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1

Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

1997-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

2

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

EGF-receptor phosphorylation and downstream signaling are activated by benzo[a]pyrene 3,6-quinone and benzo[a]pyrene 1,6-quinone in human mammary epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is activated by xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes to highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolites. Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that benzo[a]pyrene quinones (BPQs), 1,6-BPQ and 3,6-BPQ, are able to induce epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cell signaling through the production of reactive oxygen species. Recently, we have reported that BPQs have the potential to induce the expression of genes involved in numerous pathways associated with cell proliferation and survival in human mammary epithelial cells. In the present study we demonstrated that BPQs not only induced EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation, but also induced EGFR-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 and several signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). The effects of BPQs were evaluated in a model of EGF withdrawal in MCF10-A cells. We found that BPQs (1 {mu}M), induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation at positions Y845, Y992, Y1068, and Y1086. PLC-{gamma}1 phosphorylation correlated with the phosphorylation of tyrosine-Y992, a proposed docking site for PLC-{gamma}1 on the EGFR. Additionally, we found that BPQs induced the activation of STAT-1, STAT-3, STAT-5a and STAT-5b. STAT5 was shown to translocate to the nucleus following 3,6-BPQ and 1,6-BPQ exposures. Although the patterns of phosphorylation at EGFR, PLC-{gamma}1 and STATs were quite similar to those induced by EGF, an important difference between BPQ-mediated signaling of the EGFR was observed. Signaling produced by EGF ligand produced a rapid disappearance of EGFR from the cell surface, whereas BPQ signaling maintained EGFR receptors on the cell membrane. Thus, the results of these studies show that 1,6-BPQ and 3,6-BPQ can produce early events as evidenced by EGFR expression, and a prolonged transactivation of EGFR leading to downstream cell signaling pathways.

Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes [Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Avenida Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca 62210, Morelos (Mexico); Melendez, Karla; Hudson, Laurie G.; Lauer, Fredine T. [University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy Toxicology Program, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Burchiel, Scott W. [University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy Toxicology Program, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)], E-mail: sburchiel@salud.unm.edu

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Milk lipid and protein traffic in mammary epithelial cells: joint and independent pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of prolactin and oxytocin on lipid and protein secretion suggest that these processes are coupled and co is not strictly required. milk lipids / mammary epithelial cells / secretion Résumé -- Transport des lipides et biologists, dairy scientists and technologists: Are the intracellular secretion processes of lipids

Boyer, Edmond

5

Trichostatin A inhibits beta-casein expression in mammary epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many aspects of cellular behavior are affected by information derived from association of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and with cell membrane receptors. When cultured in the presence of laminin-containing ECM and prolactin (Prl), normal mammary epithelial cells express the milk protein beta-casein. Previously, we defined the minimal ECM- and Prl-responsive enhancer element BCE-1 from the upstream region of the beta-casein gene. We also found that BCE-1 was only active when stably integrated into chromatin, and that trichostatin A (TSA), a reagent that leads to alterations in chromatin structure, was able to activate the integrated enhancer element. We now show that endogenous b-casein gene, which is controlled by a genetic assembly that is highly similar to that of BCE-1 and which is also activated by incubation in ECM and Prl, is instead inhibited by TSA. We provide evidence that the differing response of b-casein and BCE-1 to TSA is neither due to an unusual effect of TSA on mammary epithelial cells, nor to secondary consequences from the expression of a separate gene, nor to a particular property of the BCE-1 construct. As a component of this investigation, we also showed that ECM could mediate rapid histone deacetylation in mammary epithelial cells. These results are discussed in combination with previous work showing that TSA mediates the differentiation of many types of cancer cells but inhibits differentiation of some nonmalignant cell types.

Pujuguet, Philippe; Radisky, Derek; Levy, Dinah; Lacza, Charlemagne; Bissell, Mina J.

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Matrix Metalloproteinase Stromelysin-1 Triggers a Cascade of Molecular Alterations that leads to stable epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Conversion and a Premalignant Phenotype in Mammary Epithelial Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate ductal morphogenesis, apoptosis, and neoplastic progression in mammary epithelial cells. To elucidate the direct effects of MMPs on mammary epithelium, we generated functionally normal cells expressing an inducible autoactivating stromelysin-1 (SL-1) transgene. Induction of SL-1 expression resulted in cleavage of E-cadherin, and triggered progressive phenotypic conversion characterized by disappearance of E-cadherin and catenins from cell-cell contacts, downregulation of cytokeratins, upregulation of vimentin, induction of keratinocyte growth factor expression and activation, and upregulation of endogenous MMPs. Cells expressing SL-1 were unable to undergo lactogenic differentiation and became invasive. Once initiated, this phenotypic conversion was essentially stable, and progressed even in the absence of continued SL-1 expression. These observations demonstrate that inappropriate expression of SL-1 initiates a cascade of events that may represent a coordinated program leading to loss of the differentiated epithelial phenotype and gain of some characteristics of tumor cells. Our data provide novel insights into how MMPs function in development and neoplastic conversion.

Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Muschler, J.; Freedman, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

7

Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 and 19 (K18K19), vimentin (vim) and ?-sm actin (ASMA) inDako), and vimentin (VIM; MEDAC, GmbH). Other antibodiesa mAb against vimentin (VIM, IgG1). The secondary antibodies

Pechoux, Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Extracellular matrix signatures of human mammary carcinoma identify novel metastasis promoters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of tumors and a significant contributor to cancer progression. In this study, we use proteomics to investigate the ECM of human mammary carcinoma xenografts and show that ...

Naba, Alexandra

9

Regulation of Mammary Lactogenic Differentiation by Singleminded-2s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

juvenile gland showing TEB structures. H. WM mature mammary gland. I, WM mammary gland at pregnancy day 10. J, WM mammary gland during lactation. 3 Studies performed in mice lacking ESR1, ESR2, Pgr, GHR, or PrlR revealed that embryonic... tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand superfamily member, and its receptor, EdaR, are expressed in the mesenchyme and epithelial placode cells, respectively (Pispa et al. 2003). Overexpression of Eda in mice results in supernumerary and enlarged mammary...

Wellberg, Elizabeth

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

10

Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, Ren& #233; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Expression of Phospholipases A2 and C in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-healing pro- cesses in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs), expression of phospholipase A2s (PLA2s for RT-PCR amplifi- cation of the known secreted (s)PLA2, cytosolic (c)PLA2, and PLC mRNAs. Corresponding and Western blot analyses were used to detect the PLA2s and PLCs expressed by HCECs. RESULTS. The m

Gelb, Michael

13

Chlorobenzene induces oxidative stress in human lung epithelial cells in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorobenzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is widely used as a solvent, degreasing agent and chemical intermediate in many industrial settings. Occupational studies have shown that acute and chronic exposure to chlorobenzene can cause irritation of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract and eyes. Using in vitro assays, we have shown in a previous study that human bronchial epithelial cells release inflammatory mediators such as the cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in response to chlorobenzene. This response is mediated through the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of monochlorobenzene on human lung cells, with emphasis on potential alterations of the redox equilibrium to clarify whether the chlorobenzene-induced inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells is caused via an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. We found that expression of cellular markers for oxidative stress, such as heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), glutathione S-transferase pi1 (GSTP1), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), were elevated in the presence of monochlorobenzene. Likewise, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased in response to exposure. However, in the presence of the antioxidants N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (MPG) or bucillamine, chlorobenzene-induced upregulation of marker proteins and release of the inflammatory mediator MCP-1 are suppressed. These results complement our previous findings and point to an oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response following chlorobenzene exposure.

Feltens, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.feltens@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Proteomics, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Moegel, Iljana, E-mail: iljana.moegel@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Roeder-Stolinski, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.roeder-stolinski@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Simon, Jan-Christoph, E-mail: Jan-Christoph.Simon@medizin.uni-leipzig.d [Leipzig University Medical Center, Clinic of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Philipp-Rosenthal-Str. 23-25, D-4103 Leipzig (Germany); Herberth, Gunda, E-mail: gunda.herberth@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lehmann, Irina, E-mail: irina.lehmann@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pim-1 kinase expression during murine mammary development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pim-1 kinase phosphorylates substrates whose activities are linked to proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although pim-1 is induced by hormones and cytokines, the hormonal control and contribution of Pim-1 to mammary gland development have not been evaluated. We examined Pim-1 expression in mammary cell lines, investigated whether Pim-1 levels could be altered in breast epithelia by mammogenic hormones, and evaluated Pim-1 expression during mammary development. We found that Pim-1 was elevated in most mammary carcinoma cell lines and progesterone increased Pim-1 protein to some extent in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelia. Pim-1 expression in situ was consistent with the documented profile of progesterone activity in mouse mammary glands. Pim-1 nuclear localization correlated with cytoplasmic distribution for its substrate, p21{sup CIP/Waf1}, and we found that Pim-1 and p21 associate in vitro. Our results suggest that Pim-1 expression may be regulated by progesterone during mammary development and Pim-1 associates with p21 in mammary epithelial cells.

Gapter, Leslie A. [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 117543 (Singapore); School of Molecular Biosciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4234 (United States); Magnuson, Nancy S. [School of Molecular Biosciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4234 (United States); Ng, Ka-yun [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 117543 (Singapore); Hosick, Howard L. [School of Molecular Biosciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4234 (United States)]. E-mail: hosick@wsu.edu

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

alveolar epithelial type-1: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the role of oral immunity in this disease. Outi Vaarala 34 Epithelial-Specific and Stage-Specific Functions of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I during Postnatal Mammary...

16

Uptake and cytotoxic effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in human bronchial epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are cytotoxic to several cell types. However, the mechanism of CNT toxicity has not been fully studied, and dosimetric analyses of CNT in the cell culture system are lacking. Here, we describe a novel, high throughput method to measure cellular uptake of CNT using turbimetry. BEAS-2B, a human bronchial epithelial cell line, was used to investigate cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and inflammatory effects of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT). The cytotoxicity of MWCNT was higher than that of crocidolite asbestos in BEAS-2B cells. The IC{sub 50} of MWCNT was 12 {mu}g/ml, whereas that of asbestos (crocidolite) was 678 {mu}g/ml. Over the course of 5 to 8 h, BEAS-2B cells took up 17-18% of the MWCNT when they were added to the culture medium at a concentration of 10 {mu}g/ml. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 2, 5, or 10 {mu}g/ml of MWCNT, and total RNA was extracted for cytokine cDNA primer array assays. The culture supernatant was collected for cytokine antibody array assays. Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 increased in a dose dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) also increased in the culture supernatant in response to MWCNT. A phosphokinase array study using lysates from BEAS-2B cells exposed to MWCNT indicated that phosphorylation of p38, ERK1, and HSP27 increased significantly in response to MWCNT. Results from a reporter gene assays using the NF-{kappa}B or AP-1 promoter linked to the luciferase gene in transiently transfected CHO-KI cells revealed that NF-{kappa}B was activated following MWCNT exposure, while AP-1 was not changed. Collectively, MWCNT activated NF-{kappa}B, enhanced phosphorylation of MAP kinase pathway components, and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines in human bronchial epithelial cells.

Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.j [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Kanno, Sanae [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein and lipid transport in human intestinal epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a 14-15 kDa cytoplasmic molecule highly expressed in the enterocyte. Although different functions have been proposed for various FABP family members, the specific function of I-FABP in human intestine remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of I-FABP in molecularly modified normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC-6). cDNA transfection resulted in 90-fold I-FABP overexpression compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector. The high-resolution immunogold technique revealed labeling mainly in the cytosol and confirmed the marked phenotype abundance of I-FABP in cDNA transfected cells. I-FABP overexpression was not associated with alterations in cell proliferation and viability. Studies using these transfected cells cultured with [{sup 14}C]oleic acid did not reveal higher efficiency in de novo synthesis or secretion of triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector only. Similarly, the incubation with [{sup 35}S]methionine did not disclose a superiority in the biogenesis of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-IV, B-48, and B-100. Finally, cells transfected with I-FABP did not exhibit an increased production of chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Our observations establish that I-FABP overexpression in normal HIEC-6 is not related to cell proliferation, lipid esterification, apo synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly, and, therefore, exclude its role in intestinal fat transport.

Montoudis, Alain [Department of Nutrition, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Delvin, Edgard [Department of Biochemistry, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Canadian Institute of Health Research, Group of the Functional Development and Physiopathology of the Digestive Tract, and Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que., Canada J1H 5N4 (Canada); Menard, Daniel [Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Canadian Institute of Health Research, Group of the Functional Development and Physiopathology of the Digestive Tract, and Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que., J1H 5N4 (Canada)] (and others)

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

Tal, Tamara L. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Simmons, Steven O. [Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa [Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Cho, Seung-Hyun [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge (United States); Ramabhadran, Ram [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Linak, William [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A. [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Samet, James M., E-mail: samet.james@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in commercial products, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, and clothing industries. For example, pants and shirts are routinely manufactured with silver nanoparticles to render them 'wrinkle-free.' Despite the growing applications, the associated environmental health and safety (EHS) impacts are completely unknown. The significance of this problem became pervasive within the general public when Prince Charles authored an article in 2004 warning of the potential social, ethical, health, and environmental issues connected to nanotechnology. The EHS concerns, however, continued to receive relatively little consideration from federal agencies as compared with large investments in basic nanoscience R&D. The mounting literature regarding the toxicology of ENMs (e.g., the ability of inhaled nanoparticles to cross the blood-brain barrier; Kwon et al., 2008, J. Occup. Health 50, 1) has spurred a recent realization within the NNI and other federal agencies that the EHS impacts related to nanotechnology must be addressed now. In our study we proposed to address critical aspects of this problem by developing primary correlations between nanoparticle properties and their effects on cell health and toxicity. A critical challenge embodied within this problem arises from the ability to synthesize nanoparticles with a wide array of physical properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, surface chemistry, etc.), which in turn creates an immense, multidimensional problem in assessing toxicological effects. In this work we first investigated varying sizes of quantum dots (Qdots) and their ability to cross cell membranes based on their aspect ratio utilizing hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy. We then studied toxicity of epithelial cell lines that were exposed to different sized gold and silver nanoparticles using advanced imaging techniques, biochemical analyses, and optical and mass spectrometry methods. Finally we evaluated a new assay to measure transglutaminase (TG) activity; a potential marker for cell toxicity.

Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Brozik, Susan Marie; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Bachand, George David; Bachand, Marlene; Aaron, Jesse S.; Allen, Amy; Seagrave, Jean-Clare

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-?B, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPAR?/?-mediated lipid homeostasis. A pro-cancer gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, and NF-?B signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ? Chronic As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure to lung epithelial cells resulted in a cancer-like phenotype. ? Mice injected with arsenic transformed (B-As) cells displayed metastatic tumors. ? Microarray profiling revealed changes in mitochondrial metabolism and ROS response. ? p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, PPAR? and NF-?B networks promoted pro-cancer signaling. ? B-As cells represent a lung cancer model to explore As-associated carcinogenesis.

Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)] [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

accelerates mammary tumorprogression: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the mammary gland is well known. However, it is not well established. To determine where PRL could exert its effects within the mammary gland, we investigated the levels Kihara,...

24

accelerates mammary oncogenesis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the mammary gland is well known. However, it is not well established. To determine where PRL could exert its effects within the mammary gland, we investigated the levels Kihara,...

25

alpha positive mammary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the mammary gland is well known. However, it is not well established. To determine where PRL could exert its effects within the mammary gland, we investigated the levels Kihara,...

26

Regulation of mammary gland remodelling and lactation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and their expression, organization and physico-chemical properties of casein micelle, and subcellular transport not induce any insulin resistance, but it improves the insulin- stimulated glucose disposal in lactating presented: laser scanning cytometry for mammary apoptosis research, septaplex PCR for "parent- age control

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

27

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced ovarian epithelial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as an animal model of human epithelial ovarian cancer (15, 26). ... Source: Mayo, Kelly E. - Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology, Northwestern...

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced epithelial ovarian Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as an animal model of human epithelial ovarian cancer (15, 26). ... Source: Mayo, Kelly E. - Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology, Northwestern...

29

Purification of PRL receptors from toad kidney: Comparisons with rabbit mammary PRL receptors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The binding characteristics of the prolactin (PRL) receptors present in toad (Bufo marinus) kidneys were investigated and compared to those of PRL receptors present in rabbit mammary glands. The molecular characteristics of the Triton X-100 solubilized renal and mammary PRL receptors were assessed by gel filtration and by migration analysis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after affinity labeling of the binding sites with {sup 125}I-human growth hormone. Similar results were obtained for both receptors. Partial purification of the toad PRL receptor could be achieved by affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of this purified receptor could be determined by analysis of SDS-PAGE. With the use of a polyclonal antiserum raised against a purified preparation of rabbit mammary PRL receptor, one or several antigenic epitope(s) could be identified on the core of the toad renal PRL receptor. In conclusion, although the structure and the biological role(s) of PRL have substantially changed during evolution, the receptor for this hormone has retained many of its structural features as could be assessed between an amphibian and a mammalian species on functionally different target tissues.

Dunand, M.; Kraehenbuhl, J.P.; Rossier, B.C.; Aubert, M.L. (Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine (Switzerland) Univ. of Lausanne School of Medicine (Switzerland))

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sustained activation of STAT5 is essential for chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specific function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epithelial cells, once dissociated and placed in two-dimensional (2D) cultures, rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. We showed previously that in addition to prolactin, signaling by laminin-111 was necessary to restore functional differentiation of mammary epithelia. Here, we elucidate two additional aspects of laminin-111 action. We show that in 2D cultures, the prolactin receptor is basolaterally localized and physically segregated from its apically placed ligand. Detachment of the cells exposes the receptor to ligation by prolactin leading to signal transducers and activators of transcription protein 5 (STAT5) activation, but only transiently and not sufficiently for induction of milk protein expression. We show that laminin-111 reorganizes mammary cells into polarized acini, allowing both the exposure of the prolactin receptor and sustained activation of STAT5. The use of constitutively active STAT5 constructs showed that the latter is necessary and sufficient for chromatin reorganization and {beta}-casein transcription. These results underscore the crucial role of continuous laminin signaling and polarized tissue architecture in maintenance of transcription factor activation, chromatin organization, and tissue-specific gene expression.

Xu, Ren; Nelson, Celeste M.; Muschler, John L.; Veiseh, Mandana; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Bissell, Mina J.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

antigen-driven mammary carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the mammary gland is well known. However, it is not well established. To determine where PRL could exert its effects within the mammary gland, we investigated the levels Kihara,...

