making task in behavioral experiments. The human subject chooses between two structures, the behavioral experiments show convergence to suboptimal choices. We propose a human- supervised and the kinds of decisions humans make in psychology experiments. We consider a class of sequential binary

  6. ancient human burials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ancient human pathogens Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 22 Experience Ancient Egypt Uncover the secrets of the ancient world... Engineering Websites Summary: in Care in...

  7. Human Assisted Robotic Team Campaigns for Aquatic Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. J. (2007a). Autonomous robotic sensing experiments at sanand development of a wireless robotic networked aquaticHuman Assisted Robotic Team Campaigns for Aquatic Monitoring

  8. Proceedings: 2003 Radiation Protection Technology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health physics professionals within the nuclear industry are continually upgrading their programs with new methods and technologies. The Third Annual EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference facilitated this effort by communicating technical developments, program improvements, and experience throughout the nuclear power industry. When viewed from the perspective of shorter outages, diminishing numbers of contract RP technicians and demanding emergent work, this information flow is critical for the industry.

  9. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  10. Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

  11. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  12. How Do We Know that Human Activities Have Influenced Global Climate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santer, Benjamin D.

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities have significantly altered not only the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere, but also the climate system. Human influences have led to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases, decreases in stratospheric ozone, and changes in the atmospheric burdens of sulfate and soot aerosols. All of these atmospheric constituents interact with incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Human-induced changes in the concentrations of these constituents modify the natural radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere, and therefore perturb climate. Quantifying the size of the human effect on climate is a difficult statistical problem. 'Fingerprint' methods are typically used for this purpose. These methods involve rigorous statistical comparisons of modeled and observed climate change patterns. Fingerprinting assumes that each individual influence on climate has a unique signature in climate records. The climate fingerprints in response to different forcing factors are typically estimated with computer models, which can be used to perform the controlled experiments that we cannot conduct in the real world. One criticism of the findings of previous scientific assessments is that they have relied heavily on fingerprint studies involving changes in near-surface temperature. Recent fingerprint work, however, has considered a variety of other climate variables, such as ocean heat content, stratospheric temperatures, Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent, sea level pressure, atmospheric water vapor, and the height of the tropopause. These studies illustrate that a human-induced climate change signal is identifiable in many different variables and geographic regions, and that the climate system is telling us an internally- and physically-consistent story.

  13. How Do We Know That Human Activities Have Influenced Global Climate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Benjamin D. Santer

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities have significantly altered not only the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere, but also the climate system. Human influences have led to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases, decreases in stratospheric ozone, and changes in the atmospheric burdens of sulfate and soot aerosols. All of these atmospheric constituents interact with incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Human-induced changes in the concentrations of these constituents modify the natural radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere, and therefore perturb climate. Quantifying the size of the human effect on climate is a difficult statistical problem. "Fingerprint" methods are typically used for this purpose. These methods involve rigorous statistical comparisons of modeled and observed climate change patterns. Fingerprinting assumes that each individual influence on climate has a unique signature in climate records. The climate fingerprints in response to different forcing factors are typically estimated with computer models, which can be used to perform the controlled experiments that we cannot conduct in the real world. One criticism of the findings of previous scientific assessments is that they have relied heavily on fingerprint studies involving changes in near-surface temperature. Recent fingerprint work, however, has considered a variety of other climate variables, such as ocean heat content, stratospheric temperatures, Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent, sea level pressure, atmospheric water vapor, and the height of the tropopause. These studies illustrate that a human-induced climate change signal is identifiable in many different variables and geographic regions, and that the climate system is telling us an internally- and physically-consistent story.

  14. The Intense Radiation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

  15. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  16. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  17. Quantum vacuum radiation in optical glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Liberati; Angus Prain; Matt Visser

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent experimental claim of the detection of analogue Hawking radiation in an optical system [PRL 105 (2010) 203901] has led to some controversy [PRL 107 (2011) 149401, 149402]. While this experiment strongly suggests some form of particle creation from the quantum vacuum (and hence it is per se very interesting), it is also true that it seems difficult to completely explain all features of the observations by adopting the perspective of a Hawking-like mechanism for the radiation. For instance, the observed photons are emitted parallel to the optical horizon, and the relevant optical horizon is itself defined in an unusual manner by combining group and phase velocities. This raises the question: Is this really Hawking radiation, or some other form of quantum vacuum radiation? Naive estimates of the amount of quantum vacuum radiation generated due to the rapidly changing refractive index --- sometimes called the dynamical Casimir effect --- are not encouraging. However we feel that naive estimates could be misleading depending on the quantitative magnitude of two specific physical effects: "pulse steepening" and "pulse cresting". Plausible bounds on the maximum size of these two effects results in estimates much closer to the experimental observations, and we argue that the dynamical Casimir effect is now worth additional investigation.

  18. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  19. Impurity feedback control for enhanced divertor and edge radiation in DIII-D discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, G.L.; Staebler, G.M.; Allen, S.L. [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long pulse and steady state fusion ignition devices will require a significant radiated power fraction to minimize heat flux to, and sputtering of, the first wall. While impurity gases have been proposed to enhance radiation, precise control of impurity gas injection is essential to achieve an adequate radiative power fraction while maintaining good energy confinement and low central impurity concentration. We report here the first experiments in the DIII-D tokamak using feedback control of the rate of impurity gas injection. These experiments were carried out with active divertor pumping using the in-situ DIII-D cryopump. The radiated power fraction was controlled by sensing either UN edge line radiation (Ne{sup +7}) or mantle radiation from selected bolometer channels and using the DIII-D digital plasma control system to calculate radiated power real-time and generate an error signal to control an impurity gas injector valve.

  20. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  1. The Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Ignatov

    2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An example of discontinuity of the energy-momentum tensor moving at superluminal velocity is discussed. It is shown that the gravitational Mach cone is formed. The power spectrum of the corresponding Cherenkov radiation is evaluated.

  2. Radiation from Accelerated Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohab Abou-Zeid; Miguel S. Costa

    2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

  3. Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

  4. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  5. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  6. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  7. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of x-ray producing

  8. Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    of External and Internal Doses E. Reports and Notices to Workers Chapter VII: Radiation ProtectionRadiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL For Columbia University NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital New York State Psychiatric Institute Barnard College December 2012 #12;Radiation Safety Manual

  9. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  10. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The form factors for the radiative transitions between charmonium mesons are investigated. We employ an anisotropic lattice using a Wilson gauge action, and domain-wall fermion action. We extrapolate the form factors to Q{sup 2} = 0, corresponding to a real photon, using quark-model-inspired functions. Finally, comparison is made with photocouplings extracted from the measured radiative widths, where known. Our preliminary results find photocouplings commensurate with these experimentally extracted values.

  11. Radiative Processes Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The

  12. Human Ecology Human ecology Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    Channel, Latin America. STUDIOS Architecture. #12;HUMAN ECOLOGY · APRIL 2005 1 Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph Frey spins a green alternative for textiles. Fibers from rapidly renewable materials

  13. Status of the AlCap experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litchfield, R Phillip

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AlCap experiment is a joint project between the COMET and Mu2e collaborations. Both experiments intend to look for the lepton-flavour violating conversion $\\mu + A \\rightarrow e + A$, using tertiary muons from high-power pulsed proton beams. In these experiments the products of ordinary muon capture in the muon stopping target are an important concern, both in terms of hit rates in tracking detectors and radiation damage to equipment. The goal of the AlCap experiment is to provide precision measurements of the products of nuclear capture on Aluminium, which is the favoured target material for both COMET and Mu2e. The results will be used for optimising the design of both conversion experiments, and as input to their simulations. Data was taken in December 2013 and is currently being analysed.

  14. Status of the AlCap experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Phillip Litchfield

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The AlCap experiment is a joint project between the COMET and Mu2e collaborations. Both experiments intend to look for the lepton-flavour violating conversion $\\mu + A \\rightarrow e + A$, using tertiary muons from high-power pulsed proton beams. In these experiments the products of ordinary muon capture in the muon stopping target are an important concern, both in terms of hit rates in tracking detectors and radiation damage to equipment. The goal of the AlCap experiment is to provide precision measurements of the products of nuclear capture on Aluminium, which is the favoured target material for both COMET and Mu2e. The results will be used for optimising the design of both conversion experiments, and as input to their simulations. Data was taken in December 2013 and is currently being analysed.

  15. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  16. Gravitational Tunneling Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The isolated black hole radiation of both Hawking and Zel'dovich are idealized abstractions as there is always another body to distort the potential. This is considered with respect to both gravitational tunneling, and black hole "no-hair" theorems. The effects of a second body are to lower the gravitational barrier of a black hole and to give the barrier a finite rather than infinite width so tha a particle can escape by tunneling (as in field emission) or over the top of the lowered barrier (as in Schottky emission). Thus radiation may be emitted from black holes in a process differing from that of Hawking radiation, P SH, which has been undetected for over 24 years. The radiated power from a black hole derived here is PR e ^2__ PSH, where e ^2__ is he ransmission probability for radiation through the barrier. This is similar to electric field emission of electrons from a metal in that the emission can in principle be modulated and beamed. The temperature and entropy of black holes are reexamined. Miniscule black holes herein may help explain the missing mass of the universe, accelerated expansion of the universe, and anomalous rotation of spiral galaxies. A gravitational interference effect for black hole radiation similar to the Aharonov-Bohm effect is also examined.

  17. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  18. SU-E-T-320: The Effect of Survivin Perturbation On the Radiation Response of Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D; Debeb, B; Woodward, W [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Survivin is the smallest member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family and is well-known for its universal over-expression in human cancers. Due to its role in apoptosis and cellular proliferation, survivin is implicated in the radiation response in several cancer types, and antisurvivin treatments have had success as a radiation sensitizer in many preclinical cancer models. As no studies to date have reported survivin as a factor affecting radiation resistance in breast cancer models, we sought to evaluate the synergistic relationship between survivin function and irradiation in breast cancer cell lines. Methods: Information regarding survivin protein expression in breast cancer was retrieved from three public databases: Oncomine, Kaplan-Meier Plotter, and GOBO. For the in vitro studies, survivin function was compromised by transducing a non-functional mutant form (survivin-DN) into two breast cancer cell lines, the estrogen receptor-positive MCF7 and the triple-negative, inflammatory SUM149. Cell growth was compared in the survivin-DN and control populations with colony-formation assays. To assess how survivin affects radiation response, clonogenic assays were performed by irradiating the cell lines up to 6 Gy. Results: From the public databases, survivin is more highly expressed in triple-negative breast cancer compared to all other subtypes, and is prognostic of poor survival in all breast cancer patients. In MCF7, the survivin-DN population had decreased colony-formation potential; the opposite was true in SUM149. In the clonogenic assays, abrogation of survivin function radio-protected MCF7 cells in monolayer and 3D growth conditions, while SUM149 survivin-DN cells were radiosensitized in monolayer conditions. Conclusion: We observed synergy between survivin function and radiation, although the results between the two cell lines were disparate. Further investigation is required to identify the mechanism of this discrepancy, including evaluation of the potential role of estrogen receptor status, before proceeding with small-animal experiments.

  19. Working With Radiation For Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    working with radiation The radiation badge is not a protective device It cannot shield you from ­ Negative Exponential Protection From Radiation #12;18 Time Distance Shielding Basic Principles #121 Working With Radiation For Research Thomas Cummings Junior Physicist Environmental Health

  20. Radiation Safety Annual Refresher Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Radiation Safety Annual Refresher Training Radiation Protection Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety #12;Topics in Radiation Safety (applicable RPD Manual sections indicated) User;Topics in Radiation Safety (applicable RPD Manual sections indicated) User and Non-user topics Types

  1. Unruh radiation: from black holes to elementary particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahar Hod

    2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We advocate the idea that Unruh's quantum radiation, whose theoretical discovery was originally motivated by the physics of black holes, may have important implications on the structure and dynamics of elementary particles. To that end, we analyze the Unruh radiation effect experienced by an accelerated particle in atomic and nuclear systems. For atomic systems, the effect is negligible as compared to the characteristic energy of the system. On the other hand, it is found that a quark inside a nucleon may experience Unruh radiation whose energy is of the same order of magnitude as the quark's own mass.

