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1

Human Radiation Experiments: Related Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment Related Sites Related Links Home Roadmap What's New Search HREX Multimedia Related Sites Federal DOE DOE Sites & National Laboratories Federal Other The following are organizations which provide related information and links to databases, electronic documents, and servers. FEDERAL - DOE U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) homepage (http://www.doe.gov/)contains information on DOE's Departmental Resources, Programs, Offices, National Labs and other DOE related topics. DOE's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Technical Information Services (TIS) homepage (http://nattie.eh.doe.gov/) is a collection of information services designed to provide safety and health professionals with reliable, accurate and current information to assist them in performing their jobs.

2

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Publication Information The Creation of the Advisory Committee The President's Charge The Committee's Approach The Historical Context Key Findings Key Recommendations What's Next: The Advisory Committee's Legacy PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Final Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (stock number 061-000-00-848-9), the supplemental volumes to the Final Report (stock numbers 061-000-00850-1, 061-000-00851-9, and 061-000-00852-7), and additional copies of this Executive Summary (stock number 061-000-00849-7) may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: Superintendent of Documents

3

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia: Film Clips  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Film Clips Multimedia Film Clips Multimedia Home Roadmap What's New Multimedia Related Sites Feedback Sound Bytes Film Clips Historical Photographs Films require: Get Real Player 5.0 to view the films on this page. The Atom and You Second in the series The Atom and You, Paramount News, March 25, 1953, shows tests conducted at Hanford, Washington, on effects of exposure of sheep and salmon to radiation; testing of radioactive dust at UCLA laboratory; the use of radioisotopes and tracer materials for detecting cancer in patients at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the use of rays from the cobalt source at N.Y. city’s Moncure Hospital, to treat cancer of the brain. (Time: 5 min 9 secs) Real Media Download Versions 28.8 kbps version (782k) 56.0 kbps version (1.3mb) T1 version (7.5mb) Iodine 131

4

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part IV: Overview Part IV: Overview In part IV we present the overall findings of the Advisory Committee's inquiry and deliberations and the recommendations that follow from these findings. In chapter 17, findings are presented in two parts, first for the period 1944 through 1974 and then for the contemporary period. These parts, in turn, are divided into findings regarding biomedical experiments and those regarding population exposures. We begin our presentation of findings for the period 1944 through 1974 with a summation of what we have learned about human radiation experiments: their number and purpose, the likelihood that they produced harm, and how human radiation experimentation contributed to advances in medicine. We then summarize what we have found concerning the nature of federal rules and policies governing research involving human subjects during this period, and the implementation of these rules in the conduct of human radiation experiments. Findings about the nature and implementation of federal rules cover issues of consent, risk, the selection of subjects, and the role of national security considerations.

5

Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report  

SciTech Connect

When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New: Press Briefing by Secretary of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE WHITE HOUSE THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release March 28, 1997 PRESS BRIEFING BY SECRETARY OF ENERGY FEDRICO PENA, ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF ENERGY TARA O'TOOLE, AND ACTING ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY GENERAL JOHN DWYER The Briefing Room 11:10 A.M. EST MS. GLYNN: Good morning, everybody. Today we have a human radiation report here. To brief is Secretary Federico Pena; Tara O'Toole, who is the Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environment, Safety and Health; and John Dwyer, the Acting Associate Attorney General. SECRETARY PENA: Thank you very much. Good morning, everybody. Dr. O'Toole, please come up, and John, join me here to my left and right. Let me begin by reading a statement from the President and then I have an opening comment. I'll introduce Dr. O'Toole and John to make some comments.

7

Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records  

SciTech Connect

The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department`s ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE`s historical records to independent research and analysis.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B-1 B-1 Appendix B APPENDIX B ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ACCESS TO RECORDS AND INFORMATION RELATING TO HUMAN RADIATION EXPERIMENTS Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Collection at the National Archives, College Park Overview: 665 cubic feet of records from the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments have been deposited at the National Archives and made part of Record Group 220, Presidential Commit- tees, Commissions, and Boards. The collection can be accessed through the Archive's Textual Reference Branch located at Archives II, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, Maryland. The phone number

9

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summary Executive Summary Executive Summary ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ "Our greatness is measured not only in how we . . . do right but also [in] how we act when we know we've done the wrong thing; how we confront our mistakes, make our apologies, and take action." -President Clinton October 3, 1995 In January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) to examine reports that the government had funded and conducted unethical human radiation experiments and releases of radiation during the

10

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview The success of the effort to open the historical record will be measured, in part, by whether we avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. ACHRE's review of human radiation experiments raised questions of whether the current system of protection is adequate for all types of human subjects research. The measures described below will strengthen the protection of human subjects and address ACHRE's findings. Federal responsibilities for maintaining ethics in human subjects research are dispersed in several agencies and committees in the

11

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

12

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 1: Openness in Government Part 1: Openness in Government Part 1: Openness in Government ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview Throughout our nation's history, the government has needed to operate with some secrecy to protect our nation's security. At the same time, Americans have recognized that the government's power to act in secret conflicts with core democratic principles. Misuse of secrecy feeds a sense of mistrust in government that can undermine our cohesion as a nation. During the Cold War, the government funded human radiation experiments, some of which were secret. It is imperative that the public have access to the record of the government's activities. The

13

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview The ACHRE report reviewed in detail several case studies of government-supported human radiation research including: the injections of plutonium into 18 hospital patients during and after World War II, research with prisoners, and research on patients who were exposed to total body irradiation in clinical settings. The Advisory Committee also considered issues related to certain radiation exposures associated with government activities that the Advisory Committee concluded should not be considered "human

14

Technological Transformation of Human Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article was inspired by Don Ihde's work on the experience of technology in human-machine relations. (See Don Ihde. "The Experience of Technology," Cultural Hermeneutics, Vol. 2, 1974, pp. 267-279.)

Arun Kumar Tripathi

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments  

SciTech Connect

We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic ?, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ?7 10{sup 14} W cm{sup ?2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, 2455 Hayward Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, 2455 Hayward Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Bingham, D.; Goh, J. [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada)] [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

17

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is the first multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. It will fly on a low-inclination NASA satellite and two Sun-synchronous NOAA satellites during the mid-1980s. Each ...

Bruce R. Barkstrom

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solar radiation and human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

Asta Juzeniene; Pl Brekke; Arne Dahlback; Stefan Andersson-Engels; Jrg Reichrath; Kristin Moan; Michael F Holick; William B Grant; Johan Moan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on first findings of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome potential obstacles before running the full experiment in 2013.

Mihovilovi?, M.; Merkel, H. [Institut fr Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitt Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Synchrotron-radiation experiments with recoil ions  

SciTech Connect

Studies of atoms, ions and molecules with synchrotron radiation have generally focused on measurements of properties of the electrons ejected during, or after, the photoionization process. Much can also be learned, however, about the atomic or molecular relaxation process by studies of the residual ions or molecular fragments following inner-shell photoionization. Measurements are reported of mean kinetic energies of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell photoionization using white and monochromatic synchrotron x radiation. Energies are much lower than for the same charge-state ions produced by charged-particle impact. The results may be applicable to design of future angle-resolved ion-atom collision experiments. Photoion charge distributions are presented and compared with other measurements and calculations. Related experiments with synchrotron-radiation produced recoil ion, including photoionization of stored ions and measurement of shakeoff in near-threshold excitation, are briefly discussed. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Levin, J.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Merril Eisenbud, January 26, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Merril Eisenbud was interviewed on January 26, 1995 by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Following a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Eisenbud relates his remembrances as the AEC`s first industrial hygienist, the setting up of AEC`s Health and Safety Laboratory, monitoring radioactive fallout, and use or exposure of humans to radiation.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function of human skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function...Stanford, CA 94305 The ubiquitous presence of solar UV radiation in human life is essential for...defense against environmental exposures like solar UV radiation, and its effects on UV targets...

Krysta Biniek; Kemal Levi; Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Human Portable Radiation Detection System Communications Package Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Testing and valuation of the Human Portable Radiation Detection System Communications Package for the US Coast Guard.

Morgen, Gerald P.; Peterson, William W.

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Experiment generates THz radiation 20,000 times brighter than...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gwyn Williams Gwyn Williams, JLab's FEL Basic Research Program manager, led a multi-lab experiment that generated nearly 20 watts of terahertz radiation - a world record....

25

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results May 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - New Mexico State University"s Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth"s surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project"s first two years of experimentation. The March 2011 edition of Health Physics printed an article titled "Exploring Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation from the Other Side of Background," summarizing some initial data taken from LBRE and from a sister experiment conducted at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute

26

Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Archival and April 1985 Results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data products being made available to the community. The Science Team used ten validation criteria to judge the acceptability of the data for archival. We list these criteria and ...

B. Barkstrom; E. Harrison; G. Smith; R. Green; J. Kibler; R. Cess; the ERBE Science Team

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

ARM - Field Campaign - Macquarie Island Cloud and Radiation Experiment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud and Radiation Experiment (MICRE) 2016.03.01 - 2018.03.31 Lead Scientist : Roger Marchand Abstract Clouds over the Southern Ocean are poorly represented in present day...

28

Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides an overview summary of radiation doses from occupational exposures at the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration for the year 2013.

29

Chronic radiation enteritis: A community hospital experience  

SciTech Connect

A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the operative management of patients with chronic radiation enteropathy. Thirty-eight affected patients from 1974 to 1986 were reviewed. Patients with recurrent cancer responsible for symptoms were excluded. Seventy-one percent of patients presented with bowel obstruction. Twenty-one patients were treated with bowel resection, while 17 were treated with a bypass procedure or diverting ostomy alone. Overall morbidity was 45%, and postoperative mortality was 16%. Patients in the bypass group were significantly older than those in the resection group (70.3 vs. 55.5 years, P = .024), suggesting that age may have been a determinant of the procedure performed. In our study there was no difference in outcome based on preexisting vascular disease, tumor site, type of procedure performed, or radiation dose. We conclude that resection is the procedure of choice in cases of chronic radiation enteritis requiring surgery except in cases with dense adhesions when enteroenterostomal bypass is a viable alternative.

Fenner, M.N.; Sheehan, P.; Nanavati, P.J.; Ross, D.S. (Southern Illinois Univ. School of Medicine, Springfield (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment govCampaignsARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment 2015.10.01 - 2016.03.31 Lead Scientist : Dan Lubin Description West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and this warming is closely connected with global sea level rise. The discovery of rapid climate change on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) has challenged previous explanations of Antarctic climate change that focused on strengthening of circumpolar westerlies in response to the positive polarity trend in the Southern Annular Mode. West Antarctic warming does not yet have a comprehensive explanation: dynamical mechanisms may vary

31

Molecular signatures of low dose radiation exposure in human subjects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular signatures of low dose radiation exposure in human subjects...Volume 46, 2005] 3096 Low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) in the 1-10 cGy range has largely unknown biological...the effect and risk at low dose by extrapolation from measured...

Zelanna Goldberg; Chad W. Schwietert; Maggie Isbell; Joerg Lehmann; Robin Stern; Christine Hartmann Siantar; and David M. Rocke

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Effects of low levels of radiation on humans  

SciTech Connect

The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed. (ACR)

Auxier, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

34

5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) measured the daily  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation for astronauts orbiting Mars. The biggest uncertainty is in the SPE dose estimate. We had important than GCRs as a source of radiation? Explain why or why not in terms of estimation uncertainties5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE

35

RADIATION PERMIT APPLICATION Western Human Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

description of purpose or objectives 2. Brief description of materials (indicate the types of equipment needed and the frequency 5. Names of personnel to handle this isotope 6. Laboratory(ies) where this procedure ( to be determined by Radiation Safety Coordinator) Diagram of Room For each of the above named locations

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

36

X radiation and the human fetus - a bibliography. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography is the end result of many years' survey of the literature pertaining to the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly x radiation, on the human embryo and fetus. It is intended to provide the technical and scientific community with a ready identification of material available to them in this discipline. It is divided into three sections: an index (KWIC) by keywords, an author list, and the bibliography.

Rugh, R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Radiation shielding and dosimetry experiments updates in the SINBAD database  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......characterisation of the radiation source, it describes...National Laboratory, Radiation Safety Information Computational...Internet Nuclear Physics Radiation Protection instrumentation Radiometry Research Software Validation...

I. Kodeli; H. Hunter; E. Sartori

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Synchrotron radiation identified human chemical fingerprints a novel forensic approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation identified human chemical fingerprints ­ a novel forensic approach T with the goal of developing an advanced forensic technique to identify complicated partial latent prints a forensic analysis of the fingerprint chemistry, or to identify the latent prints of pre-pubescent children

39

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

40

Why psychology? Every aspect of human experience, as well as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Psychology Why psychology? Every aspect of human experience, as well as behaviours in non-human species, falls within the scope of psychology. Psychologists explore topics as diverse as individual as more recently established fields such as cognitive science and artificial intelligence. Psychology

Sussex, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimation of the carcinogenic of low-dose, low-LET radiationradiation uoses, close rates, and LET to enable risk tions occur estimation at doses,radiation-induced cancer necessarily be based primarily on human dose-incidence data. in man must However, risk estimation

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Julie Langham Grilly, February 3, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Julie Langham Grilly was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) being the widow of Dr. Wright Langham, an investigator of principal interest of the committee. Her extensive experience with research at LANL was also of interest to the committee. Following a brief biographical sketch, Ms. Grilly relates her early postwar experience and her knowledge of Wright Langham`s involvement in animal research at Los Alamos, radiolanthanum tests on monkeys, Eniwetok tissue examinations, research on tritium uptake in humans, plutonium injections, tritium injections, EDTA, and etc. In addition to illuminating her former husband as a researcher and as an individual, she also relates her remembrances of Louis Hempelman, Enrico Fermi, Oppenheimer, Edward Teller, and many others.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of biophysicist Cornelius A. Tobias, Ph.D., January 16, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Cornelius A. Tobias was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). He was chosen for this interview because of his extensive biophysics and medical physics research activities while he was employed by the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco and at the Donner Laboratory. He discusses his involvement in wartime studies of effects of high altitude on aviators, carbon monoxide with radioactive tracers, blood studies with radioactive iron, human use committees, heavy-ion research with the Bevatron, boron isotope research, classified research involving human subjects, heavy-particle radiography, heavy- particle beams and medical research, and pituitary irradiation studies,.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of radiologist Henry I. Kohn, M.D., Ph.D., conducted September 13, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview of Dr. Henry I. Kohn by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Kohn was selected for this interview because of the positions he held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California at San Francisco, and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Kohn discussed his remembrances of his experiences in blood chemistry of animals and patients exposed to radiation, and his remembrances of several radiobiologists.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Disc-cylinder Argonne-Maryland gravitational radiation experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new kind of antenna has been developed for gravitational radiation. It consists of a disc operating in the radial mode of circular symmetry, and search has been carried out for a scalar component. The observ...

J. Weber

1971-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

46

Biological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in extrapolating radiation risk estimates from epidemi- ologically accessible doses down to very low doses where) and for assessing the risk from a low-dose exposure to a carcinogen such as ionizing radiation, where only a smallBiological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away Oleg V

47

Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities.

Ozawa, Tomoko [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Faddegon, Bruce A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hu, Lily J. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bollen, Andrew W. [Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lamborn, Kathleen R. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Deen, Dennis F. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: ddeen@itsa.ucsf.edu

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Targeted and Nontargeted Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Delayed Genomic Instability in Human Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...humans receive some radiation exposure, mostly...risks associated with radiation exposure come from populations exposed to ionizing radiation, primarily from epidemiologic...However, those doses, in the range of 0.2 to 2.5...

Lei Huang; Perry M. Kim; Jac A. Nickoloff; and William F. Morgan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Radiative reverse shock laser experiments relevant to accretion processes in cataclysmic variables  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to impart large energy densities on micron-thin foils makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (?100 km/s) of a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable shocked layers. The reverse shock forms in the flow once it is impeded. This paper presents the first radiographic data of normal incidence, reverse shockwaves. These experiments are primarily motivated by the contribution of radiative reverse shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. We show similarity properties to suggest that the experimental production of radiative reserve shocks in the laboratory may be scalable to such astrophysical systems.

Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Sweeney, R.; Grosskopf, M.; Klein, S.; Gillespie, R.; Keiter, P. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States); Loupias, B.; Falize, E. [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES  

SciTech Connect

We present the first results from high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments that explore the hydrodynamic and radiative properties of a reverse shock relevant to a cataclysmic variable system. A reverse shock is a shock wave that develops when a freely flowing, supersonic plasma is impeded. In our experiments, performed on the Omega Laser Facility, a laser pulse is used to accelerate plasma ejecta into a vacuum. This flow is directed into an Al plate in front of which a shock forms in the rebounding plasma. The plasma flow is moving fast enough that it is shocked to high enough temperatures that radiative cooling affects the shock structure. These are the first experiments to produce a radiative reverse shock wave.

Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Huntington, C. M.; Kaczala, D. N.; Klein, S.; Sweeney, R.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Villette, B. [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Plewa, T., E-mail: krauland@umich.edu, E-mail: rpdrake@umich.edu [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Tryptophan Cluster Protects Human ?D-Crystallin from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Photoaggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a significant risk factor for age-related cataract, a disease of the human lens and the most prevalent cause of blindness in the world. Cataract pathology involves protein misfolding ...

Schafheimer, Steven Nathaniel

52

Lineal energy and radiation quality in radiation therapy: model calculations and comparison with experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microdosimetry is a recommended method for characterizing radiation quality in situations when the biological effectiveness under test is not well known. In such situations, the radiation beams are described by their lineal energy probability distributions. Results from radiobiological investigations in the beams are then used to establish response functions that relate the lineal energy to the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). In this paper we present the influence of the size of the simulated volume on the relation to the clinical RBE values (or weighting factors). A single event probability distribution of the lineal energy is approximated by its dose average lineal energy () which can be measured or calculated for volumes from a few micrometres down to a few nanometres. The clinical RBE values were approximated as the ratio of the ?-values derived from the LQ-relation. Model calculations are presented and discussed for the SOBP of a 12C ion (290 MeV u?1) and the reference 60Co ? therapy beam. Results were compared with those for a conventional x-ray therapy beam, a 290 MeV proton beam and a neutron therapy beam. It is concluded that for a simulated volume of about 10nm, the ?-ratio increases approximately linearly with the -ratio for all the investigated beams. The correlation between y and ? provides the evidence to characterize a radiation therapy beam by the lineal energy when, for instance, weighting factors are to be estimated.

L Lindborg; M Hultqvist; Carlsson Tedgren; H Nikjoo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An investigation of solar radiation induced cell death in a human keratinocyte cell line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular Biology 64: Cell Death Regulators...investigation of solar radiation induced cell death in a human...Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland...basal and squamous cell carcinomas) accounting...radiation from non-solar type UV lamp sources...

Alanna Maguire; James Walsh; and Fiona M. Lyng

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury  

SciTech Connect

Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ?40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Modeling and analysis of affective influences on human experience, prediction, decision making, and behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subjective and affective elements are well-known to influence human decision making. This dissertation presents a theoretical and empirical framework on how human decision makers' subjective experience and affective ...

Ahn, Hyungil, 1976-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Blast wave radiation source measurement experiments on the Z Z-pinch facility  

SciTech Connect

The Dynamic Hohlraum (DH) radiation on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories [R. B. Spielman, W. A. Stygar, J. F. Seamen et al., Proceeding of the 11th International Pulsed Power Conference, Baltimore, 1997, edited by G. Cooperstein and I. Vitkovitsky (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 709] is a bright source of radiant energy that has proven useful for high energy density physics experiments. But the radiation output from a DH on Z needs to be well known. In this paper, a new method is presented for measuring the radiation fluence deposited in an experiment, specifically, an experiment driven by a Z DH. This technique uses a blast wave produced in a SiO{sub 2} foam, which starts as supersonic but transitions to subsonic, producing a shock at the transition point that is observable via radiography. The position of this shock is a sensitive measure of the radiation drive energy from the Z DH. Computer simulations have been used to design and analyze a Z foam blast wave experiment.

Peterson, R.R.; Peterson, D.L.; Watt, R.G.; Idzorek, G.; Tierney, T.; Lopez, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Transgenerational Effects of Radiation and Chemicals in Mice and Humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......transgenerational radiation car- cinogenesis. In other words...caused functional damage and defective gonad development.6,1214...studies on transgenerational car- cinogenesis were started from...leukemia in their offspring. Car- cinogenesis 19: 15531558......

Taisei Nomura

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Telomere Targeting with a New G4 Ligand Enhances Radiation-Induced Killing of Human Glioblastoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitivity to ionizing radiation of 2 human telomerase-positive...Coulter) using CellQuest software. Apoptosis assessment...of TAC combined with radiation on GBM cells in vitro...trials with acceptable safety (49). In conclusion...sensitivity to ionizing radiation of 2 human hTERT-positive...

Patrick Merle; Bertrand Evrard; Anne Petitjean; Jean-Marie Lehn; Marie-Paule Teulade-Fichou; Emmanuel Chautard; Anne De Cian; Lionel Guittat; Phong Lan Thao Tran; Jean-Louis Mergny; Pierre Verrelle; and Andre Tchirkov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Identification of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin of novel ionizing radiation signaling targets in reconstituted human skin Feng Yang, Katrina M. Waters, Bobbie-Jo Webb-Robertson, Lye-Meng Markillie, Rachel M. Wirgau, Shawna M. Hengel, Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, and David L. Stenoien. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Our focus has been on identifying the early events that occur after low dose ionizing radiation exposure that precede and often regulate downstream events such as altered transcription, protein secretion and epigenetic regulation. Phosphorylation is one of the earliest detectible events that occurs following radiation exposure and plays important roles in multiple biological pathways including DNA damage repair, transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. Very robust

60

Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Deok-Jin Jang 1 , Mingquan Guo 1 , Julia S.F.Chu 2 , Kyle T. Kurpinski 2 , Bjorn Rydberg 1 , Song Li 2 , and Daojing Wang 1 1. Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 2. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 We will present data obtained during the first year of our DOE/NASA Low Dose Radiation Research program. We utilized a comprehensive approach including transcriptomics, proteomics, phosphoproteomics, and biochemistry to characterize human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in response to low dose ionizing radiation. We first determined the cell survival, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimation of the carcinogenic risk of low-dose, low-LET radiationradiation-induced cancer in man must necessarily be based primarily on human dose-incidence data. estimation

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

DNA Radiation Environments Program Spring 1991 2-meter box experiments and analyses. [DEfense Nuclear Agency (DNA)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Spring 1991 2-m Box experiments that were performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. The MASH code system was developed for the Department of Defense and NATO for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the 2-m Box experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside a borated polyethylene lined steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-100R bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. The calculated and measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors agreed on the average within the [plus minus]20% limits mandated by DNA and demonstrate the capability of the MASH code system in reproducing measured data in nominally shielded assemblies.