32

Original article Sensitization of the bovine mammary gland to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(ReceivedI October I )96; accepted 4 February 1997) Summary ― The effect of repeated infusions intramammary infusions of E cnli endotoxin (33 pg) 24 h apart in the same mammary quarter. Along with the second infusion, the cows received one dose of endotoxin in the contralateral quarter. Milk was collected

Boyer, Edmond

33

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar epithelial gp60 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the underlying mammary mesenchyme by the presumptive mammary epithelium to establish a bulb of ... Source: Scott, Matthew - Departments of Developmental Biology, Genetics, &...

34

Epithelialmesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism in lung epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is an important human carcinogen associated with pulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Exposure to Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell morphological change and malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive, it is also not known if Cr(VI)-induced transformation might accompany with invasive properties to facilitate metastasis. We aimed to study Cr(VI)-induced epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells. The results showed that Cr(VI) at low doses represses E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, enhances mesenchymal marker vimentin expression and transforms the epithelial cell into fibroblastoid morphology. Cr(VI) also increases cell invasion and promotes colony formation. Further studies indicated that Cr(VI) uses multiple mechanisms to repress E-cadherin expression, including activation of E-cadherin repressors such as Slug, ZEB1, KLF8 and enhancement the binding of HDAC1 in E-cadherin gene promoter, but DNA methylation is not responsible for the loss of E-cadherin. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced E-cadherin and vimentin protein expression, attenuates cell invasion in matrigel and colony formation on soft agar. These results demonstrate that exposure to a common human carcinogen, Cr(VI), induces EMT and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells and implicate in cancer metastasis and prevention. - Graphical abstract: Epithelialmesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms in lung epithelial cells. - Highlights: We study if Cr(VI) might induce EMT and invasion in epithelial cells. Cr(VI) induces EMT by altering E-cadherin and vimentin expression. It also increases cell invasion and promotes oncogenic transformation. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced EMT, invasion and transformation.

Ding, Song-Ze, E-mail: dingsongze@hotmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial Peoples Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yang, Yu-Xiu; Li, Xiu-Ling [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial Peoples Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Michelli-Rivera, Audrey [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Han, Shuang-Yin [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial Peoples Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jian; Yin, Yuan-Qin; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, Andrew J. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Effect of Intravenous Amino Acid Infusion on Leucine Oxidation Across the Mammary Gland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Intravenous Amino Acid Infusion on Leucine Oxidation Across the Mammary Gland) and the AA infusion periods. Although blood flow to the mammary gland and the arterial concen- tration of most AA other than leucine were increased by the AA infusion, milk and protein yields did not change

Bequette, Brian J.

36

Epithelial-derived TGF-2 modulates basal and wound-healing subepithelial matrix homeostasis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions. We utilized an in vitro model of the epithelial-mesenchymal trophic unit in the human airways increases two- to threefold following scrape injury in a dose-depen- dent fashion and significantly enhances to epithe- lial injury. In the absence of the epithelium, exogenous active TGF- 2 (0­400 pg/ml) produces

George, Steven C.

37

Annexin A9 (ANXA9) biomarker and therapeutic target in epithelial cancer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amplification of the ANXA9 gene in human chromosomal region 1q21 in epithelial cancers indicates a likelihood of both in vivo drug resistance and metastasis, and serves as a biomarker indicating these aspects of the disease. ANXA9 can also serve as a therapeutic target. Interfering RNAs (iRNAs) (such as siRNA and miRNA) and shRNA adapted to inhibit ANXA9 expression, when formulated in a therapeutic composition, and delivered to cells of the tumor, function to treat the epithelial cancer.

Hu, Zhi (El Cerrito, CA); Kuo, Wen-Lin (San Ramon, CA); Neve, Richard M. (San Mateo, CA); Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Expression of butyrophilin (Btn1a1) in lactating mammary gland is essential for the regulated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

secretion of milk­lipid droplets Sherry L. Ogg*, Anne K. Weldon*, Lorraine Dobbie , Andrew J. H. Smith expressed in the lactating mammary gland and is secreted into milk in association with lipid droplets expression of Btn1a1 was either disrupted or eliminated, respectively. The regulated secretion of milk­lipid

Mather, Ian

39

Treatment of an Iatrogenic Left Internal Mammary Artery to Pulmonary Artery Fistula with a Bovine Pericardium Covered Stent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a case with an acquired fistula between the left internal mammary artery and the pulmonary artery following coronary bypass surgery treated with a bovine pericardium covered stent. We also reviewed similar cases reported previously.

Heper, Gulumser [SSK Ihtisas Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Turkey)], E-mail: heperg@hotmail.com; Barcin, Cem; Iyisoy, Atila; Tore, Hasan F. [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Cardiology (Turkey)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Mechanical compression attenuates normal human bronchial epithelial wound healing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open Access Research Mechanical compression attenuatesto the application of mechanical compression in the presenceResults: We found that mechanical compression and scrape

Arold, Stephen P.; Malavia, Nikita; George, Steven C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancer were...

Boggs, Rene' Michelle

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar epithelial type Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cells. Alveolar epithelial cells adherence to type I collagen was decreased... M CaCl2. Cell cultures Isolation and primary culture of alveolar epithelial cells Alveolar...

43

Structural studies of the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, pIgR, is a glycosylated type I transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral surface of secretory epithelial cells. pIgR plays a key role in mucosal immunity and, together ...

Hamburger, Agnes Eva, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Partial proteolytic digestion of the mammary prolactin receptor: Identification of smaller prolactin binding fragments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partial proteolytic digestion of the mammary prolactin (PRL) receptor was used to generate receptor fragments and analyze their immunoreactivity and PRL binding properties. Tryptic digestion of the PRL receptor produced two immunoreactive fragments (Mr approximately 30,000 and approximately 15,000) that reacted with a monoclonal anti-PRL receptor antibody and still specifically bound PRL, while the complete immunoreactive PRL binding unit (Mr approximately 42,000) disappeared. Neither chymotrypsin nor V8 protease were able to generate any immunoreactive receptor fragments. These receptor fragments may represent smaller PRL binding receptor form(s) of biological significance.

Dusanter-Fourt, I.; Kelly, P.A.; Djiane, J. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Jouy-en-Josas (France))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Comparative promoter activities of three endogenous copies of mouse mammary tumor virus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 12 CC ~ o c 0 tu x MMTV M13 pLC1 ?(, a~ CAT pBR322 0/ I SV40 Figure 5. Diagram of pLC1. The plasmid pLC1 (Toohey et al. , 1986) contains an Intact LTR obtained from the C3H provirus as a Pst I restriction fragment. The plasmid also...COMPARATIVE PROMOTER ACTIVITIES OF THREE ENDOGENOUS COPIES OF MOUSE MAMMARY TUMOR VIRUS A Thesis by LAURA REID VILANDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree...

Vilander, Laura Reid

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Prolactin and aging: X-irradiated and estrogen-induced rat mammary tumorigenesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both sexes of inbred WF rats at either 8 or 28-60 weeks of age were exposed to 200 rad whole-body radiation, 2.5 or 5.0 mg 17 beta-estradiol (E2), or both agents The female rats treated with E2 alone or with both X-rays and E2 at 8 weeks of age showed a high incidence of mammary carcinomas (MCA), a large increase in pituitary weight, and a rise in serum prolactin (PRL) levels. However, the same treatments to males did not induce MCA despite a moderate increase in both pituitary weight and serum PRL. Ovariectomy prior to E2 treatment failed to modify the occurrence of MCA or pituitary tumors. When X-rays and E2 were given to female rats at 28-60 weeks of age, pituitary weight, serum PRL levels, and the incidence of MCA were unaffected. When the E2 pellet was kept for the first 24 weeks and withdrawn during the last 12 weeks, the incidence of MCA, pituitary weight, and serum PRL was low. It was concluded that: 1) the pituitary glands of young female rats were susceptible to E2 treatment but were insensitive in older females, and 2) the occurrence of MCA in female rats appeared to be promoted by elevated PRL levels secreted by E2-induced pituitary tumors. Mammary tissue of male rats was less sensitive to PRL levels in the development of MCA.

Ito, A.; Naito, M.; Watanabe, H.; Yokoro, K.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Biological activities of binding site specific monoclonal antibodies to prolactin receptors of rabbit mammary gland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological activity of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the rabbit mammary prolactin (PRL) receptor (M110, A82, and A917) were investigated using explants of rabbit mammary gland. The three mAbs which were all able to inhibit the binding of SVI-ovine prolactin to its receptor had different biological activities. Two mAbs (M110 and A82) were able to prevent the stimulating effect of PRL on casein synthesis when the molar ratio between the mAb and PRL was 100. One mAb (A917) was able to mimic the action of PRL on both casein and DNA ((TH)thymidine incorporation) synthesis, whereas the other two mAbs were without any stimulatory effect. For this stimulatory effect to be observed, bivalency of the antibody was essential, since monovalent fragments, which were able to inhibit PRL binding, had no agonistic activity. The ability of the mAbs to induce a down-regulation of receptors was also studied. These studies suggest that the binding domain of the receptor might be relatively complex, since only a part of this domain recognized by the antibody with PRL-like activity was able to induce hormonal action. Alternatively, only those antibodies able to microaggregate the receptors may possess PRL-like activity.

Djiane, J.; Dusanter-Fourt, I.; Katoh, M.; Kelly, P.A.

1985-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mechanisms of hormonal regulation of CAD gene expression and inhibition by Aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist in human breast cancer cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mediated pathway. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands suppress several E2-induced responses in the rodent uterus and mammary tumors and in human breast cancer cells. TCDD inhibited hormone...

Khan, Shaheen Munawar Ali

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Oestrogen metabolism and action in epithelial ovarian cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ovarian cancer is the most fatal of all gynecological malignancies. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) accounts for about 90% of malignant ovarian tumours and is thought to originate mostly from ovarian surface epithelium ...

Ren, Xia

2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Concentration of PCBs,HCB,DDT, and HCH isomers in the ovaries, mammary gland, and liver of cows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Persistent organic chlorine compounds such as DDT and its metabolites, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) play an important role in chronic poisoning and take part in a number of pathological processes. This study estimates the degree of accumulation of organic Chlorine compounds and polychlorinated biphynyls in the liver, ovaries, and mammary gland tissues of cows.12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Sitarska, E.; Klucinski, W.; Faundez, R. [Agricultural Univ. of Warsaw (Poland)]|[National Inst. of Hygiene, Warsaw (Poland)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

IL1{beta}-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1{beta} in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1{beta}. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1{beta} in the fibroblasts.

Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States) [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc, Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States)] [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

Song, Chun-Hua [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Liu, Zhi-Qiang [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China) [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Huang, Shelly [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)] [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, Peng-Yuan, E-mail: medp7123@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Yang, Ping-Chang, E-mail: yangp@mcmaster.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)] [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

REVIEW Open Access Epithelial to mesenchymal transition as a biomarker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subjected to injury may undergo similar transformations and thus provide new fibroblasts in the interstitium epithelial cells aberrantly expressing fibroblast-specific protein (FSP)1 in a model of mouse anti-tubular membrane disease [4]. This led Strutz et al. to hypothesize that some fibro- blasts might be derived from

Boyer, Edmond

54

Bile Salts and Nuclear Receptors in Biliary Epithelial Cell Pathophysiology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bile Salts and Nuclear Receptors in Biliary Epithelial Cell Pathophysiology by Dr. Nicolas Chignard shaped the way I perform my work today. Among many other examples, she showed me how to simply performed by students that I had the pleasure to supervise. I'm grateful to all of them. I especially would

Boyer, Edmond

55

Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States) [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)] [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Effect of prolactin on enzymes of lipid biosynthesis in mammary gland explants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prolactin (PRL) stimulates an increased rate of incorporation of ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 3}H)glucose into lipids in cultured mammary gland explants from 10-to 14-day-pregnant mice. This response is biphasic with an early increase occurring from 6 through 12 h, and an additional increase from 16 to 24 h. Enzymes likely to be rate limiting to this process include acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthetase, acetyl CoA synthetase, and/or pyruvate dehydrogenase. Of these enzymes only pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was elevated at 6 h, suggesting that this enzymatic activity is important in stimulating early increases in lipogenesis after PRL treatment. In addition, the PRL stimulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase may also indirectly stimulate acetyl CoA carboxylase through the generation of citrate; this may explain the early (6-12 h) effect of PRL on ({sup 14}C)acetate incorporation. After 16 h of PRL treatment, the activities of all the lipogenic enzymes were enhanced. The second phase of PRLs stimulation of lipogenesis thus likely involves the enhanced activities of more than one of the lipogenic enzymes.

Waters, S.B.; Rillema, J.A. (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (USA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Hopital d'Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Castadot, Pierre [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); MacDermed, Dhara [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vandekerkhove, Christophe [Department of Medical Physics, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Magne, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@igr.f [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Response of an experimental mammary carcinoma to fractionated x-irradiation with misonidazole and microwave hyperthermia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X/Gf mice bearing the MT2 mammary adenocarcinoma were subjected to 4000 rad of x rays given either as a single dose, or five daily fractions of 800 rad. Additional experimental groups were treated with either short term localized microwave hyperthermia (LMH), or the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO), or both hyperthermia plus MISO with x rays. The combined use of MISO plus 42.5/sup 0/C with x rays was superior to the other treatment regimens as assessed by tumor regrowth delay and mean survival time. However, for the five fraction schedule, the addition of MISO plus hyperthermia was not as effective as observed for the single dose treatment. This may be attributed to reoxygenation of the hypoxic tumor cells between treatment fractions. MISO retention in tumor tissue under ambient and hyperthermic conditions was studied. The application of heat locally to the tumors caused a significant increase in MISO tumor concentration. However, after four x ray fractions the influence on MISO concentration by hyperthermia in the tumors could not be demonstrated.

Goldfeder, A.; Brown, D.M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Characterisation of microRNA expression in post-natal mouse mammary gland development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For example during puberty and gestation, proliferation and associated processes of cell division and mitosis were highly represented, cal- cium/sodium ion transport, translation and intracellular protein transport were prominent during lactation, apop- tosis... and miR-429. There is increasing evidence that this miRNA family plays a crucial role in the regulation of epithelial to mesenchy- mal transition (EMT). All five members of the miR-200 family were markedly down-regulated in cells that had undergone EMT...

Avril-Sassen, Stefanie; Goldstein, Leonard D; Stingl, John; Blenkiron, Cherie; Le Quesne, John; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Karagavriilidou, Konstantina; Watson, Christine J; Tavare, Simon; Miska, Eric A; Caldas, Carlos

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sensitive Targeted Quantification of ERK Phosphorylation Dynamics and Stoichiometry in Human Cells without Affinity Enrichment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass spectrometry-based targeted quantification is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, a major constraint of most targeted MS approaches is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents to enrich specific PTMs. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometries using a highly sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides within a given fraction from complex biological matrix with minimal sample losses, followed by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) quantification. The PRISM-SRM approach enabled direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from as little as 25 g tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided >10-fold improvement in signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM for handling small size samples. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of EGF at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). At 10 min, the maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 ng/mL dose, whereas the maximal steady state level of ERK activation at 2 h was at 3 ng/ml dose, corresponding to 1200 and 9000 occupied receptors, respectively. At 10 min, the maximally activated pTpY isoform represented ~40% of total ERK, falling to less than 10% at 2 h. The time course and dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated ERK isoforms indicated that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than distributed, model of ERK phosphorylation. The PRISM-SRM quantification of protein phosphorylation illustrates the potential for simultaneous quantification of multiple PTMs.

Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chrisler, William B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Liu, Tao; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. S.; Qian, Weijun

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation disrupts epithelial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

185-194 Plasticity of epithelial cell shape in response... expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) specifically in the ectodermal ... Source: Bosch, Thomas C. G....

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult esophageal epithelial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

However, epithelial injury... potential mechanisms regulating basal cells and allows comparison with other ... Source: Hogan, Brigid L.M. - Department of Cell Biology, Duke...

63

The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelialmesenchymal transition after 7 culture days  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, ?-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, ?-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and ?-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-?2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/?-catenin axis. The extracellular environment can promote the epithelialmesenchymal transition.

Foroni, Laura [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Vasuri, Francesco, E-mail: vasurifrancesco@libero.it [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Chair of Vascular Surgery, Department of Specialistic Surgery and Anaesthesiological Sciences, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Valente, Sabrina [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Gualandi, Chiara [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); Focarete, Maria Letizia [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); Health Science and TechnologiesInterdepartmental Center for Industrial Research (HST-ICIR), Bologna University (Italy); Caprara, Giacomo [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Scandola, Mariastella [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Ionizing Radiation Promotes Migration and Invasion of Cancer Cells Through Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine whether ionizing radiation enhances the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells through transforming growth factor (TGF-{beta})-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Methods and Materials: Six cancer cell lines originating from different human organs were irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, and the changes associated with EMT, including morphology, EMT markers, migration and invasion, were observed by microscope, Western blot, immunofluorescence, scratch assay, and transwell chamber assay, respectively. Then the protein levels of TGF-{beta} in these cancer cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in the effect of ionizing radiation on EMT was investigate by using the specific inhibitor SB431542. Results: After irradiation with {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, cancer cells presented the mesenchymal phenotype, and compared with the sham-irradiation group the expression of epithelial markers was decreased and of mesenchymal markers was increased, the migratory and invasive capabilities were strengthened, and the protein levels of TGF-{beta} were enhanced. Furthermore, events associated with EMT induced by IR in A549 could be reversed through inhibition of TGF-{beta} signaling. Conclusions: These results suggest that EMT mediated by TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in IR-induced enhancing of migratory and invasive capabilities in cancer cells.

Zhou Yongchun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Liu Junye; Li Jing; Zhang Jie [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Xu Yuqiao [Department of Pathology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Zhang Huawei; Qiu Lianbo; Ding Guirong [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Su Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, 306th Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Mei Shi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Guo Guozhen, E-mail: guozhenguo@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ? MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ? Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ? Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 5% vs. untreated: 15 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells infected with M.tuberculosis and may represent a molecular target for promoting cell survival during infection by respiratory pathogens.