  2. Spectral brilliance of channeling radiation at the ASTA photoinjector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA (United States)

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study channeling radiation from electron beams with energies under 100 MeV. We introduce a phenomenological model of dechanneling, correct non-radiative transition rates from thermal scattering, and discuss in detail the population dynamics in low order bound states. These are used to revisit the X-ray properties measured at the ELBE facility in Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rosenstock (FZDR), extract parameters for dechanneling states, and obtain satisfactory agreement with measured photon yields. The importance of rechanneling phenomena in thick crystals is emphasized. The model is then used to calculate the expected X-ray energies, linewidths and brilliance for forthcoming channeling radiation experiments at Fermilab's ASTA photoinjector.

  3. Spectral brilliance of channeling radiation at the ASTA photoinjector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sen, Tanaji; Lynn, Christopher

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study channeling radiation from electron beams with energies under 100 MeV. We introduce a phenomenological model of dechanneling, correct non-radiative transition rates from thermal scattering, and discuss in detail the population dynamics in low order bound states. These are used to revisit the X-ray properties measured at the ELBE facility in Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rosenstock (FZDR), extract parameters for dechanneling states, and obtain satisfactory agreement with measured photon yields. The importance of rechanneling phenomena in thick crystals is emphasized. The model is then used to calculate the expected X-ray energies, linewidths and brilliance for forthcoming channeling radiation experiments at Fermilab's ASTAmore »photoinjector.« less

  4. Aviation Human Factors Division Institute of Aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AHFD Aviation Human Factors Division Institute of Aviation University of Illinois at Urbana Systems Monitoring and Control Gavin R. Essenberg, Douglas A. Wiegmann, Aviation Human Factors Division experiments with more difficult path selection tasks might reveal if there are advantages for motion. Overall

  5. On-chip radiation detection from stacked Josephson flux-flow oscillators S. V. Shitov,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallraff, Andreas

    On-chip radiation detection from stacked Josephson flux-flow oscillators S. V. Shitov,a) A. V been proposed.7 In this study, we report direct radiation detection experi- ments with stacked double different mutually phase-locked modes of two junctions, the in phase and the out of phase. The radiation

  6. A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    RANA 99­06 A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass B.J. van der Linden --- R, The Netherlands e­mail: linden@win.tue.nl 15th May 2000 #12; Abstract In the production of glass, temperature Conclusion 25 2 #12; Chapter 1 Introduction The production of glass belongs to the oldest forms of human

  7. A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    RANA 99-06 A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass B.J. van der Linden -- R, The Netherlands e-mail: linden@win.tue.nl 15th May 2000 #12;Abstract In the production of glass, temperature plays Conclusion 25 2 #12;Chapter 1 Introduction The production of glass belongs to the oldest forms of human

  8. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  9. Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience Phar 6226/Nurs 5011 Spring the opportunity to learn in-depth knowledge of diabetes mellitus through active, hands-on learning experience of living with diabetes, in which they will give "insulin" injections and check blood glucoses

  10. Cognitive Science Q270, section 11246 Experiments and Models in Cognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    report. The project should either involve experimenting on human subjects or the formal modeling of human 11246 Experiments and Models in Cognition Fall 2009 Tu, Th 2:30-3:45, Room 228 Psychology Bldg project: 15% Lab 2 Apparent motion experiment & computational simulation: 11% Lab 3 Word perception

  11. Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation EffectsProtection

  12. Development of EPA radiation site cleanup regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, J.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the EPA program to develop radiation site cleanup and identifies many of the issues related to that effort. The material is drawn from portions of the Agency`s Issues Paper on Radiation Site Cleanup Regulations (EPA 402-R-93-084). The site cleanup regulations will be designed to protect human health and the environment and to facilitate the cleanup of sites. EPA believes that developing specific cleanup standards for radionuclides will ensure consistent, protective, and cost-effective site remediation. They will apply to all Federal facilities such as those operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Department of Defense (DoD), and sites licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Agreement States.

  13. Monitoring Cyp2b10 mRNA expression at cessation of 2-year carcinogenesis bioassay in mouse liver provides evidence for a carcinogenic mechanism devoid of human relevance: The dalcetrapib experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoflack, J-C.; Mueller, L., E-mail: Lutz.Mueller@roche.com; Fowler, S.; Braendli-Baiocco, A.; Flint, N.; Kuhlmann, O.; Singer, T.; Roth, A.

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Dalcetrapib is a cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) modulator in clinical assessment for cardiovascular outcome benefits. In compliance with regulatory requirements, dalcetrapib was evaluated in rodent 2-year carcinogenesis bioassays. In the mouse bioassay, male mice demonstrated increased liver weight and statistically increased incidences of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma. Hepatic cytochrome p450 (Cyp) 2b10 mRNA induction and increased Cyp2b10 enzyme activity signify activation of hepatic nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a widely established promoter of rodent-specific hepatic tumors. We therefore monitored hepatic Cyp2b10 mRNA and its enzyme activity in a subset of dalcetrapib-treated male mice from the bioassay. Methods: Liver samples were obtained from ? 1/3 of male mice from each dose group including vehicle-controls (mean and earliest study day of death 678 and 459 respectively). Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to determine Cyp2b10 mRNA expression and Cyp1a-, Cyp2b10- and Cyp3a-selective activities were monitored. Results: Cyp2b10 mRNA was strongly induced by dalcetrapib with an expected wide inter-individual variation (5–1421-fold). Group average fold-induction versus vehicle-controls showed a dose-related increase from 48-fold (250 mg/kg/day) to 160-fold (750 mg/kg/day), which declined slightly at 2000 mg/kg/day (97-fold). Cyp enzyme activities showed approximate doubling of total Cyp P450 content per milligram protein and a 9-fold increase in Cyp2b10-selective pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activity (750 mg/kg/day). Discussion: These data from hepatic Cyp2b10 monitoring are strongly suggestive of CAR activation by dalcetrapib, a mechanism devoid of relevance towards hepatocarcinogenesis in humans; results show feasibility of Cyp2b10 as a surrogate marker for this mechanism at cessation of a carcinogenesis bioassay. -- Highlights: ? Liver tumors were induced in male mice by dalcetrapib in a 2-y study (bioassay). ? Cyp2b10 induction typifies activation of nuclear receptor CAR in mouse liver. ? First report of hepatic Cyp2b10 monitoring at the end of a mouse bioassay. ? Cyp2b10 induction supports CAR activation by dalcetrapib in mouse bioassay. ? CAR activation is a mechanism of hepatic tumorigenesis of no relevance to humans.

  14. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  15. Human Mental Models of Humanoid Robots* Sau-lai Lee Sara Kiesler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiesler, Sara

    Human Mental Models of Humanoid Robots* Sau-lai Lee Sara Kiesler Human Computer Interaction ground of understanding between the two. In two experiments modelled after human-human studies we robot emits a human's voice), their mental model of the system's behavior may approach their mental

  16. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Chen-Ming [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Wei [Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzong-Huei [Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Che-Jen [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Chia [Department of Orthopaedics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tang, Chih-Hsin, E-mail: chtang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  17. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  18. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  19. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  20. Convection induced by radiative cooling of a layer of participating medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasanna, Swaminathan, E-mail: prasannaswam@gmail.com [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR 288 92295, Chatenay-Malabry, France and Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes 92295, Chatenay-Malabry (France)] [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR 288 92295, Chatenay-Malabry, France and Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes 92295, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Venkateshan, S. P., E-mail: spv@iitm.ac.in [HTTP Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering IIT Madras, Chennai (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations and experiments have been conducted to study the effect of radiative cooling on natural convection in a horizontal layer of a participating medium enclosed between isothermal opaque wall and radiatively transparent wall and exposed to a cold background. The study is of relevance to a nocturnal boundary layer under clear and calm conditions. The focus of the study is to capture the onset of convection caused by radiative cooling. The experiments have been designed to mimic the atmospheric radiative boundary conditions, and hence decoupling convection and radiation boundary conditions. Planck number Pl and optical thickness of the layer ?{sub H} are the two important parameters that govern the interaction between radiation and convection. The radiation-convection coupling is a strong function of length scale. Convection sets up within first few seconds for all the experiments. Strong plume like convection is observed for the experimental conditions used in the present study. Both simulations and experiments confirm that radiative cooling increases substantially with decrease in emissivity of the bottom wall. Radiative cooling is strongly influenced by the nongray nature of the participating medium, especially when strong emission from the medium escapes to space, in the window region of the atmosphere. Accurate representation of radiative properties is critical. Linear stability analysis of onset of convection indicates that radiation stabilizes convection as Pl decreases. The observations are similar to the case of Rayleigh Bénard convection in a radiating gas. However, for both experimental and numerical conditions, the observed Rayleigh numbers are much greater than the critical Rayleigh number. To conclude, the role of radiation is to drive and sustain convection in the unstable layer.

  1. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University] [Columbia University

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9, influence cataract development and thus radiosensitivity. These observations have direct applicability to various human populations including accidentally exposed individuals, interventional medical workers, astronauts and nuclear plant workers.

  2. Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

  3. Coherent Nuclear Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yukalov; E. P. Yukalova

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of this review is devoted to the comprehensive description of coherent radiation by nuclear spins. The theory of nuclear spin superradiance is developed and the experimental observations of this phenomenon are considered. The intriguing problem of how coherence develops from initially incoherent quantum fluctuations is analysed. All main types of coherent radiation by nuclear spins are discussed, which are: free nuclear induction, collective induction, maser generation, pure superradiance, triggered superradiance, pulsing superradiance, punctuated superradiance, and induced emission. The influence of electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions and the role of magnetic anisotropy are studied. Conditions for realizing spin superradiance by magnetic molecules are investigated. The possibility of nuclear matter lasing, accompanied by pion or dibaryon radiation, is briefly touched.

  4. Pediatric radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halperin, E.C.; Kun, L.E.; Constine, L.S.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This text covers all aspects of radiation therapy for treatment of pediatric cancer. The book describes the proper use of irradiation in each of the malignancies of childhood, including tumors that are rarely encountered in adult practice. These include acute leukemia; supratentorial brain tumors; tumors of the posterior fossa of the brain and spinal canal; retinoblastoma and optic nerve glioma; neuroblastoma; Hodgkin's disease; malignant lymphoma; Ewing's sarcoma; osteosarcoma; rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoid tumor; Wilms' tumor; liver and biliary tumors; germ cell and stromal cell tumors of the gonads; endocrine, aerodigestive tract, and breast tumors; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis; and skin cancer and hemangiomas. For each type of malignancy, the authors describe the epidemiology, common presenting signs and symptoms, staging, and proper diagnostic workup. Particular attention is given to the indications for radiation therapy and the planning of a course of radiotherapy, including the optimal radiation dose, field size, and technique.