Santoro, R.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Whitaker, S.Y. (Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Entrepreneurial experiments in science policy: Analyzing the Human Genome Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-conceptualize the role of science policy makers, envisioning and illustrating their move from being simple investors in scientific projects to entrepreneurs who create the conditions for entrepreneurial experiments ...

Huang, Kenneth G.

64

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear Energy Transfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of low-dose low-linear energy transfer ionizing radiation (LDIR) in humans...direct evidence that doses in the range of 1 to 10 cGy...the intentional radiation of healthy tissue...the response to ionizing radiation. Attempts...

Zelanna Goldberg; David M. Rocke; Chad Schwietert; Susanne R. Berglund; Alison Santana; Angela Jones; Jrg Lehmann; Robin Stern; Ruixiao Lu; and Christine Hartmann Siantar

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Measuring the effects of online advertising on human behavior using natural and field experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the effects of online advertising on human behavior: clicks, new-account sign-ups, and retail sales. Five chapters cover natural and field experiments used to measure these effects for both display ...

Lewis, Randall A. (Randall Aaron)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Electroweak Radiative Corrections to the Parity-violating Asymmetry for SLAC Experiment E158  

SciTech Connect

Electroweak radiative corrections to observable quantities of Moeller scattering of polarized particles are calculated. We emphasize the contribution induced by infrared divergent parts of cross section. The covariant method is used to remove infrared divergences, so that our results do not involve any unphysical parameters. When applied to the kinematics of SLAC E158 experiment, these corrections reduce the parity violating asymmetry by about -6.5% at E = 48 GeV and y = 0.5, and kinematically weighted 'hard' bremsstrahlung effect for SLAC E158 is {approx} 1%.

Zykunov, Vladimir A.; /Gomel State Tech. U.

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Determining the radiative properties of pulverized-coal particles from experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive coupled experimental-theoretical study has been performed to determine the effective radiative properties of pulverized-coal/char particles. The results obtained show that the ``effective`` scattering phase function of coal particles are highly forward scattering and show less sensitivity to the size than predicted from the Lorenz-Mie theory. The main reason for this is the presence of smaller size particles associated with each larger particle. Also, the coal/char particle clouds display more side scattering than predicted for the same size range spheres, indicating the irregular shape of the particles and fragmentation. In addition to these, it was observed that in the visible wavelength range the coal absorption is not gray, and slightly vary with the wavelength. These two experimental approaches followed in this study are unique in a sense that the physics of the problem are not approximated. The properties determined include all uncertainties related to the particle shape, size distribution, inhomogeneity and spectral complex index of refraction data. In order to obtain radiative property data over a wider wavelength spectrum, additional ex-situ experiments have been carried out using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer. The spectral measurements were performed over the wavelength range of 2 to 22 {mu}m. These results were interpreted to obtain the ``effective`` efficiency factors of coal particles and the corresponding refractive index values. The results clearly show that the coal/char radiative properties display significant wavelength dependency in the infrared spectrum.

Menguec, M.P.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Plasma dynamics and generation of hard radiations in experiments with cylindrical Z-pinches  

SciTech Connect

A survey of experimental studies on the generation of hard ionizing radiations from dynamic cylindrical Z-pinches is presented. Comprehensive experimental data do not confirm the hypothesis that charged particles responsible for the generation of hard radiations (neutrons and X-rays) are accelerated in short-scale Z-pinch necks (m = 0). Analysis of the experimental data indicates that, in discharges in pure hydrogen and deuterium, these particles are most probably accelerated in the axial direction along H{sub {phi} {approx}} 0 lines by the induction electric field generated during the initiation of the secondary near-wall breakdown, which disconnects the pinch from the power supply. In discharges excited in heavy gases and at high initial current growth rates (I{sub 0} {>=} 10{sup 12} A/s) in experiments with hydrogen and deuterium contaminated with admixtures arriving from the chamber wall, there is an additional acceleration mechanism related to the growth of the resistance of a radiatively cooled Z-pinch.

Matveev, Yu. V. [Academy of Sciences of Abkhazia, Sukhum Physicotechnical Institute, Abkhazia (Georgia)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluation of radiation doses and associated risk from the Fukushima nuclear accident to marine biota and human consumers of seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to marine biota and human consumers of seafood 10.1073/pnas.1221834110 Nicholas...radionuclides are in human food items such as seafood. Although statements were released by...or for human consumers of contaminated seafood. We have therefore calculated the radiation doses absorbed by diverse marine...

Nicholas S. Fisher; Karine Beaugelin-Seiller; Thomas G. Hinton; Zofia Baumann; Daniel J. Madigan; Jacqueline Garnier-Laplace

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

An Automated Method to Quantify Radiation Damage in Human Blood Cells  

SciTech Connect

Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is a well established method to assess the absorbed dose in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. Because mature lymphocytes circulate throughout the body, the dose to these cells is believed to represent the average whole body exposure. Cytogenetic methods measure the incidence of structural aberrations in chromosomes as a means to quantify DNA damage which occurs when ionizing radiation interacts with human tissue. Methods to quantify DNA damage at the chromosomal level vary in complexity and tend to be laborious and time consuming. In a mass casualty scenario involving radiological/nuclear materials, the ability to rapidly triage individuals according to radiation dose is critically important. For high-throughput screening for dicentric chromosomes, many of the data collection steps can be optimized with motorized microscopes coupled to automated slide scanning platforms.

Gordon K. Livingston, Mark S. Jenkins and Akio A. Awa

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

{sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Su Xiaoming [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Suzuki, Hiromi [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Omori, Katsunori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko [Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Advanced Engineering Services Company, Limited, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazu, Toru [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Ishioka, Noriaki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Takeo, E-mail: tohnishi@naramed-u.ac.j [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Application of synchrotron radiation computed microtomography for quantification of bone microstructure in human and rat bones  

SciTech Connect

This work aims to evaluate histomorphometric quantification by synchrotron radiation computed microto-mography in bones of human and rat specimens. Bones specimens are classified as normal and pathological (for human samples) and irradiated and non-irradiated samples (for rat ones). Human bones are specimens which were affected by some injury, or not. Rat bones are specimens which were irradiated, simulating radiotherapy procedures, or not. Images were obtained on SYRMEP beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. The system generated 14 {mu}m tomographic images. The quantification of bone structures were performed directly by the 3D rendered images using a home-made software. Resolution yielded was excellent what facilitate quantification of bone microstructures.

Parreiras Nogueira, Liebert; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Braz, Delson; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Borba de Andrade, Cherley; Tromba, Giuliana [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Physics Institute / State University of Rio de Janeiro, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratory of Radiological Sciences / State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Strada Statale S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Form 007[09/2011] 1 | P a g e Training & Experience Radiation Producing Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is based on Radiation Protection Training that you have learned in both the classroom and on the Job[09/2011] 3 | P a g e List all places where you have received classroom training in Radiation Protection. 1 and Supplement to Radiation Safety Plan for Radiation Producing Equipment; the Manual and Supplement are located

Rubloff, Gary W.

75

CMOS Imaging Detectors as X-ray Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation Experiments  

SciTech Connect

CMOS imagers are matrix-addressed photodiode arrays, which have been utilized in devices such as commercially available digital cameras. The pixel size of CMOS imagers is usually larger than that of CCD and smaller than that of TFT, giving them a unique position. Although CMOS x-ray imaging devices have already become commercially available, they have not been used as an x-ray area detector in synchrotron radiation experiments. We tested performance of a CMOS detector from Rad-icon (Shad-o-Box1024) in medical imaging, small-angle scattering, and protein crystallography experiments. It has pixels of 0.048 mm square, read-out time of 0.45 sec, 12-bit ADC, and requires a frame grabber for image acquisition. The detection area is 5-cm square. It uses a Kodak Min-R scintillator screen as a phosphor. The sensitivity to x-rays with an energy less than 15 keV was low because of the thick window materials. Since the readout noise is high, the dynamic range is limited to 2000. The biggest advantages of this detector are cost-effectiveness (about 10,000 US dollars) and compactness (thickness < 3 cm, weight < 2 kg)

Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Inoue, Katsuaki [SPring-8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masaki [SPring-8/RIKEN, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from casecontrol studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested casecontrol studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

Jolyon H Hendry; Steven L Simon; Andrzej Wojcik; Mehdi Sohrabi; Werner Burkart; Elisabeth Cardis; Dominique Laurier; Margot Tirmarche; Isamu Hayata

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Estimation of net radiation and surface heat fluxes using NOAA-7 satellite infrared data during fair-weather cloudy situations of Mesogers-84 experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimation of radiation during fair weather cloudy situations of the MESOGERS-84 experiment has been examined using micrometeorological observations and satellite data. Diurnal variation of cloudiness is empirica...

M. Zhong; A. Weill; O. Taconet

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of physician James S. Robertson, M.D., Ph.D., conducted January 20, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of in interview of Dr. James S. Robertson by representatives of the DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Robertson was chosen for this interview because of his research at Brookhaven National Laboratory, especially on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT); his work at the United States Naval Defense Laboratory; and his work at the Atomic Energy Commission. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Robertson discusses research on human subjects at Berkeley, his contributions to the beginnings of Neutron Capture Therapy at Brookhaven, his participation with the Brookhaven Human Use Committee, his involvement in the study of the effects of Castle Bravo event on the Marshallese, and his work with the Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of cell biologist Don Francis Petersen, Ph.D., conducted November 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview of Dr. Don Francis Petersen by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Petersen was selected for this interview because of his long research career at Los Alamos and his knowledge of the Atomic Energy Commission`s biomedical program. Dr. Petersen did not personally conduct research on human subjects. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Petersen discusses his remembrances of the early use of radionuclides as biological tracers, aspects of nuclear weapons testing in the 1940`s and 1950`s including fallout studies, the means by which research projects were approved, use of humans in the whole-body counter, and the Health Division Biomedical responsibilities.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Experimental demonstration of early time, hohlraum radiation symmetry tuning for indirect drive ignition experiments  

SciTech Connect

Early time radiation symmetry at the capsule for indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] will be inferred from the instantaneous soft x-ray re-emission pattern of a high-Z sphere replacing the ignition capsule. This technique was tested on the OMEGA laser facility [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, T. Boehly et al., Laser Part. Beams 11, 317 (1991)] in near full ignition scale vacuum hohlraums using an equivalent experimental setup to the one planned for NIF. Two laser cones entering each laser entrance hole heat the hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 100 eV, mimicking the NIF ignition pulse foot drive. The experiments have demonstrated accuracies of {+-}1.5% ({+-}2%) in inferred P{sub 2}/P{sub 0} (P{sub 4}/P{sub 0}) Legendre mode incident flux asymmetry and consistency between 900 eV and 1200 eV re-emission patterns. We have also demonstrated the expected tuning capability of P{sub 2}/P{sub 0}, from positive (pole hot) to negative (waist hot), decreasing linearly with the inner/outer beams power fraction. P{sub 4}/P{sub 0} on the other hand shows very little variation with power fraction. We developed a simple analytical viewfactor model that is in good agreement with both measured P{sub 2}/P{sub 0} and P{sub 4}/P{sub 0} and their dependence on inner beam power fraction.

Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J.; Thomas, C.; Sorce, C.; Glenn, S.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kline, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radiation Hard Hybrid Pixel Detectors, and a bbbar Cross Section Measurement at the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is placed on the effects of the high radiation environment on the detector operation. Measurements of the charge collection efficiency, interpixel capacitance, and other properties of the pixel sensors as a function of the radiation damage are presented...

Sibille, Jennifer Ann

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Water and ice structure in the range 220 - 365K from radiation total scattering experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The past decade or so has witnessed a large number of articles about water structure. The most incisive experiments involve radiation with a wavelength compatible with the observed inter-molecular separations found in water, of order $\\sim 3$\\AA, in other words mostly $$10keV x-rays. Because x-rays are scattered by electrons while neutrons are scattered by nuclei, the two probes give complementary information about the three site-site radial distribution functions for water, namely O-O, O-H and H-H. Here a version of Monte Carlo simulation called Empirical Potential Structure Refinement is used to devise an empirical intermolecular potential which attempts to drive the simulated radial distribution functions as close as possible to the data. New x-ray and neutron scattering data on water in the temperature range 280 - 365K are presented for the first time, alongside a new analysis of some much older neutron data on ice 1h at 220K. This temperature analysis, above and below the water freezing point of water, r...

Soper, Alan K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Neurotoxicity of 1-bromopropane: Evidence from animal experiments and human studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1-Bromopropane was introduced as an alternative to ozone layer-depleting solvents such as chlorofluorocarbons and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. However, a dozen human cases have been reported with symptoms and signs of toxicity to 1-bromopropane including numbness, diminished vibration sense in the lower extremities as well as ataxic gait. An epidemiological study also demonstrated dose-dependent prolongation of distal latency and decrease in vibration sense in the lower extremities. The initial animal experiments helped to identify and analyze the initial human case of 1-bromopropane toxicity. However, animal data that can explain the central nervous system disorders in humans are limited. Nonetheless, animal data should be carefully interpreted especially in a high-order function of the central nervous system or neurological signs such as ataxia that is influenced by fundamental anatomical/physiological differences between humans and animals. Enzymatic activity in the liver may explain partly the difference in the susceptibility between humans and animals, but further studies are needed to clarify the biological factors that can explain the difference and commonality among the species.

Gaku Ichihara; Junzoh Kitoh; Weihua Li; Xuncheng Ding; Sahoko Ichihara; Yasuhiro Takeuchi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Drug and radiation sensitivity testing of primary human tumor cells using the adhesive-tumor-cell culture system (ATCCS)  

SciTech Connect

In summary, the ATCCS is an efficient culture system which grows clonogenic cells from greater than 80% of human cancers. The ATCCS supports the growth of malignant cells from human cancers. The ATCCS shows classical drug and radiation survival curves which routinely achieve over 1 log of kill. The ATCCS has high CFE and permits sensitivity testing from small samples. Clinical correlations for the chemosensitivity assay were satisfactory. Radiosensitivity in vitro correlates with tumor histology.

Baker, F.L.; Spitzer, G.; Ajani, J.A.; Brock, W.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Neutron Radiation Enhances Cisplatin Cytotoxicity Independently of Apoptosis in Human Head and Neck Carcinoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Therapeutics, Preclinical Pharmacology Neutron Radiation Enhances Cisplatin Cytotoxicity...carcinoma (HNSCC) cells and asked if fast neutron radiation enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity...determinant for cisplatin cytotoxicity. Neutron radiation effectively enhanced cisplatin...

Harold E. Kim; Mary Ann Krug; Inn Han; John Ensley; George H. Yoo; Jeffrey D. Forman; Hyeong-Reh Choi Kim

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

CDC25B and p53 Are Independently Implicated in Radiation Sensitivity for Human Esophageal Cancers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...address: Division of Radiation Biology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan. 3 To whom requests...address: Division of Radiation Biology, Kanazawa University, Kana- zawa, Japan. 9To whom requests...6-thioguanine; UV, ultraviolet radiation (254 nm). 9, 10...

Hiroshi Miyata; Yuichiro Doki; Hitoshi Shiozaki; Msatoshi Inoue; Msahiko Yano; Yoshiyuki Fujiwara; Hirofumi Yamamoto; Kiyonori Nishioka; Kentaro Kishi; and Morito Monden

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Extremely Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Up-regulates CXC Chemokines in Normal Human Fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with radiation exposure (1). Ionizing radiation at moderate and higher doses (0.1-10 Gy) can produce DNA strand...death. Studies of mutants sensitive to ionizing radiation at this range of doses have revealed that the responsible genes...

Akira Fujimori; Ryuichi Okayasu; Hiroshi Ishihara; Satoshi Yoshida; Kiyomi Eguchi-Kasai; Kumie Nojima; Satoru Ebisawa; and Sentaro Takahashi

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Image Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Gallery Image Gallery These are images, photographs, and charts presented or developed for Low Dose Radiation Research Investigators’ Meetings. They may be used for presentations or reports. To save, right click on the picture, then choose "Save picture as." U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 1980. various sources 1980 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 2006. various sources 2006 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources in the United States for 2006. man-made 2006 Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience (Rem) Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience

90

Photon-Induced Field Desorption Experiments with Laser and Synchroton Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photon-induced field desorption of hydrogen ions from a tungsten emitter has been observed using laser light (4.5 eV). Whereas the laser light leads to thermal desorption, the synchrotron radiation seems to sh...

W. Drachsel; U. Weigmann; S. Jaenicke

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in monkeys and humans of the phosphodiesterase 4 radioligand [11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in monkeys and humans of the phosphodiesterase 4. Keywords: [11 C](R)-Rolipram; Positron emission tomography; Dosimetry; Biodistribution 1. Introduction used for positron emission Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Nuclear Medicine and Biology 35

Shen, Jun

92

ACM Computers in Entertainment, Vol. 5, No. 3, Article 4. Publication Date: November 2007. Human Trials: An Experiment in Intermedia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. SHAPIRO University at Buffalo., and Shapiro, S.C., 2007. Human trials: An experiment in intermedia performance. ACM Comput. Entertain., 5, 3 at Buffalo. Authors' address: University of Buffalo; email:. {jranstey, baycheng, depape, shapiro

Shapiro, Stuart C.

93

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

94

Dosimetry experiences and lessons learned for radiation dose assessment in Korean nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......various long-term plans to reduce radiation...conducted by the regulatory body in Korea...and thorough review in order to apply...body counting, review of inhalation...15). The regulatory body has provided...from various reviews and studies...the mid-term plan for reduction......

Jong Rak Choi; Hee Geun Kim; Tae Young Kong; Jung Kwon Son

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Diurnal Variations of Albedo Retrieved from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five years of measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) have been analyzed to define the diurnal cycle of albedo from 55N to 55S. The ERBS precesses through all local times every 72 days so as to provide data regarding the ...

David A. Rutan; G. Louis Smith; Takmeng Wong

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong [Department of Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells  

SciTech Connect

DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein components using gel electrophoresis, and by absorption spectral analysis. GeneraUy, the RNA content was <5% of the amount of DNA, and the ratio of the amount of protein to that of DNA was =1. 8-2 (w/w). Having developed a suitable methodology for routine isolation of chromatin from mammalian cells, studies of DNA damage in chromatin in vitro and in cultured human cells were pursued.

Dizdaroglu, Miral

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Radiation sensitivities of the human cancer cell lines were enhanced by silencing Ku80 gene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113, Japan. To whom requests for reprints...Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113, Japan. The radiation sensitivity of leukemic progenitor...Tochigi-ken, 329-04, Japan ABSTRACT The radiation sensitivity of leukemic progenitor...

Yoshinori Nimura; Tetsuya Kawata; Masayoshi Saito; Cuihua Liu; Jyunko Okamura; Naohiko Seki; Craig Stevens; Akira Nakagawara; Takenori Ochiai; and Hideki Tanzawa

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Human Impact on Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation during the Industrial Era  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the direct and diffuse solar radiation changes are estimated, and they contribute to the understanding of the observed global dimming and the more recent global brightening during the industrial era. Using a multistream radiative ...

Maria M. Kvalevg; Gunnar Myhre

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

extremely low-dose ionizing radiation upregulates CXC chemokines in normal human fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2006 Abstract Tumor Biology 32: Radiation Biology 2 Proc Amer Assoc Cancer...Volume 47, 2006 extremely low-dose ionizing radiation upregulates CXC chemokines in...biological effects of this low dose range have not been established. We...

Akira Fujimori; Katsutoshi Suetomi; Keiji Kinoshita; Ayako Kojima; Yaqun Fang; Ayako Egusa; and Ryuichi Okayasu

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

102

Extremely Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Up-regulates CXC Chemokines in Normal Human Fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Center for Radiation Safety, National...263-8555 Chiba, Japan. Phone: 81-43-206-3159...doses of ionizing radiation (5). A recent...study showed that Japan has the worlds highest...Research Center for Radiation Safety, National...Inage, Chiba, Japan. fujimora@nirs...

Akira Fujimori; Ryuichi Okayasu; Hiroshi Ishihara; Satoshi Yoshida; Kiyomi Eguchi-Kasai; Kumie Nojima; Satoru Ebisawa; and Sentaro Takahashi

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

ATM Requirement in Gene Expression Responses to Ionizing Radiation in Human Lymphoblasts and Fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...St. Charles, MO) software program. A two-dimensional...analysis was done using software and methods as described...ATM kinase by ionizing radiation and phosphorylation...toxicology, and drug safety evaluation. Cancer...exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiat Res 2000...

Cynthia L. Innes; Alexandra N. Heinloth; Kristina G. Flores; Stella O. Sieber; Paula B. Deming; Pierre R. Bushel; William K. Kaufmann; and Richard S. Paules

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hypothesized that the relative radiation sensitivity of hippocampal...therapies to reduce radiation-induced normal tissue...cells has potential safety concerns such as teratoma...could safely attenuate radiation-induced cognitive...employing Ethovision XT software (v5.0; Noldus Information...