Guo, Xu-Guang [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China) [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Ji, Tian-Xing [Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China)] [Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Xia, Yong, E-mail: gysyxy@gmail.com [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Ma, Yue-Yun, E-mail: cmbmayy@fmmu.edu.cn [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Effects of Carbon Nanotubes in Barrier Epithelial Cells via Effects on Lipid Bilayers Shanta Lewis1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Carbon Nanotubes in Barrier Epithelial Cells via Effects on Lipid Bilayers Shanta Lewis1 Physiology, IU School of Medicine Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of many nanoparticles (NP) which are being

Zhou, Yaoqi

67

tion. Human or mouse intestinal epithelial cells that express the poly-Ig receptor were  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Antibodies specific for Clostrid- ium difficile toxin A and Helicobacter pylori urease have been generated, Glauser M et al (1995) Oral immunization with Helicobacter pylori urease as a treatment against Helicobacter infection. Gas- troenterology (in press) Haneberg B, Kendall D, Amerongen HM, Apter FM

Boyer, Edmond

68

In vitro models for airway epithelial cell culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is about the development of a physiologically relevant model of the human airway. Various factors such as the cell model, physiochemical factors such as the cell substrate properties including its stiffness, shear ...

Sivathanu, Vivek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Berthon P, Katoh M, Dusanter-Fourt 1, Kelly PA, Djiane J, 1986b. Purification of prolactin receptor from sow mam-mary gland and polyclonal antibodies production. Mol Cell Endocrinol, soumis publication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Berthon P, Katoh M, Dusanter-Fourt 1, Kelly PA, Djiane J, 1986b. Purification of prolactin receptor publication Djiane J, Durand P, Kelly PA, 1977. Evolution of prolactin receptors in rabbit mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. Endocrinology, 100:1348-1356 Djiane J, Dusanter-Fourt 1, Katoh M, Kelly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

The FASEB Journal Research Communication Calmodulin-dependent activation of the epithelial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calcium-dependent chloride channel TMEM16A Yuemin Tian,* Patthara Kongsuphol,* Martin Hug, Jiraporn-dependent activation of the epithelial calcium-dependent chloride channel TMEM16A. FASEB J. 25, 1058­1068 (2011). www 1­10). TMEM16A has 8 putative transmembrane do- mains (TMDs) and a p-loop between TMD 5 and TMD 6

Witzgall, Ralph - Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät III

71

Modeling gas phase nitric oxide release in lung epithelial cells Jingjing Jiang a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling gas phase nitric oxide release in lung epithelial cells Jingjing Jiang a , Steven C- dated our model with experimental results of gas phase NO release and intracellular L enzyme on NO production. Our model predicts intracellular L-arginine and gas phase NO release over a wide

George, Steven C.

72

Effects of prolactin on lipid biosynthesis and protein kinase C in mouse mammary gland and NB sub 2 node lymphoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cultured mouse mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice, prolactin (PRL) stimulates an increased rate of incorporation of ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 3}H)glucose into triglycerides. The effect is significant between 4-6 hours after addition of PRL. Enzymes likely to be rate-limiting to this process include acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthetase, acetyl CoA synthetase, and/or pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). It is possible that early perturbations of phospholipid (PL) metabolism may represent the initial cellular effects of PRL. Consequently the effect of PRL on the incorporation of several precursors into PLs was determined. Employing ({sup 14}C)acetate as a substrate, PRL stimulates its incorporation into phosphatidylcholine, as early as 1-2 hours, and phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine by 2-4 hours. ({sup 3}H)Glycerol incorporation into triglycerides was significantly enhanced by PRL between 4-6 hours, but not into PLs until after 16 hours. Similarly, PRL did not enhance incorporation of ({sup 32}P)O{sub 4}, ({sup 3}H)choline, ({sup 3}H)inositol or ({sup 3}H)seine into PLs until 14-16 hours after addition to culture. 12-O-tetradeconyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was found to increase ({sup 3}H)uridine incorporation into RNA, and ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation into caseins in a PRL-like manner. In addition, PRL stimulates a transient, time-dependent translocation of PKC to the particulate fraction of mammary gland explants.

Waters, S.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparative Evaluation of Four Presumptive Tests for Blood to Detect Epithelial Injury on Fish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current methods of fish epithelial injury detection are limited to gross macroscopic examination that has a subjective bias as well as an inability to reliably quantify the degree of injury. Fluorescein, a presumptive test for blood, has been shown to have the capability to detect and quantify fish epithelial injury. However, there are several other presumptive tests for blood (Bluestar*, phenolphthalein, and HemastixH) that may have benefits over the use of fluorescein, particularly for field research on wild fish. This study investigated the capabilities of these four tests to detect and quantify a variety of injuries commonly encountered by fish (abrasion, cuts, fin frays, and punctures) using the freshwater bluegill Lepomis macrochirus as a model. Fluorescein was consistently found to be the most reliable (i.e., detected the highest proportion of true positive results and rarely detected false positive reactions) of the four presumptive tests for blood compared. Further testing was conducted to examine the reliability of fluorescein. By 24 h after an injury was inflicted, the injury was no longer detectable by fluorescein, and when fluorescein was applied to an injured fish, the fluorescein was no longer detectable 3 h after application. In a comparison of two common anaesthetics used in fisheries research, there was no significant difference in the proportion of injury detected when 3- aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester methanesulfate (tricaine) was used compared with a clove oil and ethanol (1:9) solution. In summary, fluorescein was the most reliable presumptive test for blood examined in this study for the detection and quantification of recent (hours) fish epithelial injury.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Smokorowski, Karen; Haxton, Tim; Cooke, Steven J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase Reduces Cell Surface Expression of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase Reduces Cell Surface Expression of the Epithelial Sodium levels and reduced apical surface expression of ENaC in CCD cells, down-regulating amiloride- sensitive Channel (ENaC) in Cultured Collecting Duct Cells* Received for publication,May 14, 2007, and in revised

Weisz, Ora A.

76

3624 Biophysical Journal Volume 84 June 2003 36243635 Discrete Models of Autocrine Cell Communication in Epithelial Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemical Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton-to- cell communication produces spatially nonuniform patterns in the expression of genes that guide the development of tissues and organs. The design principles of epithelial patterning are being formulated only

Shvartsman, Stanislav "Stas"

77

Human Ecology Human ecology Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Channel, Latin America. STUDIOS Architecture. #12;HUMAN ECOLOGY · APRIL 2005 1 Lisa Staiano-Coico, Ph Frey spins a green alternative for textiles. Fibers from rapidly renewable materials

Wang, Z. Jane

78

Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is independent of its primary function in the induction of angiogenesis.

Ahluwalia, Amrita [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Jones, Michael K. [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States) [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Szabo, Sandor [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States) [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Tarnawski, Andrzej S., E-mail: amrita.ahluwalia@va.gov [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

79

3,5,4?-Trimethoxystilbene, a natural methoxylated analog of resveratrol, inhibits breast cancer cell invasiveness by downregulation of PI3K/Akt and Wnt/?-catenin signaling cascades and reversal of epithelialmesenchymal transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molecular basis of epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT) functions as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer because EMT may endow breast tumor-initiating cells with stem-like characteristics and enable the dissemination of breast cancer cells. We have recently verified the antitumor activity of 3,5,4?-trimethoxystilbene (MR-3), a naturally methoxylated derivative of resveratrol, in colorectal cancer xenografts via an induction of apoptosis. The effect of MR-3 on EMT and the invasiveness of human MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell line were also explored. We found that MR-3 significantly increased epithelial marker E-cadherin expression and triggered a cobblestone-like morphology of MCF-7 cells, while reciprocally decreasing the expression of mesenchymal markers, such as snail, slug, and vimentin. In parallel with EMT reversal, MR-3 downregulated the invasion and migration of MCF-7 cells. Exploring the action mechanism of MR-3 on the suppression of EMT and invasion indicates that MR-3 markedly reduced the expression and nuclear translocation of ?-catenin, accompanied with the downregulation of ?-catenin target genes and the increment of membrane-bound ?-catenin. These results suggest the involvement of Wnt/?-catenin signaling in the MR-3-induced EMT reversion of MCF-7 cells. Notably, MR-3 restored glycogen synthase kinase-3? activity by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt, the event required for ?-catenin destruction via a proteasome-mediated system. Overall, these findings indicate that the anti-invasive activity of MR-3 on MCF-7 cells may result from the suppression of EMT via down-regulating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling, and consequently, ?-catenin nuclear translocation. These occurrences ultimately lead to the blockage of EMT and the invasion of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: MR-3 blocked MCF-7 cell invasion by inducing a reversal of EMT. Wnt/?-catenin signaling is involved in MR-3-induced EMT reversion of MCF-7 cells. Knockdown of ?-catenin was sufficient to restore epithelial marker E-cadherin levels. MR-3 recovered the function of GSK-3? that inhibits ?-catenin nuclear translocation.

Tsai, Jie-Heng [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsu, Li-Sung [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chih-Li [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hong, Hui-Mei [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Pan, Min-Hsiung [Department of Seafood Science, National Kaohsiung Marine University, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan, ROC (China); Way, Tzong-Der [Department of Biological Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Wei-Jen, E-mail: cwj519@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

aromatic hydrocarbons coated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants, known human lung carcinogens, and potent mammary carcinogens in animal models....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Autocrine TGF-beta and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) signaling drives the evolution of tumor-promoting mammary stromal myofibroblasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Much interest is currently focused on the emerging role of tumor-stroma interactions essential for supporting tumor progression. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), frequently present in the stroma of human breast ...

Kojima, Yasushi

82

Human-machine interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

83

Cognitive Science (Humanities)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive Science (Humanities) The University of Edinburgh College of Humanities and Social Science: Cognitive Science (Humanities) BSc Honours in: Cognitive Science Please see separate information sheets the disciplines that contribute to the study of human cognition. The Cognitive Science programme at Edinburgh

Schnaufer, Achim

84

The Open Breast Cancer Journal, 2011, 3, 31-44 31 1876-8172/11 2011 Bentham Open  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in breast normal cells. The breast cancer cell lines HCC1419, MCF7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, SKBR3, the normal mammary epithelial cell line HME 50 HT and the normal mammary fibroblast cell line CCD-1074sk were of the chemotherapeutics on the normal cells and tissues. Trastuzumab, the newest anticancer treatment, targets cancer

Park, Jong-Sang

85

The recruitment of stromal cells to the site of tumor formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Myofibroblasts are an alpha-smooth muscle actin ([alpha]-SMA)-expressing cell type found within human mammary carcinomas, but not in the normal mammary gland. Myofibroblasts can enhance tumor formation by promoting ...

Saelzler, Matthew P. (Matthew Paul)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Decoupling Internalization, Acidification and Phagosmal-Endosomal/Iysosomal Phagocytosis of Internalin A coated Beads in epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phagocytosis has been extensively examined in 'professional' phagocytic cells using pH sensitive dyes. However, in many of the previous studies, a separation between the end of internalization, beginning of acidification and completion of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was not clearly established, and in several cases, it was treated as a one-step process. In addition, very little work has been done to systematically examine phagosomal maturation in 'non-professional' phagocytic cells, such as epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a simple and novel method to decouple and accurately measure particle internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and Caco-2 epithelial cells. Our method was developed using a pathogen mimetic system consisting of polystyrene beads coated with Internalin A (InlA), a membrane surface protein from Listeria monocytogenes known to trigger receptor-mediated internalization. We achieved independent measurements of the rates of internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in epithelial cells by combining the InlA-coated beads (InlA-beads) with antibody quenching, pH sensitive dyes and endosomal/lysosomal dyes, as follows: the rate of InlA bead internalization was measured via antibody quenching of a pH independent dye (Alexa488) conjugated to InlA-beads, the rate at which phagosomes containing internalized InlA beads became acidified was measured using a pH dependent dye (FITC) conjugated to the beads and the rate of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was measured using a combination of unlabeled InlA-beads and an endosomal/lysosomal dye. By performing these independent measurements under identical experimental conditions, we were able to decouple the three processes and establish time scales for each. In a separate set of experiments, we also exploited the phagosomal acidification process to demonstrate an additional, real31 time method for tracking bead binding, internalization and phagosomal acidification in both MDCK and Caco-2 cells, as well as 1 NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells, using FITC conjugated to InlA-beads or fibronectin-coated beads. Using this method, we found that the time scales for internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion were 23-32 min, 3-4 min and 74-120 min, respectively, for epithelial cells, MDCK and Caco-2, which are slower than the kinetics observed in professional phagocytes such as macrophages. Both the static and real-time methods developed here are expected to be readily and broadly applicable, as they simply require conjugation of a fluorophore to a pathogen or mimetic of interest in combination with common cell labeling dyes, and are not limited to the InlA ligand or cell types used here. As such, these methods hold promise for future measurements of receptor-mediated internalization in other cell systems, e.g. other pathogen-host systems.

Blanchette, C D; Woo, Y; Thomas, C; Shen, N; Sulchek, T A; Hiddessen, A L

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

87

The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an epithelialmesenchymal transition in MDCK cells independent of ?-catenin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an EMT in MDCK cells. A mutant LEF-1 that cannot interact with ?-catenin retained the ability. The nuclear function of ?-catenin was not necessary for the LEF-1-induced EMT. The mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 increased significantly in these cells. -- Abstract: The epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cellcell junctions and cell polarity, as well as the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. LEF-1 is a member of the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) family of DNA-binding transcription factors, which interact with nuclear ?-catenin and act as central transcriptional mediators of Wnt signaling. To investigate the role of LEF-1 in EMT, we generated stable LEF-1 transfectants using MDCK cells. The transfectants had a spindle-shaped mesenchymal morphology, and enhanced migration and invasiveness relative to control cells. These EMT changes were accompanied by the downregulation of an epithelial marker protein, E-cadherin, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, vimentin and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2EMT-related transcription factorsincreased significantly. Although the N-terminally deleted mutant LEF-1 cannot interact with ?-catenin, it retained the ability to induce EMT. Consistent with these observations, neither the expression of a dominant negative ?-catenin/engrailed chimera, nor the expression of a cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin that sequesters ?-catenin from binding to LEF/TCF, reversed LEF-1-induced EMT. Together, these data indicated that the nuclear function of ?-catenin was not necessary for the induction of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 expression leading to EMT.

Kobayashi, Wakako; Ozawa, Masayuki, E-mail: mozawa@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

88

Human Resources Assistant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is located in the Headquarters (HQ) Operations Division of the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer in Washington, DC. The Division provides a full range of human capital...

89

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

Rambaut, Andrew

90

Human Research ProgramHuman Research Program Human System Risk in Exploration and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human System Risks in Exploration Missions 21SEP10 2HRP Risk Process ­ D.Grounds Presentation contentsHuman Research ProgramHuman Research Program Human System Risk in Exploration and the Human Research Program 21SEP10 1HRP Risk Process ­ D Grounds #12;Human Research ProgramHuman Research Program

Waliser, Duane E.

91

adherent human neutrophils: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

colon epithelial cells have Bashir, Rashid 26 EDITORIAL How to regulate neutrophils in gout CiteSeer Summary: Most research in gout has concentrated on the proinflammatory...

92

Differences in pulmonary responses of rats, other animals, and humans to chronic inhalation of silica and other particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulmonary carcinogenicity of quartz in rats supports the plausibility of silica-induced lung cancer in humans. However, pulmonary responses of rats to dusts differ from those of other rodents, and may differ from those of humans. Dust-exposed rats have a greater propensity than mice or hamsters for epithelial hyperplasia, metaplasia, and fibrosis. Lung tumors occur in rats, but not mice or hamsters, treated with quartz, or exposed chronically to several other dusts. There are few opportunities for directly comparing the susceptibilities of rats and humans to dust-induced lung tumors. Because of the uncertain human responses to silica and many other particles, the negative human lung cancer response to coal dust may provide the best opportunity to calibrate responses of rats against those of humans. Historical dust lung burdens in coal miners were in the range of those associated with carcinogenicity in rats exposed to several dusts, but the carcinogenicity of coal dust in rats is unknown. The usefulness of tumor data from rats for predicting human lung cancer risk from inhaled silica and other dusts remains uncertain.

Mauderly, J.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Mangiferin exerts antitumor activity in breast cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and ?-catenin signaling pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although mangiferin which is a naturally occurring glucosylxanthone has exhibited promising anticancer activities, the detailed molecular mechanism of mangiferin on cancers still remains enigmatic. In this study, the anticancer activity of mangiferin was evaluated in breast cancer cell line-based in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that mangiferin treatment resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that mangiferin induced decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and -9, and reversal of epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, it was demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibited the activation of ?-catenin pathway. Subsequent experiments showed that inhibiting ?-catenin pathway might play a central role in mangiferin-induced anticancer activity through modulation of MMP-7 and -9, and EMT. Consistent with these findings in vitro, the antitumor potential was also verified in mangiferin-treated MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice where significantly decreased tumor volume, weight and proliferation, and increased apoptosis were obtained, with lower expression of MMP-7 and -9, vimentin and active ?-catenin, and higher expression of E-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that mangiferin might be used as an effective chemopreventive agent against breast cancer. - Highlights: Mangiferin inhibits growth and metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Mangiferin down-regulates MMP-7 and -9 in breast cancer cells. Mangiferin induces the reversal of EMT in metastatic breast cancer cells. Mangiferin inhibits the activation of ?-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. Inhibiting ?-catenin is responsible for the antitumor activity of mangiferin.

Li, Hongzhong; Huang, Jing; Yang, Bing; Xiang, Tingxiu; Yin, Xuedong; Peng, Weiyan; Cheng, Wei [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wan, Jingyuan; Luo, Fuling [Department of Pharmacology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Hongyuan [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ren, Guosheng, E-mail: rgs726@163.com [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish DOE procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 CFR Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, ad in DOE P 443.1, Policy on the Protection of Human Subjects. Cancels DOE O 1300.3. Canceled by DOE O 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects; and in DOE P 443.1A, Protection of Human Subjects, dated 12-20-07. Cancels DOE O 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B.

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

96

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE Human Resources | One Washington Square | San José, CA 95192-0046 | 408-924-2250 408-924-2284 (fax) SUBJECT: STUDENT EMPLOYMENT DATE: March 2007 I. PURPOSE / DESCRIPTION Student employees are defined as matriculated students that work part-time in any

Gleixner, Stacy

97

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

Rambaut, Andrew

98

Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 ?M cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. These findings add insight to the relationship between cadmium and lung cancer.

Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Beliefs about Human Extinction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Apical polarity in three-dimensional culture systems: where to now?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delineation of the mechanisms that establish and maintain the polarity of epithelial tissues is essential to understanding morphogenesis, tissue specificity and cancer. Three-dimensional culture assays provide a useful platform for dissecting these processes but, as discussed in a recent study in BMC Biology on the culture of mammary gland epithelial cells, multiple parameters that influence the model must be taken into account.