  5. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  6. Current Status of the Synchrotron Radiation Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinraide, R.; Moore, C.J.; Jacobs, K.D.; Severson, M.; Bissen, M.J.; Frazer, B.; Bisognano, J.J.; Bosch, R.A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.; Green, M.A.; Gundelach, C.T.; Hansen, R.W.C.; Hochst, H.; Julian, R.L.; Keil, R.; Kleman, K.; Kubala, T.; Legg, R.A.; Pedley, B. [Synchrotron Radiation Center (United States)] [and others

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) operates the Aladdin electron storage ring at energies of 800 MeV or 1 GeV in support of a broad range of national and international research programs. A low emittance configuration is in routine operation during 800-MeV shifts and offers improved photon flux density with about the same beam lifetime. An improved undulator compensation algorithm and new optical beam position monitors have been implemented improving beam stability and maintaining vertical beam size variations to < 2% peak-to-peak during undulator scanning. Instrumentation initiatives include construction of a modified Wadsworth beamline (7.8 - 50 eV) and a variable-line-spacing plane-grating monochromator (VLS-PGM, 75 - 2000 eV) to utilize radiation from a permanent magnet undulator. The Wadsworth beamline is being commissioned for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments using high-resolution Scienta analyzers. The VLS-PGM is being constructed for experiments that require higher photon energies and high flux density such as x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is scheduled to be available in early 2004. Recent research at the SRC has produced exciting results in a variety of fields, culminating in eight articles published in Physical Review Letters and three in Nature since October 2002, in addition to articles in many other publications. An outreach program offers research experiences for undergraduates and provides the general public with an awareness of synchrotron radiation. Hands-on workshops and activities on FTIR microscopy and X-PEEM are offered for graduate students and scientists. SRC sponsors a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program and offers opportunities to non-research universities and high schools. Tours and educational events are coordinated with local civic groups and schools. Open houses are offered that include tours, demonstrations, and family activities.

  7. Ideal Observers for Detecting Human Motion: Correspondence Noise.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuille, Alan L.

    purpose, models of motion. We perform more psychophysical experiments which are consistent with humansIdeal Observers for Detecting Human Motion: Correspondence Noise. HongJing Lo Department obtain Barlow and Tripathy's classic model as an approximation. Our psychophysical experiments show

  8. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  9. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  10. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  11. Radiation.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiationRadiation Safety Work

  12. RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

  13. Minibeam radiation therapy for the management of osteosarcomas: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y., E-mail: prezado@gmail.com [Laboratoire d’Imagerie et Modélisation en Neurobiologie et Cancérologie (IMNC), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Campus universitaire, Bât. 440, 1er étage, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) exploits the well-established tissue-sparing effect provided by the combination of submillimetric field sizes and a spatial fractionation of the dose. The aim of this work is to evaluate the feasibility and potential therapeutic gain of MBRT, in comparison with conventional radiotherapy, for osteosarcoma treatments. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE/PENEASY code) were used as a method to study the dose distributions resulting from MBRT irradiations of a rat femur and a realistic human femur phantoms. As a figure of merit, peak and valley doses and peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) were assessed. Conversion of absorbed dose to normalized total dose (NTD) was performed in the human case. Several field sizes and irradiation geometries were evaluated. Results: It is feasible to deliver a uniform dose distribution in the target while the healthy tissue benefits from a spatial fractionation of the dose. Very high PVDR values (?20) were achieved in the entrance beam path in the rat case. PVDR values ranged from 2 to 9 in the human phantom. NTD{sub 2.0} of 87 Gy might be reached in the tumor in the human femur while the healthy tissues might receive valley NTD{sub 2.0} lower than 20 Gy. The doses in the tumor and healthy tissues might be significantly higher and lower than the ones commonly delivered used in conventional radiotherapy. Conclusions: The obtained dose distributions indicate that a gain in normal tissue sparing might be expected. This would allow the use of higher (and potentially curative) doses in the tumor. Biological experiments are warranted.

  14. Origin of Cosmic Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I give a brief overview of cosmic ray physics, highlighting some key questions and how they will be addressed by new experiments.

  15. NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Status and outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.; Riordan, C.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of NREL's Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project during fiscal year 1991. Currently, the primary focus of the SRRAP is to produce a 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base, providing hourly values of global horizontal, diffuse, and direct normal solar radiation at approximately 250 sites around the United States. Because these solar radiation quantities have been measured intermittently at only about 50 of these sites, models were developed and applied to the majority of the stations to provide estimates of these parameters. Although approximately 93% of the data base consists of modeled data this represents a significant improvement over the SOLMET/ERSATZ 1952--1975 data base. The magnitude and importance of this activity are such that the majority of SRRAP human and financial in many other activities, which are reported here. These include the continued maintenance of a solar radiation monitoring network in the southeast United States at six Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU's), the transfer of solar radiation resource assessment technology through a variety of activities, participation in international programs, and the maintenance and operation of NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. 17 refs.

  16. Ensuring Safety in Human Robot Collaboration in Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Satyandra K.

    -time behavior observed during experiments with a 5 DOF robot and a human safely performing shared assembly tasksEnsuring Safety in Human Robot Collaboration in Assembly Applications Satyandra K. Gupta, Krishnanand Kaipa, Carlos Morato, and Boxuan Zhao #12;Human Robot Collaboration · Robots welding, bolting

  17. Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Birsen Donmez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    , Standardization, Theory. Keywords Metric Quality, Human Supervisory Control, Validity, Statistics, Experiments. 1Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Metrics Birsen Donmez MIT Dept. of Aero(617)252-1512 missyc@mit.edu ABSTRACT Previous research has identified broad metric classes for human- automation

  18. Functional genomics as a window on radiation stress signaling Sally A Amundson*,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Functional genomics as a window on radiation stress signaling Sally A Amundson*,1 , Michael Bittner 20892, USA; 2 National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD before the completion of the human genome draft sequence, a number of techniques for genomic expression

  19. Local microwave background radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domingos Soares

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  20. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  1. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  2. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative Transfer (RT) effects play a crucial role in the thermal history of the intergalactic medium. Here I discuss recent advances in the development of numerical methods that introduce RT to cosmological hydrodynamics. These methods can also readily be applied to time dependent problems on interstellar and galactic scales.

  3. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  4. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  5. Coherence properties of the radiation from FLASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneidmiller, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FLASH is the first free electron laser user facility operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength range. Many user experiments require knowledge of the spatial and temporal coherence properties of the radiation. In this paper we present an analysis of the coherence properties of the radiation for the fundamental and for the higher odd frequency harmonics. We show that temporal and spatial coherence reach maximum close to the FEL saturation but may degrade significantly in the post-saturation regime. We also find that the pointing stability of short FEL pulses is limited due to the fact that non-azimuthal FEL eigenmodes are not sufficiently suppressed. We discuss possible ways for improving the degree of transverse coherence and the pointing stability.

  6. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  7. Probing axions with radiation from magnetic stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai Dong; Heyl, Jeremy [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments suggest that polarized photons may couple significantly to pseudoscalar particles such as axions. We study the possible observational signatures of axion-photon coupling for radiation from magnetic stars, with particular focus on neutron stars. We present general methods for calculating the axion-photon conversion probability during propagation through a varying magnetized vacuum as well as across an inhomogeneous atmosphere. Partial axion-photon conversion may take place in the vacuum region outside the neutron star. Strong axion-photon mixing occurs due to a resonance in the atmosphere and, depending on the axion coupling strength and other parameters, significant axion-photon conversion can take place at the resonance. Such conversions may produce observable effects on the radiation spectra and polarization signals from the star. We also apply our results to axion-photon propagation in the Sun and in magnetic white dwarfs. We find that there is no appreciable conversion of solar axions to photons during the propagation.

  8. Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

  9. Radiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent; Viskanta, Raymond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. L. Drolen, “Thermal radiation in particulate media withRadiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubblesthermophysical properties and radiation characteristics of

  10. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Abstract: A review is presented of recent results on radiation damage production, defect...

  11. Preliminary radiation shielding design for BOOMERANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary Radiation Shielding Design for BOOMERANG R. J.2003 Abstract Preliminary radiation shielding speci?cationsElectron Photon Stray Radiation from a High Energy Electron

  12. Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

  13. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straume, Tore

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ionizing radiation. In: Advances in Medical Physics (A. B.for medical management of radiation casualties. ADVANCES INMedical Center presented the radiation oncology perspective on biomarkers. Advances

  14. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

  15. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 Protocol Title: Training for Sealed Source Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

  16. In this paper, we report about a new interaction-oriented robot, which communicates with humans and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanda, Takayuki

    through psychological experiments. The experiments reveled how humans recognize the robot. 1. Introduction with humans and will participate in human society as our partner. For realizing such a robot, we have started, through cognitive experiments, we obtained impor- tant ideas about the robot's body property. To incor

  17. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers. Final report: [Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study (NSWS) was designed to determine whether there is an excess risk of leukemia or other cancers associated with exposure to low levels of gamma radiation. The study compares the mortality experience of shipyard workers who qualified to work in radiation areas to the mortality of similar workers who hold the same types of jobs but who are not authorized to work in radiation areas. The population consists of workers from six government and two private shipyards.

  18. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  19. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  20. Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data

  1. RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the high-energy proton damage than was the planar detector.as far as radiation damage is concerned. Unfortunately, some28-29, 1978 LBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

  2. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selcow, E.C.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ludewig, H.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Schmidt, E.; Todosow, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Parma, E.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ball, R.M.; Hoovler, G.S. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Benchmark analyses have been performed of Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) critical experiments (CX) using the MCNP radiation transport code. The experiments have been conducted at the Sandia National Laboratory reactor facility in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. The test reactor is a nineteen element water moderated and reflected thermal system. A series of integral experiments have been carried out to test the capabilities of the radiation transport codes to predict the performance of PBR systems. MCNP was selected as the preferred radiation analysis tool for the benchmark experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculational results indicate very good agreement. This paper describes the analyses of benchmark experiments designed to quantify the accuracy of the MCNP radiation transport code for predicting the performance characteristics of PBR reactors.

  3. Double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of double beta decay experiments are reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments, NEMO-3 and CUORICINO, are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments are considered. In these experiments sensitivity for the effective neutrino mass will be on the level of (0.1-0.01) eV.

  4. Author's personal copy Effects of ultraviolet radiation on an intertidal trematode parasite: An assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, Robert

    Author's personal copy Effects of ultraviolet radiation on an intertidal trematode parasite: An assessment of damage and protection A. Studer a, , V.M. Cubillos b,c , M.D. Lamare c , R. Poulin a , D ecosystems which experience high levels of ultraviolet radiation. Although these parasites mostly live within

  5. STUDIES OF LASER-DRIVEN RADIATIVE BLAST WAVES A.D. EDENS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditmire, Todd

    -driven radiating blast waves. In the first set of experiments the effect of a drive laser's passage throughSTUDIES OF LASER-DRIVEN RADIATIVE BLAST WAVES A.D. EDENS1 , T. DITMIRE1 , J.F. HANSEN2 , M a background gas on the hydrodynamical evolution of blast waves was examined. The laser's passage heated

  6. Radiation-hard/high-speed data transmission using optical links , W. Fernandoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, K. K.

    Radiation-hard/high-speed data transmission using optical links K.K. Gana , B. Abic , W. Fernandoa The main radiation effect in a VCSEL is expected to be bulk damage and in a PIN diode the displacement experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva) use optical links for data transmission

  7. DOE Radiation Records Contacts List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  9. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  10. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  11. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  12. NCSRNCSR ""DEMOKRITOSDEMOKRITOS"" INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTIONINSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROTECTIONINSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTION ·· ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORYENVIRONMENTAL·· NCSRNCSR ""DEMOKRITOSDEMOKRITOS"" ·· INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION

  13. Interpreting the unresolved intensity of cosmologically redshifted line radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switzer, Eric R; Masui, Kiyoshi W; Pen, Ue-Li; Voytek, Tabitha C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas, and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically ~10^2-10^3 times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of foregrounds may also not be well-known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments, and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data itself. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they ...