Munjal M. Acharya; Lori-Ann Christie; Mary L. Lan; Erich Giedzinski; John R. Fike; Susanna Rosi; and Charles L. Limoli

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Human Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry of the Tachykinin NK1 Antagonist Radioligand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with PET. The aims of this study were to estimate the radiation safety profile and relative risks of [18F wall, kidneys, and thyroid had the highest radiation-absorbed doses. Biexponential fitting of mean: Insofar as effective dose is an accurate measure of radiation risk, all 3 methods of analysis provided

Shen, Jun

106

Interdisciplinary promises versus practices in medicine: The decoupled experiences of social sciences and humanities scholars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper explores social scientists' and humanities (SSH) scholars' integration within the academic medical research environment. Three questions guided our investigation: Do SSH scholars adapt to the medical research environment? How do they navigate their career within a culture that may be inconsistent with their own? What strategies do they use to gain legitimacy? The study builds on three concepts: decoupling, doxa, and epistemic habitus. Twenty-nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with SSH scholars working in 11 faculties of medicine across Canada. Participants were selected through purposeful and snowball sampling. The data were analyzed by thematic content analysis. For most of our participants, moving into medicine has been a challenging experience, as their research practices and views of academic excellence collided with those of medicine. In order to achieve some level of legitimacy more than half of our participants altered their research practices. This resulted in a dissonance between their internalized appreciation of academic excellence and their new, altered, research practices. Only six participants experienced no form of challenge or dissonance after moving into medicine, while three decided to break with their social science and humanities past and make the medical research community their new home. We conclude that the work environment for SSH scholars in faculties of medicine does not deliver on the promise of inclusiveness made by calls for interdisciplinarity in Canadian health research.

Mathieu Albert; Elise Paradis; Ayelet Kuper

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

108

Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Target Material Radiation Damage Studies Using Energetic Protons of the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Production (BLIP) Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the future multi-MW accelerators is the LBNE Experiment where Fermilab aims to produce a beam of neutrinos with a 2.3 MW proton beam as part of a suite of experiments associated with Project X. Specifically, the LBNE Neutrino Beam Facility aims for a 2+ MW, 60 -120 GeV pulsed, high intensity proton beam produced in the Project X accelerator intercepted by a low Z solid target to facilitate the production of low energy neutrinos. The multi-MW level LBNE proton beam will be characterized by intensities of the order of 1.6 e+14 p/pulse, {\\sigma} radius of 1.5 -3.5 mm and a 9.8 microsecond pulse length. These parameters are expected to push many target materials to their limit thus making the target design very challenging. To address a host of critical design issues revealed by recent high intensity beam on target experience a series of experimental studies on radiation damage and thermal shock response conducted at BNL focusing on low-Z materials have been undertaken with the latest one focusing on LBNE.

Simos, N; Hurh, P; Mokhov, N; Kotsina, Z

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radiation-induced ICAM-1 Expression via TGF-?1 Pathway on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells; Comparison between X-ray and Carbon-ion Beam Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......expression in cells irradiated with car- bon-ion beam and the same...HUVE cells at 48 hours after car- bon beam irradiation. ICAM-1...human lymphoblasts and mice are defective in radiation- induced apoptosis...endothelial growth factor in lung car- cinoma cells. Int J Radiat......

Hiroki Kiyohara; Yasuki Ishizaki; Yoshiyuki Suzuki; Hiroyuki Katoh; Nobuyuki Hamada; Tatsuya Ohno; Takeo Takahashi; Yasuhiko Kobayashi; Takashi Nakano

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photoelectrons. For most ionizing radiations, a large proportion...the absorbed dose is deposited...having a shorter range and being more strongly ionizing close to the...in high local doses, causing damage...enhancement of the radiation dose in volumes...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Use of the Tetrazolium Assay in Measuring the Response of Human Tumor Cells to Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...irradiation dose rate was...demonstrated a range of absorbance...RESPONSE TO IONIZING RADIATION with 1 mg...with graded doses of irradiation...each with a range of seeded...MGHU1 0 5 10 DOSE (Gy) RT112...RESPONSE TO IONIZING RADIATION 150000 FF...

Patricia Price and Trevor J. McMillan

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

Lazanu, S; Lazanu, Sorina; Lazanu, Ionel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

Sorina Lazanu; Ionel Lazanu

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Synergistic Effect of Combination Topotecan and Chronomodulated Radiation Therapy on Xenografted Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the in vivo chronomodulated radiosensitizing effect of topotecan (TPT) on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and its possible mechanisms. Methods and Materials: Xenografted BALB/c (nu/nu) NPC mice were synchronized with an alternation of 12 hours of light from 0 to 12 hours after light onset (HALO) and 12 hours of darkness to establish a unified biological rhythm. Chronomodulated radiosensitization of TPT was investigated by analysis of tumor regrowth delay (TGD), pimonidazole hydrochloride, histone H2AX phosphorylation, (?-H2AX) topoisomerase I (Top I), cell cycle, and apoptosis after treatment with (1) TPT (10 mg/kg) alone; (2) radiation therapy alone (RT); and (3) TPT+RT at 3, 9, 15, and 21 HALO. The tumor-loaded mice without any treatment were used as controls. Results: The TPT+RT combination was more effective than TPT or RT as single agents. The TPT+RT combination at 15 HALO was best (TGD = 58.0 3.6 days), and TPT+RT at 3 HALO was worst (TGD = 35.0 1.5 days) among the 4 TPT+RT groups (P<.05). Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a significantly increased histone H2AX phosphorylation expression and decreased pimonidazole hydrochloride expression in the TPT+RT group at the same time point. The results suggested that the level of tumor hypoxia and DNA damage varied in a time-dependent manner. The expression of Top I in the TPT+RT group was also significantly different from the control tumors at 15 HALO (P<.05). Cell apoptosis index was increased and the proportion of cells in S phase was decreased (P<.05) with the highest value in 15 HALO and the lowest in 3 HALO. Conclusions: This study suggested that TPT combined with chronoradiotherapy could enhance the radiosensitivity of xenografted NPC. The TPT+RT group at 15 HALO had the best therapeutic effect. The chronomodulated radiosensitization mechanisms of TPT might be related to circadian rhythm of tumor hypoxia, cell cycle redistribution, DNA damage, and expression of Top I.

Zhang, YanLing; Chen, Xin; Ren, PeiRong; Su, Zhou; Cao, HongYing; Zhou, Jie; Zou, XiaoYan; Fu, ShaoZhi; Lin, Sheng; Fan, Juan; Yang, Bo; Sun, XiaoYang [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Zhou, Yan; Chen, Yue [Department of Medical Imaging, Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Yang, LingLin, E-mail: yanglinglin2003@tom.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, JingBo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Advanced photoelectric effect experiment beamline at Elettra: A surface science laboratory coupled with Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We report the main characteristics of the advanced photoelectric effect experiments beamline, operational at Elettra storage ring, featuring a fully independent double branch scheme obtained by the use of chicane undulators and able to keep polarization control in both linear and circular mode. The paper describes the novel technical solutions adopted, namely, (a) the design of a quasiperiodic undulator resulting in optimized suppression of higher harmonics over a large photon energy range (10-100 eV), (b) the thermal stability of optics under high heat load via cryocoolers, and (c) the end station interconnected setup allowing full access to off-beam and on-beam facilities and, at the same time, the integration of users' specialized sample growth chambers or modules.

Panaccione, G.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Krizmancic, D.; Annese, E.; Giovanelli, L.; Maccherozzi, F.; Salvador, F.; De Luisa, A.; Benedetti, D.; Gruden, A.; Bertoch, P.; Rossi, G. [TASC Laboratory, INFM-CNR, S.S. 14-Km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Polack, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cocco, D.; Sostero, G.; Diviacco, B. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 Km 163.5, Area Science Park, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Hochstrasser, M.; Maier, U.; Pescia, D. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); and others

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications Mehmet Balman, Eric Pouyoul, Yushu Yao, E. Wes Bethel Burlen Loring, Prabhat, John Shalf, Alex Sim, and Brian L. Tierney Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA {mbalman,epouyoul,yyao,ewbethel,bloring,prabhat,jshalf,asim,btierney}@lbl.gov ABSTRACT 100Gbps networking has finally arrived, and many research and educational institutions have begun to deploy 100Gbps routers and services. ESnet and Internet2 worked together to make 100Gbps networks available to researchers at the Supercomputing 2011 con- ference in Seattle Washington. In this paper, we describe two of the first applications to take advantage of this network. We demon- strate a visualization application that enables remotely located sci- entists to gain insights from large datasets. We also demonstrate climate

117

Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry in Humans of a New PET Ligand, 18F-PBR06,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at various time points. Radiation absorbed doses were estimated by the MIRD scheme. Results: Moderate to high and spleen may limit the amount of permissible injected radioactivity. Key Words: MIRD scheme; defluorination

Shen, Jun

118

Specific gene expression by extremely low-dose ionizing radiation which related to enhance proliferation of normal human diploid cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrated that X-ray irradiation at low doses of between 2 and 5 cGy stimulated proliferation of a normal human diploid. At low doses of between 2 and 5 cGy, ERK1/2 was phosphorylated as efficiently as at higher doses between 50 and 100 cGy of X-rays, while the p53 protein level was not increased by doses below 50 cGy. On the other hand, the p53 protein was efficiently accumulated at higher doses of X-ray more than 100 cGy. ERK1/2 was phosphorylated by doses over 50 cGy with increasing doses. We found that activated ERK1/2 augmented phosphorylation of the Elk-1 protein. Furthermore, over expression of ERK2 in NCI-H1299, and human lung carcinoma cells, potentiated enhanced proliferation, while down-regulation of ERK2 using the anti-sense ERK2 gene abrogated the stimulative effect of low-dose irradiation. These results indicate that a limited range of low-dose ionizing radiation differentially activate ERK1/2 kinases, which causes enhanced proliferation of cells receiving very low doses of ionizing radiation.

Masami Watanabe; Keiji Suzuki; Seiji Kodama

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Induction by ionizing radiation of the gadd45 gene in cultured human cells: lack of mediation by protein kinase C.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coordinately induced by UV radiation and alkylating agents...rapidly after X rays at doses as low as 2 Gy. After...isolation & purification radiation effects DNA Damage Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation Genes radiation effects...

M A Papathanasiou; N C Kerr; J H Robbins; O W McBride; I Alamo Jr; S F Barrett; I D Hickson; A J Fornace Jr

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Assessment of the Technologies for Molecular Biodosimetry for Human Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Symposium  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to ionizing radiation produces few immediate outwardly-visible clinical signs, yet, depending on dose, can severely damage vital physiological functions within days to weeks and produce long-lasting health consequences among survivors. In the event of a radiological accident, the rapid evaluation of the individual absorbed dose is paramount to discriminate the worried but unharmed from those individuals who must receive medical attention. Physical, clinical and biological dosimetry are usually combined for the best dose assessment. However, because of the practical limits of physical and clinical dosimetry, many attempts have been made to develop a dosimetry system based on changes in biological parameters, including techniques for hematology, biochemistry, immunology, cytogenetics, etc. Lymphocyte counts and chromosome aberrations analyses are among the methods that have been routinely used for estimating radiation dose. However, these assays require several days to a week to be completed and therefore cannot be used to obtain a fast estimate of the dose during the first few days after exposure when the information would be most critical for identifying victims of radiation accidents who could benefit the most by medical intervention. The steadily increasing sophistication in our understanding of the early biochemical responses of irradiated cells and tissues provides the opportunity for developing mechanism-based biosignatures of exposure. Compelling breakthroughs have been made in the technologies for genome-scale analysis of cellular transcriptional and proteomic profiles. There have also been major strides in the mechanistic understanding of the early events in DNA damage and radiation damage products, as well as in the cellular pathways that lead to radiation injury. New research with genomic- and proteomic-wide tools is showing that within minutes to hours after exposure to ionizing radiation protein machines are modified and activated, and large-scale changes occur in the gene expression profile involving a broad variety of cell-process pathways after a wide range of both low (<10 cGy) and high dose (>10 cGy) exposures. Evaluation of these potential gene and protein biomarkers for early and late diagnostic information will be critical for determining the efficacy of the signatures to both low and high dose IR exposures. Also needed are approaches that enable rapid handling and processing for mass-casualty and population triage scenarios. Development of in vivo model system will be crucial for validating both the biological and the instrumentation for biodosimetry. Such studies will also help further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the biological effects of radiation and the differences of responses due to individual genetic variation.

Matthew A. Coleman Ph.D.; Narayani Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.; Sally A. Amundson; James D. Tucker, Ph.D.; Stephen D. Dertinger, Ph.D.; Natalia I. Ossetrova, Ph.D.; Tao Chen

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Initial optical-transition radiation measurements of the electron beam for the Boeing free-electron-laser experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential for characterization of electron beams at ? 100 MeV at the Boeing Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility by optical-transition radiation (OTR) techniques has been demonstrated as an important complement to other diagnostic means. Electron beam properties such as spatial profile and position, current intensity, emittance and energy were studied using OTR. Initial examples including transport through the 5 m wiggler and the resolution of Cherenkov radiation and spontaneous-emission radiation competitive sources are discussed.

A.H. Lumpkin; R.B. Fiorito; D.W. Rule; D.H. Dowell; W.C. Sellyey; A.R. Lowrey

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Biological Effects of Space Radiation on Human Cells: History, Advances and Outcomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......XIV crossed intense solar flares explaining...and clo- nogenic cell survival assays that...Although the onboard technology available did not...were likely due to solar flares. From all...time variation of solar cosmic rays during...double-strand breaks in human cells: history, progress......

Mira Maalouf; Marco Durante; Nicolas Foray

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A High-Resolution Radiation Hybrid Map of the Human Genome Draft Sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...constructed at the Stanford Human Genome Center (SHGC) with 50,000 rad of x-rays (the...accessed at Web table 1 and http://shgc.stanford.edu(23). Next, we used...accessed at Web table 2 and http://shgc.stanford.edu. Table 1 Summary of TNG...

Michael Olivier; Amita Aggarwal; Jennifer Allen; Annalisa A. Almendras; Eva S. Bajorek; Ellen M. Beasley; Shannon D. Brady; Jannette M. Bushard; Valerie I. Bustos; Angela Chu; Tisha R. Chung; Anniek De Witte; Mirian E. Denys; Rakly Dominguez; Nicole Y. Fang; Brian D. Foster; Robert W. Freudenberg; David Hadley; Libby R. Hamilton; Tonya J. Jeffrey; Libusha Kelly; Laura Lazzeroni; Michelle R. Levy; Saskia C. Lewis; Xia Liu; Frederick J. Lopez; Brent Louie; Joseph P. Marquis; Robert A. Martinez; Margaret K. Matsuura; Nedda S. Misherghi; Jolanna A. Norton; Adam Olshen; Shanti M. Perkins; Amy J. Perou; Chris Piercy; Mark Piercy; Fawn Qin; Tim Reif; Kelly Sheppard; Vida Shokoohi; Geoff A. Smick; Wei-Lin Sun; Elizabeth A. Stewart; J. Fernando; Tejeda; Nguyet M. Tran; Tonatiuh Trejo; Nu T. Vo; Simon C. M. Yan; Deborah L. Zierten; Shaying Zhao; Ravi Sachidanandam; Barbara J. Trask; Richard M. Myers; David R. Cox

2001-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Abnormal Sensitivity of Human Fibroblasts from Xeroderma Pigmentosum Variants to Transformation to Anchorage Independence by Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2-Nitroimidazole (EF5) Binding Predicts Radiation Resistance in Individual 9L s.c...Terashima,and H. Yamaguchi (eds.), Radiation Research, pp. 885 "892.Tokyo, Japan: Japanese Association for Radiation Research, 1979. 9. Franko, A...

J. Justin McCormick; Suzanne Kateley-Kohler; Masami Watanabe; and Veronica M. Maher

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Telomerase-Dependent Oncolytic Adenovirus Sensitizes Human Cancer Cells to Ionizing Radiation via Inhibition of DNA Repair Machinery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surgical resection, radiation, and cytotoxic...the threshold for radiation-induced tumor cell death; the safety and efficacy of...1-3). Ionizing radiation primarily targets...with the CalcuSyn software (BioSoft), and...

Shinji Kuroda; Toshiya Fujiwara; Yasuhiro Shirakawa; Yasumoto Yamasaki; Shuya Yano; Futoshi Uno; Hiroshi Tazawa; Yuuri Hashimoto; Yuichi Watanabe; Kazuhiro Noma; Yasuo Urata; Shunsuke Kagawa; and Toshiyoshi Fujiwara

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Entropy of English text: Experiments with humans and a machine learning system based on rough sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different types of text material (Shannon used only a single book). We also show how the results are affected when we replace the human subjects with a machine learning system based on rough sets. Automating the play of the guessing game with this system...

Moradi, H.; Grzymala-Busse, Jerzy W.; Roberts, James A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves hematologic toxicity in particular. Although the long-term efficacy of current treatment options remains disappointing, the improved therapeutic index of IMRT may aid in generalizing its use and allowing the addition of novel approaches such as intraperitoneal immunotherapy.

Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal damage. Therefore, Q40P/S47I/H93G is pharmacologically one of the most promising candidates for clinical applications for radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.

Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland)] [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The estimation of radiation doses in human organs due to natural and artificial radioactivity in surface waters of the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the estimation of the radiation doses in the human body in the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain), following drinking water ingestion by measuring 40K, 226Ra, 90Sr and 3H. The equivalent dose in ten different organs was estimated. Dose calculations were performed by means of the GENII computer program. The lowest equivalent dose calculated through ingesting drinking water was in the small intestine whereas the highest was in the bone surface.

Feda Oner; Nazmi T. Okumusoglu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Libing [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: wanghua@nic.bmi.ac.c [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Lisheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Hideyuki Kawai; Shohei Nishida; Takayuki Sumiyoshi

2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Nishida, Shohei; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Whole-body radiation dosimetry of 2-[F-18]fluoro-A-85380 in human PET imaging studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R, Budinger T, Watson E. MIRD Primer for Absorbed DoseInternal Radiation Dose (MIRD) system [28]. To perform thesimplifications inherent in the MIRD phantom model, several

Obrzut, S L; Koren, A O; Mandelkern, M A; Brody, A L; Hoh, C K; London, E D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Personal Experience Reducing Radiation Exposures: Protecting Family in Kiev during the First Two Weeks after Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect

The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident occurred in 1986. The plume from the explosions and fires was highly radioactive and resulted in very high exposure levels in the surrounding regions. This paper describes how the people in Kiev, Ukraine, a city 90 miles (120 km) south of Chernobyl, and in particular one individual in that city, Professor Vitaly Eremenko, became aware of the threat before the official announcement and the steps he took to mitigate potential impacts to his immediate family. The combination of being informed and using available resources led to greatly reduced consequences for his family and, in particular, his newborn granddaughter. He notes how quickly word of some aspects of the hazard spread in the city and how other aspects appear to not have been understood. Although these events are being recalled as the 20th anniversary of the terrible event approaches, the lessons are still pertinent today. Threats of possible terrorist use of radiation dispersal devices makes knowledge of effective individual actions for self-protection from radiation exposures a topic of current interest.

Eremenko, Vitaly A.; Droppo, James G.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Medical radiation protection in next decade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......towards increasing radiation safety levels. Whether...users whenever the radiation dose to the patient...human errors and software-related problems...global view of radiation protection in medicine...increasing radiation safety levels. Whether......

Madan M. Rehani; Eliseo Vano

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear Energy Transfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biotinylated nucleotide analogue/ribonucleotide mix. The biotinylated cRNA targets were then...dose-response to controlled, low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation exposure. | The effect of low doses of low-linear energy transfer (photon) ionizing radiation...

Zelanna Goldberg; David M. Rocke; Chad Schwietert; Susanne R. Berglund; Alison Santana; Angela Jones; Jrg Lehmann; Robin Stern; Ruixiao Lu; and Christine Hartmann Siantar

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for understanding

Pennycook, Steve

138

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM

Pennycook, Steve

139

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposedAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 Fig. F.1. The hydrogen atom and its

Pennycook, Steve

140

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

142

Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays  

SciTech Connect

Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

144

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary glandas a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland as a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer Antoine M. Snijders 1 , Francesco Marchetti 1 , Ju Han 1 , Sandhya Bhatnagar 1 , Nadire Duru 1 , Zhi Hu 1 , Jian-Hua Mao 1 , Mina Bissell 1 , Joe Gray 1,2 , Gary H. Karpen 1 , Priscilla K. Cooper 1 and Andrew J. Wyrobek 1 1 Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Current affiliation: Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health Science Univ, Portland, OR Goal: Our goal is to develop an in vivo mechanistic model of genetic variation in the low-dose damage responses of mammary glands using inbred mice known to vary in their sensitivity to low-dose induced mammary gland cancer, and to develop molecular predictors for susceptibility or resistance to low-dose induced breast cancer.

147

Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The {sup 237}Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination.

Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Correlation of radiation absorbed dose to the human thyroid using the FBX dosimeter and external probe techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal Radiaion Dose Reports (MIRD) of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The dosimeter exhibited a similar response to that. obtained in the research of Benedetto who also correlated his results to ca)culat)ons made using MIRD techniques (Beg4k... that would be able to assess the radiation absorbed dose produced by radioisotopes in both nuclear medicine and due to accidental internal deposition of radionuclides to radiation workers or to members of the general public would have many desirable...

Bateman, Sarah Caroline Louisa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Meningeal HemangiopericytomaExperience From the SEER Database  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) on cause-specific survival in patients with meningeal hemangiopericytomas. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1990-2008 was queried for cases of surgically resected central nervous system hemangiopericytoma. Patient demographics, tumor location, and extent of resection were included in the analysis as covariates. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to analyze cause-specific survival. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine which factors were associated with cause-specific survival. Results: The mean follow-up time is 7.9 years (95 months). There were 76 patients included in the analysis, of these, 38 (50%) underwent gross total resection (GTR), whereas the other half underwent subtotal resection (STR). Postoperative RT was administered to 42% (16/38) of the patients in the GTR group and 50% (19/38) in the STR group. The 1-year, 10-year, and 20-year cause-specific survival rates were 99%, 75%, and 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, postoperative RT was associated with significantly better survival (HR = 0.269, 95% CI 0.084-0.862; P=.027), in particular for patients who underwent STR (HR = 0.088, 95% CI: 0.015-0.528; P<.008). Conclusions: In the absence of large prospective trials, the current clinical decision-making of hemangiopericytoma is mostly based on retrospective data. We recommend that postoperative RT be considered after subtotal resection for patients who could tolerate it. Based on the current literature, the practical approach is to deliver limited field RT to doses of 50-60 Gy while respecting the normal tissue tolerance. Further investigations are clearly needed to determine the optimal therapeutic strategy.