Inman, J.L.; Bissell, Mina

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Stromal cell-derived factor-1 overexpression induces gastric dysplasia through expansion of stromal myofibroblasts and epithelial progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objective: Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12), the main ligand for CXCR4, is overexpressed in human cancer. This study addressed the precise contribution of SDF-1 to gastric carcinogenesis.

Shibata, Wataru

102

miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohns disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-? and IFN-?). miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). NF-?B signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohns disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-?B was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-? and IFN-? was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-?B inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Humanities Academic Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Humanities Academic Human Resources VOLUNTARY WORKLOAD/or Spring ____ Quarter(s) Funding Source: ________________________________________ (Salary adjustments

California at Santa Cruz, University of

104

Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Pathogen Importation Importing "Human" Pathogens from Outside Canada 1) Permits be obtained from the Public Health Agency Canada (PHAC) to facilitate customs clearance. 2) If a permit

105

Division of Human Resources Human Resources / Attendance and Leave Philosophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources PHILOSOPHY Human Resources / Attendance and Leave Philosophy Form Leave Act (FMLA). USF augments these provisions with local processes and philosophies and, in some cases

Meyers, Steven D.

106

Associate Vice President Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associate Vice President Human Resources Enjoy Athens! Great schools Affordable housing Eclectic Vice President for Human Resources. This position reports directly to the Vice President for Finance and Administration and provides leadership for the University's human resources programs and services

Arnold, Jonathan

107

Human Resources Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Resources Simon Fraser University Administrative and Professional Staff Job Description A. Identification Position Number: 31482 Position Title: Administrative Assistant (Human Resources Liaison) Name guidance, direction, coordination and effective management and implementation of SFU's Human Resources

Kavanagh, Karen L.

108

Special Issue on Human Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

Nijholt, Anton

109

The human genome project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

Bell, G.I.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Human Reliability | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Reliability SHARE Human Reliability The Structured Trusted Employee Program (STEP) Evaluation is an example of a method for identifying, assessing, and retaining reliable and...

111

Human Reliability Program Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

Bodin, Michael

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

112

KRFTWRK Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Policy is to establish DOE-specific principles for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Cancels DOE P 443.1. Canceled by DOE O 443.1B

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Protection of Human Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this Policy is to establish DOE-specific policy for the protection of human subjects involved in DOE research. Canceled by DOE P 443.1A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Human Resource Management Delegation  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The notice is to clarifies and updates existing Human Resource Management Delegation Authorities and the levels to which they are delegated. Expired 6-28-97. Does not cancel any directives.

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE Workforce Planning | One Washington Square | San José of the Request for Temporary Support, Workforce Planning will make a determination of the type of temporary

Su, Xiao

117

Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.j [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Akashi, Makoto [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Developing Human Performance Measures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRCs risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Time, Humans and Societal Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 (human development) Since 1850 (industrial revolution Since 1950 (population explosion) Sustainable

120

Human hybrid hybridoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

1987-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CANDU human performance analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of human performance is presented in this paper in the context of the operational safety management system. To focus on problems, an experience review program has been developed to establish trends, demonstrate the degree of compliance with standards, and determine the causes of poor performance. The primary method by which the experience review takes place is significant event reporting (SER). A significant event is an incident that causes an undesirable effect on safety, product quality, environmental protection, or product cost. In spite of advanced technology and the degree of automation of the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) design, mistakes and malfunctions to occur. Considerable effort has been made to prevent or reduce the incidence of error. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations developed a system to analyze human error, called the Human Performance Evaluation System (HPES). To encourage an open exchange of information, the system is anonymous and nonpunitive. All data gathered during HPES evaluations are kept confidential.

Walker, I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

de la Chapelle, Albert (Helsingfors, FI); Vogelstein, Bert (Baltimore, MD); Kinzler, Kenneth W. (Baltimore, MD)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Human MSH2 protein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Human Processing (Position Paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and describe remaining challenges in the area (Section 6). 2. MOTIVATING EXAMPLE "Priam," the editor below, we explain how Priam might go about accomplishing this task. Figure 1: Basic Buyer human. The programmer (Priam) writes a normal program. 2. That program can, in the course of execution, create HTML

Chang, Edward Y.

125

transforming human health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transforming human health AnnUAl REpoRt 2011­2012 #12;#12;how we're changing medical research 1 are transforming health. He proposed an entirely new theory for developing drugs to treat diseases that have malaria and solid tumors such as lung and breast cancers are in development. #12;A TrAnsformATive educ

Kenny, Paraic

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid inhibits tumor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

we show here that intrametastatic lymphatic vessels and bulk tumor cell... model of tumor bulk invasion, human mammary carcinoma cells caused ... Source: Floreano, Dario -...

127

Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ?40 nm; intermediates ?4080 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ? First report of release of prominin-1containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ? Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1containing microvesicles in FEMX-I melanoma. ? Down-regulation of prominin-1 results in decreased nuclear localization of ?-catenin. ? Wnt signaling as mediator of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1.

Rappa, Germana [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Le, Thuc T. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Johlfs, Mary G. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Fiscus, Ronald R. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Wilsch-Bruninger, Michaela [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstr. 108, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Corbeil, Denis [Tissue Engineering Laboratories (BIOTEC) and DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Technische Universitt Dresden, Tatzberg 4749, 01307 Dresden, Germany Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lorico, Aurelio, E-mail: alorico@roseman.edu [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Human sciences The human sciences database contains approximately 254 academic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human sciences The human sciences database contains approximately 254 academic journals and statistical reports on the following subjects: (comparative literature, theology, history and geography, education, psychology, arts, languages and Library Science) Social sciences The social sciences database

129

Human-elephant conflicts; Human-elephant conflicts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? It is widely recognized that human-wildlife conflicts can reduce farmers support for long-term species conservation. The subject of human-elephant conflicts is highly relevant in (more)

Olsson, Linnea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Antioxidant and Anti-Inflamatory Effects and Mechanisms of Green Tea in Vitro in Vascular Epithelial Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or lone electrons. These electrons are reactive and have the capability to cause damage to tissues if left in their unstable state. In order to counteract these free radicals there are antioxidants which seek out the free radicals and bind to them... Cells. (April 2009) Abida Hasan Department of Nutritional Sciences Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Susanne Talcott Department of Nutritional Sciences In the human body there are free radicals present which have one or many unpaired...

Hasan, Abida

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

131

The effect of DDT and its metabolite (DDE) on prostaglandin secretion from epithelial cells and on contractions of the smooth muscle of the bovine oviduct in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The insecticide DDT and its metabolite (DDE), due to their lipolytic nature and resistance to biodegradation, are accumulated in the living tissues. In cows, DDT and DDE were found to affect prostaglandin (PG) secretion from the endometrium and contractions of the myometrium. In this study, the impact of both xenobiotics (0.1, 1, 10 or 100 ng/ml) on the function of epithelial cells and muscle strips of bovine oviducts from 1 to 5 day of the oestrous cycle was examined. Therefore the concentration of PGE2 and PGFM (a metabolite of PGF2?) in culture media, mRNA expression of genes involved in PGs synthesis in epithelial cells and the force and amplitude of strips contractions were measured after 2 and 24 or 48 h of incubation. Neither DDT nor DDE affected the viability of cells after 48 h (P > 0.05). Both DDT and DDE increased the concentrations of PGFM in culture medium and secretion of PGE2 after only 2 h of cell culture (P < 0.05). Similar effects were seen for the influence of DDE on amount of PGFM after 48 h, while DDT decreased secretion of PGE2 (P < 0.05). DDT after 2 h increased (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of PGF2? synthase (PGFS), while both xenobiotics decreased (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) after 24 h. DTT also increased the force of isthmus contractions after 2 h, as did both xenobiotics after 48 h (P < 0.05). Moreover, after 2 and 48 h, DDE stimulated the amplitude of contractions of the isthmus as well as the ampulla, (P < 0.05). The effect of both compounds on oviduct contractions was diminished by indomethacin, which blocks PG synthesis. We conclude that oviductal secretion of prostaglandins is affected, by DDT and DDE. The influence of these xenobiotics on PGF2? and PGE2 secretion and ratio may be part of the mechanism by which both DDT and its metabolite disturb the contractions of oviductal muscle. -- Highlights: ? DDT and its metabolite DDE are accumulated in the living tissues. ? The insecticides affected PGF2? and PGE2 release from epithelial cells of oviduct. ? They also stimulated markedly the contractions of oviductal strips. ? Prostaglandins were involved in the effect of insecticides on oviduct function.

Wrobel, Michal H.; Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw; Kotwica, Jan, E-mail: janko@pan.olsztyn.pl

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Policy on Human Subjects Research Policy on Human Subjects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy on Human Subjects Research 10/15/2014 Policy on Human Subjects Research I. Purpose and Scope requirements that the rights and welfare of human subjects receive adequate protection. This policy applies, except that research conducted or assigned as part of their coursework is governed by the Policy

Sridhar, Srinivas

133

Human Capital Management Accountability Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements, roles and responsibilities for the Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) for human resources programs and personnel and ensures that human capital activities are regulatory and procedurally compliant with Federal statutes and Departmental policies. Does not cancel other directives.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Expression of human cytokines dramatically improves reconstitution of specific human-blood lineage cells in humanized mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adoptive transfer of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) into mice lacking T, B and natural killer (NK) cells leads to development of human-blood lineage cells in the recipient mice (humanized mice). Although human B ...

Chen, Qingfeng

135

Aspects of nitrogen dioxide toxicity in environmental urban concentrations in human nasal epithelium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) as part of urban exhaust pollution are widely discussed as potential hazards to human health. This study focuses on toxic effects of NO{sub 2} in realistic environmental concentrations with respect to the current limit values in a human target tissue of volatile xenobiotics, the epithelium of the upper aerodigestive tract. Nasal epithelial cells of 10 patients were cultured as an air-liquid interface and exposed to 0.01 ppm NO{sub 2}, 0.1 ppm NO{sub 2}, 1 ppm NO{sub 2}, 10 ppm NO{sub 2} and synthetic air for half an hour. After exposure, genotoxicity was evaluated by the alkaline single-cell microgel electophoresis (Comet) assay and by induction of micronuclei in the micronucleus test. Depression of proliferation and cytotoxic effects were determined using the micronucleus assay and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. The experiments revealed genotoxic effects by DNA fragmentation starting at 0.01 ppm NO{sub 2} in the Comet assay, but no micronucleus inductions, no changes in proliferation, no signs of necrosis or apoptosis in the micronucleus assay, nor did the trypan blue exclusion assay show any changes in viability. The present data reveal a possible genotoxicity of NO{sub 2} in urban concentrations in a screening test. However, permanent DNA damage as indicated by the induction of micronuclei was not observed. Further research should elucidate the effects of prolonged exposure.

Koehler, C.; Ginzkey, C.; Friehs, G.; Hackenberg, S.; Froelich, K.; Scherzed, A.; Burghartz, M.; Kessler, M. [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Kleinsasser, N., E-mail: Kleinsasser_N@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.d [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wuerzburg (Germany)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Human Resources Organizational Development and Training 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Resources Organizational Development and Training 1 Development Guide for Tufts Leadership Competencies Human Resources Training, Learning and Development Copyright 2013 Tufts University Developed with Copperbeech Group Inc. #12;Human Resources Training, Learning and Development 2 #12;Human Resources Training

Dennett, Daniel

137

Mentoring Human Performance - 12480  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the positive effects of implementing a human performance approach to operations can be hard to quantify, many organizations and industry areas are finding tangible benefits to such a program. Recently, a unique mentoring program was established and implemented focusing on improving the performance of managers, supervisors, and work crews, using the principles of Human Performance Improvement (HPI). The goal of this mentoring was to affect behaviors and habits that reliably implement the principles of HPI to ensure continuous improvement in implementation of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) within a Conduct of Operations framework. Mentors engaged with personnel in a one-on-one, or one-on-many dialogue, which focused on what behaviors were observed, what factors underlie the behaviors, and what changes in behavior could prevent errors or events, and improve performance. A senior management sponsor was essential to gain broad management support. A clear charter and management plan describing the goals, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes was established. Mentors were carefully selected with senior management endorsement. Mentors were assigned to projects and work teams based on the following three criteria: 1) knowledge of the work scope; 2) experience in similar project areas; and 3) perceived level of trust they would have with project management, supervision, and work teams. This program was restructured significantly when the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) and the associated funding came to an end. The program was restructured based on an understanding of the observations, attributed successes and identified shortfalls, and the consolidation of those lessons. Mentoring the application of proven methods for improving human performance was shown effective at increasing success in day-to-day activities and increasing confidence and level of skill of supervisors. While mentoring program effectiveness is difficult to measure, and return on investment is difficult to quantify, especially in complex and large organizations where the ability to directly correlate causal factors can be challenging, the evidence presented by Sydney Dekker, James Reason, and others who study the field of human factors does assert managing and reducing error is possible. Employment of key behaviors-HPI techniques and skills-can be shown to have a significant impact on error rates. Our mentoring program demonstrated reduced error rates and corresponding improvements in safety and production. Improved behaviors are the result, of providing a culture with consistent, clear expectations from leadership, and processes and methods applied consistently to error prevention. Mentoring, as envisioned and executed in this program, was effective in helping shift organizational culture and effectively improving safety and production. (authors)

Geis, John A.; Haugen, Christian N. [CALIBRE Systems, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Human Genome Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Human Resources | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC HistoryVeteransto getEmployee Relations Human

140

Human Genome: DOE Origins  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPA addressesHowHughHumanDecoding

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesB PrivacyAugust 1,Human Resources

142

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesB PrivacyAugust 1,Human

143

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesB PrivacyAugust 1,HumanAppraisal

144

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesBQuestions aboutHuman Resources

145

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesBQuestions aboutHuman Resources

146

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesBQuestions aboutHuman ResourcesCode

147

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesBQuestions aboutHuman ResourcesCode

148

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesBQuestions aboutHuman

149

Jefferson Lab Human Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesBQuestions aboutHumanAppraisal

150

PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National...

151

Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

NONE

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Human-computer interface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

Anderson, Thomas G.

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

153

Human Reliability Program Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Human Reliability Program (HRP) is designed to protect national security as well as worker and public safety by continuously evaluating the reliability of those who have access to sensitive materials, facilities, and programs. Some elements of a site HRP include systematic (1) supervisory reviews, (2) medical and psychological assessments, (3) management evaluations, (4) personnel security reviews, and (4) training of HRP staff and critical positions. Over the years of implementing an HRP, the Department of Energy (DOE) has faced various challenges and overcome obstacles. During this 4-day activity, participants will examine programs that mitigate threats to nuclear security and the insider threat to include HRP, Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Enhancement, and Employee Assistance Programs. The focus will be to develop an understanding of the need for a systematic HRP and to discuss challenges and best practices associated with mitigating the insider threat.

Landers, John; Rogers, Erin; Gerke, Gretchen

2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

237Poverty and Human Capability Studies Poverty and Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

237Poverty and Human Capability Studies Poverty and Human CaPability StudieS (Pov) Core FaCulty: PROFESSORS beCKley*, GOLDSMITH, MARGAND The Shepherd Program for the interdisciplinary Study of Poverty and graduate studies can prepare them as futureprofessionalsandcitizenstoaddresstheproblems of poverty and how

Dresden, Gregory

156

227Poverty and Human Capability Studies Poverty AND HUMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

227Poverty and Human Capability Studies Poverty AND HUMAN CAPABILIty StUDIeS (Pov) Core FACULty: PROFESSORS BeCKLey*, GOLDSMITH, MARGAND The Shepherd Program for the Interdisciplinary Study of Poverty studies can prepare them as future professionals and citizens to address the problems of poverty

Dresden, Gregory

157

The human activity of visualization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Griffin et al 2006 #12;Human-Computer Interaction: Software of the Mind each user has a setThe human activity of visualization cultural and psychological factors in representation; Gibbon 1998; Marcus 2000) conventions and metaphors of Westerners may not hold worldwide colors

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

158

RECRUITMENT SEARCH FIRMS HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECRUITMENT SEARCH FIRMS HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINES Workforce Planning | Washington Square, San by the Workforce Planning Unit in Human Resources at SJSU. Process Consistent, defensible processes for evaluating of the recruitment. - At this meeting, the Workforce Planning analyst can provide contact information for search

Su, Xiao

159

Human Reliability Analysis for Digital Human-Machine Interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the fact that existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods do not provide guidance on digital human-machine interfaces (HMIs). Digital HMIs are becoming ubiquitous in nuclear power operations, whether through control room modernization or new-build control rooms. Legacy analog technologies like instrumentation and control (I&C) systems are costly to support, and vendors no longer develop or support analog technology, which is considered technologically obsolete. Yet, despite the inevitability of digital HMI, no current HRA method provides guidance on how to treat human reliability considerations for digital technologies.

Ronald L. Boring

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

06241 Abstracts Collection Human Motion -Understanding, Modeling,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

06241 Abstracts Collection Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Summary Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Workshop Reinhard Klette 06241 Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Workshop "Theoretical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Guest editorial: Special issue on human computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

Pantic, Maja

162

Human genome. 1993 Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol Management Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office of Human Capitol...

164

The Politics of Human Rights in Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Valente, Marcela. Argentinas Biggest Human Rights Motor is Linked to Argentinas Dirty War. New fortune of my heart. Argentina's 1985 human rights

Brysk, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Scientists Help Define the Healthy Human Microbiome  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists Help Define the Healthy Human Microbiome Scientists Help Define the Healthy Human Microbiome Computing, bioinformatics, and microbial ecology resources play key role in...

166

Physical and functional interactions of human papillomavirus E2 protein with nuclear receptor coactivators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to the human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced immortalization of epithelial cells, which usually requires integration of the viral DNA into the host cell genome, steroid hormone-activated nuclear receptors (NRs) are thought to bind to specific DNA sequences within transcriptional regulatory regions on the long control region to either increase or suppress transcription of dependent genes. In this study, our data suggest that the NR coactivator function of HPV E2 proteins might be mediated through physical and functional interactions with not only NRs but also the NR coactivators GRIP1 (glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1) and Zac1 (zinc-finger protein which regulates apoptosis and cell cycle arrest 1), reciprocally regulating their transactivation activities. GRIP1 and Zac1 both were able to act synergistically with HPV E2 proteins on the E2-, androgen receptor-, and estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation systems. GRIP1 and Zac1 might selectively function with HPV E2 proteins on thyroid receptor- and p53-dependent transcriptional activation, respectively. Hence, the transcriptional function of E2 might be mediated through NRs and NR coactivators to regulate E2-, NR-, and p53-dependent transcriptional activations.