  14. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  15. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia by more than 50 percent. #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212 ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia

  16. 6, 52315250, 2006 Radiative properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the short- wave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effects (CRE), but the impact is small: 0.02 W m-2 tests are conducted to evaluate the impact that5 such an over-layer would have on the radiative effects, terrestrial) radiation. The SW "albedo" effect brings about cooling and the LW "greenhouse" effect warming

  17. Coherent multiple-foil x-ray transition radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, M.J.; Chang, B.; Schneider, M.B.

    1993-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense x-ray transition radiation can be generated when relativistic electrons pass through a multiple-foil target. When the foil spacing is periodic, the transition radiation can be spatially coherent with respect to the target period. The spatial coherence can be evident in the spectra and angular distributions of transition radiation from such targets. A series of experiments has measured coherent transition radiation distributions from multiple-foil targets (up to six foils) with spacings of 50 {mu}m and 100 {mu}m. The electron energy was about 75 MeV and the photon energies were about 200 eV. Agreement between calculation and experimental data is excellent.

  18. Research and Education Reports Virtual International Experiences in Veterinary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Randall

    in their professions. For one thing, unprecedented changes in human and animal demographics, diseases, and biotech in all areas of international health. The convergence of global issues in animal, humanResearch and Education Reports Virtual International Experiences in Veterinary Medicine

  19. Effect of non-standard interaction for radiative neutrino mass model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konishi, Y.; Sato, J.; Shimomura, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Shimo-okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama, 338-8570 (Japan); Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata, 950-2181 (Japan)

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined effects of non-standard interactions (NSIs) in a radiative neutrino mass model. The radiative neutrino mass model suggested by Kraus Nasri and Trodden can explain not only neutrino flavor mixing and neutrino masses, but also dark matter relic abundance. Although the NSI effects of the model are too small to be detected by present neutrino oscillation experiments, we might observe the small effects in future experiments such as neutrino factory.

  20. Measuring the quantum efficiency of single radiating dipoles using a scanning mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Buchler; T. Kalkbrenner; C. Hettich; V. Sandoghdar

    2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using scanning probe techniques, we show the controlled manipulation of the radiation from single dipoles. In one experiment we study the modification of the fluorescence lifetime of a single molecular dipole in front of a movable silver mirror. A second experiment demonstrates the changing plasmon spectrum of a gold nanoparticle in front of a dielectric mirror. Comparison of our data with theoretical models allows determination of the quantum efficiency of each radiating dipole.

  1. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  2. Radiative Levitation in Hot Horizontal Branch Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Landsman

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now considerable evidence that horizontal branch (HB) stars hotter than about 11,500 K experience an enormous enhancement of their photospheric iron abundance due to radiative levitation. In globular clusters, the photospheric iron abundance can reach values of [Fe/H] ~ +0.3, or up to two orders of magnitude higher than the cluster iron abundance. Model atmospheres which take into account the iron overabundance are needed for understanding the appearance of the HB in globular cluster color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), for the derivation of accurate luminosities, gravities and masses, and for the ultraviolet spectral synthesis of old, metal-poor stellar populations.

  3. Radiation Chemistry of Advanced TALSPEAK Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincher, Bruce; Peterman, Dean; Mcdowell, Rocklan; Olson, Lonnie; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of initial experiments designed to understand the radiation chemistry of an Advanced TALSPEAK process for separating trivalent lanthanides form the actinides. Biphasic aerated samples were irradiated and then analyzed for post-irradiation constituent concentrations and solvent extraction distribution ratios. The effects of irradiation on the TALSPEAK and Advanced TALSPEAK solvents were similar, with very little degradation of the organic phase extractant. Decomposition products were detected, with a major product in common for both solvents. This product may be responsible for the slight increase in distribution ratios for Eu and Am with absorbed dose, however; separation factors were not greatly affected.

  4. A HUMAN PERFORMANCE MODEL OF COMMERCIAL JETLINER TAXIING Michael D. Byrne, Jeffrey C. Zemla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Mike

    performance between large-scale engineering-oriented simulations and human-in-the-loop experiments. In order are limited in several ways. One common method is to employ human-in-the-loop (HITL) experiments. In orderA HUMAN PERFORMANCE MODEL OF COMMERCIAL JETLINER TAXIING Michael D. Byrne, Jeffrey C. Zemla Rice

  5. Recognizing Human Activities from Multi-Modal Shu Chen,Yan Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yan

    and used in our experiments can also be accessed online. II. RELATED WORK Automatic human activities and experiments are not provided in their paper. Joshua et al. [5] use RFID-based tech- niques to detect humanRecognizing Human Activities from Multi-Modal Sensors Shu Chen,Yan Huang Department of Computer

  6. Prefrontal involvement in the regulation of emotion: convergence of rat and human studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    experiments designed to bridge human and rodent models of emotion regulation. Addresses 1 Department of prefrontal involvement of emotion regula- tion using rat and human models, and suggest future experimentsPrefrontal involvement in the regulation of emotion: convergence of rat and human studies Gregory J

  7. Terahertz radiation mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

  8. National Ambient Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

  9. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  10. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  11. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  12. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  13. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  14. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  15. Multilayer radiation shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Urbahn, John Arthur (Saratoga Springs, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Niskayuna, NY)

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  16. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  17. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  18. Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide COURSE...

  19. POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubin, Philip Lubin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a 45° angle. Radiation whose electric field (polarization)radiation field, it can be uniquely characterized by its electric

  20. Computational and experimental research on infrared trace by human being contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong Zonglong; Yang Kuntao; Ding Wenxiu; Zhang Nanyangsheng; Zheng Wenheng

    2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The indoor detection of the human body's thermal trace plays an important role in the fields of infrared detecting, scouting, infrared camouflage, and infrared rescuing and tracking. Currently, quantitative description and analysis for this technology are lacking due to the absence of human infrared radiation analysis. To solve this problem, we study the heating and cooling process by observing body contact and removal on an object, respectively. Through finite-element simulation and carefully designed experiments, an analytical model of the infrared trace of body contact is developed based on infrared physics and heat transfer theory. Using this model, the impact of body temperature on material thermal parameters is investigated. The sensitivity of material thermal parameters, the thermal distribution, and the changes of the thermograph's contrast are then found and analyzed. Excellent matching results achieved between the simulation and the experiments demonstrate the strong impact of temperature on material thermal parameters. Conclusively, the new model, simulation, and experimental results are beneficial to the future development and implementation of infrared trace technology.

  1. Global aspects of radiation memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Winicour

    2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational radiation has a memory effect represented by a net change in the relative positions of test particles. Both the linear and nonlinear sources proposed for this radiation memory are of the "electric" type, or E mode, as characterized by the even parity of the polarization pattern. Although "magnetic" type, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory in which the velocity of charged particles obtain a net "kick". Again, the physically realistic sources of electromagnetic radiation memory that have been identified are of the electric type. In this paper, a global null cone description of the electromagnetic field is applied to establish the non-existence of B mode radiation memory and the non-existence of E mode radiation memory due to a bound charge distribution.

  2. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  3. Portable controls experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Richard Winston

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments for controls classes like MIT's 2.004 require large lab setups and expensive equipment such as oscilloscopes and function generators. We developed a series of controls experiments based on National Instruments' ...

  4. Defect Mass in Gravitational Field and Red Shift of Atomic and Nuclear Radiation Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. M. Beshtoev

    2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown, that radiation spectrum of atoms (or nuclei) in the gravitational field has a red shift since the effective mass of radiating electrons (or nucleons) changes in this field. This red shift is equal to the red shift of radiation spectrum in the gravitational field measured in existence experiments. The same shift must arise when the photon (or $ \\gamma $ quantum) is passing through the gravitational field if it participates in gravitational interactions (photon has no rest mass). The absence of the double effect in the experiments, probably, means that photons (or $ \\gamma $ quanta) are passing through the gravitational field without interactions.

  5. Bremsstrahlung radiation in the deuteron - proton collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Przerwa

    2005-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the fact that Bremsstrahlung radiation has been observed many years ago, it is still the subject of interest of many theoretical and experimental groups. Due to the high sensitivity of the NN --> NNgamma reaction to the nucleon-nucleon potential, Bremsstrahlung radiation is used as a tool to investigate details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Such investigations can be performed at the cooler synchrotron COSY in the Research Centre Juelich, by dint of the COSY-11 detection system. For the first time at the COSY--11 experiment signals from gamma - quanta were observed in the time-of-flight distribution of neutral particles measured with the neutral particle detector. In this thesis the results of the identification of Bremsstrahlung radiation emitted via the dp --> dpgamma reaction in data taken with a proton target and a deuteron beam are presented and discussed. The time resolution of the neutral particle detector and its timing calibration are crucial for the identification of the dp --> dpgamma reaction. Therefore, methods of determining the relative timing between individual modules - constituting the neutron detector - and of the general time offset with respect to the other detector components are described. Furthermore the accuracy of the momentum determination of the registered neutron which defines the precision of the event reconstruction was extracted from the data.

  6. Limited-field radiation for bifocal germinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafay-Cousin, Lucie [Pediatric Brain Tumor Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: lucie.lafay-cousin@sickkids.ca; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mabbott, Donald [Pediatric Brain Tumor Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Psychology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Spiegler, Brenda [Department of Psychology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Drake, Jim [Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bartels, Ute [Pediatric Brain Tumor Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Annie [Pediatric Brain Tumor Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bouffet, Eric [Pediatric Brain Tumor Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of bifocal germinomas treated with chemotherapy followed by focal radiation. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review. Inclusion criteria included radiologic diagnosis of bifocal germinoma involving the pineal and neurohypophyseal region, no evidence of dissemination on spinal MRI, negative results from cerebrospinal fluid cytologic evaluation, and negative tumor markers. Results: Between 1995 and 2004, 6 patients (5 male, 1 female; median age, 12.8 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All had symptoms of diabetes insipidus at presentation. On MRI, 4 patients had a pineal and suprasellar mass, and 2 had a pineal mass associated with abnormal neurohypophyseal enhancement. All patients received chemotherapy followed by limited-field radiation and achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. The radiation field involved the whole ventricular system (range, 2,400-4,000 cGy) with or without a boost to the primary lesions. All patients remain in complete remission at a median follow-up of 48.1 months (range, 9-73.4 months). Conclusions: This experience suggests that bifocal germinoma can be considered a locoregional rather than a metastatic disease. Chemotherapy and focal radiotherapy might be sufficient to provide excellent outcomes. Staging refinement with new diagnostic tools will likely increase the incidence of the entity.

  7. Double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  8. For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    and the Solar Radiation Monitoring LaboratoryG:SourcesforBackgroundInformation© Useful Web Sites: UO Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory Website: http://solardata.uoregon.edu/Educational Solar Radiation Basics Solar Electric Lesson Plans o What is a KiloWatt Hour? o Experiments

  9. Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

  10. Radiation Testing of Electronics for the CMS Endcap Muon System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bylsma; D. Cady; A. Celik; L. S. Durkin; J. Gilmore; J. Haley; V. Khotilovich; S. Lakdawala; J. Liu; M. Matveev; B. P. Padley; J. Roberts; J. Roe; A. Safonov; I. Suarez; D. Wood; I. Zawisza

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronics used in the data readout and triggering system for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator at CERN are exposed to high radiation levels. This radiation can cause permanent damage to the electronic circuitry, as well as temporary effects such as data corruption induced by Single Event Upsets. Once the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) accelerator upgrades are completed it will have five times higher instantaneous luminosity than LHC, allowing for detection of rare physics processes, new particles and interactions. Tests have been performed to determine the effects of radiation on the electronic components to be used for the Endcap Muon electronics project currently being designed for installation in the CMS experiment in 2013. During these tests the digital components on the test boards were operating with active data readout while being irradiated with 55 MeV protons. In reactor tests, components were exposed to 30 years equivalent levels of neutron radiation expected at the HL-LHC. The highest total ionizing dose (TID) for the muon system is expected at the inner-most portion of the CMS detector, with 8900 rad over ten years. Our results show that Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components selected for the new electronics will operate reliably in the CMS radiation environment.