Stessin, Alexander M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Sison, Cristina [Department of Biostatistics, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States); Nieto, Jaime; Raifu, Muri [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York (United States); Li, Baoqing, E-mail: bal9018@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Impact of New Technologies on Radiation Oncology Events and Trends in the Past Decade: An Institutional Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review the type and frequency of patient events from external-beam radiotherapy over a time period sufficiently long to encompass significant technology changes. Methods and Materials: Ten years of quality assurance records from January 2001 through December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed to determine the frequency of events affecting patient treatment from four radiation oncology process steps: simulation, treatment planning, data entry/transfer, and treatment delivery. Patient events were obtained from manual records and, from May 2007 onward, from an institution-wide database and reporting system. Events were classified according to process step of origination and segregated according to the most frequently observed event types. Events from the institution-wide database were evaluated to determine time trends. Results: The overall event rate was 0.93% per course of treatment, with a downward trend over time led by a decrease in treatment delivery events. The frequency of certain event types, particularly in planning and treatment delivery, changed significantly over the course of the study, reflecting technologic and process changes. Treatments involving some form of manual intervention carried an event risk four times higher than those relying heavily on computer-aided design and delivery. Conclusions: Although the overall event rate was low, areas for improvement were identified, including manual calculations and data entry, late-day treatments, and staff overreliance on computer systems. Reducing the incidence of pretreatment events is of particular importance because these were more likely to occur several times before detection and were associated with larger dosimetric impact. Further improvements in quality assurance systems and reporting are imperative, given the advent of electronic charting, increasing reliance on computer systems, and the potentially severe consequences that can arise from mistakes involving complex intensity-modulated or image-guided treatments.

Hunt, Margie A., E-mail: huntm@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pastrana, Gerri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Amols, Howard I. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Killen, Aileen [Quality of Care Initiative, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Quality of Care Initiative, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Oral Histories: Radiation Biologist Marvin Goldman, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Radiation Biologist Marvin Goldman, Ph.D. Conducted December 22, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments September 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Educational Background and Early Involvement in Radiation Research Brookhaven Acquaintances and Early Hospital Research (Circa 1952) Vulnerable Populations and Acceptable Risks Research at the University of Rochester (1952-57) Relationship with Newell Stannard and Stafford Warren (1952-57) Participation in "Project Sunshine" and Move to the University of California, Davis (Mid '50s to '58) Participation in Beagle Studies at the University of California at Davis (1958 to '60s) Budget Concerns and Goldman's Other Radiation Research Projects (1965 to Late '60s)

152

Radiation protection: Natural radiation risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... radiation to which humans are exposed consists of four components - cosmic, gamma, internal, radon. The relative contribution that each makes to the sum is shown in the chart. ... but exposure of the whole body to terrestrial gamma rays and of the lungs to radon daughters are influenced by the nature and location of housing. Gamma rays are emitted ...

M. C. O'Riordan

1983-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

[Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells]. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The excision of radiation-induced lesions in DNA by a DNA repair enzyme complex, namely the UvrABC nuclease complex, has been investigated. Irradiated DNA was treated with the enzyme complex. DNA fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. The results showed that a number pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA were excised by the UvrABC nuclease complex and that the enzyme complex does not act on radiation-induced DNA lesions as a glycosylase. This means that it does not excise individual base products, but it excises oligomers containing these lesions. A number of pyrimidine-derived lesions that were no substrates for other DNA repair enzymes investigated in our laboratory were substrates for the UvrABC nuclease complex.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

155

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

156

A PC-Based Computer Program for the Estimation of the Radiation Dose in in Vitro and in Vivo Boron Neutron Capture Irradiation Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) microdosimetry of charged particle radiation depends on total boron concentration and intracellular boron distribution. Due to the inhomogeneity of boron distribution in...

Ruud Verrijk; Rene Huiskamp; Adrian C. Begg

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A DSM-based 2.0 System for Human Intervention Planning and Scheduling in Facilities Emitting Ionizing Radiations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To efficiently and safely plan, schedule and control its interventions in underground facilities, which are subject to ionizing radiations, CERN is currently developing a collaborative Web-based system. A similar project for maintenance management is also under way. On top of presenting their key requirements, this paper shows how the implementation of DSM can enhance a so-called Web 2.0 or collaborative dimension by bringing an intuitive and fair way of taking the dependencies between several activities into account. It is also discussed that the incoherencies brought in DSM by collaborative use (for instance regarding the time intervals) can be addressed by enlarging the binary DSM span of dependencies to ones of the Allens interval algebra or at least a subset of its dependencies.

Baudin, M; De Jonghe, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan, Pat Concannon & John H.J. Petrini The goal of this program is to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the NBS1 gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. Patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage. It is unclear whether humans heterozygous for the mutations associated with NBS are radiation sensitive and results from cell culture experiments give conflicting results. In collaboration with John Petrini at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City we developed a mouse model of this disorder and are directly testing the hypothesis

159

Appendix F. Radiation Annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis

Pennycook, Steve

160

Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The health effects of radiation from atomic explosions in Japan were completely different from those due to radiation from the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan. The sudden exposure to acute radiation in extremely high doses killed Japanese people, and harmed the survivors in lower doses as shown by increased cancer mortality, especially the leukemia based on the LNT model. The chronic radiation received by the residents unknowingly in the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan, even in higher doses, caused no excess cancer deaths; on the contrary their spontaneous cancer deaths were sharply reduced to only about 2.5% of that of the general population, and hereditary defects in their offspring were only 5%??7% of those of the normal population. Therefore, the residents in the Co-60 contamination apartments had coincidently accomplished a human experiment of the health effects to human beings. The chronic radiation received from the Co-60 contaminated houses is quite similar to the radiation exposure to the workers and public in the peaceful use of nuclear energy and medical radiation. Acute radiation from a nuclear accident could harm a limited number of people, but the chronic radiation might benefit people, such as in the case of the Chernobyl accident. People should not be fearful of chronic exposure to low radiation and the traditional radiation protection policy and practices used in past 60 years should be revised based on the health effects observed in Taiwan.

Y.C. Luan; M.C. Shieh; S.T. Chen; H.T. Kung; K.L. Soong; Y.C. Yeh; T.S. Chou; W.C. Fang; S.L. Yao; C.J. Pong; S.H. Mong; J.T. Wu; J.M. Wu; H.J. Jen; W.L. Chen; W.P. Deng; M.F. Wu; M.L. Shen; C.P. Sun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Hyperplasia in Canine Model Gayle Woloschak Northwestern University Abstract Purpose/Objective(s): There have been few studies analyzing radiation-induced prostate cancer in humans or animals. Our research attempts to fill this void by determining the effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation on the incidence of prostate cancer and prostatic hyperplasia in a large cohort of beagle dogs. Material/Methods: The subjects for the experiment were beagle dogs, which were chosen due to physiologic and anatomic similarities to humans (Thompson, 1989). We retrospectively analyzed data from historic irradiation experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on 347 beagles. The cobalt-60 cohort consisted of 268 dogs, which received whole

162

The National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE): A Network of Excellence for Environmental and Human Radiation Risk Reduction - 13365  

SciTech Connect

Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950's when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a graduate education training program for radioecology. Recently, NCoRE hosted a workshop to identify the immediate needs for science-driven discoveries, tool development and the generation of scientific data to support the legislative decision-making process for remediation strategies, long-term monitoring of radiologically- contaminated sites and protection of human health and the environment. Some of the immediate strategic research needs were identified in the fields of functional genomics for determining low-dose effects, improved low-level dosimetry, and mixed (radiological and chemical) contaminant studies. Longer term strategic research and tool development areas included development of radioecology case study sites, comprehensive decision-making tools, consequence response actions, and optimized scenario based ecosystem modeling. A summary of the NCoRE workshop findings related to waste management needs and priority areas will be presented in this paper. (authors)

Kuhne, W.W.; Jannik, G.T.; Farfan, E.B.; Knox, A.S.; Mayer, J.J.; Murray, A.M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Forbush decrease effects on radiation dose received on-board aeroplanes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......information provided by the US FAA to promote radiation safety for air carrier crew members. Radiat...Cosmic Radiation Humans Monte Carlo Method Radiation Dosage Radiation Monitoring methods Software Solar Activity...

P. Lantos

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparative investigations of sodium arsenite, arsenic trioxide and cadmium sulphate in combination with gamma-radiation on apoptosis, micronuclei induction and DNA damage in a human lymphoblastoid cell line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the field of radiation protection the combined exposure to radiation and other toxic agents is recognised as an important research area. To elucidate the basic mechanisms of simultaneous exposure, the interaction of the carcinogens and environmental toxicants cadmium and two arsenic compounds, arsenite and arsenic trioxide, in combination with gamma-radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6) were investigated. Gamma-radiation induced significant genotoxic effects such as micronuclei formation, DNA damage and apoptosis, whereas arsenic and cadmium had no significant effect on these indicators of cellular damage at non-toxic concentrations. However, in combination with gamma-radiation arsenic trioxide induced a more than additive apoptotic rate compared to the sum of the single effects. Here, the level of apoptotic cells was increased, in a dose-dependent way, up to two-fold compared to the irradiated control cells. Arsenite did not induce a significant additive effect at any of the concentrations or radiation doses tested. On the other hand, arsenic trioxide was less effective than arsenite in the induction of DNA protein cross-links. These data indicate that the two arsenic compounds interact through different pathways in the cell. Cadmium sulphate, like arsenite, had no significant effect on apoptosis in combination with gamma-radiation at low concentrations and, at high concentrations, even reduced the radiation-induced apoptosis. An additive effect on micronuclei induction was observed with 1?M cadmium sulphate with an increase of up to 80% compared to the irradiated control cells. Toxic concentrations of cadmium and arsenic trioxide seemed to reduce micronuclei induction. The results presented here indicate that relatively low concentrations of arsenic and cadmium, close to those occuring in nature, may interfere with radiation effects. Differences in action of the two arsenic compounds were identified.

Sabine Hornhardt; Maria Gomolka; Linda Walsh; Thomas Jung

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Extremely Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Causes Activation of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway and Enhances Proliferation of Normal Human Diploid Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stimulative effect of low-dose irradiation. These results indicate that a limited range of low-dose ionizing radiation differentially activates...indicate that a limited range of low-dose ionizing radiation differentially activates...

Keiji Suzuki; Seiji Kodama; and Masami Watanabe

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Health Physics Practices and Experience at Duke Power Company  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Radiation Protection and Health Physics Practices and Experience in Operating Reactors Internationally / Nuclear Safety

Lionel Lewis

167

Continuity of the processing of declarative knowledge during human sleep: evidence from interrelated contents of mental sleep experiences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The positive influence of sleep on memory may partly depend on the processing which transforms items of declarative knowledge into contents of mental sleep experience (MSE). This view implies that the consolidation level should be more enhanced for those items which have been repeatedly processed and transformed into identical or very similar (so-called interrelated) contents of distinct \\{MSEs\\} in the same night. We examined here the occurrence of interrelated contents in the \\{MSEs\\} reported after an awakening provoked in stage 2 at sleep onset and the spontaneous awakening in the morning. Interrelated contents resulted much more frequently than the chance occurrence of contents with the same semantic features, regardless of the sleep stage in which morning awakening occurred. The accessibility of given items for transformation into MSE contents over the night makes it plausible that they are reprocessed, and thus further consolidated, during various stages and cycles of sleep.

Carlo Cipolli; Pier Carla Cicogna; Katia Mattarozzi; Michela Mazzetti; Vincenzo Natale; Miranda Occhionero

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer {gamma}-Radiation-Induced NF{kappa}B-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NF{kappa}B regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NF{kappa}B-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNF{kappa}B-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-I{kappa}B{alpha}-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NF{kappa}B activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NF{kappa}B. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NF{kappa}B becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the {kappa}B-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NF{kappa}B-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NF{kappa}B by the I{kappa}B{alpha} mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NF{kappa}B overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced the IR-induced inhibition of cell survival. Conclusions: These results strongly suggest that curcumin inhibits IR-induced TA in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner in human neuroblastoma cells.

Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

SU?E?I?41: Study On the CT Radiation Attenuation Characteristics of Human Body for Phantom Design Using Monte Carlo Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: The CTDI values measured with standard PMMA phantoms were now being challenged due to the clinical application of new technologies such as automatic tube current modulation(TCM) the aim of this study is to simulate the CT radiation attenuation characteristics of human body along Z?axis which were the basic data of developing new phantoms used to evaluate TCM. Methods: The CT model used in this study has been modeled including the source energy spectrum the bow?tie filter as well and the beam shape. The voxel phantoms RPI Adult Male designed to match the ICRP anatomical references for average individuals were also selected in this study. MCNPX 2.5.0 was used to simulate the 120 kVp CT X?ray attenuation of voxel phantom along the z?axis. Averaged photon flux was tallied before and after it passed though the phantom separately simulations were also carried out using different thickness of PMMA plates instead of the voxel phantom. Results: The CT X?ray attenuation of PMMA and its thickness presents a significant negative exponential relationship with the r2=0.9975. The CT X?ray attenuation data of every 2cm along Z?axis direction of voxel phantom were obtained combined with characteristics of CT X?ray attenuation of PMMA the PMMA equivalent thickness of the voxel phantom torso along the Z?axis direction in terms of CT X?ray attenuation were calculated. The PMMA equivalent thickness ranges from 5.5cm to 30.1cm. The liver and spleen plane which contents substantive organs such as the liver and spleen and bone structure as ribs and the lumbar was the maximum attenuation plane. Conclusion: The trend of the overall attenuation characteristics of the human body in terms of CT X?ray was in accord with the anatomical structure these results could be used to develop new dose phantoms which were used to evaluate automatic tube current modulation with further study. This project was partially funded by National Institutes of Health (National Library of Medicine R01LM009362 and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering R42EB010404)

h Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

172

The flying radiation case  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 1, 301-302 Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars: Space Radiation Data,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation environment will be needed to plan these missions and instrumentation will be needed to conduct) and the partial protection afforded by its atmosphere (~20 g/cm2 ). The talk will describe the current plans and Mars: Space Radiation Data, Modeling and Instrumentation Needs J.H. Adams, Jr.a , A.F. Barghoutya , M

Lin, Zi-wei

174

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

175

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

176

Radiative Muon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory of radiative muon capture is developed. The discussion includes both parity conserving and nonconserving effects. The Gell-Mann weak magnetic term and the induced pseudoscalar are included, along with comparable relativistic effects in the nucleons. The theory is applied to light nuclei and especially to the radiative Godfrey reaction ?-+C126??+?+B125. An experiment to detect the induced pseudoscalar directly is proposed.

Jeremy Bernstein

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Appendix E. Radiation Annual Site Environmental Report--2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food and waterAppendix E. Radiation #12;#12;Annual Site Environmental Report--2011 Appendix E. Radiation E-3

Pennycook, Steve

178

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Rainer K. Sachs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rainer K. Sachs Rainer K. Sachs University of California, Berkeley Funded Projects BIO-BASED RISK MODELING 03-20: Modeling the Interrelations Among Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects, Genomic Instability and Cancer Cytogenetic Tests of Radiobiological Models Relating Epidemiologically Measurable Risks to Low-Dose Risks Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop The Bystander Effect in Normal Human 3-D Tissue: Experiments, Models, and Implications Brenner, D., Ponnaiya, B., Shuryak, I., Sachs, R., and Geard, D. Radiation Carcinogenesis Risk as Influenced by Intercellular Interaction Hahnfeldt, P., Hlatky, L., and Sachs, R.K. 2005 Workshop: Modelling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Sachs, R.K., Chan, M., Hlatky, L., and Hahnfeldt, P. 2003 Workshop: Chromosome Spatial Clustering Uncovered Through Radiogenic Aberrations

179

Symptomatic Outcomes in Relation to Tumor Expansion After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: Single-Institutional Long-Term Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The effect of transient tumor expansion after conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) on the symptomatic outcomes is not well-known. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 201 consecutive patients who received SRT for vestibular schwannoma. A conventional fractionation schedule was applied in 194 patients (97%), and 142 (71%) received a total dose of 50 Gy. The median follow-up time was 72 months. Results: The maximum diameter was 9 mm or less in 13 patients, 10-19 mm in 79 patients, 20-29 mm in 87 patients, and 30 mm or greater in 22 patients. At presentation, tumor size of 20 mm or greater was significantly associated with loss of serviceable hearing and trigeminal neuropathy. After SRT, tumor expansion was observed in 42 patients (21%). By tumor size, tumor expansion was observed in 0%, 11.4%, 25.6%, and 50% of patients with tumors of 9 mm or less, 10-19 mm, 20-29 mm, and 30 mm or greater, respectively, in diameter. The tumor expansion was significantly associated with an increased risk of hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement (P=.004), loss of serviceable hearing (P=.0064), and worsening of facial (P<.0001) and trigeminal nerve (P<.0001) functions. Spontaneous tumor shrinkage was observed in 29 of those 42 patients, mostly within 2 years after the expansion, and the majority of the worsened symptoms except for hearing resolved once the tumor had shrunk. As a result, salvage surgical resection for symptomatic relief was required in only 5% of patients. Conclusions: Fractionated SRT could be safely applied even for medium- to large-sized ({>=}20 mm) tumors. However, greater knowledge of the risks and consequences, including transient symptomatic worsening, and the time span of expansion will be required for the follow-up of patients after SRT to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention.

Aoyama, Hidefumi, E-mail: h-aoyama@med.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan) [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Onodera, Shunsuke [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takeichi, Norihito [Department of Otolaryngology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

Nelson, Carl [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Bai, Harrison [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Neboori, Hanmanth [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Takita, Cristiane [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Motwani, Sabin [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Jones, Tiffanie [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Goyal, Sharad [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

182

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Effects in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells E.A. Blakely1, M.P. McNamara1, P.Y. Chang1, K.A. Bjornstad1, D. Sudar1, and A.C. Thompson2 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California; 2Advanced Light Source Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California. Introduction The human lens is one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body. Cataract, the opacification of the lens, is a late-appearing response to radiation damage. There are few data available on the late radiation effects of exposure in space flight to charged particle beams, the most prevalent of which are protons. Basic research in this area is needed to integrate the responses of both critical and other representative tissues

184

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Infrared radiation: Herschel revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The year 2000 marks the 200th anniversary of Herschels discovery of infrared radiation. Using a car light in place of the Sun and a liquid crystal sheet instead of thermometers the experiment is an effective classroom demonstration of invisible light.

Erin E. Pursell; Richard Kozlowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

188

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

73Exploring Radiation in your Life Our exposure to many unavoidable sources of radiation is a fact of life, and one  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and determine the consequences of human radiation impacts, have estimated that the average human accumulates to the daily radiation dose change when the Fukushima source is included in terms of microSeiverts/day? Space73Exploring Radiation in your Life Our exposure to many unavoidable sources of radiation is a fact

190

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The purposes of this study were to estimate the radiation-absorbed doses of 18 F-SP203 in humans. Radiation-absorbed doses were estimated by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose scheme. Results AfterORIGINAL ARTICLE Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron emission tomographic ligand

Shen, Jun

191

Radiative muon capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown by relating the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture to that of radiative pion capture, that the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture proposed recently by Hwang and Primakoff differs from the others mainly by Low's counter terms. Despite the fact that the "original" transition amplitude does not violate seriously the conservation of the hadronic electromagnetic current, Low's counter terms, as introduced via Low's prescription to secure the presence of small conservation-of-hadronic-electromagnetic-current-breaking terms, are confirmed to be of numerical importance. Further, it is found in the "elementary-particle" treatment of radiative muon capture that the uncertainty arising from the nuclear structure can be reduced to become negligible. Therefore, an exclusive radiative muon capture experiment can in principle differentiate the Hwang-Primakoff theory from the others and yet provide a comprehensive test of partial conservation of axial-vector current.RADIOACTIVITY Theories of radiative muon capture, linearity hypothesis versus Low's prescription; nuclear structure and PCAC.

W -Y. P. Hwang

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Human Heterochromatin Protein 1 Isoforms HP1Hs? and HP1Hs? Interfere with hTERT-Telomere Interactions and Correlate with Changes in Cell Growth and Response to Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subsequently exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The...a particular dose of radiation. The cells...to IR in the dose range of 0 to 8 Gy...treatment. Dose response curves...treated with ionizing radiation while growing...

Girdhar G. Sharma; Kyu-kye Hwang; Raj K. Pandita; Arun Gupta; Sonu Dhar; Julie Parenteau; Manjula Agarwal; Howard J. Worman; Raymund J. Wellinger; Tej K. Pandita

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiation protection in inhomogeneous betagamma fields and modelling of hand phantoms with MCNPX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......performed using the MCNPX software. In order to investigate...recommendations regarding radiation protection measures...Karlsruhe GmbH, Central Safety Department, KES...Simulation Gamma Rays Hand radiation effects Humans Models...radiation effects Software...

Ch. Blunck; F. Becker; L. Hegenbart; B. Heide; J. Schimmelpfeng; M. Urban

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Radiation doses to patients undergoing barium meal and barium enema examinations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......organ dose determination in radiation hygiene. STUK-A87 Raport, Finish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (1989). 14. Carroll, E...methods Greece Humans Middle Aged Radiation Dosage Radiometry methods Software...

M. G. Delichas; K. Hatziioannou; E. Papanastassiou; P. Albanopoulou; E. Chatzi; A. Sioundas; K. Psarrakos

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The whole-body counting facility at the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority after relocation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority new location...funded by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...Measurements of gamma-radiation from the human body...ORTEC. MCA emulator software version 6.0. 2000......

L. del Risco Norrlid; I. stergren

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Comparison of codes assessing galactic cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the galactic cosmic radiation. Results are provided...fully satisfactory for radiation protection purposes...Protection and Nuclear Safety, F-92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses...Computer Simulation Cosmic Radiation Europe Humans Occupational...instrumentation methods Software Solar Activity...