Wu, M.-H. [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Huang, C.-J. [Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry Laboratory, Cathay Medical Research Institute, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei County 221, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Liu, S.-T. [Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Liu, P.-Y. [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Ho, C.-L. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Huang, S.-M. [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China) and Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: shihming@ndmctsgh.edu.tw

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

167

HUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) by coordinating budget submissions, estimating and preparing cost projections, liaising with PurchasingHUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE & PROFESSIONAL JOB DESCRIPTION Position of the position in one or two sentences. Manages the Department's operating, capital, temporary instruction

168

HUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funding priorities, budget consideration, application requirements, University policies and proceduresHUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE & PROFESSIONAL JOB DESCRIPTION Position to Canadian and international funding agencies. The incumbent will assist with the writing and reviewing

169

HUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The position is responsible for developing test scenarios, responding to system problems by investigating regarding the design of testing scenarios and scripts and how to evaluate outcomes. Makes decisions1 HUMAN RESOURCES SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY TEMPORARY ADMINISTRATIVE & PROFESSIONAL STAFF POSITION

170

ORISE: Human Subjects Research Database  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Subjects Research Database Section 10, Part 745 of the Code of Federal Regulations and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 443.1 and 481.1 require the maintenance of...

171

Robot manipulation in human environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human environments present special challenges for robot manipulation. They are often dynamic, difficult to predict, and beyond the control of a robot engineer. Fortunately, many characteristics of these settings can be ...

Edsinger, Aaron Ladd, 1972-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Robot Manipulation in Human Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human environments present special challenges for robot manipulation. They are often dynamic, difficult to predict, and beyond the control of a robot engineer. Fortunately, many characteristics of these settings can be ...

Edsinger, Aaron

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Contractor Human Resource Management Programs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this directive is to establish Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities and requirements for the management and oversight of contractor Human Resource Management (HR) programs. Chg 1, 5-8-98; Chg 2, 11-22-09

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Contractor Human Resource Management Programs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this directive is to establish Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities and requirements for the management and oversight of contractor Human Resource Management (HR) programs. Chg 1, 5-8-98; Chg 2, 11-22-09.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Cordinating human-robot communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As robots begin to emerge from the cloisters of industrial and military applications and enter the realms of coperative partners for people, one of the most important facets of human-robot interaction (HRI) will be ...

Brks, Andrw G. (Brks Zoz)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Director Human Resources Assoc Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Director ­ Human Resources Assoc Director Workforce Planning & Organisational Change Director) - Organisational change - Workforce planning - Grievance & performance mgt support - Performance management line and not a formal Branch ** Includes Classifications ANU Search Workforce Planning* Remunerations

Botea, Adi

177

Unravelling daily human mobility motifs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human mobility is differentiated by time scales. While the mechanism for long time scales has been studied, the underlying mechanism on the daily scale is still unrevealed. Here, we uncover the mechanism responsible for ...

Schneider, Christian M.

178

Reservations to human rights treaties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the default application of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties reservation rules to reservations to human rights treaties. The contemporary practice of formulating reservations allows ...

McCall-Smith, Kasey Lowe

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Human Factors of Reporting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed.), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK. pp 715-750 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Johnson, C.W.

180

Human Genome Education Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will contribute to the final revisions of each unit during the second-year of this grant.

Richard Myers; Lane Conn

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Protection of Human Research Subjects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) procedures and responsibilities for implementing the policy and requirements set forth in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 745, Protection of Human Subjects, 45 CFR Part 46, and the Secretarial Policy Memorandum on Military or Intelligence-Related Human Subject Research, December 9, 2009. Cancels DOE O 443.1A and DOE P 443.1A.

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

Low-Income Weatherization: The Human Dimension  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation focuses on how the human dimension saves energy within low-income weatherization programs.

183

Haptic Human Interfaces for Robotic Telemanipulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While discussing human perception mechanisms , Sekuler and Balke [1] eloquently stated that ... whether of regard. Human haptic perception is the result of a complex investigatory dexterous manipulation act-level perception and task planning abilities of a human operator equipped with adequate human interfaces [6

Payeur, Pierre

184

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

62 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers one-of-a- kind opportunities for interdisciplinary exploration, but the enduring questions. The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities is organized into three schools

Stuart, Steven J.

185

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

63 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers one-of-a- kind opportunities for interdisciplinary exploration, but the enduring questions. The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities is organized into three schools

Stuart, Steven J.

186

The SACADA database for human reliability and human performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lack of appropriate and sufficient human performance data has been identified as a key factor affecting human reliability analysis (HRA) quality especially in the estimation of human error probability (HEP). The Scenario Authoring, Characterization, and Debriefing Application (SACADA) database was developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to address this data need. An agreement between NRC and the South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) was established to support the SACADA development with aims to make the SACADA tool suitable for implementation in the nuclear power plants' operator training program to collect operator performance information. The collected data would support the STPNOC's operator training program and be shared with the NRC for improving HRA quality. This paper discusses the SACADA data taxonomy, the theoretical foundation, the prospective data to be generated from the SACADA raw data to inform human reliability and human performance, and the considerations on the use of simulator data for HRA. Each SACADA data point consists of two information segments: context and performance results. Context is a characterization of the performance challenges to task success. The performance results are the results of performing the task. The data taxonomy uses a macrocognitive functions model for the framework. At a high level, information is classified according to the macrocognitive functions of detecting the plant abnormality, understanding the abnormality, deciding the response plan, executing the response plan, and team related aspects (i.e., communication, teamwork, and supervision). The data are expected to be useful for analyzing the relations between context, error modes and error causes in human performance.

Y. James Chang; Dennis Bley; Lawrence Criscione; Barry Kirwan; Ali Mosleh; Todd Madary; Rodney Nowell; Robert Richards; Emilie M. Roth; Scott Sieben; Antonios Zoulis

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Quantum Physics and Human Language  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human languages employ constructions that tacitly assume specific properties of the limited range of phenomena they evolved to describe. These assumed properties are true features of that limited context, but may not be general or precise properties of all the physical situations allowed by fundamental physics. In brief, human languages contain `excess baggage' that must be qualified, discarded, or otherwise reformed to give a clear account in the context of fundamental physics of even the everyday phenomena that the languages evolved to describe. The surest route to clarity is to express the constructions of human languages in the language of fundamental physical theory, not the other way around. These ideas are illustrated by an analysis of the verb `to happen' and the word `reality' in special relativity and the modern quantum mechanics of closed systems.

James B. Hartle

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

190

10.1101/gr.108217.110Access the most recent version at doi: 2010 20: 1730-1739 originally published online November 2, 2010Genome Res.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and neoplastic mammary epithelial cell transcriptomes. We develop data analysis pipelines that allow the mapping is significantly higher than that of normal cells. Our analysis indicates that transcript discovery plateaus at 10. Comparison of SAGE-Seq and traditional SAGE on normal and cancerous breast tissues reveals higher sensitivity

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

191

Effets de la prolactine sur la scrtion des lipides du lait dans les cellules pithliales mammaires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-en-Josas, France. Summary. Effect of prolactin on milk lipid secretion in lactating rabbit mammary gland epithelial secretion. These results show that the radioactivity of neosynthesized lipid constituents was modified during the secretion of milk lipids. Prolactin, which increased the total labelled lipids secreted, had

Boyer, Edmond

192

WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

Mayer, J.

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cognitive Engineering Automation and Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Home automation · Robotics · Unmanned vehicles (UAVs and UGVs) · Drug design/Molecular geneticsCognitive Engineering PSYC 530 Automation and Human Performance Raja Parasuraman #12;Overview Automation-Related Accidents Levels and Stages of Automation Information Acquisition and Analysis Decision

Parasuraman, Raja

194

NCSU Human Resources Training & Organizational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 NCSU Human Resources Training & Organizational Development Spring & Summer 2011 Learning to Training & Organizational Development's new eLearning Training Catalog. This catalog serves as a central information regarding: Participating Units and Who To Contact Certificate Programs Courses and Sessions eLearning

195

Human retroviruses and AIDS 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compendium, including accompanying floppy diskettes, is the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts it comprises: (I) Nucleic Acid Alignments and Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Alignments; (III) Analysis; (IV) Related Sequences; (V) Database communications.

Myers, G.; Korber, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S.; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Henderson, L.E.; Pavlakis, G.N. [eds.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Biodiversity in Human-Impacted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 #12;1 Biodiversity in Human-Impacted Landscapes Biodiversidad en Paisajes Intervenidos Volumen-1 complex and dynamic. Traditionally, efforts to protect biodiversity and address environmental problems abilities of policy makers and on-the-ground practitioners is essential to biodiversity conservation

Haller, Gary L.

197

EMERGENCY HIRE GUIDELINES HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCY HIRE GUIDELINES HUMAN RESOURCES Workforce Planning · One Washington Square · San José, Ca: Workforce Planning; Sr. Workforce Planning Analyst DATE: May 2, 2008 I. PURPOSE / DESCRIPTION The Emergency. B. The Workforce Planning Analyst will work with the hiring manager/HR contact to identify and hire

Su, Xiao

198

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Human Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the exciting stories about how our faculty, students, and alumni are engineering solutions to health careCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Human Health #12;Welcome to our Health issue ­ Please take the time to read to tackle large worldwide health problems. A few years ago, the College of Engineering made a strategic

199

Collective migration of epithelial sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The varied movements of the epithelium play vital roles in the development and renewal of complex tissues, from the separation of tissues in the early embryo, to homeostasis in the adult. Their movement is intricately ...

Murrell, Michael Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Propeller based human powered swimming device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently the only human powered swimming device widely sold on the market are swim flippers. However, flippers are not efficient for the human body, and there is a potential to increase the speed while swimming with a ...

Bunker, Kristine (Kristine Alina)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GT Human Resources PERSONAL DATA FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GT Human Resources PERSONAL DATA FORM Page 1 Updated: 0//201 Student Employee? Yes No Print clearly.: _________________________________ Job Title: Email: _________________________________ #12;GT Human Resources PERSONAL DATA FORM Page 2 using black or blue ink. Personal Information Name

Garmestani, Hamid

202

GT Human Resources PERSONAL DATA FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GT Human Resources PERSONAL DATA FORM Page 1 Updated: 05/01/2014 Student Employee? Yes No Print.: _________________________________ Job Title: _________________________________ #12;GT Human Resources PERSONAL DATA FORM Page 2 Updated clearly using black or blue ink. Personal Information Name

Jacobs, Laurence J.

203

Human Biology Program Brown Bag Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Biology Program Brown Bag Series Fall 2012 12:001:00 pm Morrison Hall 103 SeptemberVisser Department of Biology & Human Biology Prog. "Good Behavior, Bad Behavior: Insights From the Microbial

Indiana University

204

Cost estimation of human systems integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Systems Integration (HSI) is the interdisciplinary technical and management processes for integrating human considerations within and across all system elements. The goal of this research is to develop a better ...

Liu, Kevin K. (Kevin Kaitan), 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Video looping of human cyclic motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a system called Video Looping is developed to analyze human cyclic motions. Video Looping allows users to extract human cyclic motion from a given video sequence. This system analyzes similarities from a large amount of live footage...

Choi, Hye Mee

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Human Resources Organizational Development and Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Resources Organizational Development and Training November 2009 Development Guide for Tufts Organizational Competencies Copyright 2009 Tufts University #12;Human Resources Organizational Development Resources Organizational Development and Training 3 INTRODUCTION TO THE GUIDE November 2009 Dear Tufts

Dennett, Daniel

207

In Vitro Perfused Human Capillary Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during vessel network formation, micro- spheres traversedof a living network of dynamic human capillaries in a micro-

Moya, Monica L.; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Abraham P.; Hughes, Christopher C.W.; George, Steven C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Guessing human-chosen secrets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

number of third parties seeking to authenticate users [121, 244]. Reliable data on damages caused by weak human-chosen secrets is hard to come by [141], but a recent study of corporate data breaches commissioned by Verizon [12] suggested that nearly a... on Financial Cryptography and Data Security. Springer-Verlag, 2012 Some data on personal knowledge questions analysed in 7 was published in collaboration with Mike Just and Greg Matthews, who assisted in gathering government census records from around...

Bonneau, Joseph

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

Contractor Human Resource Management Programs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes DOE responsibilities and requirements for the management and oversight of contractor Human Resource Management (HR) programs. Chg 1, 5-8-98; Chg 2, 11-22-09; Chg 3, 2-23-10; Chg 4, 4-29-13. DOE O 350.1 Chg 5, dated 9-30-2014, cancels Chapters I-III of DOE O 350.1 Chg 4

1996-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Contractor Human Resource Management Programs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this directive is to establish Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities and requirements for the management and oversight of contractor Human Resource Management (HR) programs. Chg 1, 5-8-98; Chg 2, 11-22-09; Chg 3, 2-23-10; Chg 4, 4-29-13. This order cancels DOE O 3220.1A, DOE O 3220.4A, DOE O 3220.6A, and DOE O 3309.1A.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Human Eye June 4, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Human Eye T. Albers June 4, 2009 1 #12;1 Abstract The eyes provide a profound part of the human in my research. The eye is a biological system and, as such, does not lend itself to simplification Introduction Upon researching the human eye I have found it to be an exquisitely engineered piece of equipment

La Rosa, Andres H.

212

Policy Title: Human Subject Responsible Office: UFS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Title: Human Subject Payments Responsible Office: UFS HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Effective Date: 1/1/11 Revision Date: N/A HUMAN SUBJECT PAYMENTS Policy Number TAX102 HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY POLICY STATEMENT Individuals conducting Harvard research studies that compensate human

Chen, Yiling

213

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Construction Science and Management; Digital Pro- duction Arts

Stuart, Steven J.

214

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25 College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities offers graduate programs in three schools: the School in Architecture; City and Regional Planning; Construction Science and Management; Digital Pro- duction Arts

Stuart, Steven J.

215

College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

56 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities 56 COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The collaboration of Architecture (Landscape Ar- chitecture, Construction Science and Management, City and Regional Planning, and Architecture) with Arts (Visual Arts and Performing Arts) and the Humanities (Communication

Stuart, Steven J.

216

College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

57 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The collaboration of Architecture (Landscape Ar- chitecture, Construction Science and Management, City and Regional Planning, and Architecture) with Arts (Visual Arts and Performing Arts) and the Humanities (Communication

Stuart, Steven J.

217

Human Resources Recruiting Contracts 2013 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Resources Recruiting Contracts 2013 2014 Department of Human Resources | Prepared by David Ferraro | July 1, 2013 #12;The Department of Human Resources provides the attached advertising contracts resources provide a national and international presence while others are focused more regionally

Crawford, T. Daniel

218

HUMAN RESOURCES MANUAL SECTION 1: GENERAL PROVISIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HUMAN RESOURCES MANUAL SECTION 1: GENERAL PROVISIONS 1 | P a g e S e c t i o n 1 Purpose The purpose of this Human Resources Manual is to: 1. Provide the personnel and payroll policies and procedures, regulations and benefits. 3. Establish requirements and instructions for submission of Human Resources System

219

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF NATURAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CODE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF NATURAL RESOURCES College of Natural Resources Colorado;3 DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF NATURAL RESOURCES CODE ARTICLE I. GOAL AND OBJECTIVES A. DEPARTMENT MISSION The mission of the Department of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources is to contribute

220

Reflections on the human prospect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

World population and the global economy are expanding in a manner that is propelling civilization along a path that is unsustainable, inequitable, and unstable. A concerted, global effort to discover, integrate, disseminate, and apply knowledge about the natural world and human behavior would change this trajectory to a path of sustainable human development. This path would point toward the vision of a society in which the basic human needs and an equitable share of life`s amenities could be met by successive generations while maintaining in perpetuity a health, physically attractive, and biologically productive environment. The scholarly community is urged to provide impetus for the pursuit of this vision. An unprecedented degree of collaboration among the disciplines will be necessary. New modes of communication and cooperation among the major sectors of society will have to be fashioned. Knowledge will become an organizing principle for society in the twenty-first century. Climate change has resulted from continuing economic and demographic growth. To stabilize world climate, the emission of greenhouse gases must be controlled. 57 refs.

Malone, T.F. [Sigma Xi Center, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Integrating Human Performance and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human error is a significant factor in the cause and/or complication of events that occur in the commercial nuclear industry. In recent years, great gains have been made using Human Performance (HU) tools focused on targeting individual behaviors. However, the cost of improving HU is growing and resistance to add yet another HU tool certainly exists, particularly for those tools that increase the paperwork for operations. Improvements in HU that are the result of leveraging existing technology, such as hand-held mobile technologies, have the potential to reduce human error in controlling system configurations, safety tag-outs, and other verifications. Operator rounds, valve line-up verifications, containment closure verifications, safety & equipment protection, and system tagging can be supported by field-deployable wireless technologies. These devices can also support the availability of critical component data in the main control room and other locations. This research pilot project reviewing wireless hand-held technology is part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRSP), a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The project is being performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing, and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRSP vision is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current nuclear reactor fleet.

Ronald K. Farris; Heather Medema

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

HUMANITIES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting wasEngineering andHQHSI Bestscientists

223

The LIRIS Human activities dataset and the ICPR 2012 human activities recognition and localization competition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LIRIS Human activities dataset and the ICPR 2012 human activities recognition and localization-69621, France March 28, 2012 Abstract We describe the LIRIS human activities dataset, the dataset used competitions and existing datasets, the tasks focus on complex human behavior involving several people

Wolf, Christian

224

Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Disease Control and Prevention #12;Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals i2009 Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals #12;Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals 2009 Department of Health and Human Services Centers

225

Interactive Manipulation Between a Human and a Humanoid: When Robots Control Human Arm Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, humanoids and anthropo- morphic designs can facilitate the human/robot interaction, because peopleInteractive Manipulation Between a Human and a Humanoid: When Robots Control Human Arm Motion Bruno a novel approach in human/robot collaboration, where the robot controls not only its arm but also

Boyer, Edmond

226

HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES, and student body." From David Ward, "A Vision for the Future," p. 9. This document lists the human-resource goals and plans of the Office of Human Resources, the Equity and Diversity Resource Center

Sheridan, Jennifer

227

Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expression by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.