  11. Effects of radiation reaction in relativistic laser acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadad, Y.; Labun, L.; Rafelski, J.; Elkina, N.; Klier, C.; Ruhl, H. [Departments of Physics and Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, 85721 (United States); Department fuer Physik der Ludwig-Maximillians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37A, 80333 Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is twofold: to explore the response of classical charges to electromagnetic force at the level of unity in natural units and to establish a criterion that determines physical parameters for which the related radiation-reaction effects are detectable. In pursuit of this goal, the Landau-Lifshitz equation is solved analytically for an arbitrary (transverse) electromagnetic pulse. A comparative study of the radiation emission of an electron in a linearly polarized pulse for the Landau-Lifshitz equation and for the Lorentz force equation reveals the radiation-reaction-dominated regime, in which radiation-reaction effects overcome the influence of the external fields. The case of a relativistic electron that is slowed down by a counterpropagating electromagnetic wave is studied in detail. We further show that when the electron experiences acceleration of order unity, the dynamics of the Lorentz force equation, the Landau-Lifshitz equation and the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation all result in different radiation emission that could be distinguished in experiment. Finally, our analytic and numerical results are compared with those appearing in the literature.

  12. Allopurinol therapy and cataractogenesis in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerman, S.; Megaw, J.M.; Gardner, K.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term ingestion of allopurinol, an antihyperuricemic agent used to treat gout, may be related to the development of lens opacities in relatively young patients (second to fifth decades of life). Cataracts obtained from three patients taking allopurinol were subjected to high-resolution phosphorescence spectroscopy. The characteristic allopurinol triplet was demonstrated in all three cataracts. Identical spectra were obtained for normal human lenses incubated in media containing 10(-3)M allopurinol and exposed to 1.2 mW/cm2 ultraviolet radiation for 16 hours; control lenses (irradiated without allopurinol) showed no allopurinol triplets. Similar data were obtained for lenses from rats given one dose of allopurinol and exposed to ultraviolet radiation overnight. These data provide evidence that allopurinol can be photobound in rat and human lenses and suggest its cataractogenic potential.

  13. The reduction of low frequency fluctuations in RFP experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.A.; Baker, D.A.; Gribble, R.F.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low frequency fluctuations seen in RFP experiments are found to be correlated with changes in the toroidal flux measured by diamagnetic loops surrounding the discharge. The correlation of the onset of impurity radiation and x-rays with the crash seen in experiments is caused by plasma bombarding the metal liner associated with this loss of flux. Efforts should be made to design improved stabilizing shells that will reduce the loss of flux and give improved RFP energy confinement times.

  14. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

  15. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  16. Solar radiation intensity calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , radiation per unit area per unit time, on a flat-plate collector is given by: I = I cos B (2. 1a) where I is the solar constant. insolation received at one astro- nomical unit from the sun. Since clear sky conditions are assumed I o w i 1 1 b e a.... INSOLATION EQUATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS Page III. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA 25 47 48 52 Vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE I. Optimal Inclination for Ap=O, No Checks for Ip &0 and a Time Independent Solar Constant. II. Optimal...

  17. Radiative ?(1S) decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    — wW~ ii~ ~ + v~ 1''&WV'' V 0.20 0.45 0.70 ~y ~ EBFA~ 0.95 l.20 FIG. 4. Energy spectrum (normalized to beam energy) for Y~y2(h+h ) event candidates, with continuum data and ex- pected background from Y~m 2(h +h ) overplotted. 40 30— ~ 20— LLI IO— hl...PHYSICAL REVIEW 0 VOLUME 41, NUMBER 5 Radiative T(lS) decays 1 MARCH 1990 R. Fulton, M. Hempstead, T. Jensen, D. R. Johnson, H. Kagan, R. Kass, F. Morrow, and J. Whitmore Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 W.-Y. Chen, J. Dominick, R. L. Mc...

  18. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

  19. Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation Effects

  20. Radiation Safety Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation

  1. Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

  2. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  3. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1500 Engineering Drive, 410 ERB, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: wollaeger@wisc.edu, E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ?10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  4. RADIATIVE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et Cosmochimie de Museum (LMCM), CNRS and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7202, 57 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris (France); Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr, E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g., at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H II region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick 'adiabatic' regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved, for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state and derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability condition.

  5. Cooperative controllers for highways based on human experience , V. Milansb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ), and the growing population. Its highly automated vehicle illustrates the characteristics of the future of mobility , J. Villagrác , E. Onievad AUTOPIA program at Centre for Automation and Robotics (CAR), 28500 Madrid.onieva@decsai.ugr.es Abstract The AUTOPIA program has been working on the development of intelligent autonomous vehicles

  6. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  7. Observable dark radiation from cosmologically safe QCD axion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a QCD axion model that avoids the cosmological domain wall problem, introducing a global SU(3)_f family symmetry to which we embed the unwanted PQ discrete symmetry. The spontaneous breaking of SU(3)_f and PQ symmetry predicts eight NG bosons as well as axion, all of which contribute to dark radiation in the Universe. The derivation from the standard model prediction of dark radiation can be observed by future observations of CMB fluctuations. Our model also predicts a sizable exotic kaon decay rate, which is marginally consistent with the present collider data and would be tested by future collider experiments.

  8. Performance of the AMS-02 Transition Radiation Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. v. Doetinchem; S. Fopp; W. Karpinski; T. Kirn; K. Luebelsmeyer; J. Orboeck; S. Schael; A. Schultz von Dratzig; G. Schwering; T. Siedenburg; R. Siedling; W. Wallraff; U. Becker; J. Burger; R. Henning; A. Kounine; V. Koutsenko; J. Wyatt

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    For cosmic particle spectroscopy on the International Space Station the AMS experiment will be equipped with a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) to improve particle identification. The TRD has 20 layers of fleece radiator with Xe/CO2 proportional mode straw tube chambers. They are supported in a conically shaped octagon structure made of CFC-Al-honeycomb. For low power consumption VA analog multiplexers are used as front-end readout. A 20 layer prototype built from final design components has achieved proton rejections from 100 to 2000 at 90% electron efficiency for proton beam energies up to 250 GeV with cluster counting, likelihood and neural net selection algorithms.

  9. Theory of Light Emission in Sonoluminescence as Thermal Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang-Kong Tse; P. T. Leung

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the model proposed by Hilgenfeldt {\\it at al.} [Nature {\\bf 398}, 401 (1999)], we present here a comprehensive theory of thermal radiation in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). We first invoke the generalized Kirchhoff's law to obtain the thermal emissivity from the absorption cross-section of a multilayered sphere (MLS). A sonoluminescing bubble, whose internal structure is determined from hydrodynamic simulations, is then modelled as a MLS and in turn the thermal radiation is evaluated. Numerical results obtained from simulations for argon bubbles show that our theory successfully captures the major features observed in SBSL experiments.

  10. Radiator Labs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: TheCompetition » Radiator Labs

  11. Split SUSY Radiates Flavor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Baumgart; Daniel Stolarski; Thomas Zorawski

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative flavor models where the hierarchies of Standard Model (SM) fermion masses and mixings are explained via loop corrections are elegant ways to solve the SM flavor puzzle. Here we build such a model in the context of Mini-Split Supersymmetry (SUSY) where both flavor and SUSY breaking occur at a scale of 1000 TeV. This model is consistent with the observed Higgs mass, unification, and WIMP dark matter. The high scale allows large flavor mixing among the sfermions, which provides part of the mechanism for radiative flavor generation. In the deep UV, all flavors are treated democratically, but at the SUSY breaking scale, the third, second, and first generation Yukawa couplings are generated at tree level, one loop, and two loops, respectively. Save for one, all the dimensionless parameters in the theory are O(1), with the exception being a modest and technically natural tuning that explains both the smallness of the bottom Yukawa coupling and the largeness of the Cabibbo angle.

  12. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL] [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL] [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL] [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL] [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  13. Enhanced tumor responses through therapies combining CCNU, MISO and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemann, D.W.; Hill, S.A.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed to determine whether the radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could enhance the tumor control probability in a treatment strategy combining radiation and the nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). In initial experiments KHT sarcoma-bearing mice were injected with 1.0 mg/g of MISO simultaneously with a 20 mg/kg dose of CCNU 30-40 min prior to irradiation (1500 rad). With this treatment protocol approximately 60% of the mice were found to be tumor-free 100 days post treatment. By comparison all 2 agent combinations led to 0% cures. To evaluate the relative importance of chemopotentiation versus radiosensitization in the 3 agent protocol, tumors were treated with MISO plus one anti-tumor agent (either radiation of CCNU) and then at times ranging from 0 to 24 hr later exposed to the other agent. When the time between treatments was 0 to 6 hr, a 60 to 80% tumor control rate was achieved for both MISO plus radiation followed by CCNU and MISO plus CCNU followed by radiation. However if the time interval was increased to 18 or 24 hr, the cure rate in the former treatment regimen dropped to 10% while that of the latter remained high at 40%. The data therefore indicate that (1) improved tumor responses may be achieved when MISO is added to a radiation-chemotherapy combination and (2) MISO may be more effective in such a protocol when utilized as a chemopotentiator.

  14. Radiative corrections to real and virtual muon Compton scattering revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kaiser

    2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate in closed analytical form the one-photon loop radiative corrections to muon Compton scattering $\\mu^- \\gamma \\to \\mu^- \\gamma $. Ultraviolet and infrared divergencies are both treated in dimensional regularization. Infrared finiteness of the (virtual) radiative corrections is achieved (in the standard way) by including soft photon radiation below an energy cut-off $\\lambda$. We find that the anomalous magnetic moment $\\alpha/2\\pi$ provides only a very small portion of the full radiative corrections. Furthermore, we extend our calculation of radiative corrections to the muon-nucleus bremsstrahlung process (or virtual muon Compton scattering $\\mu^-\\gamma_0^* \\to \\mu^- \\gamma $). These results are particularly relevant for analyzing the COMPASS experiment at CERN in which muon-nucleus bremsstrahlung serves to calibrate the Primakoff scattering of high-energy pions off a heavy nucleus with the aim of measuring the pion electric and magnetic polarizabilities. We find agreement with an earlier calculation of these radiative corrections based on a different method.

  15. Radiation Safety Work Control Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-3) Rev. May 2014 Area: Form : Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers...

  16. Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

  17. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  18. Radiating Levi-Civita Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgur Delice

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper has been withdrawn by the author, See J.Krishna Rao, J. Phys. A: Gen. Phys., 4, 17 (1971) for radiating Levi-Civita metric.

  19. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder; Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  20. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM); Looney, Larry D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  1. Quality Services: Radiation (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish standards for protection against ionizing radiation resulting from the disposal and discharge of radioactive material to the environment. The regulations apply to any...