J. F. Bottollier-Depois; P. Beck; B. Bennett; L. Bennett; R. Btikofer; I. Clairand; L. Desorgher; C. Dyer; E. Felsberger; E. Flckiger; A. Hands; P. Kindl; M. Latocha; B. Lewis; G. Leuthold; T. Maczka; V. Mares; M. J. McCall; K. O'Brien; S. Rollet; W. Rhm; F. Wissmann

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Bacterial stress response to environmental radiation relating to the Fukushima radiation discharge event, Japan: Will environmental bacteria alter their antibiotic susceptibility profile?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Antibiotic resistance in clinical pathogens in humans may be traced back to resistance mechanisms in environmental bacteria and any factors, which are likely to alter (upregulate) resistance in environmental organisms, is of potential and eventual consequence to human pathogens. Furthermore, sublethal doses of gamma radiation to environmental organisms may cause sublethal stress and a selective pressure, which may lead to mutational events that alter the bacterium's susceptibility profile. A gamma (?) radiation simulation experiment was performed to emulate the exposure of four environmental bacteria, including Listeria innocua, Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to levels of radiation in and around Fukushima, Japan, equating to 1, 10 and 100 years equivalence exposure. Alteration to susceptibility to 14 antibiotics was measured as the primary endpoint. There was no significant alteration in the susceptibility of the Gram-positive organisms, whereas both Gram-negative organisms became slightly more susceptible to the antibiotics tested over time. These data indicate that such radiation exposure will not increase the antibiotic resistance profile of these organisms and hence not add to the global public health burden of increased antibiotic resistance in human bacterial pathogens.

Shigeyuki Nakanishi; John E. Moore; Motoo Matsuda; Colin E. Goldsmith; Wilson A. Coulter; Juluri R. Rao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ionizing-Radiation Resistance in the Desiccation-Tolerant CyanobacteriumChroococcidiopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...differences between radiation-resistant and radiation-susceptible microorganisms...after exposure to high doses of X rays ranging...cultures used for radiation experiments were 3-month-old...Goleta, Calif.). Estimation of survival. To determine...

Daniela Billi; E. Imre Friedmann; Kurt G. Hofer; Maria Grilli Caiola; Roseli Ocampo-Friedmann

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

successful at predicting SEP spectra and radiation dose estimates at different distances in the inner-dependent estimates of organ dose and dose equivalent rates for human crews in deep space from the 26 Oct 2003 solar orbit, Spaceweather, 8, 2010 · Dayeh, et al, Modeling proton intensity gradients and radiation dose

Pringle, James "Jamie"

203

IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field #12;Rel.dose=25 In actual FRIB system, estimated rel.dose would be ~10. rel.dose=25 is close for any radiated samples. Rel.dose=25 gives slightly higher Ic than rel.dose=2.5 in some magnetic fields field As radiation dose increases, Ic decreases monotonically for bot

McDonald, Kirk

204

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal F0 Germline Irradiation Authors: J.E. Baulch and O.G. Raabe Institutions: Center for Health and the Environment, University of California, Davis, CA. The main goal of this grant is to evaluate heritable, transgenerational effects of low dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (0.1 Gy attenuated 137Cs gamma rays) on Type B spermatogonia in 129SVE mice; wild-type and heterozygous for Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The ATM heterozygotes are carriers for a genetic mutation (AT mutated, ATM) that is thought to predispose both humans and mice to radiation sensitivity. Experiments conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated heritable effects of paternal germline exposure to ionizing radiation in mice using 1.0 Gy of

205

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments AE01 - Micro-undulator FEL Experiment. Spokesperson: I. Ben-Zvi, BNL. (1992 - 1997) AE02. - Inverse FEL Accelerator. Spokesperson: A. van Steenbergen, BNL. [Yale, Columbia]. (1992-1997) AE03 - Laser Grating Accelerator Experiment. Spokesperson: R. Fernow, BNL. [Princeton, LANL]. (1992- 1996) AE05 - Nonlinear-Compton Scattering. Spokesperson: K. McDonald, Princeton (1992-) AE06 - Inverse Cherenkov Acceleration. Spokesperson: W. Kimura, STI Optronics. [UCSB,BNL]. (1992-1997) AE08 - Far Infrared Radiation Source. Spokesperson J. Walsh, Dartmouth. [Oxford, BNL]. (1992 - 1994) AE09. - Photocathode R&D. Spokesperson: T. Rao, BNL. (1992 - ) AE10. - High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL. Spokesperson: L.H. Yu, BNL. [ANL] (1992 - 2001)

206

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radiation Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Simon Bouffler Health Protection Agency Abstract Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation. The CBA mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has been used extensively for both quantitative and mechanistic studies. Loss of genetic material from chromosome 2 (chr2) is known to be associated with most radiation-induced AMLs. AML develops in CBA mice exposed to X- or γ-radiation, after a mean latency period of 18 months, with a maximal incidence of approximately 25% at 3Gy. A strong candidate AML-suppressor gene located within the commonly deleted region of chr2 has been identified, Sƒpil/PU.1. This gene suffers hemizygous loss and specific

208

Medical applications of synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

210

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Online Literature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online Literature Online Literature Journals, Books and other Publications Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute Chornobyl Center for Nuclear Safety Radioactive Waste and Radioecology "Insight" Magazine Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) News: Aiming at an information center on low dose radiation research Health Physics International Journal of Radiation Biology Iranian Journal of Radiation Research Journal of Radiological Protection National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Radiation Research U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge Reports Animal Cancer Tests and Human Cancer Risk Assessment: A Broad Perspective Effects of Ionizing Radiation: Atomic Bomb Survivors and Their Children (1945-1995) Health Effects of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation: BEIR

211

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

212

Consolidation effect of the processing of declarative knowledge during human sleep: evidence from long-term retention of interrelated contents of mental sleep experiences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sleep may partly exert a positive influence on memory through the processing underlying the transformation of items of declarative knowledge into contents of mental sleep experience (MSE). This hypothesis implies that the level of consolidation (and thus, long-term retention) should be enhanced for those items which are repeatedly processed and transformed into identical or very similar (so-called interrelated) contents of distinct \\{MSEs\\} developed over the same night. To test this prediction, we examined accessibility at delayed recall (i.e., the next morning) of the interrelated contents of \\{MSEs\\} reported (immediate recall) by 14 subjects who were awakened during the first four periods of rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep in two experimental nights. Interrelated contents were much more frequent, and at delayed recall much better retained, than other, non-interrelated contents in report pairs of MSEs. Moreover, they were also more frequent and better retained than by-chance similar or identical contents, as estimated in report pairs of \\{MSEs\\} of different subjects. These findings provide partial but coherent evidence in favour of the hypothesis that a generation effect occurs during sleep, with a further consolidation of the input and the output of MSE processing (respectively, the items of declarative knowledge and the contents of \\{MSEs\\} resulting from their elaboration during sleep).

Carlo Cipolli; Igino Fagioli; Michela Mazzetti; Giovanni Tuozzi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Radiation Damage in Titanate Ceramics Used for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

Results from radiation damage experiments are discussed with respect to the immobilization of Pu declared excess to the weapons programs. The ceramics are titanate-based.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

215

Ignition Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Experiments The goal of many NIF experiments is to create a self-sustaining "burn" of fusion fuel (the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium) that produces as much or...

216

Radiation hormesis research findings and therapeutic applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1982, Professor Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri University asserted 'radiation hormesis' in the journal Health Physics. Following his assertion, the CRIEPI initiated a research programme on radiation hormesis to confirm 'is it true or not'. Twelve years of research with 8??14 universities in Japan produced fruitful results on radiation hormesis. Hormone response tests on rabbits, enzyme response tests on rats and mice, p53 gene responses from mice and rats and helper-T responses from human patients gave us impressive information to consider the therapeutic application of radiation hormesis.

Sadao Hattori

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

Azzam, Edouard I

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Frequencies of Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Randomness of Chromosome Territory Locations Relative to One Another. Authors: RK Sachs,§ MN Cornforth,‡ KM Greulich-Bode,* L Hlatky, and DJ Brenner|| Institutions: §Department of Mathematics, University of California, ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, *Department of Skin Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center DFCI, Harvard Medical School, ||Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. Leukemogenesis, and perhaps carcinogenesis in general, often involves specific chromosome translocations. Radiation-induced chromosome translocation frequencies are strongly influenced by how close participating chromosomes are to one another in an interphase cell nucleus. We sought to determine whether chromosomes in human peripheral blood

219

Digestion Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blank in Bulletin] BULLETIN NO. 291 FEBRUARY, 1922 DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS This is the sixth bulletin in a series whose object is to ascertain the Aceding value of Texas feeding stuffs by means of digestion experiments. Previous bulletins... The productive values and the values for digestible protein in t Bulletin have been calculated from the results of digestion esperiine? with sheep. The method of conducting the experiments is described Bulletins Nos. 147 and 166 of this Station. The production...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

222

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

223

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic framework to understand the changes taking place on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and/or tomography, is a popular method of investigating micrometer deformation and fracture behavior in bone. However, the role that irradiation plays in these high-exposure experiments, and how it affects the properties of bone tissue, are not yet fully understood. A team of researchers led by Robert O. Ritchie at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley used synchrotron radiation micro-tomography at Advanced Light Source Beamline 8.3.2 to investigate changes in crack path and toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone with increased exposure to radiation, finding that exposure to high levels of irradiation can lead to drastic losses in strength, ductility, and toughness.

224

Radiating gravastars  

SciTech Connect

Considering a Vaidya exterior spacetime, we study dynamical models of prototype gravastars, made of an infinitely thin spherical shell of a perfect fluid with the equation of state p = ?, enclosing an interior de Sitter spacetime. We show explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, an unstable gravastar, a stable gravastar or a 'bounded excursion' gravastar, depending on how the mass of the shell evolves in time, the cosmological constant and the initial position of the dynamical shell. This work presents, for the first time in the literature, a gravastar that emits radiation.

Chan, R. [Coordenao de Astronomia e Astrofsica, Observatrio Nacional, Rua General Jos Cristino, 77, So Cristvo 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, M.F.A. da [Departamento de Fsica Terica, Instituto de Fsica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua So Francisco Xavier 524, Maracan 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Jaime F. Villas da [Instituto de Biocincias, Departamento de Cincias Naturais, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pasteur 458, Urca, CEP 22290-240, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wang, Anzhong, E-mail: chan@on.br, E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com, E-mail: jfvroch@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu [GCAP-CASPER, Department of Physics, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Appendix E. Radiation Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report--2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix E. Radiation #12;#12;Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report--2012 Appendix

Pennycook, Steve

226

Appendix E. Radiation Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report--2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix E. Radiation #12;#12;Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report--2013 Appendix

Pennycook, Steve

227

Natural and Radiation Carcinogenesis in Man. III. Radiation Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mice. NATURAL AND RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN MAN. 3. RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS. | Journal Article | Japan Neoplasms etiology Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced Radiation Genetics | JAPAN NEOPLASM ETIOLOGY NEOPLASMS, RADIATION-INDUCED RADIATION...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Low Dose Radiation Program: Workshop VI Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Anderson, Carl Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. Averbeck, Dietrich Cellular Responses at Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Azzam, Edouard Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate ?-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism. Bailey, Susan The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability. Balajee, Adayabalam Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Imaging Bioinformatics for Mapping Multidimensional Responses. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Biological Response to Radiation Mediated through the Microenvironment and

229

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

231

Hydronuclear experiments  

SciTech Connect

Hydronuclear experiments, a method for assessing some aspects of nuclear weapon safety, were conducted at Los Alamos during the 1958 to 1961 moratorium on nuclear testing. The experiments resulted in subcritical multiplying assemblies or a very slight degree of supercriticality and, in some cases, involved a slight, but insignificant, fission energy release. These experiments helped to identify so-called one-point safety problems associated with some of the nuclear weapons systems of that time. The need for remedial action was demonstrated, although some of the necessary design changes could not be made until after the resumption of weapons testing at the end of 1961.

Thorn, R.N.; Westervelt, D.R.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

234

Parallelization of Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning(RTTP) : A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to treat cancer- ous tumors. This paper reports our experiences with the parallelization of a real-world 3-D radiation therapy treat- ment planning (RTTP) system on a wide range of plat at the tumor in a patient from different directions, thereby concentrating radiation dose in the tumor

Chaudhary, Vipin

235

Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro [Service of General Surgery, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Gmez-Esp, Marina [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Blanco, Jose [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); and others

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. <' ," . . * . RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED . 370 Lexl.ngton Avenue New York 17# New York jq.5' L- Contract No. A T (30-l)-2093 with the United States Atom ic Energy Commission F O A M SEPARATION Progress Report for March, 1959 Abstract Appreciable cesium enrichment in the foam has been obtained using the system sodium tetraphenyl boron-Geigy reagent. Enrichment ratios varied from 1.5 to 3.5 depending upon operating conditions. The en- richment appears to depend on the ratio of the sodium tetraphenyl boron to Geigy reagent rather than on the absolute values of the indi- vidual concentrations. Further experiments are being conducted to verify and extend the range of results. Continuous countercurrent column operation has been continued.

237

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

238

Emplacing experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose that understandings of the role of space and place in everyday life are of value to designing the environment of Role Playing Games (RPGs). We compare aspects of space and place in spatial experiences while moving through terrains in physical ... Keywords: place, space, video games

David Browning; Steven Stanley; Michael Fryer; Nicola J Bidwell

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Howard L. Liber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Howard L. Liber Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: Delayed genomic instability in human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs y-rays radiation Schwartz, J.L., Jordan, R., Lenarczyk, M. and Liber, H.L. 2002 Workshop: Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Liber, H.L. and Schwartz, J.L. Publications Zhang, Y., Zhou, J., Held, K.D., Redmond, R.W., Prise, K.M., and Liber, H.L. (2008). Deficiencies of double-strand break repair factors and effects on mutagenesis in directly [gamma]-irradiated and medium-mediated bystander human lymphoblastoid cells. Radiation Research 169(2):197-206.

240

Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee Charter 1. Purpose The committee reviews functional changes to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) and Personnel Protection System (PSS) used to provide personnel protection and area exclusion related to APS accelerators, storage ring and other radiation handling areas. The RSPP Committee advises APS management on radiation safety matters. At the request of APS Management the committee reviews projects, recommends radiation safety policy, and evaluates accident investigation conclusions. 2. Membership Members are appointed by the APS Division Directors and APS Director for their knowledge and background in Interlock Systems, Radiation Safety, Accelerator Operations and Work on the Experiment Floor.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental Insights in Biology  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Research supported by OHER [Office of Health and Environmental Research] and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

Setlow, Richard B.

1982-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

242

Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators  

SciTech Connect

At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

Nikolai V. Mokhov

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

243

Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

245

Properties of Natural Radiation and Radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

Ubiquitous natural sources of radiation and radioactive material (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) have exposed humans throughout history. To these natural sources have been added technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) sources and human-made (anthropogenic) sources. This chapter describes the ubiquitous radiation sources that we call background, including primordial radionuclides such as 40K, 87Rb, the 232Th series, the 238U series, and the 235U series; cosmogenic radionuclides such as 3H and 14C; anthropogenic radionuclides such as 3H, 14C, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I; radiation from space; and radiation from technologically-enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides, particularly the short-lived decay products of 222Rn ("radon") and 220Rn ("thoron") in indoor air. These sources produce radiation doses to people principally via external irradiation or internal irradiation following intakes by inhalation or ingestion. The effective doses from each are given, with a total of 3.11 mSv y-1 (311 mrem y-1) to the average US resident. Over 2.5 million US residents receive over 20 mSv y-1 (2 rem y-1), primarily due to indoor radon. Exposure to radiation from NORM and TENORM produces the largest fraction of ubiquitous background exposure to US residents, on the order of 2.78 mSv (278 mrem) or about 89%. This is roughly 45% of the average annual effective dose to a US resident of 6.2 mSv y-1 (620 mrem y-1) that includes medical (48%), consumer products and air travel (2%), and occupational and industrial (0.1%). Much of this chapter is based on National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report No. 160, "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States," for which the author chaired the subcommittee that wrote Chapter 3 on "Ubiquitous Background Radiation."

Strom, Daniel J.

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

246

Device for calibrating a radiation detector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Device for calibrating a radiation detector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

Mc Fee, Matthew C. (New Ellenton, SC); Kirkham, Tim J. (Beech Island, SC); Johnson, Tippi H. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 97, No. 1, pp. 6973 (2001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ionising radiations such as alpha particles (e.g. radon, plutonium workers, individuals exposed to depleted uranium is not well known(1) , there is considerable uncertainty concerning the proportion of the excess cancer risk for radiation-induced human cancer(6) suggested that identification of a radi- ation `signature' was a key

Brenner, David Jonathan

249

Precise gene localization by phenotypic assay of radiation hybrid cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...phenotype. The Stanford Human Genome Center (SHGC) G3 panel of radiation hybrid cell lines...sequence within ?250 kb (http://www-shgc.stanford.edu). It also is possible to screen...Evaluation of the results by using the SHGC radiation hybrid web server (http...

John E. J. Rasko; Jean-Luc Battini; Leonid Kruglyak; David R. Cox; A. Dusty Miller

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A physical map of the human genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... fingerprinted clones (primarily radiation hybrid chromosomal localization data from the Stanford Human Genome Center (SHGC)). The parameters finally used (overlap statistic of 3??10-12 or about ... http://carbon.wi.mit.edu:8000/cgi-bin/contig/phys_map), GeneMap99, SHGC G3 radiation hybrid map (http://www- ...

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Ecology Impact of Human ecology Research Bonus Issue FROM SCHOLARSHIP TO POLICY MAKING OF HUMAN ECOLOGY APRIL 2005/VOLUME 33, NUMBER 1 #12;Human Ecology Volume 33, Number 1 April 2005 The New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph.D. Rebecca Q

Wang, Z. Jane

252

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purpose: To use beams of heavy ions provided by the Booster accelerator at Brookhaven to study the effects of simulated space radiation on biological and physical systems, with the goal of developing methods and materials to reduce the risk to human beings on prolonged space missions of the effects of ionizing radiation Sponsor: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Project cost $34 million over 4 years Operating costs Nearly $8 million per year in 2007 Features * beams of heavy ions extracted from the Booster accelerator with masses and energies similar to the cosmic rays encountered in space: * 1-billion electron volt (GeV)/nucleon iron-56 * 0.3-GeV/nucleon gold-97 * 0.6-GeV/nucleon silicon-28 * 1-GeV/nucleon protons * 1-GeV/nucleon titanium

253

Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body Particles and People: Aerosol Movement Into and Around the Human Body Speaker(s): Miriam Byrne Date: April 14, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Miriam Byrne is a participating guest in the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group at LBL. She is an academic member of staff in the Physics Department at the National University of Galway, Ireland. Her research interests, primarily funded by European Commission radiation protection programs, focus on the mechanisms of aerosol transport to and from human body surfaces. Over the last ten years, she has been involved in tracer aerosol experiments to determine rates of particle deposition and resuspension from skin, hair and clothing, as well as studying particle transport into skin pores and hair follicles, and contact transfer from

254

Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. The course curriculum combines...

255

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

256

DarkLight radiation backgrounds  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

Kalantarians, N. [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton VA 23668 (United States); Collaboration: DarkLight Collaboration

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

DarkLight radiation backgrounds  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

Kalantarians, Narbe [University of Texas

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

259

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: William F. Morgan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William F. Morgan William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999 Richland, Washington About this Project Projects Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Mechanisms of Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose/ Low Dose Rate Radiation Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation

260

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient uv-b radiation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

typically been conducted under low levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, a naturally occurring mutagen... . We conducted experi- ments to test whether the inclusion of...

262

Detection of DNA Damage Induced by Space Radiation in Mir and Space Shuttle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced...American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced...studied in Go human lymphocytes using the comet assay. J. Radiat. Res. 42: 91101......

Takeo Ohnishi; Ken Ohnishi; Akihisa Takahashi; Yoshitaka Taniguchi; Masaru Sato; Tamotsu Nakano; Shunji Nagaoka

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

264

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

265

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Design for a High Energy Density Kelvin-Helmholtz Experiment  

SciTech Connect

While many high energy density physics (HEDP) Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments have been fielded as part of basic HEDP and astrophysics studies, not one HEDP Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) experiment has been successfully performed. Herein, a design for a novel HEDP x-ray driven KH experiment is presented along with supporting radiation-hydrodynamic simulation and theory.

Hurricane, O A

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radiation dose modeling using IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans in radiation environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO (Ergonomics) simulation software products. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide the radiation exposure information to and collect the radiation dose information from the workcell simulations. The emphasis of this paper is on the IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO parts of REMS, since that represents the extension to existing capabilities developed by the authors. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these database files to compute and accumulate dose to human devices (Deneb`s ERGO human) during simulated operations around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. REMS was developed because the proposed reduction in the yearly radiation exposure limit will preclude or require changes in many of the manual operations currently being utilized in the Weapons Complex. This is particularly relevant in the area of dismantlement activities at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. Therefore, a capability was needed to be able to quantify the dose associated with certain manual processes so that the benefits of automation could be identified and understood.

Vickers, D.S.; Davis, K.R.; Breazeal, N.L.; Watson, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ford, M.S. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Safety

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air- tantly, what radiation dose people may have received. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP, additionalProjectworkcouldresultin revisions of these dose estimates. April 21, 1994 Companion

269

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

270

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

271

Reception of longitudinal vector potential radiation with a plasma antenna  

SciTech Connect

To help resolve the long-running debate between physicists and engineers regarding the existence of the magnetic vector potential, herewith we describe an experiment demonstrating reception of time-harmonic vector potential radiation at 1.3 GHz.

Zimmerman, Robert K. Jr. [Sigma Space Corporation, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Sigma Space Corporation, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8MAY98 8MAY98 Exp # Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul Accelerator-Mass-Spectrometry Measurements of Natural 236U Concentrations with the ECR-ATLAS System 4 667-2 Janssens Unsafe Coulex of the 238,239Pu Nuclei 4 669-2 Carpenter Excited States Associated with Different Shapes in 178Hg and Neighboring Odd-A Nuclei 4 673-2 Lister A Study of Radiative Decay from High Lying States in 24Mg 5 689-2 Freeman Spectroscopy of Odd Tin Isotopes Approaching 100Sn 5 693-2 Reiter Structure and Formation Mechanism of Heavy Elements - Request for additional beam time for Experiment 693 - 6 706 Kwok Heavy-Ion Lithography on High Temperature Superconductors 2 708 Yu In-Beam Spectroscopy Study of the Proton Emitter 109I with Recoil-Decay Tagging Technique

273

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

274

Radiative Muon Capture in Calcium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The branching ratio relative to ordinary muon capture and the photon asymmetry relative to the muon-spin direction were measured for radiative muon capture in Ca40. For ~ 1200 photon events, the partial branching ratio is Rk>57MeV=(21.11.4)10-6, and the asymmetry for k>63.5 MeV is +0.900.50. A fit of the photon spectrum to the theory of Rood, Yano, and Yano gives the value gP?=(6.51.6)gA for the pseudoscalar-coupling constant. These results are in disagreement with earlier experiments.