Garcia-Becerra, Rocio [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, Lorenza, E-mail: lorenzadiaz@gmail.com [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Camacho, Javier [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barrera, David; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Morales, Angelica [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, Cindy Sharon [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Avila, Euclides [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bargallo, Enrique [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Arrecillas, Myrna [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Strategic Use of Human Capital | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Human Capital Strategic Use of Human Capital A report on how the DOE uses and plans to reform their use of human capital. Strategic Use of Human Capital More Documents &...

229

NUMBER: HR 1.85 SECTION: Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUMBER: HR 1.85 SECTION: Human Resources SUBJECT: Research Grant or Time-limited Positions DATE: Chris Byrd Issued by: Division of Human Resources OF HUMAN RESOURCES HAS THE AUTHORITY TO INTERPRET THE UNIVERSITY'S HUMAN RESOURCES POLICIES

Almor, Amit

230

Contractor Human Resource Management Programs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes DOE responsibilities and requirements for the management and oversight of contractor Human Resource Management (HR) programs. Chg 1, 5-8-98; Chg 2, 11-22-09; Chg 3, 2-23-10; Chg 4, 4-29-13. DOE O 350.1 Chg 5, dated 9-30-2014, cancels DOE O 350.1 Chg 4. The Order is revised to reflect the cancellation of Chapters 1-3 due to the incorporation of these chapters into DOE Order 350.3; reflect organizational changes; delete reference to the DOE Retrospective Rating Insurance Plan, which is no longer available; remove the CRD from Chapter VII.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Simulation of human decision making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for computer emulation of human decision making defines a plurality of concepts related to a domain and a plurality of situations related to the domain, where each situation is a combination of at least two of the concepts. Each concept and situation is represented in the computer as an oscillator output, and each situation and concept oscillator output is distinguishable from all other oscillator outputs. Information is input to the computer representative of detected concepts, and the computer compares the detected concepts with the stored situations to determine if a situation has occurred.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM); Jordan, Sabina E. (Albuquerque, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

232

Human Resources | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC HistoryVeteransto getEmployee RelationsHuman

233

ORISE: Protecting Human Subjects Website  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK MappingHistory TheManagementProcess andProtecting Human

234

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPA addressesHowHughHumanDecoding DNA

235

China and the Humanities: At the Crossroads of the Human and the Humane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to legitimatize their own rule. However unlike the Manchu rulers, his analysis reveals only a dark portent for the future of Chinese civilization. Part Three Humanities Mark on People |???????? The five chapters of part three of this volume revolve around... or Virginia Woolf Academic Web] (http://globe.eworkway.com) that provides an im- portant on-line venue for Chinese academics and readers who are devoted to the life and works of Virginia Woolf. Judy LATTAS Judy Lattas is the Director of the Interdisciplinary...

Tchou, W. Kang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

Hardt, Marah Justine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HUMAN HEALTH SCIENCE BLDG GEO HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Principal Investigator Source Heat Pumps Demo Projects May 20, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential,...

238

Dealing with Data in Human Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we present a brief discussion of current challenges to data integration and sharing in the field of human neuroimaging at Edinburgh University.

Job, Dominic; Gonzalez, Rodriguez; Wardlaw, Joanna

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

239

Genomic mosaicism in the human brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zlokovic BV (2008) The blood-brain barrier in health andmosaicism in the human brain . Chapter Threethe Alzheimers disease brain . Chapter Five DNA

Westra, Jurjen Willem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Essays on Human Development and Public Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

52, January 2003. [54] Amartya Sen. Editorial: Human capitalapproach is advocated by Amartya Sen (1997) greater control1961, December 1997. [55] Amartya K Sen. Poverty: An ordinal

Raykar, Neha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Apparatus and methods for a human extender  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A human extender controller for interface between a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant. The human extender controller uses an inner-feedback loop to increase the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human extender controller of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the present invention is able to achieve a force reflection ratio 500 to 1 and capable of handling loads above the two (2) ton range.

Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Human factors methods in DOE nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of developing a series of guidelines for the use of human factors standards, procedures, and methods to be used in nuclear facilities. This paper discusses the philosophy and process being used to develop a DOE human factors methods handbook to be used during the design cycle. The following sections will discuss: (1) basic justification for the project; (2) human factors design objectives and goals; and (3) role of human factors engineering (HFE) in the design cycle.

Bennett, C.T.; Banks, W.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Waters, R.J. (Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A novel synthetic analog of militarin, MA-1 induces mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by ROS generation in human lung cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synthetic Militarin analog-1[(2R,3R,4R,5R)-1,6-bis(4-(2,4,4-trimethylpentan-2-yl)phenoxy) hexane-2,3,4,5-tetraol] is a novel derivative of constituents from Cordyceps militaris, which has been used to treat a variety of chronic diseases including inflammation, diabetes, hyperglycemia and cancers. Here, we report for the first time the synthesis of Militarin analog-1 (MA-1) and the apoptotic mechanism of MA-1 against human lung cancer cell lines. Treatment with MA-1 significantly inhibited the viability of 3 human lung cancer cell lines. The inhibition of viability and growth in MA-1-treated A549 cells with an IC{sub 50} of 5 ?M were mediated through apoptosis induction, as demonstrated by an increase in DNA fragmentation, sub-G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-DNA fraction, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. The apoptotic cell death caused mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through regulation of expression of the Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the final stage of apoptosis, activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, was induced. Furthermore, A549 lung cancer cells were more responsive to MA-1 than a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B), involving the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation and JNK/p38 MAPK exhibited attenuated DNA fragmentation in MA-1-induced apoptosis. Oral administration of MA-1 also retarded growth of A549 orthotopic xenografts. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the new synthetic derivative MA-1 triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through ROS generation and regulation of MAPKs and may be a potent therapeutic agent against human lung cancer. - Highlights: We report a novel synthesized derivative, militarin analog-1 (MA-1). MA-1-induced cancer cell death was triggered by the ROS generation through MAPKs. The MA-1-induced cell death was also modulated by the mitochondria-mediated pathway. The apoptotic cancer cell death by MA-1 was also exhibited in orthotopic xenografts. Our findings suggest MA-1 as a clinically useful agent for human lung cancer.

Yoon, Deok Hyo; Lim, Mi-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yu Ran [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi-Ho [Mushroom Research Division, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 404-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [R and D Center, Dong-A Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Yongin 446-905 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byeong Hwa [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Youl [Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Won O. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Park, Haeil [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sunga, E-mail: sachoi@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Woong, E-mail: tawkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Gestures for Industry: Intuitive Human-Robot Communication from Human Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gestures for Industry: Intuitive Human-Robot Communication from Human Observation Brian Gleeson we present a gestural communication lexicon for human-robot collaboration in industrial assembly in a study of industry needs, providing potential real-world applicability to our results. Actions required

MacLean, Karon

245

Mammary stem and progenitor cells: Tumour precursors? Amy Paguirigana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.01.048 * Corresponding author: Tel.: +1 608 265 5182; fax: +1 608 262 2824. E-mail address: alexander

Beebe, David J.

246

Sequencing the transcriptome of milk production: milk trumps mammary tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

important for milk lipid secretion. J Biol Chem 53. Russellin milk lipid formation and secretion. Trends Endocrinol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brownfield1 , Derek C Radisky1,6 , Carlos Bustamante2,3,4 and Mina J Bissell1, * 1 Life Sciences Division

Nelson, Celeste M.

248

Compressive stress enhances coordinated migration of mammary carcinoma cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer research has traditionally focused on genetic and biochemical changes during tumor progression. Uncontrolled cell proliferation of a solid tumor in a confined space not only creates well-studied oxidative stress ...

Tse, Janet M. (Janet Man-Yu)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

417. Aumailley, M. , C. Battaglia, U. Mayer, D. Reinhardt,S. Conzelmann, P. Ekblom, C. Battaglia, M. Aumailley, and R.

Streuli, Charles H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Is the Human Mind Massively Modular?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER T H R E E Is the Human Mind Massively Modular? Richard Samuels Introduction: Minds as Mechanisms Among the most pervasive and fundamental assumptions in cognitive science is that the human mind (or mind-brain) is a mechanism of some sort: a physical device com- posed of functionally specifiable

Samuels, Richard

251

Articulated Human Pose Estimation in Natural Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Articulated Human Pose Estimation in Natural Images by Samuel Alan Johnson Submitted in accordance. c 2012 The University of Leeds and Samuel Alan Johnson 2 #12;Abstract In this thesis the problem. Johnson and M. Everingham, "Learning Effective Human Pose Estimation from In- accurate Annotation

Hogg, David

252

Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions Ruina Ma, Damien Chablat, Fouad Bennis, and Liang Ma Abstract Human muscle fatigue is considered to be one of the main reasons for Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD). Recent models have been introduced to define muscle fatigue for static postures. However, the main

Boyer, Edmond

253

Culture Representation in Human Reliability Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding human-system response is critical to being able to plan and predict mission success in the modern battlespace. Commonly, human reliability analysis has been used to predict failures of human performance in complex, critical systems. However, most human reliability methods fail to take culture into account. This paper takes an easily understood state of the art human reliability analysis method and extends that method to account for the influence of culture, including acceptance of new technology, upon performance. The cultural parameters used to modify the human reliability analysis were determined from two standard industry approaches to cultural assessment: Hofstedes (1991) cultural factors and Davis (1989) technology acceptance model (TAM). The result is called the Culture Adjustment Method (CAM). An example is presented that (1) reviews human reliability assessment with and without cultural attributes for a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system attack, (2) demonstrates how country specific information can be used to increase the realism of HRA modeling, and (3) discusses the differences in human error probability estimates arising from cultural differences.

David Gertman; Julie Marble; Steven Novack

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Human-Robot-Communication and Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be obtained from today's industrial robots. However, to enable new robot applications with emphasis on serviceHuman-Robot-Communication and Machine Learning Abbr. title: Human-Robot-Communication and ML Volker for Real-Time Computer Systems and Robotics Kaiserstr. 12 D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany Phone: +49 721 608

Demiris, Yiannis

255

Human Resource Management: Employee Compensation Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Resource Management: Employee Compensation Guide Risk Management *Extension Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service; and Extension Program Specialist III.... ?Employee Compensation and Job Satisfaction on Dairy Farms in the Northeast.? April 1999. Cornell University, RB99-02. Kansas Department of Human Resources. Kansas Wage Survey, 1996 Edition. Rosenberg, Howard. ?Labor Management Decisions.? University...

Fogleman, Sarah L.; McCorkle, Dean

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

West Virginia University Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the WVU Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict between the current posted version and this printed copy, the posted version on the Web page is controlling. Page 1 of 2 of this administrative procedure has been posted on the WVU Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event

Mohaghegh, Shahab

257

West Virginia University Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict between the current posted version and this printed copy, the posted version on the Web page is controlling. Page 1 of 2 Access been posted on the WVU Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict

Mohaghegh, Shahab

258

West Virginia University Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict between the current posted version and this printed copy, the posted version on the Web page is controlling. Page 1 of 2 Employment been posted on the WVU Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict

Mohaghegh, Shahab

259

West Virginia University Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the WVU Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict between the current posted version and this printed copy, the posted version on the Web page is controlling. Page 1 of 2 been posted on the WVU Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict

Mohaghegh, Shahab

260

West Virginia University Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the WVU Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict between the current posted version and this printed copy, the posted version on the Web page is controlling. Page 1 of 3 Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict between the current posted

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Environmental Design and Planning; Historic Preservation; His- tory; Landscape Architecture; Professional Com25 College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES The College of Architecture, Arts, and Humani- ties offers graduate programs in three schools: the School

Stuart, Steven J.

262

Faculty of Humanities, Languages and Social Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Humanities, Languages and Social Science Schools Outreach Programme The Faculty of Humanities, Languages and Social Science, are offering schools a wide range of outreach activity for students a new language, such as Chinese or Arabic. They can find out more about French cinema, Latin American

263

Medical Examination Office of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medical Examination 4.40 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Faculty, staff, graduate associates, student employees, and applicants The Ohio State University Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 4.40 medical Examination Resources Edited 12/10/13 Resources for Policy 4.40 Drug-Free Workplace, Policy 7

Howat, Ian M.

264

Human-Centered Sustainable Product Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.! Black Cloud ­ Art and Technology for Sustainability 3.! Sustainable Building Design with the PinolevilleHuman-Centered Sustainable Product Design !!Module Overview !!Need Finding Methods 1 ME Module Lectures !! Week 1 ­! Introduction Sustainable Product Design ­! Human-Centered Need Finding and Contextual

Agogino, Alice M.

265

International Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of southern Russia and climatic changes" 15.00 ­ Dr. A. Skorobogatov (Voronezh University, Russia). "TheInternational Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human Society to Climatic Changes in Ukraine- Ukrainian team started to investigate Holocene climate changes and the resulting vegetation and human

Bern, Universität

266

Mathematics of Planet Earth: Sustainable Human Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 Sustainable Human Environments · In 1900, only 13% of the world's population lived in cities. · By 2050 · As rapid city expansion continues, mathematical scientists can play key roles in shaping sustainable living1 Mathematics of Planet Earth: Sustainable Human Environments Fred Roberts Rutgers University #12

267

Mathematics of Planet Earth: Sustainable Human Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expansion continues, mathematical scientists can play key roles in shaping sustainable living environments1 Mathematics of Planet Earth: Sustainable Human Environments Fred Roberts Rutgers University #12 Clusters, beginning with workshops: Sustainable Human Environments (Rutgers U.), April 23-25, 2014 (this

268

Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Deformable human body model development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Human-computer interface design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern military forces assume that computer-based information is reliable, timely, available, usable, and shared. The importance of computer-based information is based on the assumption that {open_quotes}shared situation awareness, coupled with the ability to conduct continuous operations, will allow information age armies to observe, decide, and act faster, more correctly and more precisely than their enemies.{close_quotes} (Sullivan and Dubik 1994). Human-Computer Interface (HCI) design standardization is critical to the realization of the previously stated assumptions. Given that a key factor of a high-performance, high-reliability system is an easy-to-use, effective design of the interface between the hardware, software, and the user, it follows logically that the interface between the computer and the military user is critical to the success of the information-age military. The proliferation of computer technology has resulted in the development of an extensive variety of computer-based systems and the implementation of varying HCI styles on these systems. To accommodate the continued growth in computer-based systems, minimize HCI diversity, and improve system performance and reliability, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is continuing to adopt interface standards for developing computer-based systems.

Bowser, S.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Human retroviruses and AIDS 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compendium is the result of an effort to compile, organize, and rapidly publish as much relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses as possible. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the four parts that it comprises: (1) Nucleic Acid Alignments, (2) Amino Acid Alignments, (3) Reviews and Analyses, and (4) Related Sequences. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. This year we are not including floppy diskettes as the entire compendium is available both at our Web site and at our ftp site. If you need floppy diskettes please contact either Bette Korber (btk@t10.lanl.gov) or Kersti Rock (karm@t10.lanl.gov) by email or fax ((505) 665-4453). While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. The exception to this are reviews submitted by experts in areas deemed of particular and basic importance to research involving AIDS viral sequence information. These are included in Part III, and are contributed by scientists with particular expertise in the area of interest. In addition to the general descriptions below of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

Korber, B.; Foley, B.; Leitner, T. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Models and evaluation of human-machine systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The field of human-machine systems and human-machine interfaces is very multidisciplinary. We have to navigate between the knowledge waves brought by several areas of the human learning: cognitive psychology, artificial ...

Bayout Alvarenga, Marco Antonio

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NUMBER: HR 1.54 SECTION: Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ______________________________________________________________________________ I. Policy The Division of Human Resources maintains a limited pool of temporary employees (floaters1 NUMBER: HR 1.54 SECTION: Human Resources SUBJECT: Floater Services DATE: August 1988 REVISED: Division of Human Resources

Almor, Amit

274

Human dopamine receptor and its uses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

Civelli, Olivier (Portland, OR); Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie (Toronto, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Applying lessons learned to enhance human performance and reduce human error for ISS operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major component of reliability, safety, and mission success for space missions is ensuring that the humans involved (flight crew, ground crew, mission control, etc.) perform their tasks and functions as required. This includes compliance with training and procedures during normal conditions, and successful compensation when malfunctions or unexpected conditions occur. A very significant issue that affects human performance in space flight is human error. Human errors can invalidate carefully designed equipment and procedures. If certain errors combine with equipment failures or design flaws, mission failure or loss of life can occur. The control of human error during operation of the International Space Station (ISS) will be critical to the overall success of the program. As experience from Mir operations has shown, human performance plays a vital role in the success or failure of long duration space missions. The Department of Energy`s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is developed a systematic approach to enhance human performance and reduce human errors for ISS operations. This approach is based on the systematic identification and evaluation of lessons learned from past space missions such as Mir to enhance the design and operation of ISS. This paper describes previous INEEL research on human error sponsored by NASA and how it can be applied to enhance human reliability for ISS.

Nelson, W.R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Human-robot cross-training: Computational formulation, modeling and evaluation of a human team training strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We design and evaluate human-robot cross-training, a strategy widely used and validated for effective human team training. Cross-training is an interactive planning method in which a human and a robot iteratively switch ...

Nikolaidis, Stefanos

277

Spatial Spectra of Human ECG 1 Freeman et al. Spatial spectral analysis of human electrocorticograms including the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Spectra of Human ECG 1 Freeman et al. Spatial spectral analysis of human Spectra of Human ECG 2 Freeman et al. (AM) of a broad spectrum gamma oscillation having a similar

Freeman, Walter J.

278

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pumps Project objectives: Construct a ground sourced heat pump, heating,...

279

Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

characterization of human colon and rectal cancer. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer. Abstract: We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors...

280

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management Innovation and Solutions DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management Innovation and...

282

Revising California Policies on Human Trafficking Will Help Protect Victims  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING WILL HELP PROTECT VICTIMS BY LAURAON HUMAN TRAFFICKING WILL HELP PROTECT VICTIMS Humanhuman trafficking laws could help shift the paradigm and

Carter, Laura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic...

284

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human Ecologicalindicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human EcologicalI explore how life-cycle assessment (LCA) results can

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

advanced human atherosclerotic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complex co Centred Design Trends; Niels Ccm Moes; Imre Horvth 4 Advancing Medicine for Horses and Humans Geosciences Websites Summary: Advancing Medicine for Horses and Humans...