  2. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  3. Human-machine interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  4. Mentoring Human Performance - 12480

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geis, John A.; Haugen, Christian N. [CALIBRE Systems, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the positive effects of implementing a human performance approach to operations can be hard to quantify, many organizations and industry areas are finding tangible benefits to such a program. Recently, a unique mentoring program was established and implemented focusing on improving the performance of managers, supervisors, and work crews, using the principles of Human Performance Improvement (HPI). The goal of this mentoring was to affect behaviors and habits that reliably implement the principles of HPI to ensure continuous improvement in implementation of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) within a Conduct of Operations framework. Mentors engaged with personnel in a one-on-one, or one-on-many dialogue, which focused on what behaviors were observed, what factors underlie the behaviors, and what changes in behavior could prevent errors or events, and improve performance. A senior management sponsor was essential to gain broad management support. A clear charter and management plan describing the goals, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes was established. Mentors were carefully selected with senior management endorsement. Mentors were assigned to projects and work teams based on the following three criteria: 1) knowledge of the work scope; 2) experience in similar project areas; and 3) perceived level of trust they would have with project management, supervision, and work teams. This program was restructured significantly when the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) and the associated funding came to an end. The program was restructured based on an understanding of the observations, attributed successes and identified shortfalls, and the consolidation of those lessons. Mentoring the application of proven methods for improving human performance was shown effective at increasing success in day-to-day activities and increasing confidence and level of skill of supervisors. While mentoring program effectiveness is difficult to measure, and return on investment is difficult to quantify, especially in complex and large organizations where the ability to directly correlate causal factors can be challenging, the evidence presented by Sydney Dekker, James Reason, and others who study the field of human factors does assert managing and reducing error is possible. Employment of key behaviors-HPI techniques and skills-can be shown to have a significant impact on error rates. Our mentoring program demonstrated reduced error rates and corresponding improvements in safety and production. Improved behaviors are the result, of providing a culture with consistent, clear expectations from leadership, and processes and methods applied consistently to error prevention. Mentoring, as envisioned and executed in this program, was effective in helping shift organizational culture and effectively improving safety and production. (authors)

  5. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

  6. CSR SHIELDING EXPERIMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    triplets are essential elements of CSR shielding experiment beamline setup. e - e - e - BPMflag image HES image Dispersion function minimized in the dipole where shielding plates...

  7. Hawking radiation and Quasinormal modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SangChul Yoon

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of Hawking radiation by quantum fields in the curved spacetime is continuous, so the explanation of Hawking radiation using quasinormal modes can be suspected to be impossible. We find that quasinormal modes do not explain the relation between the state observed in a region far away from a black hole and the short distance behavior of the state on the horizon.

  8. Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY J. Kenneth Shultis and Richard E. Faw* Abstract Physics Society INTRODUCTION THIS IS a review of the technology of shielding against the effects to the review. The first treats the evolution of radiation-shielding technology from the beginning of the 20th

  9. Radiative recombination data for tungsten ions: II. W{sup 47+}–W{sup 71+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trzhaskovskaya, M.B., E-mail: Trzhask@MT5605.spb.edu [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Nikulin, V.K. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    New radiative recombination and photoionization cross sections, radiative recombination rate coefficients, and radiated power loss rate coefficients are presented for 23 tungsten impurity ions in plasmas. We consider ions from W{sup 47+} to W{sup 71+} that are of importance to fusion studies for ITER and for experiments using electron beam ion traps. The calculations are fully relativistic and all significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The Dirac–Fock method is used to compute the electron wavefunctions. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are found using the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution of the continuum electron velocity. The total radiative recombination cross sections are given in the electron energy range from 1 eV to ?80keV. Partial cross sections for ground and excited states are approximated by an analytical expression involving five fit parameters. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are calculated in the temperature range from 10{sup 4}K to 10{sup 9}K. The total radiative recombination rates are approximated by another analytical expression with four fit parameters.

  10. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  11. Gravitational Radiation From Cosmological Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Kosowsky; Andrew Mack; Tinatin Kahniashvili

    2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection of energy into the early Universe on a given characteristic length scale will result in turbulent motions of the primordial plasma. We calculate the stochastic background of gravitational radiation arising from a period of cosmological turbulence, using a simple model of isotropic Kolmogoroff turbulence produced in a cosmological phase transition. We also derive the gravitational radiation generated by magnetic fields arising from a dynamo operating during the period of turbulence. The resulting gravitational radiation background has a maximum amplitude comparable to the radiation background from the collision of bubbles in a first-order phase transition, but at a lower frequency, while the radiation from the induced magnetic fields is always subdominant to that from the turbulence itself. We briefly discuss the detectability of such a signal.

  12. Transition Radiation in QCD matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Djordjevic

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions a finite size QCD medium is created. In this paper we compute radiative energy loss to zeroth order in opacity by taking into account finite size effects. Transition radiation occurs on the boundary between the finite size medium and the vacuum, and we show that it lowers the difference between medium and vacuum zeroth order radiative energy loss relative to the infinite size medium case. Further, in all previous computations of light parton radiation to zeroth order in opacity, there was a divergence caused by the fact that the energy loss is infinite in the vacuum and finite in the QCD medium. We show that this infinite discontinuity is naturally regulated by including the transition radiation.

  13. Radiation Reaction in Quantum Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keita Seto

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    From the development of the electron theory by H. A. Lorentz in 1906, many authors have tried to reformulate this model named "radiation reaction". P. A. M. Dirac derived the relativistic-classical electron model in 1938, which is now called the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. But this model has the big difficulty of the run-away solution. Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. Therefore, it is desirable to stabilize this model of the radiation reaction for estimations. Via my recent research, I found a stabilized model of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum. This leads us to an updated Fletcher-Millikan's charge to mass ratio including radiation, de/dm, derived as the 4th order tensor measure. In this paper, I will discuss the latest update of the model and the ability of the equation of motion with radiation reaction in quantum vacuum via photon-photon scatterings.

  14. A model code for the radiative theta pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S., E-mail: leesing@optusnet.com.au [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 Australia (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 Australia (Australia); Lee, P. C. K. [Nanyang Technological University, National Institute of Education, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Akel, M. [Department of Physics, Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus, P. O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Damideh, V. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Khattak, N. A. D. [Department of Physics, Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan (Pakistan); Mongkolnavin, R.; Paosawatyanyong, B. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for the theta pinch is presented with three modelled phases of radial inward shock phase, reflected shock phase, and a final pinch phase. The governing equations for the phases are derived incorporating thermodynamics and radiation and radiation-coupled dynamics in the pinch phase. A code is written incorporating correction for the effects of transit delay of small disturbing speeds and the effects of plasma self-absorption on the radiation. Two model parameters are incorporated into the model, the coupling coefficient f between the primary loop current and the induced plasma current and the mass swept up factor f{sub m}. These values are taken from experiments carried out in the Chulalongkorn theta pinch.

  15. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  16. Spectrum of second-harmonic radiation generated from incoherent light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stabinis, A.; Pyragaite, V.; Tamosauskas, G.; Piskarskas, A. [Department of Quantum Electronics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Avenue 9, Building 3, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the development of the theory of second-harmonic generation by an incoherent pump with broad angular and frequency spectra. We show that spatial as well as temporal walk-off effects in a nonlinear crystal result in angular dispersion of the second-harmonic radiation. We demonstrate that the acceptance angle in second-harmonic generation by incoherent light is caused by the width of the pump angular spectrum and the resulting angular dispersion of second-harmonic radiation but does not depend on crystal length. In this case the frequency spectrum of second-harmonic radiation is determined by its angular dispersion and the pump angular spectrum. The theory is supported by an experiment in which a LiIO{sub 3} crystal was pumped by a tungsten halogen lamp.

  17. Numerical Analysis of Spherically Convergent Rayleigh-Taylor Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galmiche, D.; Cherfils, C.; Glendinning, S.G.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the frame of a CEA/US DOE collaboration, radiation driven spherically convergent experiments were performed on the Nova laser in order m measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front. Numerical simulations using the 2D Lagrangian code FCI2 have correctly reproduced experiments in moderate convergent geometry. [C. Cherfils et al., PRL 83, 5507 (1999)]. Experiments have addressed convergence ratios up to 4 by considering larger capsules, larger hohlraum and longer laser pulses [S.G. Glendinning et al., to be published in Physics of Plasmas]. Numerical analysis of these high convergence implosions is presented, and the effect of convergence on the Rayleigh-Taylor growth is investigated.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolay, Nils H., E-mail: n.nicolay@dkfz.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute [Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Trinh, Thuy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Sisombath, Sonevisay [Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  19. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, William

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12] G. F. Knoll, Radiation Detection and Measurements, JohnEnergy nonlinearity in radiation detection materials: Causes

  20. Franklin: User Experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  1. Visual sensations during megavoltage radiotherapy to the orbit attributable to Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, Francis; Asadi-Zeydabadi, Masoud; Durairaj, Vikram D.; Ding Meisong; Stuhr, Kelly; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado 80217 (United States); Department of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado, 80045 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During megavoltage photon and electron beam radiotherapy treatment involving the eye, patients commonly report visual sensations; 'nerve stimulation' is the conventional explanation. We propose that the phenomenon can be attributed to Cherenkov radiation inside the eye. The threshold electron energy for Cherenkov radiation in water is 260 keV. The human retina is able to perceive approximately 5-14 visible photons in 0.001 s. A single 500 keV electron traversing 1 mm of water will induce nearly 15 Cherenkov visible range photons. We propose that a portal image involving the eye will produce sufficient Cherenkov radiation to be detected by the retina.

  2. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

  3. Radiation events in astronomical CCD images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    268. 10. “On the Rates of Radiation Events in CCD’s (Excerpt23 Jan 2002 LBNL-49316 Radiation events in astronomical CCDof depleted silicon to ionizing radiation is a nuisance to

  4. High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ager III, J.W.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. F. Geisz, “Superior radiation resistance of In 1-x Ga x Nand H. Itoh, “Proton radiation analysis of multi-junction56326 High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells Final

  5. Lack of Bystander Effects From High LET Radiation For Early Cytogenetic Endpoints.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groesser, Torsten; Cooper, Brian; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work was to study radiation-induced bystander effects for early cytogenetic end points in various cell lines using the medium transfer technique after exposure to high- and low-LET radiation. Cells were exposed to 20 MeV/ nucleon nitrogen ions, 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions, or 575 MeV/nucleon iron ions followed by transfer of the conditioned medium from the irradiated cells to unirradiated test cells. The effects studied included DNA double-strand break induction, {gamma}-H2AX focus formation, induction of chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes, and micronucleus formation using DNA repair-proficient and -deficient hamster and human cell lines (xrs6, V79, SW48, MO59K and MO59J). Cell survival was also measured in SW48 bystander cells using X rays. Although it was occasionally possible to detect an increase in chromatid break levels using nitrogen ions and to see a higher number of {gamma}-H2AX foci using nitrogen and iron ions in xrs6 bystander cells in single experiments, the results were not reproducible. After we pooled all the data, we could not verify a significant bystander effect for any of these end points. Also, we did not detect a significant bystander effect for DSB induction or micronucleus formation in these cell lines or for clonogenic survival in SW48 cells. The data suggest that DNA damage and cytogenetic changes are not induced in bystander cells. In contrast, data in the literature show pronounced bystander effects in a variety of cell lines, including clonogenic survival in SW48 cells and induction of chromatid breaks and micronuclei in hamster cells. To reconcile these conflicting data, it is possible that the epigenetic status of the specific cell line or the precise culture conditions and medium supplements, such as serum, may be critical for inducing bystander effects.

  6. IAEACN69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles the severe problem of concentrated power loading of the divertor. [2] Experiments have shown that a large1 IAEA­CN­69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

  7. IAEA-CN-69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy production (7.6ÊMJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles the severe problem of concentrated power loading of the divertor.Ê[2] Experiments have shown that a large1 IAEA-CN-69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

  8. The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids: a review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Wishart, James F.

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids have received increasing attention as media for radiochemical separations. Recent literature includes examinations of the efficiencies and mechanisms of the solvent extraction of lanthanides, actinides and fission products into ionic liquid solutions. For radiochemical applications, including as replacement solvents for nuclear fuel reprocessing, a thorough understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids will be required. Such an understanding can be achieved based upon a combination of steady-state radiolysis experiments coupled with post-irradiation product identification and pulse-radiolysis experiments to acquire kinetic information. These techniques allow for the elucidation of radiolytic mechanisms. This contribution reviews the current ionic liquidmore »radiation chemistry literature as it affects separations, with these considerations in mind.« less

  9. The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids: a review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Wishart, James F.