R. D. Hart; C. R. Cox; G. W. Dodson; M. Eckhause; J. R. Kane; M. S. Pandey; A. M. Rushton; R. T. Siegel; R. E. Welsh

1977-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Augusto Tentori  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Augusto Tentori Augusto Tentori Student's expertise in microfluidics helps develop prototype device for human radiation exposure detection If the unthinkable happens, time is of the essence in a potential mass population radiological event, where thousands of people would be exposed to radiation and their survival could hinge on prompt medical diagnosis and treatment. Augusto Tentori Augusto Tentori, a participant in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Scholarship and Fellowship Program (administered for DHS by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education), uses microfluidic technology to analyze blood samples for evidence and calculation of radiation exposure dose-a field known as "radiation biodosimetry." Photo courtesy of Christopher Phaneuf. Click image to enlarge.

276

Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [18F]-5-fluorouracil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose To estimate the radiation dose and biodistribution of 18F-5-fluorouracil ([18F]-5-FU) from positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) data, and to extrapolate mouse data to human data in order to evaluate cross-species consistency. Methods Fifteen cancer patients (head and neck cancer (n=11), colon cancer (n=4)) were enrolled. Sequential PET/CT images were acquired for 2h after intravenous administration of [18F]-5-FU, and the percent of the injected dose delivered to each organ was derived. For comparison, [18F]-5-FU was administered to female BALB/cAJcl-nu/nu nude mice (n=19), and the percent of the injected dose delivered to mouse organs was extrapolated to the human model. Absorbed radiation dose was calculated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software. Results In human subjects, high [18F]-5-FU uptake was seen in the liver, gallbladder and kidneys. The absorbed dose was highest in the gallbladder wall. In mice, the biodistribution of [18F]-5-FU corresponded to that of humans. Estimated absorbed radiation doses for all organs were moderately correlated, and doses to organs (except the gallbladder and urinary bladder) were significantly correlated between mice and humans. The mean effective [18F]-5-FU dose was higher in humans (0.0124mSv/MBq) than in mice (0.0058mSv/MBq). Conclusion Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [18F]-5-FU were compared between humans and mice: biodistribution in mice and humans was similar. Data from mice underestimated the effective dose in humans, suggesting that clinical measurements are needed for more detailed dose estimation in order to ensure radiation safety. The observed effective doses suggest the feasibility of [18F]-5-FU PET/CT for human studies.

Ayako Hino-Shishikura; Akiko Suzuki; Ryogo Minamimoto; Kazuya Shizukuishi; Takashi Oka; Ukihide Tateishi; Sadatoshi Sugae; Yasushi Ichikawa; Choichi Horiuchi; Tomio Inoue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqua thermodynamic experiment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Their Meridional Energy Transports Summary: is applied to a study of the total heat transport estimated from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE... to the pristine...

278

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

279

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

282

Overview and Experimental Program of the Levitated Dipole Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the experiment. #12;Why is dipole confinement interesting? Simplest confinement field High- confinement occurs naturally in magnetospheres ( ~ 2 in Jupiter) Possibility of fusion power source with near- classical energy tori Design Radiation Shield Outer Vacuum Shell

283

SCIPP 11/06 Fundamentals of LHC Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCIPP 11/06 Fundamentals of LHC Experiments Jason Nielsen Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics is proportional to 4 /. For example, radiation losses per turn were 0.2 µW for each electron in the LEP collider

California at Santa Cruz, University of

284

Differential Damage in Bacterial Cells by Microwave Radiation on the Basis of Cell Wall Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consistent when the microwave radiation was repeated. Changes in the...NaCl was exposed to microwave radiation at 600 W, and its temperature...U200; Hitachi Co., Tokyo, Japan). All the experiments were...cells were treated by microwave radiation, the shape of the cells was...

Im-Sun Woo; In-Koo Rhee; Heui-Dong Park

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Measurement of the radiation field surrounding the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

We present here the first direct and detailed measurements of the spatial distribution of the ionizing radiation surrounding a hadron collider experiment. Using data from two different exposures we measure the effect of additional shielding on the radiation field around the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Employing a simple model we parameterize the ionizing radiation field surrounding the detector.

K. Kordas et al.

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

287

Tracking uncertainties in the causal chain from human activities to climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and are designated forthe causal chain from human activities, to GHG emissions, tothe increasing GHG abundances, to the radiative forcing of

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Adaptive Response Against Spontaneous Neoplastic Transformation In Vitro Induced by Ionizing Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to establish a dose response curve for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells in vitro under experimental conditions were an adaptive response, if it were induced, would have an opportunity to be expressed. During the first two years of the grant an exhaustive series of experiments were performed and the resulting data were reported at the 2000 Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society and then Subsequently published. The data showed that an adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation was seen up to doses of 10cGy of Cs-137 gamma rays. At dose of 30, 50 and 100 cGy the transformation frequencies were above background. This indicated that for this system, under the specific experimental conditions used, there was a threshold of somewhere between 10 and 30 cGy. The results also indicated some unexpected, though very interesting, correlations with relative risk estimates made from human epidemiologic studies.

J. Leslie Redpath, Ph.D.

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

290

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Skyshine Benchmark Experiment Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......both calculate skyshine radiation and accurately model...users of the code. | Radiation Safety and Shielding Design...Models, Statistical Radiation Dosage Radiation Protection...Sensitivity and Specificity Software Software Validation...

Ian R. Terry

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

293

Radiation.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An average American's exposure is about 620 millirems per year from naturally occurring and other sources. Other Factors Background radiation varies with location....

294

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

295

Radiation Safety September 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................... 8 2.6 RUA Holder........................................................................................................ 11 3.3 Radiation Use Authorization (RUA).......................................................................................... 11 3.4 Review of RUA Applications

California at Irvine, University of

296

Radiative polarization of electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new method of calculating the radiative polarization of electrons in homogeneous magnetic fields, using the modified electron propagation function.

Julian Schwinger and Wu-yang Tsai

1974-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Radon in context of natural radiation exposure: the Czech experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......doses from ingestion of water are reasonably avertable...and intervention (remediation of existing exposure...effective dose caused by water containing 1000 Bq l1...radon concentrations in ground water vary from some Becquerel......

J. Hulka

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Low-Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Bobby R. Scott, Ph.D. and Jennifer D. Di Palma Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA Life on earth evolved in a low-level ionizing radiation environment comprised of terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays. Today we all reside in an ionizing radiation environment comprised of both natural background radiation and radiation from human activities (e.g., Chernobyl accident). An evolutionary benefit of the interaction of low-level, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) ionizing radiation with mammalian life forms on earth is adapted protection. Adapted protection involves low-dose/dose-rate, low-LET radiation induced high-fidelity DNA repair in cooperation with normal apoptosis (presumed p53

299

Single electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta elec- tron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

D. M. Asner; R. F. Bradley; L. de Viveiros; P. J. Doe; J. L. Fernandes; M. Fertl; E. C. Finn; J. A. Formaggio; D. Furse; A. M. Jones; J. N. Kofron; B. H. LaRoque; M. Leber; E. L. McBride; M. L. Miller; P. Mohanmurthy; B. Monreal; N. S. Oblath; R. G. H. Robertson; L. J Rosenberg; G. Rybka; D. Rysewyk; M. G. Sternberg; J. R. Tedeschi; T. Thummler; B. A. VanDevender; N. L. Woods

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Turkey vs. human digestion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turkey vs. human digestion Turkey vs. human digestion Name: wallyb Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How is the digestive system of turkeys different from that of humans? Replies: Hmmm.. been a while since I had sophomore biology, so I can't completely answer this one, but I can say a few things. One, since turkeys are birds, and birds as a general rule have not had teeth for several million years at least, the turkey needs a way to mash up its food -- thus, the crop, which is essentially like another stomach: the turkey (and many other birds, for that matter) swallows small stones which serve in lieu of teeth, mashing up food via muscular action in the crop, from whence the "chewed" food moves on into the rest of the digestive tract. As for any other differences, I'll have to leave that to someone else with more ornithological experience...

302

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management Radiation and Chemical Risk Management EVS helps meet the challenge of protecting human health and the environment through the management of risk associated with radiation and chemicals in the environment. Protecting human health, welfare, and the environment in a world affected by energy production and technology is a global challenge. EVS helps to meet this challenge through research and analysis on the management of risk associated with radiation and chemicals in the environment. To improve the management of risk associated with nuclear and chemical materials and wastes at contaminated sites, we develop information and tools that support decision making related to health, safety, environmental, economic, and social-cultural concerns. Nuclear Materials and Waste Disposition

303

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DDE ESTIMATED DOSE FROM CONCEPTION TO DECLARATION: DDE Radiation Safety Officer Signature for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation dose of the occupational dose limit of 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The CPMC Radiation Safety Office will provide education

Jia, Songtao

304

RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · Radiation therapist - a health professional who designs, calculates (plans) and provides the radiation dose and monitors the delivery of radiation therapy, taking into account the protection and safety of patientsRADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE #12;A Career in Radiation Oncology YOUR CHOICE SAVE LIVES

Tobar, Michael

305

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occupational illness to personnel, major damage...acceptable levels. Selection of control measures...or equipment operating correctly in...99 103 to 104 Personnel life safety...and abnormal operating conditions under...radiation risk to personnel, public and...worker radiation training) reduces the......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disable this safety function and...circuits and software. Other required...source in case of radiation monitors. Feedback...from other non-safety systems to prevent...write and check software. The expected...logic systems for safety functions can...levels of prompt radiation hazard. ACS......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Risks from ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... RADON indoors now accounts for nearly half of the average UK population exposure to ionizing radiation ... exposure to ionizing radiation. We believe that the extent of the variation in exposure to radon in the United Kingdom and else-where and its magnitude in relation to exposures from ...

R. H. Clarke; T. R. E. Southwood

1989-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radiation Weighting Factors and High Energy Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generally inadequate for high energy radiation. In order to determine...appropriate wR values in the high energy region, several criteria are...are proposed for neutrons of energy above 100 MeV and for protons above 10 MeV. The wR value for muons is confirmed to be practically......

M. Pelliccioni

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radiative ablation to low-Z matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Eight beams of 0.35-?m laser with pulse duration of about 1.0 ns and energy of 260 J per beam were injected into a cylindrical cavity to generate intense x-ray radiation on the Shengguang II high power laser facility. Plastic foils with a thickness in the range of about 3.045 ?m were attached on the diagnostic hole of the cavity and ablated by the intense x-ray radiation. The radiative energy transport through plastic foils with different thicknesses has been studied experimentally. The burn-through time of the plastic foils has been obtained. For comparison, we also simulated the experimental results with Planckian and non-Planckian x-ray spectrum source, respectively. It is shown that for thick plastic foil the simulation with non-Planckian x-ray spectrum source is in good agreement with the experiment.

Jiamin Yang; Jiatian Sheng; Yaonan Ding; Yunsheng Li; Shaoen Jiang; Tinggui Feng; Zhijian Zheng; Kexu Sun; Wenghai Zhang; Yanli Cui; Jiushen Cheng

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Introduction to nuclear resonant scattering with synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the use of synchrotron radiation has enjoyed increasing interest in applications to topics of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The development was initiated by the pioneering experimental work of Gerdau et al. following the original proposal of Ruby to use synchrotron radiation for the excitation of low energy nuclear resonances. From the early experiments it was clear that synchrotron radiation experiments with nuclear resonances would only succeed if familiar energy resolved measurements were replaced with a new time resolved technique. During the last decade, the authors experienced the refinement of this novel method for obtaining hyperfine parameters. This exciting development-materialized because of more intense synchrotron radiation sources at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), powerful new avalanche photo diode detectors, and improved high energy resolution monochromators. Simultaneously the tools for evaluation of the novel time spectra were created, e.g., Sturhahn and Gerdau developed extensive computer codes based on the theoretical descriptions of Hannon and Trammel. Many beautiful demonstrations of the basic features of the coherent elastic scattering channel using Bragg- and Laue-reflections from single crystals deepened the understanding of nuclear resonant scattering. The concepts leading to the application of synchrotron radiation to elastic and inelastic nuclear resonant scattering are discussed. The resulting new experimental techniques are compared to conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy. A survey of situations that favor experiments with synchrotron radiation is offered.

Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E.E.; Toellner, T.S.; Hession, P.; Hu, M.; Sutter, J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A robotic system to conduct radiation and contamination surveys on nuclear waste transport casks  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of performing, numerous spent fuel cask operations using fully integrated robotic systems is under evaluation. Using existing technology, operational and descriptive software and hardware in the form of robotic end effectors are being designed in conjunction with interfacing cask components. A robotic radiation and contamination survey system has been developed and used on mock-up cask hardware to evaluate the impact of such fully automated operations on cask design features and productivity. Based on experience gained from the survey system, numerous health physics operations can be reliably performed with little human intervention using a fully automated system. Such operations can also significantly reduce time requirements for cask-receiving operations. 7 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

Harrigan, R.W.; Sanders, T.L.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward 10.1126/science.331.6024...radiation, workers at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant wear protective gear...Candidate radiation drugs inch forward. | News | 0 (E)-4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone...

Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

315

Low dose radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform pre-malignant human breast cells Paul Yaswen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Determine whether low dose radiation exerts persistent epigenetic effects that promote malignancy. Background and Significance: Some persistent carcinogenic effects of radiation may not be traceable to specific DNA sequence alterations and may not be linearly related to dose. Through the biochemical initiation of positive feedback loops, ionization-induced events may have heritable non-linear effects on cellular behavior. Inflammatory responses involving the transcription factor NFκB may be subject to such effects. Increased NFκB activity has been strongly linked to carcinogenesis in a number of published in vitro and in vivo studies (reviewed in [1]). Since radiation

316

Space Radiation and Cataracts (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Eleanor Blakely, radiation biologist of the Life Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has been a scientist at Berkeley Lab since 1975. She is studying the effect of radiation on cataracts which concerns not only cancer patients, but also astronauts. As astronauts spend increasingly longer time in space, the effects of cosmic radiation exposure will become an increasingly important health issue- yet there is little human data on these effects. Blakely reviews this emerging field and the contributions made at Berkeley Lab

Blakely, Eleanor

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiation-Absorbed Dose Estimation of 166Ho Microspheres in Liver Radioembolization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate assessment of the three-dimensional 166Ho activity distribution to estimate radiation-absorbed dose distributions in 166Ho-loaded poly (L-lactic acid) microsphere (166Ho-PLLA-MS) liver radioembolization. Methods and Materials MRI, computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission CT (SPECT) experiments were conducted on an anthropomorphic gel phantom with tumor-simulating gel samples and on an excised human tumor-bearing liver, both containing known amounts of 166Ho-PLLA-MS. Three-dimensional radiation-absorbed dose distributions were estimated at the voxel level by convolving the 166Ho activity distribution, derived from quantitative MRI data, with a 166Ho dose point-kernel generated by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code) and from Medical Internal Radiation Dose Pamphlet 17. MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions were qualitatively compared with CT and autoradiography images and quantitatively compared with SPECT-based dose distributions. Both MRI- and SPECT-based activity estimations were validated against dose calibrator measurements. Results Evaluation on an anthropomorphic phantom showed that MRI enables accurate assessment of local 166Ho-PLLA-MS mass and activity distributions, as supported by a regression coefficient of 1.05 and a correlation coefficient of 0.99, relating local MRI-based mass and activity calculations to reference values obtained with a dose calibrator. Estimated MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions of 166Ho-PLLA-MS in an exvivo human liver visually showed high correspondence to SPECT-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions. Quantitative analysis revealed that the differences in local and total amounts of 166Ho-PLLA-MS estimated by MRI, SPECT, and the dose calibrator were within 10%. Excellent agreement was observed between MRI- and SPECT-based dosevolume histograms. Conclusions Quantitative MRI was demonstrated to provide accurate three-dimensional 166Ho-PLLA-MS activity distributions, enabling localized intrahepatic radiation-absorbed dose estimation by convolution with a 166Ho dose point-kernel for liver radioembolization treatment optimization and evaluation.

Peter R. Seevinck; Gerrit H. van de Maat; Tim C. de Wit; Maarten A.D. Vente; Johannes F.W. Nijsen; Chris J.G. Bakker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN ULTRARELATIVISTIC OUTFLOWS  

SciTech Connect

Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for the equation of radiative transfer in ultrarelativistic opaque jets. The solution describes the initial trapping of radiation, its adiabatic cooling, and the transition to transparency. Two opposite regimes are examined. (1) Matter-dominated outflow. Surprisingly, radiation develops enormous anisotropy in the fluid frame before decoupling from the fluid. The radiation is strongly polarized. (2) Radiation-dominated outflow. The transfer occurs as if radiation propagated in vacuum, preserving the angular distribution and the blackbody shape of the spectrum. The escaping radiation has a blackbody spectrum if (and only if) the outflow energy is dominated by radiation up to the photospheric radius.

Beloborodov, Andrei M., E-mail: amb@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

320

Radiation prevents much cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence reviewed here supports the concept that chronic exposure to ionising radiation can dramatically decrease cancer incidence and mortality. This evidence includes an inverse relationship between radiation levels and cancer induction and/or mortality in: over 200 million people in the USA; 200 million people in India; 10,000 residents of Taipei who live in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; high radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; almost 300,000 homes with radon in the USA; non-smokers in high radon areas of Saxony, Germany.

T.D. Luckey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Biophysics and synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book, contains contributions to the conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation held in July 1986 at Frascati. It is devoted to advances in the resolution of biological molecule structure obtainable through synchroton radiation studies. The use of synchroton radiation has firmly established x-ray spectroscopy of biological molecules. More detailed knowledge on the local structure of active sites of metalloproteins, as well as a number of studies on the interaction of metal ions with other important biological macromolecular systems are presented. This new method for protein structure analysis is a major improvement for the rapidly expanding field of protein engineering.

Bianconi, A.; Castellano, C.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Quantum vacuum radiation in optical glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent experimental claim of the detection of analogue Hawking radiation in an optical system [PRL 105 (2010) 203901] has led to some controversy [PRL 107 (2011) 149401, 149402]. While this experiment strongly suggests some form of particle creation from the quantum vacuum (and hence it is per se very interesting), it is also true that it seems difficult to completely explain all features of the observations by adopting the perspective of a Hawking-like mechanism for the radiation. For instance, the observed photons are emitted parallel to the optical horizon, and the relevant optical horizon is itself defined in an unusual manner by combining group and phase velocities. This raises the question: Is this really Hawking radiation, or some other form of quantum vacuum radiation? Naive estimates of the amount of quantum vacuum radiation generated due to the rapidly changing refractive index --- sometimes called the dynamical Casimir effect --- are not encouraging. However we feel that naive estimates could be misleading depending on the quantitative magnitude of two specific physical effects: "pulse steepening" and "pulse cresting". Plausible bounds on the maximum size of these two effects results in estimates much closer to the experimental observations, and we argue that the dynamical Casimir effect is now worth additional investigation.

Stefano Liberati; Angus Prain; Matt Visser

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Time Users Guide First Time Users Guide The following is a collection of useful facts that First Time Users of NSRL should familiarize themselves with. If you have any questions, contact the NSRL Liaison Physicist (631-344-3072 or 631-344-5830). You MUST have a dry run of your experiment before conducting your first NSRL run. When planning an exposure the time you need for each sample exposure should include time to change samples. If RHIC is running, the sample changing time is approximately 7 minutes. If RHIC is not running, time to change samples is only about 4 minutes. The size of the radiation field that can uniformly expose a set of samples can be as large as 20 x 20 cm2 for most ions and energies. By special request, the NSRL beam can operate in Large Beam mode with a 60 x 60 cm2 usable beam size.

327

Development of Radiation Hard Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trackers of the present LHC experiments mainly use silicon pixel detectors in the innermost regions close to the interaction point, while silicon micro-strip detectors are used at larger radii. The next phases of the LHC will present new challenges for the operation of the tracking detectors in terms of radiation levels and data rates. For ATLAS, CMS and LHCb radiation levels will amount to levels of the order of hundreds of Mrad and 10^16 NIEL (1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm^2) in the innermost layers. Higher granularity and a reduction in material budget especially for the layers close to the IP are under development to further improve the impact parameter resolution. The choice of sensors for the trackers will be driven by the need to meet these requirements. A short overview on the status of the R&D on silicon sensors suitable for this challenging environment will be given, covering the presently used but also newly emerging technologies such as CMOS based silicon sensors. The capabilities of tec...

Riedler, P; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Experiment Hazard Class 10.2 - UV Light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Ultraviolet Light 2 - Ultraviolet Light Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of ultraviolet radiation generating equipment.Ultraviolet light (UV) is non-ionizing radiation in the 180 to 400-nanometer wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Ultraviolet light poses hazards: Eyes hazards - inflammation, cataracts, retinal damage Skin hazards - sunburn, accelerate wrinkling, increased risk of skin cancer Invisible Possible ozone generation Experiment Category Experiments involving only experiment hazard class 10.2 qualify for medium risk. The addition of other hazard classes may require the experiment to be categorized as high risk and undergo additional reviews. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Shield or contain UV as close to the source as

329

How Do We Know that Human Activities Have Influenced Global Climate?  

SciTech Connect

Human activities have significantly altered not only the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere, but also the climate system. Human influences have led to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases, decreases in stratospheric ozone, and changes in the atmospheric burdens of sulfate and soot aerosols. All of these atmospheric constituents interact with incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Human-induced changes in the concentrations of these constituents modify the natural radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere, and therefore perturb climate. Quantifying the size of the human effect on climate is a difficult statistical problem. 'Fingerprint' methods are typically used for this purpose. These methods involve rigorous statistical comparisons of modeled and observed climate change patterns. Fingerprinting assumes that each individual influence on climate has a unique signature in climate records. The climate fingerprints in response to different forcing factors are typically estimated with computer models, which can be used to perform the controlled experiments that we cannot conduct in the real world. One criticism of the findings of previous scientific assessments is that they have relied heavily on fingerprint studies involving changes in near-surface temperature. Recent fingerprint work, however, has considered a variety of other climate variables, such as ocean heat content, stratospheric temperatures, Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent, sea level pressure, atmospheric water vapor, and the height of the tropopause. These studies illustrate that a human-induced climate change signal is identifiable in many different variables and geographic regions, and that the climate system is telling us an internally- and physically-consistent story.