286

Medical Sequencing at the extremes of Human Body Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medical Sequencing at the Extremes of Human Body Mass Nadavcandidate genes and the extremes of human body mass.especially in the population extremes of a given phenotype

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

GT Human Resources PERSONAL DATA FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GT Human Resources PERSONAL DATA FORM Page 1 Updated: 05/01/2014 Student Employee? Yes No Print clearly using black or blue ink. Personal Information Name) __________________________________________________________________________________________ (City) (State) (Zip) (County) Personal Telephone #: (_______)________-__________ GT Work Telephone

Jacobs, Laurence J.

288

Data-driven human body morphing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents an efficient and biologically informed 3D human body morphing technique through data-driven alteration of standardized 3D models. The anthropometric data is derived from a large empirical database and processed using principal...

Zhang, Xiao

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Human leading the Thermal Comfort Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 Zhang H., 2003, Human Thermal Sensation and Comfort in Transient and Non Uniform Thermal Environments; Phd Thesis Zhang H., Arens E., Huizinga C., Han T., 2010, Thermal sensations and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments...

Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Van Houten, R.; Vissers, D.; Maaijen, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Purdue University Human Resources -33ABSENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(PPL) Outside Activity Leave (five consecutive working days or less) 2 (OL) Reportable Outside Activity by Authorized University Officer BUSINESS OFFICE/HUMAN RESOURCE SERVICES/PAYROLL USE ONLY PPL Eligibility based

Ginzel, Matthew

291

1 Calibration against independent human travel datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Calibration against independent human travel datasets 1.1 Calibration against United States at www.bts.gov. Although the BTS dataset is large, the movements were histogrammed 1 #12;with a low

Shull, Kenneth R.

292

INDIVIDUAL DISCIPLINES: HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION MARKETING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIVIDUAL DISCIPLINES: HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION MARKETING AND RECRUITMENT CAMPAIGN STAFF .:|:. Client: Y. Mankin, Computing Sciences #12;DESIGN MAIN MENU 1 2 344 4 5WEBSITES Joint BioEnergy Institute

293

HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lectures and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on the role of technology in reproductive ...

Klapholz, Henry

294

Immunoassay for Monitoring Environmental and Human Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rising worldwide (4). PBDEs accumulate in house dust, sewage sludge, biosolids, wildlife/pets, and humans workers in electronic-recycling facilities that experience high PBDE exposure (11), a major route

Hammock, Bruce D.

295

Measurement of the human sar a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of the human sar a) acoustic input immittance of the. William M. Rabinowitz Research for immittance measurements A closed sound system was calibrated using known acoustic immittances as "loads

Allen, Jont

296

Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pollination Cultural: Aesthetic, spiritual, educational, recreational Security: personal safety, secureEcosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith, happiness, social/community acceptance, recognition, etc) #12;Some problems: · ***What is `culture

297

Embodied cognition in robots and human evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the notion of embodied cognition in humans using the research of former University of Washington researcher William Calvin and robots using the research of former MIT professor Rodney Brooks. The ...

Myhrvold, Conor L. (Conor Lachlan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Implications of the Human Genome Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Genome Project (HGP), launched in 1991, aims to map and sequence the human genome by 2006. During the fifteen-year life of the project, it is projected that $3 billion in federal funds will be allocated to it. The ultimate aims of spending this money are to analyze the structure of human DNA, to identify all human genes, to recognize the functions of those genes, and to prepare for the biology and medicine of the twenty-first century. The following summary examines some of the implications of the program, concentrating on its scientific import and on the ethical and social problems that it raises. Its aim is to expose principles that might be used in applying the information which the HGP will generate. There is no attempt here to translate the principles into detailed proposals for legislation. Arguments and discussion can be found in the full report, but, like this summary, that report does not contain any legislative proposals.

Kitcher, P.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Finite element decomposition of the human neocortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dividing boundary types of neuroanatomical consistency . . . . . . . . 5 1 18 Mapping a template onto the object domain. . . . ?53 FIGURE Page 19 Hierarchical division of the human brain into its anatomical parts, . . . 54 20 Decomposition of a... major gyrus into macro elements . ?. , 56 21 Different gyral shapes and their lines of symmetry. . . . 57 22 Mapping gyral line of symmetry at different levels of detail. . . . . . . . 58 23 Sectional view in a human brain atlas. , . . . 60 24...

Chow, Seeling

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Exploring Paradigms of Human Resource Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paradigms of HRD. The study was carried out by examining the text of articles published in Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD)-sponsored journals. Purposeful, stratified, and random sampling was used to select 16 articles published in AHRD... educational programs of HRD can be found in countries throughout many parts of the world. The Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) is the predominant global professional organization with individual memberships that focus on research. It holds four...

Hurt, Andrew Christopher

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Human Capital Accountability Program--Withdrawn  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Withdrawn 3-26-14. The purpose of maintaining and updating this directive is to (1) Ensure compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and other directives. (2) Reduce the risk of DOE losing any of its personnel authorities. (3) Incorporate functional accountability to ensure that Human Resource Directors' position descriptions and classifications are appropriate, selections result in quality leadership with skills needed, and performance plans and evaluations are consistent with Department and Administration human resources priorities and audit findings.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial and medical applications raises the urgent need for tools that can predict NP toxicity. Global transcriptome and proteome analyses were conducted on three human cell types, exposed to two high aspect ratio NP types, to identify patterns of expression that might indicate high versus low NP toxicity. Three cell types representing the most common routes of human exposure to NPs, including macrophage-like (THP-1), small airway epithelial and intestinal (Caco-2/HT29-MTX) cells, were exposed to TiO2 nanobelts (TiO2-NB; high toxicity) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT; low toxicity) at low (10 g/mL) and high (100 g/mL) concentrations for 1 and 24 h. Unique patterns of gene and protein expressions were identified for each cell type, with no differentially expressed (p < 0.05, 1.5-fold change) genes or proteins overlapping across all three cell types. While unique to each cell type, the early response was primarily independent of NP type, showing similar expression patterns in response to both TiO2-NB and MWCNT. The early response might, therefore, indicate a general response to insult. In contrast, the 24 h response was unique to each NP type. The most significantly (p < 0.05) enriched biological processes in THP-1 cells indicated TiO2-NB regulation of pathways associated with inflammation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA replication stress and genomic instability, while MWCNT-regulated pathways indicated increased cell proliferation, DNA repair and anti-apoptosis. These two distinct sets of biological pathways might, therefore, underlie cellular responses to high and low NP toxicity, respectively.

Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Tolic, Ana; Xie, Yumei; Lai, Xianyin; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Waters, Katrina M.; Holian, Andrij; Witzmann, Frank A.; Orr, Galya

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Learned Human-in-the-Loop Decision Making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that it was human. - Alan Turing Introduction Learning is agreat frequency. - Alan Turing Introduction The Generalized

Basso, Brandon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

TO: HR and Business Contacts FROM: Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEMORANDUM TO: HR and Business Contacts FROM: Division of Human Resources DATE: October 25, 2013 RE: Human Resources Fall 2013 Forum The Division of Human Resources will sponsor an HR Forum from 1 to the Division of Human Resources' Organizational and Professional Development Office at hrtrain

Almor, Amit

305

TO: HR and Business Contacts FROM: Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO: HR and Business Contacts FROM: Division of Human Resources DATE: September 6, 2012 RE: Human Resources Fall 2012 Forum The Division of Human Resources will sponsor an HR Forum from 1-4 p in person or by webinar. Any questions about the forum may be e-mailed to the Division of Human Resources

Almor, Amit

306

CS 4317 Human-Computer Interaction Course Number: CS4317  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interaction. Theory of human-computer interaction. Development methods for interfaces such as user1 CS 4317 Human-Computer Interaction Course Number: CS4317 Course Title: Human-Computer Interaction Course Instructors Nigel Ward Course Description: CS4317: Models and methods of human-computer

Ward, Karen

307

Human Resources hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Worksafe NZ , any restricted work as defined in regulation 2 and 26 of The Health and Safety in EmploymentHuman Resources ­ hs_pro08 Page 1 of 12 Human Resources: Health, Safety & Wellbeing Protocol & Safety Manager Contact: Health & Safety Team Table of Contents Introduction

Hickman, Mark

308

Bachelor of Science in Human Services Department of Counseling and Human Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Science in Human Services Department of Counseling and Human Services Darden College: ________________________________________________________________________ Site: On-campus/Hampton Roads OR TTN site: _____________________________________(Select one) GENERAL, or THEA 241A ___________________ 3_____ Interpreting the Past ­ 3 hours HIST 100H, 101H, 102H, 103H, 104H

309

Bachelor of Science in Human Services Department of Counseling and Human Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Science in Human Services Department of Counseling and Human Services Darden College: ________________________________________________________________________ Site: On-campus OR Online: _____________________________________(Select one) GENERAL EDUCATION AND PRE_____ Interpreting the Past ­ 3 hours HIST 100H, 101H, 102H, 103H, 104H or 105H _________________ 3_____ Literature

310

Advancing Usability Evaluation through Human Reliability Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces a novel augmentation to the current heuristic usability evaluation methodology. The SPAR-H human reliability analysis method was developed for categorizing human performance in nuclear power plants. Despite the specialized use of SPAR-H for safety critical scenarios, the method also holds promise for use in commercial off-the-shelf software usability evaluations. The SPAR-H method shares task analysis underpinnings with human-computer interaction, and it can be easily adapted to incorporate usability heuristics as performance shaping factors. By assigning probabilistic modifiers to heuristics, it is possible to arrive at the usability error probability (UEP). This UEP is not a literal probability of error but nonetheless provides a quantitative basis to heuristic evaluation. When combined with a consequence matrix for usability errors, this method affords ready prioritization of usability issues.

Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Planet-scale Human Mobility Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research into, and design and construction of mobile systems and algorithms requires access to large-scale mobility data. Unfortunately, the wireless and mobile research community lacks such data. For instance, the largest available human contact traces contain only 100 nodes with very sparse connectivity, limited by experimental logistics. In this paper we pose a challenge to the community: how can we collect mobility data from billions of human participants? We re-assert the importance of large-scale datasets in communication network design, and claim that this could impact fundamental studies in other academic disciplines. In effect, we argue that planet-scale mobility measurements can help to save the world. For example, through understanding large-scale human mobility, we can track and model and contain the spread of epidemics of various kinds.

Pan Hui; Richard Mortier; Tristan Henderson; Jon Crowcroft

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

312

United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Human Space Technology Initiative was launched in 2010 within the framework of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications implemented by the Office for Outer Space Affairs of the United Nations. It aims to involve more countries in activities related to human spaceflight and space exploration and to increase the benefits from the outcome of such activities through international cooperation, to make space exploration a truly international effort. The role of the Initiative in these efforts is to provide a platform to exchange information, foster collaboration between partners from spacefaring and non-spacefaring countries, and encourage emerging and developing countries to take part in space research and benefit from space applications. The Initiative organizes expert meetings and workshops annually to raise awareness of the current status of space exploration activities as well as of the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications. The Initiative is also carrying out primary ...

Ochiai, M; Steffens, H; Balogh, W; Haubold, H J; Othman, M; Doi, T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Human Resources Reports | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergy andAction CenterHumanHuman Resources

314

Collagen-Hyaluronic Acid Scaffolds for Adipose Tissue Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-drying, also known as lyophilization, is commonly employed to produce water-soluble polymer scaffolds such as collagen [12, 41-43]. In this technique, a suspension of the water-soluble polymer is frozen, thereby forming an interpenetrating network of ice... . Keywords: Collagen; crosslinking; freeze-drying; hyaluronic acid; scaffolds, adipose tissue engineering 1. Introduction The mammary gland comprises a complex branched epithelial network invested within an adipocyte-rich stroma termed a fat...

Davidenko, Natalia; Campbell, J. J.; Thian, E. S.; Watson, C. J,; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nickel-induced down-regulation of {Delta}Np63 and its role in the proliferation of keratinocytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epidemiological, animal, and cell studies have demonstrated that nickel compounds are human carcinogens. The mechanisms of their carcinogenic actions remain to be investigated. p63, a close homologue of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, has been linked to cell fate determination and/or maintenance of self-renewing populations in several epithelial tissues, including skin, mammary gland, and prostate. {Delta}Np63, a dominant negative isoform of p63, is amplified in a variety of epithelial tumors including squamous cell carcinomas and carcinomas of the prostate and mammary glands. The present study shows that nickel suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in a short-time treatment (up to 48 h). Nickel treatment caused activation of NF-{kappa}B. Blockage of NF-{kappa}B partially reversed nickel-induced {Delta}Np63 suppression. Nickel decreased interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by nickel. Nickel was able to activate p21, and its activation was offset by the over-expression of {Delta}Np63. In turn, elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth. The present study demonstrated that nickel decreased interferon regulatory proteins IRF3 and IRF7, and activated NF-{kappa}B, resulting in {Delta}Np63 suppression and then p21 up-regulation. {Delta}Np63 plays an important role in nickel-induced cell proliferation. - Highlights: > Ni suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in HaCat cells. > Ni activated NF-{kappa}B, decreased expressions of IRF3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. > Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by Ni. > Ni activated p21, and its activation was offset by over-expression of {Delta}Np63. > Elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth.

Zhang Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li Wenqi [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Cheng Senping [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yao Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Zhang Fan; Chang Qingshan [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke Zunji [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang Xin; Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Division of Human Resources Termination Of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources Termination Of Domestic Partnership Health Stipend Questions (813) 974 Insurance Stipend will terminate as of the Effective Date on this Termination of Domestic Partnership Health. ______ The Domestic Partnership Declaration attested to and filed by me with USF shall be and is terminated

Meyers, Steven D.

317

Human Voice Recognition Depends on Language Ability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in their lan- guage. Leading theories of dyslexia propose that impoverished phonological processing often un recognition by human listeners relies on linguis- tic (phonological) representations, listeners with dyslexia-specific phonologi- cal representations). We assessed partici- pants with and without dyslexia for their ability

318

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, planning, development and construction. Issues of sustainability and green building are among the areas of Design and Building, the School of the Arts, and the School of Humanities. Advanced degrees are of- fered; Planning, Design and the Built Environment; Professional Communication; Real Estate Development; Rhetorics

Bolding, M. Chad

319

College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities ARCHITECTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contemporary issues of design, planning, development and construction. Issues of sustain- ability and green of Design and Building, the School of the Arts, and the School of Humanities. Advanced degrees are of- fered; Planning, Design and the Built Environment; Professional Communication; Real Estate Development; Rhetorics

Stuart, Steven J.

320

Division of Human Resources Nonresident Alien Federal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources Nonresident Alien Federal Withholding Requirements Questions (813) 974 classified as nonresident aliens for tax purposes with regard to their federal withholding taxes.gov. In brief, the Form W-4 requirements for individuals who are nonresident aliens (NRA) for tax purposes

Meyers, Steven D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

PEOPLE OF CALIFORNIA HEALTH AND HUMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chair AIR RESOURCES BOARD Mary Nichols Chair DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES Toby Douglas DirectorPEOPLE OF CALIFORNIA HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AGENCY Diana Dooley Secretary Michael Wilkening Deborah Raphael Director OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT George Alexeeff Director

322

Human Resources Tool Kit: Employee Self Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Resources Tool Kit: Employee Self Service Overview: Employee Self Service (ESS) offers a single, secure source for individuals to manage their personal information. ESS offers two components in both eProfile and BuckeyeLink for employee-students. ESS will roll out university-wide April 30

323

Achieving a Fieldable, Acquisition Process for Human-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Based Operations) Objective Effect Desired Capability Exploit Info Ops Engage Targets with Survivable Weapon of Industrial Engineering University of Buffalo (SUNY) Ken Boff Chief Scientist AFRL Human Effectiveness Effectiveness Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory John Flach Department of Psychology Wright State

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

324

Biomedical Sciences Contributing to Progress in Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Sciences Contributing to Progress in Human Health as a Leading Integrated Research and global impact. The University also strives to complement this breadth of scholarship with focus Medicine, Nature Genetics, Lancet and Science Contribution to 68 out of the 395 `top' papers from

Huang, Jianwei

325

Philosophy Honours (& BA Humanities and Social Science)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Philosophy Honours Handbook (& BA Humanities and Social Science) 2012/2013 Philosophy School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences University of Edinburgh #12;1 Philosophy Honours Handbook (& BA.......................................... 13 #12;2 1. Resources for Philosophy A complete list of the full-time academic staff in Philosophy

Edinburgh, University of

326

Understanding complexity in the human brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding complexity in the human brain Danielle S. Bassett1 and Michael S. Gazzaniga2 1 the ultimate aim of neuroscientific enquiry is to gain an understanding of the brain and how its work- ings of mind­brain mechanisms if the cumulative findings from these neu- roscientific studies are coupled

Gazzaniga, Michael

327

Human Resources Security Access Matrix Function Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 2013 Human Resources Security Access Matrix Function Training Course Required Class Mode Training Course Prerequisite Security Access Form Required Contact for Additional Information Complete Electronic I-9 Forms REC001: I-9 /E-Verify Web Training OR Online OR None Electronic I-9 Security Access Form

Wu, Shin-Tson

328

Human-Centered Sustainable Product !!Environmental impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human-Centered Sustainable Product Design !!Environmental impact of buildings !!Green Building million tons annually) ·! 12% of potable water in the U.S. Environmental Impact of Buildings Environmental Design !! "The ongoing energy use is probably the single greatest environmental impact of a building

Agogino, Alice M.

329

Division of Human Resources University Grievance Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources University Grievance Procedures Employee Relations/ USF System Grievance Procedure Questions: (813) 974-2970 Rev. 12/2012 This procedure applies to Administration, Staff in this procedure are expressed in calendar days. If a deadline falls on a Saturday, Sunday or holiday, an action

Meyers, Steven D.

330

French Studies The School of Humanities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 French Studies The School of Humanities Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Courses in this department hone language skills in French while placing a diverse, generalized knowledge of French literature within a broad spectrum of cultural, historical, philosophical, and theoretical concerns. Students also

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

331

French Studies The School of Humanities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

181 French Studies The School of Humanities Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Courses in this department hone language skills in French while placing a diverse, generalized knowledge of French literature within a broad spectrum of cultural, historical, philosophical, and theoretical concerns. Students also

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

332

French Studies The School of Humanities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

164 French Studies The School of Humanities Chair Bernard Aresu Professors Madeleine Alcover Jean in this department hone language skills in French while placing a diverse, generalized knowledge of French literature within a broad spectrum of cultural, histori- cal, philosophical, and theoretical concerns. Students

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

333

French Studies The School of Humanities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of French literature within a broad spectrum of cultural, histori- cal, philosophical, and theoretical179 French Studies The School of Humanities Chair Michel Achard Professors Madeleine Alcover.D. Courses in this department hone language skills in French while placing a diverse, generalized knowledge

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

334

BachelorofArts GeneralMajorintheHumanities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Humanities, the Social Sciences and the Sciences.The main emphasis of the General Major is to provide a broad, if French 1500 is required in your program, you could not use French (1000 level) to fulfill English - all courses One of French, German or Spanish (Linguistics 2300 may be substituted for one

Seldin, Jonathan P.