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids have received increasing attention as media for radiochemical separations. Recent literature includes examinations of the efficiencies and mechanisms of the solvent extraction of lanthanides, actinides and fission products into ionic liquid solutions. For radiochemical applications, including as replacement solvents for nuclear fuel reprocessing, a thorough understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids will be required. Such an understanding can be achieved based upon a combination of steady-state radiolysis experiments coupled with post-irradiation product identification and pulse-radiolysis experiments to acquire kinetic information. These techniques allow for the elucidation of radiolytic mechanisms. This contribution reviews the current ionic liquid radiation chemistry literature as it affects separations, with these considerations in mind.

  10. Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico); Watson, Patrick (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); McDaniel, Mark A. (Washington University); Eichenbaum, Howard B. (Boston University); Cohen, Neal J. (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

  11. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  12. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. (Yale Univ. Medical Center, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  13. Synchrotron radiation from massless charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal'tsov, D V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical radiation power from an accelerated massive charge diverges in the zero-mass limit, while some general arguments suggest that strictly massless charge does not not radiate at all. On the other hand, the regularized classical radiation reaction force, though looking odd, is non-zero and finite. To clarify this controversy, we consider radiation problem in massless scalar quantum electrodynamics in the external magnetic field. In this framework, synchrotron radiation is found to be non-zero, finite, and essentially quantum. Its spectral distribution is calculated using Schwinger's proper time technique for {\\em ab initio} massless particle of zero spin. Provided $E^2\\gg eH$, the maximum in the spectrum is shown to be at $\\hbar \\omega=E/3$, and the average photon energy is $4E/9$. The normalized spectrum is universal, depending neither on $E$ nor on $H$. Quantum nature of radiation makes classical radiation reaction equation meaningless for massless charge. Our results are consistent with the view (sup...

  14. Human Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to present the results of human factors experiments looking at the power system flow animation. IIHuman Factors Aspects of Power System Flow Animation Douglas A. Wiegmann, Gavin R. Essenberg experimental results associated with human factors aspects of using animation to display electric power system

  15. Identification of Human Gene Core Promoters Michael Q. Zhang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Human Gene Core Promoters in Silico Michael Q. Zhang1 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724 USA Identification of the 5 -end of human genes requires--CorePromoter. Our experiments indicate that when given a 1- to 2-kb extended promoter, CorePromoter will correctly

  16. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  17. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accident Registries The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains a number of radiation...

  18. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Treatment Medications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment Medications The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) is a valuable resource in the use of drug therapies to treat radiation exposure. REACTS...

  19. 10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

  20. Hybrid Radiator Cooling System | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiator Cooling System Technology available for licensing: Hybrid radiator cooling system uses conventional finned air cooling under most driving conditions that would be...

  1. Standards for Protection Against Radiation (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes standards for protection against radiation hazards. In addition to complying with requirements set forth, every reasonable effort should be made to maintain radiation levels...

  2. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  3. Human action categorization using ultrasound micro-Doppler signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wennekers, Thomas

    of a wave radiated or scattered by the object. This is known as the Doppler effect. If the object frequency shift, known as the micro-Doppler effect. The micro-Doppler signature enables to determineHuman action categorization using ultrasound micro-Doppler signatures Salvador Dura-Bernal1

  4. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riedel, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Wintenberg, Alan L. (Knoxville, TN); Clonts, Lloyd G. (Knoxville, TN); Cooper, Ronald G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A preamplifier circuit for processing a signal provided by a radiation detector includes a transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a detector and generate a voltage signal at its output. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifier for providing an amplified voltage signal. Detector electronics include a preamplifier circuit having a first and second transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a first and second location on a detector, respectively, and generate a first and second voltage signal at respective outputs. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifiers for amplifying the first and said second voltage signals to provide first and second amplified voltage signals. A differential output stage is coupled to the second amplification stage for receiving the first and second amplified voltage signals and providing a pair of outputs from each of the first and second amplified voltage signals. Read out circuitry has an input coupled to receive both of the pair of outputs, the read out circuitry having structure for processing each of the pair of outputs, and providing a single digital output having a time-stamp therefrom.

  5. 1998 Oxford University Press 919932Human Molecular Genetics, 1998, Vol. 7, No. 5 Statistical features of human exons and their flanking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -specific sequence data available today, to facilitate experiments on human molecular genetics and to meet the need© 1998 Oxford University Press 919­932Human Molecular Genetics, 1998, Vol. 7, No. 5 Statistical features of human exons and their flanking regions M. Q. Zhang Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, PO Box 100

  6. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

  7. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  8. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  9. Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measurement are also briefed.

  10. Radiation effects in SYNROC-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Guinan, M.W.

    1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes SYNROC-D and the irradiation it will be subjected to over the first million years of storage. This will include about 8 x 10/sup 24/ alpha decays per m/sup 3/ and a total ionization dose of about 1 x 10/sup 11/ rads. Methods of simulating the radiation effects are discussed. Previous work by others is reviewed and compared on a dpa basis. /sup 238/Pu doping experiments to simulate internal alpha decay are described, and the progress is discussed. It is concluded that dose rate effects on swelling and metamictization of perovskite and zirconolite are small over a wide range of dose rate, and that swelling and metamictization in these minerals does not anneal significantly over geological time periods.

  11. Progress in radiation immune thermionic integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, D.K.; McCormick, J.B. (comps.)

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a program directed at evaluating the thermionic integrated circuit (TIC) technology for applicability to military systems. Previous programs under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, have developed an initial TIC technology base and demonstrated operation in high-temperature and high-radiation environments. The program described in this report has two parts: (1) a technical portion in which experiments and analyses were conducted to refine perceptions of near-term as well as ultimate performance levels of the TIC technology and (2) an applications portion in which the technical conclusions were to be evaluated against potential military applications. This report draws several conclusions that strongly suggest that (1) useful radiation-hard/high-temperature operable integrated circuits can be developed using the TIC technology; (2) because of their ability to survive and operate in hostile environments, a variety of potential military applications have been projected for this technology; and (3) based on the above two conclusions, an aggressive TIC development program should be initiated to provide the designers of future systems with integrated circuits and devices with the unique features of the TICs.

  12. Radiation to atom quantum mapping by collective recoil in Bose-Einstein condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo G. A. Paris; Mary Cola; Nicola Piovella; Rodolfo Bonifacio

    2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an experiment to realize radiation to atom continuous variable quantum mapping, i.e. to teleport the quantum state of a single mode radiation field onto the collective state of atoms with a given momentum out of a Bose-Einstein condensate. The atoms-radiation entanglement needed for the teleportation protocol is established through the interaction of a single mode with the condensate in presence of a strong far off-resonant pump laser, whereas the coherent atomic displacement is obtained by the same interaction with the radiation in a classical coherent field. In principle, verification of the protocol requires a joint measurement on the recoiling atoms and the condensate, however, a partial verification involving populations, i.e. diagonal matrix elements may be obtained through counting atoms experiments.

  13. ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul Accelerator-Mass-Spectrometry...

  14. General relativity and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

  15. Simulated pion photoproduction experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, Ethan (Ethan Gabriel Grief)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: In this paper, I will be assessing the capabilities of the Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) detector in a planned experiment at the High Intensity Gamma Source at Duke University. I will review the relevant ...

  16. The MAJORANA Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MAJORANA Collaboration

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment, an R&D effort that will field approximately 40kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR.

  17. The Majorana Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Kephart, J. D.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Back, H. O. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bergevin, M.; Chan, Y.-D.; Detwiler, J. A.; Loach, J. C. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  18. The MAJORANA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, John; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  19. Energy Flow in Interjet Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carola F. Berger; Tibor Kucs; George Sterman

    2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the distribution of transverse energy, Q_Omega, radiated into an arbitrary interjet angular region, Omega, in high-p_T two-jet events. Using an approximation that emphasizes radiation directly from the partons that undergo the hard scattering, we find a distribution that can be extrapolated smoothly to Q_Omega=Lambda_QCD, where it vanishes. This method, which we apply numerically in a valence quark approximation, provides a class of predictions on transverse energy radiated between jets, as a function of jet energy and rapidity, and of the choice of the region Omega in which the energy is measured. We discuss the relation of our approximation to the radiation from unobserved partons of intermediate energy, whose importance was identified by Dasgupta and Salam.

  20. Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Radiation Control Act is designed to prevent any associated harmful effects upon the environment or the health and safety of the public through the institution and maintenance of a...

  1. Texas Radiation Control Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to institute and maintain a regulatory program for radiation sources that is compatible with federal standards and regulatory programs, and, to the degree possible,...

  2. Ionizing Radiation Injury (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation applies to employers that have more than one employee who engages in activities which involve the presence of ionizing radiation. Employers with less than three employees can...

  3. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  4. MULTI-POINT RADIATION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofstetter, K; Donna Beals, D; Ken Odell, K; Robert Eakle, R; Russell Huffman, R; Larry Harpring, L

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique radiation monitor has been developed for performing wide-area field surveys for radiation sources. This device integrates the real-time output of multiple radiation detectors into a hand-held personal computer (e.g., a PDA) containing an intuitive graphical user interface. An independent hardware module supplies high voltage to the detectors and contains a rapid sampling system for transferring the detector count rates through an interface to the PDA. The imbedded firmware can be changed for various applications using a programmable memory card. As presently configured, the instrument contains a series of Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes in a flexible detector string. This linear array of multiple sensors can be used by US Coast Guard and Customs container inspection personnel to measure radiation intensity in stacks of transport containers where physical access is impeded.

  5. Using Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget dataUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget data to evaluate global models and radiative processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cloud cover r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk© University of Reading 20108 #12;Radiative bias: climate models estimate radiative effect of contrail cirrus:contrail cirrus: LW ~ 40 Wm-2 SW up to 80 Wm-2 rUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget dataUsing Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget data

  6. Radiation-Associated Liver Injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Charlie C., E-mail: cpan@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Das, Shiva K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The liver is a critically important organ that has numerous functions including the production of bile, metabolism of ingested nutrients, elimination of many waste products, glycogen storage, and plasma protein synthesis. The liver is often incidentally irradiated during radiation therapy (RT) for tumors in the upper- abdomen, right lower lung, distal esophagus, or during whole abdomen or whole body RT. This article describes the endpoints, time-course, and dose-volume effect of radiation on the liver.

  7. Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyzar, James Ronald

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the cyclotron would induce cataracts in the exposed eye (1). In 1949 the National Research Council's Committee on Ophthalmology delegated an investigational team to Japan to study the occurrence of radiation cataracts among atom bomb survivors. This team... for the most part to ophthalmological circles arousing little interest in other elements of the scien- tific world (13) . In the decade of the 1940's conditions arose which were to vastly change research into the area of radiation damage. These conditions...

  8. Ghost Imaging with Blackbody Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangjian Cai; Shiyao Zhu

    2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical study of ghost imaging by using blackbody radiation source. A Gaussian thin lens equation for the ghost imaging, which depends on both paths, is derived. The dependences of the visibility and quality of the image on the transverse size and temperature of the blackbody are studied. The main differences between the ghost imaging by using the blackbody radiation and by using the entangled photon pairs are image-forming equation, and the visibility and quality of the image

  9. Angular Ordering in Gluon Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong B. Choi; Byeong S. Choi; Su K. Lee

    2002-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption of angular ordering in gluon radiation is essential to obtain quantitative results concerning gluonic behaviors. In order to prove the validity of this assumption, we have applied our momentum space flux-tube formalism to check out the angular dependences of gluon radiation. We have calculated the probability amplitudes to get new gluon, and have found that the new gluon is generally expected to have the maximum amplitude when it is produced between the momentum directions of the last two partons.