Santer, Benjamin D.

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About this Project About this Project Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation Damage Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Low-LET Bystander Effects in Cells In Vitro Are Significantly Less Than Published For High-LET Radiation Blakely, E.A., Thompson, A.C., Chang, P., Schwarz, R.I., Bjornstad, K., Rosen, C., Wisnewski, C., and Mocherla, D. 2005 Workshop: X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., Sudar, D., Romano, R., and Parvin, B. 2003 Workshop: 12.5 keV X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., and Sudar, D. 2001 Workshop:

331

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

332

Radiation from accelerated branes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

Mohab Abou-Zeid and Miguel S. Costa

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

Radiation Induced Mammary Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Induced Mammary Cancer R.L. Ullrich * R.J. Preston # * Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77550 # Biology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A Over the last......

R.L. Ullrich; R.J. Preston

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

336

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

337

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

338

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? Even low doses (0.1 Gy) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. The first-known oxidative lesion repaired only by nucleotide excision repair found in normal cells is cyclo-dA. This lesion is found in normal cells and thought to be a byproduct of oxidative metabolism. When this lesion occurs, it stimulates repair. If repair is stimulated by low dose radiation, there are some implications for human health. For example, do some individuals exhibit a greater, lower, or no stimulation to certain DNA lesions? If there are population polymorphism that influence DNA repair, then it would be possible to use our assay for screening individuals for repair sensitivity.

339

Human Nature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the human enhancement debate, both parties advocate a partial truth. On the one hand, the bioconservatives argue that, if transhumanism is unleashed without some kind of bioethical...have (A+) is itself a prod...

Prof.; Dr. Hub Zwart

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon ranksum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ? P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ? P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

342

Human Enhancement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Categorizing different human enhancements into personal, social, or species enhancements, as well as considering whether a particular enhancement technique generates asymmetric or network benefits, brings clarity to discussions about the ethical issues pertaining to any individual technique. The four aspects of principlism can help to assess the ethical implications of different human enhancements, revealing complexities in their aspirational claims for personally directed self-development. At a practical level, this article examines important questions about real expectations, scientific hubris, and hype.

P. Moore

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Sn Plasma Focus Discharge for EUV Radiation Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small plasma focus device was constructed for the EUV radiation experiment. The storage energy of capacitor bank is 3.4 kj and the maximum discharge current is 140 kA. Although the device was not well optimized for strong pinch EUV radiation was observed from the focus plasma. The plasma dynamics was affected by electrode material and the use of Sn electrode was proved to be effective for producing Sn plasma.

Keiichi Takasugi; Takeshi Umeda; Ena Kiuchi; Takuya Hayashi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electron Beam Diagnostics using Coherent Cherenkov Radiation in Aerogel  

SciTech Connect

The use of coherent Cherenkov radiation as a diagnostic tool for longitudinal distribution of an electron beam is studied in this paper. Coherent Cherenkov radiation is produced in an aerogel with an index of refraction close to unity. An aerogel spectral properties are experimentally studied and analyzed. This method will be employed for the helical IFEL bunching experiment at Neptune linear accelerator facility at UCLA.

Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B. [UCLA Physics Dept., Los Angeles, CA 90066 (United States); Ruelas, M. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Marina Del Ray, CA 90292 (United States)

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

346

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

347

Oak Ridge Integrated Center for Radiation Materials Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORIC Home ORIC Home About ORIC Contacts Specialists Capabilities Irradiation Campaigns Nuclear Fuels Radiation Effects and Defect Modeling Structural Materials Dual Purpose Radiological Characterization Equipment Working with Us Related Links HFIR MSTD NSTD NNFD Comments Welcome to Oak Ridge Integrated Center for Radiation Materials Science & Technology The Oak Ridge National Laboratory ranks among the founding laboratories for the scientific field of radiation materials science. Since the creation of the laboratory, we have maintained strong ties to both the technology and scientific underpinning of nuclear materials research as evidenced by the experience and capabilities across our research divisions. The capabilities at ORNL enjoys include the highest neutron flux nuclear

348

Proteasome Structures Affected by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effect of ionizing radiation on 26S but...radiation doses, and immediately...the dose range 1 to 20 Gy...ionizing radiation induced a...38), ionizing radiation (39...over a wide range of radiation doses and further...

Milena Pervan; Keisuke S. Iwamoto; and William H. McBride

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

148 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 18, NO. 1, JANUARY 1, 2006 Radiation Resistance of Single-Frequency 1310-nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments, and for space and medical applications. Typical radiation doses in medical applications range to ionizing radiation using 200-MeV/c proton beams are reported. Twelve powered lasers survived a total radiation dose of up to 22.3 Mrad. One of the two not-powered lasers survived a total dose of 1.5 Mrad

Ye, Jingbo

350

Radiation Safety Analysis for FELL Addition E. C. Schreiber, R. S. Canon, P. G. O'Shea, H. R. Weller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems. We also present our estimations for the types and amounts of shielding re­ quired to bring dose of the North Carolina Regulations for Protection Against Radiation defines the maximum dose rate in public outside the building will not experience significant radiation levels. Radiation dose distributions

Saskatchewan, University of

351

Phoenix Leader Education Program (Hiroshima Initiative) for Renaissance from Radiation Disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phoenix Leader Education Program (Hiroshima Initiative) for Renaissance from Radiation Disaster The 3rd International Symposium "Nature, Human being, and Radiation"was held at International Conference Center Hiroshima on February 15-16, 2014. With guest speakers from Japan and abroad, participation

Ishii, Hitoshi

352

Radiation Research Department Paper: www.risoe.dk/rispubl/art/2007_333.pdf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and released to the environment by human nuclear activity, including nuclear weapons testing, operation of Radionuclides in Environmental, Biological and Nuclear Waste Samples Xiaolin Hou and Per Roos Radiation Research in Environmental, Biological and Nuclear Waste Samples Xiaolin Hou* Per Roos Radiation Research Department, Risø

353

Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

354

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

NASA/TM--2005213688 Revolutionary Concepts of Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA/TM--2005�213688 Revolutionary Concepts of Radiation Shielding for Human Exploration of Space J, Alabama R.M. Winglee University of Washington, Seattle, Washington March 2005 #12;The NASA STI Program Office...in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics

Rathbun, Julie A.

356

A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RANA 99-06 A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass B.J. van der Linden -- R, The Netherlands e-mail: linden@win.tue.nl 15th May 2000 #12;Abstract In the production of glass, temperature plays Conclusion 25 2 #12;Chapter 1 Introduction The production of glass belongs to the oldest forms of human

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

357

A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RANA 99­06 A new method for solving radiative heat problems in glass B.J. van der Linden --- R, The Netherlands e­mail: linden@win.tue.nl 15th May 2000 #12; Abstract In the production of glass, temperature Conclusion 25 2 #12; Chapter 1 Introduction The production of glass belongs to the oldest forms of human

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

358

Human Resource Management: Employee Compensation Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Resource Management: Employee Compensation Guide Risk Management *Extension Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service; and Extension Program Specialist III.... ?Employee Compensation and Job Satisfaction on Dairy Farms in the Northeast.? April 1999. Cornell University, RB99-02. Kansas Department of Human Resources. Kansas Wage Survey, 1996 Edition. Rosenberg, Howard. ?Labor Management Decisions.? University...

Fogleman, Sarah L.; McCorkle, Dean

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Cognitive Neuroscience of Human Memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cognitive Neuroscience of Human Memory Since H.M. Larry R. Squire1,2,3,4 and John T. Wixted4 1 about the organization of memory that inspired decades of experi- mental work. Since H.M., the study of human memory and its disorders has continued to yield new insights and to improve understanding

Squire, Larry R.

360

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Experiment Hazard Class 8.3 - X-Ray Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 - X-Ray Generators 3 - X-Ray Generators Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of X-Ray Generators (other than the APS storage ring). As specified in LMS-PROC-109 a Radiation Generating Device (RGD) must be registered with the Argonne RGD Safety Officer using the ANL-847 form. The RGD will be assigned an inventory number, hazard class, RWP requirement, and inspection and survey frequencies. Experiment Category Experiments the Experiment Hazard Class are always categorized as High Risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - As determined in LMS-PROC-109. Samples chambers and all beam paths are fully enclosed by barriers. Class 2 and higher RGDs require an interlock to fail-safe beam shutter/beam stop or radiation

362

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

363

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Radiation Minimum Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frost resulting from cooling of vegetation by nocturnal radiation is a serious agricultural problem. Because of the number of variables involved attacks on this problem from a purely theoretical point of view have met with only moderate success. It seems logical to suppose that an instrument might be devised which would speed up the natural radiation processes and enable an observer to obtain in a few hours a measure of the cooling which occurs naturally over a period of 12 to 14 hr. Such an instrument could serve as a frost warning device. This paper describes the construction of a radiation device and presents experimental evidence to show that it can be used as a predictor of freezing temperatures at vegetation level.

Francis K. Davis Jr.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Audible radiation monitor  

SciTech Connect

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity  

SciTech Connect

The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9, influence cataract development and thus radiosensitivity. These observations have direct applicability to various human populations including accidentally exposed individuals, interventional medical workers, astronauts and nuclear plant workers.

Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University] [Columbia University

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Tunable terahertz radiation source  

SciTech Connect

Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y rays, Authors: K. Rithidech1, E.B. Whorton2, M. Tungjai1, E. Ar-Bab1, S.R. Simon1, M. Tawde3 and C.W. Anderson3. Institutions: 1Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, NY 11794-8691, USA, 2University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77550-1047,3Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000. Information on potential health hazards of radiation at doses below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection (less than or equal to 10 cGy) is currently lacking. It is therefore important to characterize early and subsequent in vivo biological response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation because such data should provide information that can help determine whether radiation at this dose level

371

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Authors: Howard L. Liber1 and Jeffrey L. Schwartz2. Institutions: 1Colorado State University and 2University of Washington. Knowledge of the signal and target through which radiation induces genomic instability, which we propose to investigate herein, will allow us to model effects at low doses. Such knowledge will aid in understanding variations in the induction of this genomic instability, both among cells and among individuals. This information could also lead to more sensitive measures of instability that could yield accurate measures of instability induction at low doses. We have developed an in-vitro cell model, in which radiation-induced chromosome instability develops in a two-stage process.

372

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Marianne B. Sowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marianne B. Sowa Marianne B. Sowa PNNL - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Funded Projects A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Morphological Changes in a 3D Mammary Model Following Exposure to Low Dose, Low-LET Radiation Opresko, L.K., Chrisler, W., Emory, K., Arthurs, B., and Sowa, M.B. 2005 Workshops: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Morgan, W.F. and Sowa, M.B. Publications Perrine, K.A., Lamarche, B.L., Hopkins, D.F., Budge, S.E., Opresko, L.K., Wiley, H.S., and Sowa, M.B. (2007). High speed method for in situ

373

Environmental Radiation Effects: A Need to Question Old Paradigms  

SciTech Connect

A historical perspective is given of the current paradigm that does not explicitly protect the environment from radiation, but instead, relies on the concept that if dose limits are set to protect humans then the environment is automatically protected as well. We summarize recent international questioning of this paradigm and briefly present three different frameworks for protecting biota that are being considered by the U.S. DOE, the Canadian government and the International Commission on Radiological Protection. We emphasize that an enhanced collaboration is required between what has traditionally been separated disciplines of radiation biology and radiation ecology if we are going to properly address the current environmental radiation problems. We then summarize results generated from an EMSP grant that allowed us to develop a Low Dose Irradiation Facility that specifically addresses effects of low-level, chronic irradiation on multiple levels of biological organization.

Hinton, T.G.; Bedford, J.; Ulsh, B.; Whicker, F. Ward

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

Biological Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation Wenshu Chen Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Abstract The major hypothesis in this project is that low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation stimulates an adaptive response that protects cells from neoplastic transformation involving modulation of paracrine factors (e.g., cytokines), cell survival/death signaling pathways, and reprogramming of the epigenome. To test this hypothesis, a validated, sensitive in vitro transformation model and a media transfer method were used to study the mechanisms of low-LET gamma radiation activated natural protection (ANP) against chemical carcinogen-induced bronchial cell transformation. Immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell

375

DNA damage: risk comparisons of low radiation vis-a-vis dietary micronutrient deficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micronutrients are the substances in minute amounts that are essential for human life. This study discusses laboratory and epidemiological evidence that dietary micronutrient deficiencies cause DNA damage. DNA damage comparisons are made between dietary micronutrient deficiencies and low dose radiation. Laboratory studies show that micronutrient deficiencies can cause greater DNA damage than radiation doses significantly above background environmental levels. Previous concerns that have been expressed about comparing endogenous DNA damages to radiation-induced DNA damages are discussed, in particular, the role of radiation clusters. It is shown that cluster damage does not preclude making comparisons of dietary micronutrient deficiencies vis-a-vis radiation, especially at background environmental levels. Such damage comparisons provide the public with a means of placing radiation risk in perspective by comparing a readily appreciated, everyday concept (dietary deficiencies) with that of radiation.

Daniel P. Hayes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic canada experience Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- the first continuous measuring... experiment on humanity's life- support system. Pre-industrial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were... of the programme in 2001, a...

377

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Why This Project This research will be to investigate the condition known as genomic instability. This can be defined as a state in which genetic alterations, including chromosome aberrations and gene mutations, occur at rates that are much higher than normal. In fact, genomic instability is what allows a normal cell to accumulate the multiple genetic alterations that are required to convert it into a cancer cell. The chromosomes of human cells have structures at their ends called telomeres. Telomeres normally function to prevent chromosomes from fusing together end-to-end. An important

378

Human Resources Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Protection Services...............................................................51 Radiation and Succession Planning.................................24 Health, Wellness and Family Pandemic and H1N1 Planning..........................................................42 Environmental Health

Sun, Yu

379

Origin of Cosmic Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give a brief overview of cosmic ray physics, highlighting some key questions and how they will be addressed by new experiments.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Configuration Options: Vortex detector, Si(111) Analyzer CrystalPhoto Multiplier Tube, Si(111) Data Collection Mode: Transmission Reflection Have you had previous experience...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

RADIATION ALERT User Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not contaminate the Inspector by touching it to radioactive surfaces or materials. If contamination is suspected Environmental Area Monitoring 16 Checking for Surface Contamination 16 5 Maintenance 17 Calibration 17, and x-ray radiation. Its applications include: · Detecting and measuring surface contamination

Haller, Gary L.

382

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Solar energy: Radiation nation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Australia receives more solar radiation per square metre, on average, than any other continent. Although turning this ... to make use of its heat. We spoke to Australian proponents of two very different solar-thermal systems, both rather confusingly known as ...

Carina Dennis

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect

Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos Soares

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

386

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

388

Assessing exposure to radiation  

SciTech Connect

Since the founding of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been world leaders in evaluating the risks associated with radiation. Ultrasensitive tools allow us not only to measure radionuclides present in the body but also to reconstruct the radiation dose from past nuclear events and to project the levels of radiation that will still be present in the body for 50 years after the initial intake. A variety of laboratory procedures, including some developed here, give us detailed information on the effects of radiation at the cellular level. Even today, we are re-evaluating the neutron dose resulting from the bombing at Hiroshima. Our dose reconstruction and projection capabilities have also been applied to studies of Nagasaki, Chernobyl, the Mayak industrial complex in the former Soviet Union, the Nevada Test Site, Bikini Atoll, and other sites. We are evaluating the information being collected on individuals currently working with radioactive material at Livermore and elsewhere as well as previously collected data on workers that extends back to the Manhattan Project.

Walter, K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Ray tracing of Jovian kilometric radiation  

SciTech Connect

Results of computer ray tracing of Jovian kilometric from 56.2 kHz to 1 MHz in a model Jovian magnetosphere with an Io torus are presented. Ray tracing calculations indicate that the Io torus presents a propagation barrier to the radiation and that the Jovian kilometric radiation must be generated in the L-O mode from a source near Jupiter on field lines passing through the Io torus. One effect of the Io torus is to refract the rays away from the magnetic equator forming a shadow zone at radial distances beyond the torus. In general, at radial distances greater than 10 Jovian radii, as the wave frequency increases (>200 kHz) so does the magnetic latitude of the shadow zone. These and other features of the ray tracing calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the observations from the plasma wave receiver and planetary radio astronomy experiment on board both Voyager 1 and 2.

Green, J.L.; Gurnett, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

COR Summary of Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE Effective January 1, 2012 CORs who are applying for certification must demonstrate past contracting, acquisition, procurement, program/project management, and general business experience. This experience is based on a set of competencies. Some of the competencies are listed below to use as a reference when you are documenting your previous experience. Use this template to document your experience. Experience should be supported by a written confirmation from the cognizant Contracting Officer/Contract Specialist showing the contract number, title and date(s) to which the experience applied. Once you have completed this document, please forward it and its supporting statement(s) to your Site Acquisition Career Manager (SACM) as part of your application for COR certification.

391

ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of external surfaces by naturally occurring atomic oxygen. CCD detectors are particularly vulnerable to damage damage. A comprehensive discussion of the types of radiation damage known to occur in CCDs is beyond1 ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment Michael R. Jones Space Telescope Science

Sirianni, Marco

392

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

393

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports September 24, 2013 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report...

394

Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Radiation Exposure Welcome The Occupational Radiation Exposure Information page on this web page is intended to provide the latest available information on radiation exposure to...

395

Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers. Final report: [Draft  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study (NSWS) was designed to determine whether there is an excess risk of leukemia or other cancers associated with exposure to low levels of gamma radiation. The study compares the mortality experience of shipyard workers who qualified to work in radiation areas to the mortality of similar workers who hold the same types of jobs but who are not authorized to work in radiation areas. The population consists of workers from six government and two private shipyards.

Matanoski, G.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Functional genomics as a window on radiation stress signaling Sally A Amundson*,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional genomics as a window on radiation stress signaling Sally A Amundson*,1 , Michael Bittner 20892, USA; 2 National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD before the completion of the human genome draft sequence, a number of techniques for genomic expression

397

Acceleration and Classical Electromagnetic Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classical radiation from an accelerated charge is reviewed along with the reciprocal topic of accelerated observers detecting radiation from a static charge. This review commemerates Bahram Mashhoon's 60th birthday.

E. N. Glass

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

Mathematical Problems of Radiative Equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in turn with the cases of purely absorbing and grey material in local radiative equilibrium (Schwarzschild-Milne model) and that of monochromatic radiative equilibrium with scattering but zero emissivity (Schuster ...

1935-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist) senior subject matter expert for health physics/radiation safety at the sites. You will...

400

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff - 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV Abstract Title: TGF-β Protects Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Radiation-Induced Centrosome Amplification Authors: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Bahram Parvin, Anna C. Erickson and Rishi Gupta Institutions: Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Life Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California In recent studies we have shown that ionizing radiation (IR), a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland, compromises human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) polarity and multicellular organization in a manner characteristic of neoplastic progression through a heritable, non-mutational mechanism (1). Thus, when all cells are irradiated with a significant dose (2 Gy), the daughters of irradiated cells lose their

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Measurements of Dust Oscillations with Laser Heterodyne Receiver of Scattered Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We performed the experiments on measurement of vibration amplitudes for microparticles in gas and water with laser heterodyne receiver of scattered radiation. The measured vibration amplitude values are about 20 nm.

Serozhkin, Yuriy; Venger, Yevgen [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 41 Nauky Prospect, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

Retinal Degeneration and Ionizing Radiation Hypersensitivity in a Mouse Model for Cockayne Syndrome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitive to a single dose of ionizing radiation at doses up to 10 Gy. In marked...least within the age range investigated, the...photoreceptor cells for ionizing radiation. This finding underscores...experiment (cumulative dose, 35 kJ/m2). The...

Theo G. M. F. Gorgels; Ingrid van der Pluijm; Renata M. C. Brandt; George A. Garinis; Harry van Steeg; Gerard van den Aardweg; Gerard H. Jansen; Jan M. Ruijter; Arthur A. B. Bergen; Dirk van Norren; Jan H. J. Hoeijmakers; Gijsbertus T. J. van der Horst

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

403

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments S. Bottone and S. Moore Mission Research Corporation Santa Barbara, California Introduction Quality Measurement Experiments (QME) are a special class of Value-Added Products (VAP). QMEs add value to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program datastreams by providing for continuous assessment of the quality of incoming data based on internal consistency checks, comparisons between independent similar measurements, or comparisons between measurements and modeled results. Like any datastream, QME datastreams need to be checked for data quality. For each QME, we analyze a representative sample of files from the ARM data archive to determine 'typical' values of the QME variables. We then design outlier tests, specific to each variable, to be applied to

404

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued) ... Examines nuclear instrumentation available from several major U.S. manufacturers. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DOE Radiation Records Contacts List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

406

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

408

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

Ingersoll, D.T. (comp.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Ingersoll, J.K. (comp.) (Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing ...

H. F. Kraybill; D. C. Brunton

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Radiative proton-antiproton annihilation to a lepton pair  

SciTech Connect

The annihilation of proton and antiproton to an electron-positron pair, including radiative corrections due to the emission of virtual and real photons is considered. The results are generalized to leading and next-to leading approximations. The relevant distributions are derived and numerical applications are given in the kinematical range accessible to the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility.

Ahmadov, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Bytev, V. V.; Kuraev, E. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. [CEA, IRFU, SPhN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France, and CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, UMR 8608, 91405 Orsay (France)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A mesoscopic description of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a formulation of the nanoscale radiative heat transfer (RHT) using concepts of mesoscopic physics. We introduce the analog of the Sharvin conductance using the quantum of thermal conductance. The formalism provides a convenient framework to analyse the physics of RHT at the nanoscale. Finally, we propose a RHT experiment in the regime of quantized conductance.

Svend-Age Biehs; Emmanuel Rousseau; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

417

A comparison of approximate models for radiation in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Approximate equations for radiative heat transfer equations coupled to an equation for the temperature are stated and a comparative numerical study of the different approximations is given. The approximation methods considered here range from moment methods to simplified PN-approximations. Numerical experiments and comparisons in different space dimensions and for various physical situations are presented.