  10. Solar Radiation and Asteroidal Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of solar wind and solar electromagnetic radiation on motion of asteroids are discussed. The results complete the statements presented in Vokrouhlick\\'{y} and Milani (2000). As for the effect of electromagnetic radiation, the complete equation of motion is presented to the first order in $v/c$ -- the shape of asteroid (spherical body is explicitly presented) and surface distribution of albedo should be taken into account. Optical quantities must be calculated in proper frame of reference.

  11. In-Ground Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Hensley, Walter K.

    2006-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertically oriented radiation detectors may not provide sufficient screening in rail or aviation applications. Railcars can be heavily shielded on the sides, reducing the sensitivity of vertically mounted monitors. For aviation, the distance required for wingspan clearance reduces a vertical detector’s coverage of the fuselage. To surmount these, and other, challenging operational and sensitivity issues, we have investigated the use of in-ground radiation detectors. (PIET-43741-TM-605).

  12. Radiation Protection | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal Regulation governing

  13. Nuclear Targets for a Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Radiative Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Martel; E. Clinton; R. McWilliams; D. Lawrence; R. Miskimen; A. Ahmidouch; P. Ambrozewicz; A. Asratyan; K. Baker; L. Benton; A. Bernstein; P. Cole; P. Collins; D. Dale; S. Danagoulian; G. Davidenko; R. Demirchyan; A. Deur; A. Dolgolenko; G. Dzyubenko; A. Evdokimov; J. Feng; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; A. Gasparian; O. Glamazdin; V. Goryachev; V. Gyurjyan; K. Hardy; M. Ito; M. Khandaker; P. Kingsberry; A. Kolarkar; M. Konchatnyi; O. Korchin; W. Korsch; S. Kowalski; M. Kubantsev; V. Kubarovsky; I. Larin; V. Matveev; D. McNulty; B. Milbrath; R. Minehart; V. Mochalov; S. Mtingwa; I. Nakagawa; S. Overby; E. Pasyuk; M. Payen; R. Pedroni; Y. Prok; B. Ritchie; C. Salgado; A. Sitnikov; D. Sober; W. Stephens; A. Teymurazyan; J. Underwood; A. Vasiliev; V. Verebryusov; V. Vishnyakov; M. Wood

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, density * T, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is +/- 0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an x-ray attenuation technique is +/- 0.43%.

  14. A Monitor of the Focusing Strength of Plasma Lenses Using MeV Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clive Field; Gholam Mazaheri; Johnny S. T. Ng

    2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The focusing strength of plasma lenses used with high energy electron or positron beams can give rise to synchrotron radiation with critical energies in the MeV range. A method is described for measuring the characteristic energy of this radiation as a way of monitoring the strength of the focus. The principle has been implemented in a plasma lens experiment with a 28.5 GeV positron beam.

  15. Radiation hardness qualification of PbWO4 scintillation crystals for the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Group; P. Adzic; N. Almeida; D. Andelin; I. Anicin; Z. Antunovic; R. Arcidiacono; M. W. Arenton; E. Auffray; S. Argiro; A. Askew; S. Baccaro; S. Baffioni; M. Balazs; D. Bandurin; D. Barney; L. M. Barone; A. Bartoloni; C. Baty; S. Beauceron; K. W. Bell; C. Bernet; M. Besancon; B. Betev; R. Beuselinck; C. Biino; J. Blaha; P. Bloch; A. Borisevitch; A. Bornheim; J. Bourotte; R. M. Brown; M. Buehler; P. Busson; B. Camanzi; T. Camporesi; N. Cartiglia; F. Cavallari; A. Cecilia; P. Chang; Y. H. Chang; C. Charlot; E. A. Chen; W. T. Chen; Z. Chen; R. Chipaux; B. C. Choudhary; R. K. Choudhury; D. J. A. Cockerill; S. Conetti; S. Cooper; F. Cossutti; B. Cox; D. G. Cussans; I. Dafinei; D. R. Da Silva Di Calafiori; G. Daskalakis; A. David; K. Deiters; M. Dejardin; A. De Benedetti; G. Della Ricca; D. Del Re; D. Denegri; P. Depasse; J. Descamps; M. Diemoz; E. Di Marco; G. Dissertori; M. Dittmar; L. Djambazov; M. Djordjevic; L. Dobrzynski; A. Dolgopolov; S. Drndarevic; G. Drobychev; D. Dutta; M. Dzelalija; A. Elliott-Peisert; H. El Mamouni; I. Evangelou; B. Fabbro; J. L. Faure; J. Fay; A. Fedorov; F. Ferri; D. Franci; G. Franzoni; K. Freudenreich; W. Funk; S. Ganjour; S. Gascon; M. Gataullin; F. X. Gentit; A. Ghezzi; A. Givernaud; S. Gninenko; A. Go; B. Gobbo; N. Godinovic; N. Golubev; P. Govoni; N. Grant; P. Gras; M. Haguenauer; G. Hamel de Monchenault; M. Hansen; J. Haupt; H. F. Heath; B. Heltsley; W. Hintz; R. Hirosky; P. R. Hobson; A. Honma; G. W. S. Hou; Y. Hsiung; M. Huhtinen; B. Ille; Q. Ingram; A. Inyakin; P. Jarry; C. Jessop; D. Jovanovic; K. Kaadze; V. Kachanov; S. Kailas; S. K. Kataria; B. W. Kennedy; P. Kokkas; T. Kolberg; M. Korjik; N. Krasnikov; D. Krpic; Y. Kubota; C. M. Kuo; P. Kyberd; A. Kyriakis; M. Lebeau; P. Lecomte; P. Lecoq; A. Ledovskoy; M. Lethuillier; S. W. Lin; W. Lin; V. Litvine; E. Locci; E. Longo; D. Loukas; P. D. Luckey; W. Lustermann; Y. Ma; M. Malberti; J. Malclès; D. Maletic; N. Manthos; Y. Maravin; C. Marchica; N. Marinelli; A. Markou; C. Markou; M. Marone; V. Matveev; C. Mavrommatis; P. Meridiani; P. Milenovic; P. Miné; O. Missevitch; A. K. Mohanty; F. Moortgat; P. Musella; Y. Musienko; A. Nardulli; J. Nash; P. Nedelec; P. Negri; H. B. Newman; A. Nikitenko; F. Nessi-Tedaldi; M. M. Obertino; G. Organtini; T. Orimoto; M. Paganoni; P. Paganini; A. Palma; L. Pant; A. Papadakis; I. Papadakis; I. Papadopoulos; R. Paramatti; P. Parracho; N. Pastrone; J. R. Patterson; F. Pauss; J-P. Peigneux; E. Petrakou; D. G. Phillips II; P. Piroué; F. Ptochos; I. Puljak; A. Pullia; T. Punz; J. Puzovic; S. Ragazzi; S. Rahatlou; J. Rander; P. A. Razis; N. Redaelli; D. Renker; S. Reucroft; P. Ribeiro; C. Rogan; M. Ronquest; A. Rosowsky; C. Rovelli; P. Rumerio; R. Rusack; S. V. Rusakov; M. J. Ryan; L. Sala; R. Salerno; M. Schneegans; C. Seez; P. Sharp; C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous; J. G. Shiu; R. K. Shivpuri; P. Shukla; C. Siamitros; D. Sillou; J. Silva; P. Silva; A. Singovsky; Y. Sirois; A. Sirunyan; V. J. Smith; F. Stöckli; J. Swain; T. Tabarelli de Fatis; M. Takahashi; V. Tancini; O. Teller; K. Theofilatos; C. Thiebaux; V. Timciuc; C. Timlin; M. Titov; A. Topkar; F. A. Triantis; S. Troshin; N. Tyurin; K. Ueno; A. Uzunian; J. Varela; P. Verrecchia; J. Veverka; T. Virdee; M. Wang; D. Wardrope; M. Weber; J. Weng; J. H. Williams; Y. Yang; I. Yaselli; R. Yohay; A. Zabi; S. Zelepoukine; J. Zhang; L. Y. Zhang; K. Zhu; R. Y. Zhu

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Ensuring the radiation hardness of PbWO4 crystals was one of the main priorities during the construction of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at CERN. The production on an industrial scale of radiation hard crystals and their certification over a period of several years represented a difficult challenge both for CMS and for the crystal suppliers. The present article reviews the related scientific and technological problems encountered.

  16. DESIGN OF FOAM COVERING FOR ROBOTIC ARMS TO ENSURE HUMAN SAFETY Lingqi Zeng and Gary M. Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bone, Gary

    , and robot and human velocities. The impact experiments are performed with an apparatus simulating the humanDESIGN OF FOAM COVERING FOR ROBOTIC ARMS TO ENSURE HUMAN SAFETY Lingqi Zeng and Gary M. Bone@mcmaster.ca ABSTRACT Unintentional physical human-robot contact is becoming more common as robots operate in closer

  17. Working on the moon: The Apollo experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful completion of any scientific or engineering project on the Moon will depend, in part, on human ability to do useful work under lunar conditions. In making informed decisions about such things as the use of humans rather than robots for specific tasks, the scheduling of valuable human time, and the design and selection of equipment and tools, good use can be made of the existing experience base. During the six completed landing missions, Apollo lunar surface crews conducted 160 astronaut-hours of extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) and also spent a similar sum of waking hours working in the cramped confines of the Lunar Module. The first three missions were primarily proof-tests of flight hardware and procedures. The ability to land equipment and consumables was very modest but, despite stay times of no more than 32 hours, the crews of Apollos 11, 12, and 14 were able to test their mobility and their capability of doing useful work outside the spacecraft. For the last three missions, thanks to LM modifications which enabled landings with significant amounts of cargo, stay times more than doubled to three days. The crews were able to use Lunar Rovers to conduct extensive local exploration and to travel up to 10 kilometers away from their immediate landing sites. During these final missions, the astronauts spent enough time doing work of sufficient complexity that their experience should be of use in the formulation early-stage lunar base operating plans. 2 refs.

  18. Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Experience Do YOU have what it takes to join the team? Find out more at dle.dulye.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulyeLeadershipExperience Twitter: DLE4SU #12;Dulye Leadership Experience Program Overview Dulye Leadership Experience The Dulye Leadership Experience (DLE) is a full scholarship, professional development program for Syracuse University

  19. Electron Bunch Profile Reconstruction in the Few fs Regime using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolini, R.; /Oxford U., JAI /Diamond Light Source /SLAC; Clarke, C.; /SLAC; Delerue, N; /Oxford U., JAI /Diamond Light Source /SLAC; Doucas, G; Reichold, A; /Oxford U., JAI

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced accelerators for fourth generation light sources based on high brightness linacs or laser-driven wakefield accelerators will operate with intense, highly relativistic electron bunches that are only a few fs long. Diagnostic techniques for the determination of temporal profile of such bunches are required to be non invasive, single shot, economic and with the required resolution in the fs regime. The use of a radiative process such as coherent Smith-Purcell radiation (SPR), is particularly promising with this respect. In this technique the beam is made to radiate a small amount of electromagnetic radiation and the temporal profile is reconstructed from the measured spectral distribution of the radiation. We summarise the advantages of SPR and present the design parameters and preliminary results of the experiments at the FACET facility at SLAC. We also discuss a new approach to the problem of the recovery of the 'missing phase', which is essential for the accurate reconstruction of the temporal bunch profile.

  20. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, A. S. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacLaren, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graham, P. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Seugling, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Satcher, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klingmann, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Comley, A. J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Marrs, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glendinning, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Castor, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sain, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Back, C. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hund, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di#11;usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range