M. Frank; M. Seaid; A. Klar; R. Pinnau; G. Thommes; J. Janicka

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The contribution of collision cascades to sputtering and radiation damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Experiments within nuclear reactors are difficult...researchers turned to particle accelerators for better-controlled...struck by a particle of nuclear radiation and initiates...beam of ions from an accelerator with 10100 kV applied...attempts to cross into the vacuum as sputtered atoms...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Human Resources Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indicators SECTION 3. RADIATION PROTECTION SERVICE a) Ionizing Radiation b) Non-Ionizing Radiation c PLANNING PROGRAMS a) Mentoring Programs b) Succession Planning c) Leadership Programs at OISE/UT and School&S Training b) Radiation Training c) Laser Safety Training d) Biosafety Training e) Environmental Training

Sun, Yu

420

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009  

SciTech Connect

A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Radiation Chemistry of Advanced TALSPEAK Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of initial experiments designed to understand the radiation chemistry of an Advanced TALSPEAK process for separating trivalent lanthanides form the actinides. Biphasic aerated samples were irradiated and then analyzed for post-irradiation constituent concentrations and solvent extraction distribution ratios. The effects of irradiation on the TALSPEAK and Advanced TALSPEAK solvents were similar, with very little degradation of the organic phase extractant. Decomposition products were detected, with a major product in common for both solvents. This product may be responsible for the slight increase in distribution ratios for Eu and Am with absorbed dose, however; separation factors were not greatly affected.

Mincher, Bruce; Peterman, Dean; Mcdowell, Rocklan; Olson, Lonnie; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

Performance of aerogel as Cherenkov radiator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerogel with index of refraction around 1.03 has been studied as Cherenkov radiator in a test at CERN PS using a ?? and a mixed ?+/p beam of momenta between 6 and 10GeV/c. The Cherenkov photons were detected by means of four large HPD tubes designed and constructed at CERN. Results on the photoelectron yield, the Cherenkov angle and its resolution, and the ?/p separation are obtained. The performances measured demonstrate that a RICH with aerogel is a viable detector for experiments with high multiplicity of particles in the final state.

T Bellunato; M Calvi; C Matteuzzi; M Musy; P Negri; A Braem; E Chesi; C Hansen; D Liko; C Joram; N Neufeld; J Sguinot; P Weilhammer; A.R Buzykaev; E.A Kravchenko; A.P Onuchin; A.F Danilyuk; S Easo; S Wotton; S Jolly

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electroweak Radiative Corrections to Muon Capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electroweak radiative corrections to muon capture on nuclei are computed and found to be sizable. They enhance the capture rates for hydrogen and helium by 2.8% and 3.0% respectively. As a result, the value of the induced pseudoscalar coupling, g_P^exp, extracted from a recent hydrogen 1S singlet capture experiment is increased by about 21% to g_P^exp = 7.3 +/- 1.2 and brought into good agreement with the prediction of chiral perturbation theory, g_P^theory=8.2 +/- 0.2. Implications for helium capture rate predictions are also discussed.

A. Czarnecki; W. J. Marciano; A. Sirlin

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measurements of Relative K Radiative Decay Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relative radiative decay rates were measured for K-shell vacancies for elements between Z=62and92 with a high-resolution Ge(Li) spectrometer. The ratios ?2?1, ?1??1, and ?2??1 (Siegbahn notation) were determined, with ?2?1 significantly higher (4-14%) than those reported by Beckman but in excellent agreement with recent Hartree-Slater calculations of Scofield. The ratios ?1??1 and ?2??1 do not agree with either Beckman's experiment or Scofield's calculations.

P. J. Ebert and V. W. Slivinsky

1969-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

426

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

429

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Aharonov-Bohm radiation  

SciTech Connect

A solenoid oscillating in vacuum will pair produce charged particles due to the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interaction. We calculate the radiation pattern and power emitted for charged scalar particles. We extend the solenoid analysis to cosmic strings and find enhanced radiation from cusps and kinks on loops. We argue by analogy with the electromagnetic AB interaction that cosmic strings should emit photons due to the gravitational AB interaction of fields in the conical spacetime of a cosmic string. We calculate the emission from a kink and find that it is of similar order as emission from a cusp, but kinks are vastly more numerous than cusps and may provide a more interesting observational signature.

Jones-Smith, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Vachaspati, Tanmay [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Performance andPerformance and Operational Experience ofOperational Experience of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CNGS) Introduction ( ) long base-line appearance experiment: · Produce muon neutrino beam at CERN, shielding, fluids, etc... ­ Intervention on equipment `impossible' · Remote handling by overhead crane · Replace broken equipment, no repair · Human intervention only after long `cooling time' ­ Design

McDonald, Kirk

432

Coherence in Spontaneous Radiation Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering a radiating gas as a single quantum-mechanical system, energy levels corresponding to certain correlations between individual molecules are described. Spontaneous emission of radiation in a transition between two such levels leads to the emission of coherent radiation. The discussion is limited first to a gas of dimension small compared with a wavelength. Spontaneous radiation rates and natural line breadths are calculated. For a gas of large extent the effect of photon recoil momentum on coherence is calculated. The effect of a radiation pulse in exciting "super-radiant" states is discussed. The angular correlation between successive photons spontaneously emitted by a gas initially in thermal equilibrium is calculated.

R. H. Dicke

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation  

SciTech Connect

Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Cancer incidence in areas with elevated levels of natural radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been reported that on reaching a certain level of cell damage the production of repair enzymes is triggered which decreases the chromosome aberrations. If this happens, prolonged exposure to high levels of natural radiation in areas with elevated levels of background radiation could decrease the frequency of chromosome aberrations. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that there is an increased risk of cancer in healthy individuals with high levels of chromosomal aberrations. Studies performed in Nordic countries as well as Italy, showed that increased levels of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes can be used to predict cancer risk in humans. One may conclude that a dose of ionising radiation sufficient to produce a certain level of cell damage increases production of antioxidants and repair enzymes that decrease either the frequency of chromosome aberrations or the cancer risk. People in some areas of Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, receive an annual radiation dose from background radiation that is more than five times higher than the 20 mSv. Yr-1 that is permitted for radiation workers. Inhabitants of Ramsar have lived for many generations in these high background areas. If an annual radiation dose of a few hundred mSv is detrimental to health, causing genetic abnormalities or an increased risk of cancer, it should be evident in these people. The absorbed dose rate in some high background radiation areas of Ramsar is approximately 55-200 times higher than that of the average global dose rate. It has been reported that 3??8% of all cancers are caused by current levels of ionising radiation. If this estimation were true, all the inhabitants of such an area with extraordinary elevated levels of natural radiation would have died of cancer. Our cytogenetic studies show no significant differences between people in the high background area compared to people in normal background areas. As there was no increased level of chromosome aberrations, it may be predicted that the cancer incidence is not higher than in the neighbouring areas with a normal background radiation level. Although there is not yet solid epidemiological information, most local physicians in Ramsar report anecdotally that there is no increase in the incidence rates of cancer or leukemia in their area. There are no data to indicate a significant increase of cancer incidence in other high background radiation areas (HBRAs). Furthermore, several studies show a significant decrease of cancer death rates in areas with high backgrounds. It can be concluded that prolonged exposure to high levels of natural radiation possibly triggers processes such as the production of antioxidants and repair enzymes, which decreases the frequency of chromosome aberrations and the cancer incidence rate.

S.M.J. Mortazavi; M. Ghiassi-Nejad; P.A. Karam; T. Ikushima; A. Niroomand-Rad; J.R. Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Airborne Remote Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the airborne data collected during the 2002 and 2003 Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). These data include gamma radiation observations, multi- and hyperspectral optical imaging, optical altimetry, and passive and active ...

Don Cline; Simon Yueh; Bruce Chapman; Boba Stankov; Al Gasiewski; Dallas Masters; Kelly Elder; Richard Kelly; Thomas H. Painter; Steve Miller; Steve Katzberg; Larry Mahrt

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Los Angeles Physics Teachers Alliance Group (LAPTAG) Plasma Physics Experiments 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this is a fiber optic based spectrometer so the plasma experiments can be expanded to study line radiation source and a turbo pump with controller) were purchased inexpensively from a financially unsuccessful

Carter, Troy

437

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas tar...

DiGiovine, B; Holt, R J; Rehm, K E; Raut, R; Robinson, A; Sonnenschein, A; Rusev, G; Tonchev, A P; Ugalde, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Anisotropic radiation elds: causality and quantum statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation transport 5 2.1 Radiation transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Closures The transport of radiation through a medium is described by the radiation transport equation for the radiative is used to describe anisotropic radiation. Because the two moment equations do not form a closed set

Honingh, Aline

440

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earths surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY. A & M COLLEGE, CAMPUS I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 469 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE... of seven years experiments with fertilizers on cotton at Troup, Nacogdoches, Angleton, College Station, Beeville, Tem- ple, and Denton, Texas, are reported in this Bulletin. The Kirvin fine sandy loam at Troup and the Nacogdoches and Ruston fine sandy...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO 101 January, 1908. ish Potato Fertilizer Experiments - Postoffice, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD. (Board of Directors... was sc Be Irish Potato Fl nents W. S. Hotchkiss and E. J. Kyle. e fertilizer work with the Irish potato at Troupe was first planned fall of 1902. The results which were gotten upon harvesting the the spring of 1903 were so opposed, especially...

Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A Simple Eclipse Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the experiment above cited may be produced in one of three ways: first, by roughening the surface of the pin's head; secondly, by dust on the edges of ...

W. G. ROYAL-DAWSON

1912-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

444

CASL Test Stand Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Test Stand Experience Stephen Hess, EPRI Heather Feldman, EPRI Brenden Mervin, EPRI Martin Pytel, EPRI Rose Montgomery, TVA Bill Bird, TVA Fausto Franceschini,...

445

Operating Experience Committee Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and the ability to learn from experience are attributes consistently evident in High Reliability Organizations. These organizations are learning organizations, which have...

446

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Impact of Genetic Factors on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation Janet E. Baulch University of California, Davis Why This Project? There is concern about the possible genetic effects of low dose radiation exposure. As a result, much effort has gone towards understanding mutation of cells due to radiation exposure. While recognition of the potential for mutation from exposure to ionizing radiation has led to extensive research, less effort has been given to the possible delayed risk of radiation exposure transmitted to the offspring of the exposed parent. Data from animal models show that parental exposures to DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation, predispose the offspring to serious health effects, including cancer offspring. Additionally, data from both humans and animal

447

ORISE Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS):  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities REAC/TS offers medical management of radiation incidents, consultation and training in radiation emergency medicine REAC/TS staff member providing medical assistance Recognized around the world for its expertise in the medical management of radiation incidents, the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides radiation incident response, consultation and preparedness training, and participates in simulation exercises to address the medical aspects of human exposure to ionizing radiation. As REAC/TS continues to establish international partnerships through education, exercises and conferences, the group is strengthening radiological emergency preparedness and response around the globe. REAC/TS

448

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

449

Dome C for a GABLS4 experiment : a challenge ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters (10 Hz) from 6 ultra-sonic anemometers : 3D Wind components and sonic temperature Low frequency and direction (Young) 1 minute solar radiation components Sub and surface temperatures Radiometer HAMSTRAD (P , time step=60s (SL), preliminary test with 60 and then 90 vertical levels ·Two types of experiment

Ribes, Aurélien

450

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

451

Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments  

SciTech Connect

Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 11002400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 7001700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Experiment Hazard Class 8.2 - Sealed Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 -Sealed Sources 2 -Sealed Sources Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of DOE exempt and non-exempt radioactive sealed sources. Experiment Category Experiments in this Experiment Hazard Class are always categorized as low risk experiments. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - None. Procedural Controls - Sealed sources must be secured when no experimenter is present. Design Reviews and Equipment Inspections - Sealed sources must be checked out from the Beamline Sealed Source Custodian and logged into the RMS System. Sources will be exempt or non-exempt as determined by RSO-HP personnel. Training - GERT (ESH 738) for exempt sealed sources ANL Radiation Worker I or II (ESH 700 or ESH 702) for non-exempt sealed

453

RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R : R : . . . RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

454

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Translocation analysis by the FISH-painting method for retrospective dose reconstruction in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation 10 years after exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful method largely used for detecting chromosomal rearrangements, translocations in particular, which are important biomarkers for dose assessment in case of human exposure to ionizing radiation. To test the possibility of using the translocation analysis by FISH-painting method in retrospective dose assessment, we carried out in vitro experiments in irradiated human lymphocytes, in parallel with the analysis of translocations in lymphocytes from 10 individuals, who were exposed to 137cesium in the Goinia (Brazil) accident (samples collected 10 years after exposure). The in vitro doseresponse curve for the genomic translocation frequencies (FGs) fits a linear quadratic model, according to the equation: Y=0.0243X2+0.0556X. The FG values were also calculated for the individuals exposed to 137cesium, ranging from 0.58 to 5.91 per 100 cells, and the doses were estimated and compared with the results obtained by dicentric analysis soon after the accident, taking the opportunity to test the validity of translocation analysis in retrospective biodosimetry. A tentative of retrospective dosimetry was performed, indicating that the method is feasible only for low level exposure (below 0.5Gy), while for higher doses there is a need to apply appropriate correction factors, which take into consideration mainly the persistence of chromosomal translocations along with time, and the influence of endogenous and exogenous factors determining the inter-individual variability in the cellular responses to radiation.

Marjori L. Camparoto; Adriana T. Ramalho; Adayapalam T. Natarajan; Maria P. Curado; Elza T. Sakamoto-Hojo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The DITE Tokamak Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...April 1981 research-article The DITE Tokamak Experiment J. W. M. Paul W. H. M...magnetic containment of hot plasma in the tokamak toroidal configuration, and plasma heating...these concepts in the Divertor Injection Tokamak Experiment (DITE) at Culham Laboratory...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Practical Experiments in Statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An simple and inexpensive experiment in radioactive decay that can be applied to any field that requires a knowledge of statistics; the primary goal is to familiarize students with probability distributions. ... A Didactic Experience of Statistical Analysis for the Determination of Glycine in a Nonaqueous Medium Using ANOVA and a Computer Program ...

Craig A. Stone; Lorin D. Mumaw

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Conference: Synergy Between Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kaxiras (Harvard) Synopsis ­ Society's ceaseless demand for clean, renewable energy resources on rapidly developing areas of nanoscale computation, will hold a conference on energy research, experimentAn NNIN/C Conference: Synergy Between Experiment and Computation in Energy ­ Looking to 2030. Yu

Heller, Eric

460

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), requires assessment, recording and reporting of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or radioactive contamination. This includes assessing external exposure from a variety of radiation types, such as, beta, photon, and neutron radiation. External exposures may be uniform over the whole body or occur in a non-uniform (i.e., limited body location) fashion. Internal doses occur when radioactive material is taken into the body through ingestion, inhalation, absorption or wounds. The requirements include assessing doses to the whole body, skin, lens of the eyes, extremities and various organs and tissues.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Measurement of radiation impedance of stepped piston radiator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was noted in a paper given in 1972 [A. H. Lubell J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 52 1310 (1972)] that the radiation mass of a stepped piston underwater loudspeaker was approximately half of the value expected from simple piston theory. Recently the integral equation approach was used to compute the radiation impedance for the Lubell Laboratories model 98 underwater loudspeaker and new measurements were made. This paper reviews the measurement and data reduction procedures and compares measured and theoretical radiation impedances. The original observation of reduced radiation mass is supported. A companion paper covers the integral equation computation. [This work was supported by Lubell Laboratories Inc.

Alan H. Lubell

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

463

COR Summary of Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE Effective January 1, 2012, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) added a requirement for past COR experience to qualify for FAC-COR Level II (journeyman level) and III (senior/expert level). At least 1 year of COR experience is required to qualify for Level II; 2 years for Level III. OFPP strongly advises that applicants for Level III have prior experience at Level II. Applicants with no prior experience as an appointed COR must demonstrate proficiency in the specific competencies listed below for the same time period, validated by a cognizant Contracting Officer or Contract Specialist by signature below or an accompanying e-mail. Submit this form to your Site Acquisition Career Manager (SACM) as part of your application

464

Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240?eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

Moore, A. S., E-mail: alastair.moore@physics.org; Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

466

Radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems, and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g.\\ at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H \\textsc{ii} region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick "adiabatic" regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved,for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state, and we derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability conditi...

Jacquet, Emmanuel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Collateral  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collateral Damage Collateral Damage Using targeted irradiation to understand radiation-induced effects in bystander cells chromosomal A typical example of chromosomal instability induction measured by chromosome-type aberrations in primary human lymphocytes at delay time post-irradiation of a fraction of the cell population. Similar types of aberrations were observed in whole irradiated population but were not observed in untreated cells. Munira Kadhim Background: It has long been understood that radiation exposure can influence cellular changes. Studies indicate that even very low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha-particle irradiation, such as that from environmental radon, can affect cells. Radiation-induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells and as a

468

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Denise Munoz 1 , Albert Davalos 1 , Francis Rodier 1 , Misako Kawahara 1 , Judith Campisi 1,2 and Steven Yannone 1,3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 84-171, Berkeley CA 94720; 2 Buck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Boulevard, Novato CA 94945; 3 Corresponding author Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytologically detectable as large nuclear foci that contain phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), the adaptor protein 53BP1, and several other proteins that participate in the sensing and processing of DNA damage (DNA damage foci). In normal human cells, moderately high IR (0.5-1 Gy) doses cause the rapid appearance of these foci (acute DNA damage foci), which gradually disappear

469

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE / NASA Joint Funded Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects NASA Source Photo Space explorers are subject to exposure to low dose ionizing radiation. Research that helps determine health risks from this exposure is funded by NASA and DOE. Source: NASA DOE's Low Dose Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) jointly fund new research to develop a better scientific basis for understanding risks to humans from exposures to low doses or low fluences of ionizing radiation. Research must focus on elucidating molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in normal radiobiological responses to low dose exposure, and must have the potential to ultimately increase understanding of health outcomes from radiation exposures that are at or near current workplace exposure

470

The radiation-tolerant x-ray monitor  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum photoelectric detector (monitor) (VPD) designed for plasma tomography, megnetohydrodynamics monitoring, and imaging with the help of thermal x-ray radiation on the ITER facility is described. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that VPD has high sensitivity to thermal x rays and low sensitivity to hard gamma rays and neutrons. The results of tests of a prototype of this monitor on a {sup 60}Co source of gamma rays, on nuclear reactor and its calibration using radiation from an x-ray tube, and tests of its serviceability on the T-10 facility are presented.

Gott, Yu. V.; Stepanenko, M. M. [Nuclear Fusion Institute, Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of proton radiation damage. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine the relative cataractogenic effects of different proton en- ergies, (2) to determine the relative cataractogenic effects of different radiation doses and (3) to determine... Laboratory in 1945 and 1946. Ten victims were exposed to various doses of moderately fast neutrons and hard gamma rays. In the eight survivors, two radiation cataracts resulted (15). In 1948 it was reported that five nuclear physicists with a common...

Kyzar, James Ronald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Deterministic methods in radiation transport  

SciTech Connect

The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W. (eds.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Numerical Simulations of Radiatively-Driven Dusty Winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation pressure on dust grains may be an important mechanism in driving winds in a wide variety of astrophysical systems. However, the efficiency of the coupling between the radiation field and the dusty gas is poorly understood in environments characterized by high optical depths like those in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and massive dense star clusters. We present a series of idealized numerical experiments, performed with the radiation-hydrodynamic code \\textsc{orion}, in which we study the dynamics of such winds and quantify their properties. We find that, after wind acceleration begins, radiation Rayleigh-Taylor instability forces the gas into a configuration that reduces the rate of momentum transfer from the radiation field to the gas by a factor ~ 10 - 100 compared to an estimate based on the optical depth at the base of the atmosphere; instead, the rate of momentum transfer from a driving radiation field of luminosity L to the gas is roughly L/c multiplied by half the optical depth at...

Krumholz, Mark R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

475

Presentation: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources delivered by Patricia Dehmer, U.S. Department of Energy

476

Reporting Occupational Radiation Exposure Data  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Due to increasing security concerns for the protection of Personnally Identifiable Information (PII), AU-23 has issued a policy statement regarding the submission of radiation...

477

The Neutron EDM Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron EDM experiment has played an important part over many decades in shaping and constraining numerous models of CP violation. This review article discusses some of the techniques used to calculate EDMs under various theoretical scenarios, and highlights some of the implications of EDM limits upon such models. A pedagogical introduction is given to the experimental techniques employed in the recently completed ILL experiment, including a brief discussion of the dominant systematic uncertainties. A new and much more sensitive version of the experiment, which is currently under development, is also outlined.

P. G. Harris

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

478

Space radiation shielding analysis and dosimetry for the space shuttle program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Active and passive radiation dosimeters have been flown on every Space Shuttle mission to measure the naturally?occurring background Van Allen and galactic cosmic radiation doses that astronauts and radiation?sensitive experiments and payloads receive. A review of the various models utilized at the NASA/Johnson Space Center Radiation Analysis and Dosimetry is presented. An analytical shielding model of the Shuttle was developed as an engineering tool to aid in making premission radiation dose calculations and is discussed in detail. The anatomical man models are also discussed. A comparison between the onboard dosimeter measurements for the 24 Shuttle missions to date and the dose calculations using the radiation environment and shielding models is presented.

William Atwell; E. R. Beever; A. C. Hardy; R. G. Richmond; B. L. Cash

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE The Radiation Safety Committee shall advise the Provost on all policy matters relating to radiation safety;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE Functions The Radiation Safety Committee shall advise the Provost on all policy matters relating to radiation safety; formulate campus radiation safety policies in compliance the Risk Manager) monitor the performance of the Radiation Safety Officer as it relates to implementation

Sze, Lawrence

480

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Jian Jian Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jian Jian Li Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University Newly Funded Projects Regulation of NF-kB and Mn SOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshops: NF-kB Mediated Signaling Network in Low Dose X-Ray Induced Adaptive Protection on Mouse and Human Skin Epithelial Cells Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Spitz, and Li, J.J. 2005 Workshops: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1. Li, J.J., Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Dong, S., Spitz, D.R., and Yu, C.-R. 2003 Workshops: Gene Expression Profiles of Human Skin Keratinocytes Exposed to Acute and Chronic Ionizing Radiation Li, J.J., Ozeki, M., Wang, T., Tamae, D., Nelson, D., Wyrobek, A., and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human radiation experiments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.