335

French Studies The School of Humanities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

174 French Studies The School of Humanities Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Courses in this department hone language skills in French while placing a diverse, generalized knowledge of French literature within a broad spectrum of cultural, historical,philosophical,and theoretical concerns.Students are also

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

336

French Studies The School of Humanities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

189 French Studies The School of Humanities Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Courses in this department hone language skills in French while placing a diverse, generalized knowledge of French literature within a broad spectrum of cultural, historical, philosophical, and theoretical concerns. Students also

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

337

French Studies The School of Humanities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 French Studies The School of Humanities Degrees Offered: BA, MA, PhD Courses in this department hone language skills in French while placing a diverse, generalized knowledge of French literature within a broad spectrum of cultural, historical,philosophical,and theoretical concerns.Students are also

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

338

Nucleotide Frequency Variation Across Human Genes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nucleotide Frequency Variation Across Human Genes Elizabeth Louie, Jurg Ott, and Jacek Majewski1 The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA The frequencies of individual nucleotides exhibit significant fluctuations across eukaryotic genes. In this paper, we investigate nucleotide variation across

Majewski, Jacek

339

HUMAN RESOURCES 3 February 2012 UNIVERSITET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Officer Margit Troelsen, tel. 871 53348 e-mail; mt@teo.au.dk > Personnel Officer Dorte Moe Jakobsen, tel. 871 53327 > e-mail; dmj@adm.au.dk > Personnel Office, AU HR #12;HUMAN RESOURCES 3 February 2012 AARHUS

340

Advancing Medicine for Horses and Humans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancing Medicine for Horses and Humans Animal Reproduction and Biotechnology Laboratory-Tech Helping Hand Dr. Patrick McCue From Dairy Farm to Horse Farm: A Love of Teaching and Clinical Work Come, Researcher's Enthusiasm Is Infectious Dr. Edward Squires Love of Horses Brought Researcher to Life's Work

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Face Recognition Algorithms Surpass Humans Matching Faces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over humans, in light of the absolute performance levels of the algorithms, underscores the need systems for security applications. How accurate must a face recognition algorithm be to contribute to these applications? Over the last decade, academic computer vision researchers and commercial product developers have

Abdi, Hervé

342

West Virginia University Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict between the current posted version and this printed copy, the posted version on the Web page is controlling. Page 1 of 9 Family Medical Leave Act Division of Human Resources Web page hr.wvu.edu. In the event of a conflict between the current posted

Mohaghegh, Shahab

343

College of Human and Health Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8988 College of Human and Health Sciences All research is delivered through discipline-focused research centres, which examine fields such as child research, ageing, psychology and social care, as well as midwifery, nursing and allied health professions. External funding from a number of prestigious bodies has

Harman, Neal.A.

344

Human Impacts in Pine Forests: Past, Present,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These changes are occurring against a backdrop of natural and anthropogenically driven climate change. We review human pressure. The immense scale of impacts and the complex synergies between agents of change calls hominids first encountered these trees in the Mediterranean Basin about a million years ago. Ancient Greeks

345

Traffic culture human factors & traffic safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic culture human factors & traffic safety by Dr.-Ing. Haraldur Sigþórsson and Dr.-Ing. Stefán) Culture, traffic culture and traffic safety culture are interrelated Culture www.hr.is 3 Traffic Culture Traffic safety culture What is culture? · A culture is a collection of behavioral patterns that are found

Karlsson, Brynjar

346

TEMPORARY AGENCY APPOINTMENTS HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

submit the Request for Temporary Support form to Workforce Planning available on the Human Resources web or performance issues should be reported to Workforce Planning. Workforce Planning will contact the temporary of the Request for Temporary Support, Workforce Planning will determine that the services of a temporary agency

Su, Xiao

347

HLT/EMNLP 2005 Human Language  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and the 9th International Workshop on Parsing Technologies (IWPT). In the HLT tradition, the conference Language Processing Proceedings of the Conference 6-8 October 2005 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada #12HLT/EMNLP 2005 Human Language Technology Conference and Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural

348

Division of Human Resources Payroll Certification Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources Payroll Certification Process Questions (813) 974-7955 Payroll/Payroll Processing Rev. 04/2010 Payroll Certification is the process by which departments submit to Payroll the hours to be paid for each employee within each department. This process utilizes the online Certification System

Meyers, Steven D.

349

Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services Workers' Compensation Update RETURN TO WORK or supervisor upon returning to work. The manager or supervisor should fax a copy of the release to Risk, the University's Workers' Compensation Program Manager, at extension 2824 or visit the Risk Management Website

de Lijser, Peter

350

Essays on human capital and financial economics by Jialan Wang.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis consists of three essays examining issues related to human capital, careers, and financial economics. In the first chapter, I examine how the process of corporate bankruptcy varies by human capital intensity ...

Wang, Jialan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare Tuesday 2nd December 2014 safety, quality and productivity in healthcare. Showcasing enduring solutions to patient safety recognised speakers in patient safety including: Martin Bromiley, Founder, Clinical Human Factors Group Dr

Levi, Ran

352

A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on a 38 kDa pre?HDL (Lp1-AI) particle . A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on...

353

Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

SURGICAL HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY | UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURGICAL HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY | UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN Spring 2014 Journal, COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING Department of Surgery University of Saskatchewan COVER PAGE Primal (96" x 60 Humanities Program Department of Surgery University of Saskatchewan Health Sciences Building 107 Wiggins Road

Peak, Derek

355

NUMBER: HR 1.34 (NEW) SECTION: Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the President, Vice Presidents, Secretary of the Board of Trustees, University Treasurer, and General Counsel OF HUMAN RESOURCES HAS THE AUTHORITY TO INTERPRET THE UNIVERSITY'S HUMAN RESOURCES POLICIES. I. Policy

Almor, Amit

356

a549 human lung: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human (more) Weems, Jessica Marie 2010-01-01 26 KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG Physics Websites Summary: to the epidemiologically derived value...

357

The New Frontier of Human-Level Artificial Intelligence Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the field of human-level intelligence, researchers are combining a variety of approaches toward the goals of human-like breadth, flexibility, and resilience for artificial intelligence systems. Each of the four ...

Winston, Patrick Henry

358

Designing Everyday Technologies with Human-Power and Interactive Microgeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paulos Human-Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie Mellon 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, USA on electricity we importantly also consider non-electrical and manual technologies em- ploying "human power" (e technologies, inc

Paulos, Eric

359

Human walking model predicts joint mechanics, electromyography and mechanical economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we present an under-actuated model of human walking, comprising only a soleus muscle and flexion/extension monoarticular hip muscles. The remaining muscle groups of the human leg are modeled using quasi-passive, ...

Endo, Ken

360

On the Use of Human Mobility Proxies for Modeling Epidemics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human mobility is a key component of large-scale spatial-transmission models of infectious diseases. Correctly modeling and quantifying human mobility is critical for improving epidemic control, but may be hindered by data ...

Tizzoni, Michele

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

assessing human immunodeficiency: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and risk assessment of many species are affected by the presence of humans Blumstein, Daniel T. 202 Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is an essential...

362

adult human muscle: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Human Muscle...

363

2011-2015 Human Capital Management Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This Human Capital Management Plan (HCMP or Plan) shows how we intend to recruit, hire, train, develop, and retain such employees. 2011-2015 Human Capital Management Plan More...

364

Human rights enforcement: a fundamental duty of the sovereign state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of human rights international claims to the "'grossest cases' of abuse that infringe the minimal views of decency embodied in every major world cultural tradition" (Falk 143). Berger includes the following as violations of basic human rights: Genocide... of human rights international claims to only the "'grossest cases' of abuse that infiinge the minimal views of decency embodied in every major world cultural tradition" (Falk 143). Berger's conception of serious human rights violations provides a...

Englehart, Ellen Marie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Human Portable Radiation Detection System Communications Package Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing and valuation of the Human Portable Radiation Detection System Communications Package for the US Coast Guard.

Morgen, Gerald P.; Peterson, William W.

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

366

Justice and the Human Genome Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. [eds.] [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Justice and the Human Genome Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Evidence for Cardiomyocyte Renewal in Humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been difficult to establish whether we are limited to the heart muscle cells we are born with or if cardiomyocytes are generated also later in life. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, into DNA to establish the age of cardiomyocytes in humans. We report that cardiomyocytes renew, with a gradual decrease from 1% turning over annually at the age of 20 to 0.3% at the age of 75. Less than 50% of cardiomyocytes are exchanged during a normal lifespan. The capacity to generate cardiomyocytes in the adult human heart suggests that it may be rational to work towards the development of therapeutic strategies aiming to stimulate this process in cardiac pathologies.

Bergmann, O; Bhardwaj, R D; Bernard, S; Zdunek, S; Barnabe-Heider, F; Walsh, S; Zupicich, J; Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Druid, H; Jovinge, S; Frisen, J

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Crystal Structure of Human Argonaute2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans.

Schirle, Nicole T.; MacRae, Ian J. (Scripps)

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

370

Allopurinol therapy and cataractogenesis in humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term ingestion of allopurinol, an antihyperuricemic agent used to treat gout, may be related to the development of lens opacities in relatively young patients (second to fifth decades of life). Cataracts obtained from three patients taking allopurinol were subjected to high-resolution phosphorescence spectroscopy. The characteristic allopurinol triplet was demonstrated in all three cataracts. Identical spectra were obtained for normal human lenses incubated in media containing 10(-3)M allopurinol and exposed to 1.2 mW/cm2 ultraviolet radiation for 16 hours; control lenses (irradiated without allopurinol) showed no allopurinol triplets. Similar data were obtained for lenses from rats given one dose of allopurinol and exposed to ultraviolet radiation overnight. These data provide evidence that allopurinol can be photobound in rat and human lenses and suggest its cataractogenic potential.

Lerman, S.; Megaw, J.M.; Gardner, K.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Human Reliability Analysis for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because no human reliability analysis (HRA) method was specifically developed for small modular reactors (SMRs), the application of any current HRA method to SMRs represents tradeoffs. A first- generation HRA method like THERP provides clearly defined activity types, but these activity types do not map to the human-system interface or concept of operations confronting SMR operators. A second- generation HRA method like ATHEANA is flexible enough to be used for SMR applications, but there is currently insufficient guidance for the analyst, requiring considerably more first-of-a-kind analyses and extensive SMR expertise in order to complete a quality HRA. Although no current HRA method is optimized to SMRs, it is possible to use existing HRA methods to identify errors, incorporate them as human failure events in the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), and quantify them. In this paper, we provided preliminary guidance to assist the human reliability analyst and reviewer in understanding how to apply current HRA methods to the domain of SMRs. While it is possible to perform a satisfactory HRA using existing HRA methods, ultimately it is desirable to formally incorporate SMR considerations into the methods. This may require the development of new HRA methods. More practicably, existing methods need to be adapted to incorporate SMRs. Such adaptations may take the form of guidance on the complex mapping between conventional light water reactors and small modular reactors. While many behaviors and activities are shared between current plants and SMRs, the methods must adapt if they are to perform a valid and accurate analysis of plant personnel performance in SMRs.

Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Human Right to Access Electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity access is already well established within the framework of human rights, either as an implicit attribute of a pre-existing right (such as non-discrimination or sustainable development) or explicitly in the context of eliminating discrimination against women. There is also broad acknowledgement by states of the desirability of eliminating energy poverty - for all, but particularly for the rural poor, and women. (author)

Tully, Stephen

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

HUMAN FRONTIER SCIENCE PROGRAM Bureaux Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HUMAN FRONTIER SCIENCE PROGRAM Bureaux Europe 20, place des Halles 67080 STRASBOURG CEDEX FRANCE FRONTIER WORKSHOP VIII THE REGULATION OF SLEEP 5 5 5 5 N A M U H F R R O N T IE P MA R G O RE SC I E N C of the sleep­wake cycle is generated in a part of the hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus

Gillette, Martha U.

374

Dishwasher: 1; Human: 0 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services AuditTransatlanticDirect-Cooled PowerDishwasher: 1; Human: 0

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - actions human reliability Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

human reliability Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: actions human reliability Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Reformulating Human...

376

Building a foundation for human centric multi-dimensional data analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAN DIEGO Building a foundation for human centric multi-DISSERTATION Building a foundation for human centric multi-This dissertation introduces a foundation for human centric,

Ponto, Kevin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. Keywords: SustainableHuman Toxicity Potential (HTP) is used for the human healthassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Heart of the Matter The Humanities and Social Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Heart of the Matter The Humanities and Social Sciences for a vibrant, competitive, and secure of the humanities and social sciences for a vibrant democracy. The Heart of the Matter, a report of the Commis- sion secure nation, the humanities and social sciences are the heart of the matter, the keeper of the republic

Rohs, Remo

379

Digital Human Symposium 2009 March 12th, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, resulting in autonomous pedestrian models, and (2) a comprehen- sive biomechanical model of the human body of the human body, its detailed biomechanical modeling has not received ad- equate attention. I will describe to synthesize autonomous movements for the behavioral animation of the human head and face. 2. Autonomous

Terzopoulos, Demetri

380

Mapping genetic in uences on human brain Paul Thompson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping genetic in uences on human brain structure Paul Thompson 1 , Tyrone D Cannon 2 and Arthur W Toga 1 Recent advances in brain imaging and genetics haveRecent advances in brain imaging and genetics and environmental in¯uences on the human brain. These techniques shed lightin¯uences on the human brain

Thompson, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

e! Science News Better than the human eye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e! Science News Better than the human eye Published: Monday, January 17, 2011 - 15:36 Researchers to develop a curvilinear camera, much like the human eye, with the significant feature of a zoom capability, unlike the human eye. The "eyeball camera" has a 3.5x optical zoom, takes sharp images, is inexpensive

Rogers, John A.

382

Tier I Canada Research Chair Human Capital and Productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tier I Canada Research Chair in Human Capital and Productivity The University of Western Ontario and international candidates for a Tier I Canada Research Chair in the area of Human Capital and Productivity renowned group of economists who work on research related to human capital and productivity. This includes

Lennard, William N.

383

A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance Fabrizio Flacco Torsten Kr is presented for safe human-robot coexistence. The main contribution is a fast method to evaluate distances between the robot and possibly moving obstacles (including humans), based on the concept of depth space

De Luca, Alessandro

384

Hotspots of Biased Nucleotide Substitutions in Human Genes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hotspots of Biased Nucleotide Substitutions in Human Genes Jonas Berglund1 , Katherine S. Pollard2) Hotspots of biased nucleotide substitutions in human genes. PLoS Biol 7(1): e1000026. doi:10.1371/journal selection in the human lineage. However, HARs tend to have biased patterns of nucleotide substitution

Sorenson, Michael

385

Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy Yan Zhou Cheng-Hui Liu Yi Sun Yang Pu://biomedicaloptics.spiedigitallibrary.org/ on 11/16/2012 Terms of Use: http://spiedl.org/terms #12;Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro

Sun, Yi

386

Human Robot Interaction in Mobile Robot Applications Akihisa Ohya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Robot Interaction in Mobile Robot Applications Akihisa Ohya PRESTO, JST / University the usefulness of mobile robots by showing concrete applications in human daily life through this study. Only a few mobile robot applications were de- signed and made with the purpose of supporting humans

Ohya, Akihisa

387

BSBA IN MANAGEMENT -HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BSBA IN MANAGEMENT - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN (REV. 7 in Human Resource Management (HRM), the goal is to provide a foundation of all areas of human resources countries. · Content Delivered in: MGT 350, MGT 405, & MGT 357. · Assessment Method: Culminating exam

Gallo, Linda C.

388

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic of Science and Health, the School of Health and Human Performance at DCU is developing an international reputation in health and exercise science. As such, the School of Health and Human Performance is committed

Humphrys, Mark

389

Towards Human Energy Expenditure Estimation Using Smart Phone Inertial Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reliably estimate energy expenditure (EE). Direct calorimetry [5] measures the heat produced by human bodyTowards Human Energy Expenditure Estimation Using Smart Phone Inertial Sensors Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1 human energy expenditure during sport and normal daily ac- tivities. The paper presents technical

Lu?trek, Mitja

390

Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff Office of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff 9.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Regular by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department for further information. The Ohio State University Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 9.15 Reduction in Work

Howat, Ian M.

391

POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources Chapter 4: Classification Issuing Office: Human Resource Resource Services Originally Issued: August 19, 1968 Most Recently Revised: March 3, 2006 1 Classification Responsibilities 7 History 7 Official Documentation 7 Statement of Policy Human Resource Services classifies

392

V 1.0 April 27, 2011 Classified Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V 1.0 April 27, 2011 Classified Human Resources Policies and Procedures for Classified Employees, 2011 Classified Human Resources Policies and Procedures for Classified Employees Page 2 of 7 Chapter 7. Information for Supervisors Consult with your Human Resources Representative as soon as you have any concern

Sheridan, Jennifer

393

Tony TorresRamos Office of Civilian Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6-14 Tony TorresRamos Director, Office of Civilian Human Resources Mr. TorresRamos is the Department of the Navy's (DON) Director of the Office of Civilian Human Resources (OCHR). In this capacity he provides leadership to OCHR and the Human Resources community at large. OCHR is an Echelon II Command

394

TO: HR and Business Contacts FROM: Division of Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO: HR and Business Contacts FROM: Division of Human Resources DATE: September 24, 2012 RE: Reminder: Human Resources Fall 2012 Forum This is a reminder that you will need to register online by the Division of Human Resources, this forum will include information about benefits updates to annual

Almor, Amit

395

HUMAN RESOURCES MANUAL SECTION 4: NON-STUDENT HOURLY EMPLOYEES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HUMAN RESOURCES MANUAL SECTION 4: NON-STUDENT HOURLY EMPLOYEES 1 | P a g e S e c t i o n 4 will be notified by the Human Resources Department as non-student hourly employees approach their employment limits is submitted to the Human Resources Department by March and October for each school term of each year

396

Human factors issues in qualitative and quantitative safety analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humans are a critical and integral part of any operational system, be it a nuclear reactor, a facility for assembly or disassembling hazardous components, or a transportation network. In our concern over the safety of these systems, we often focus our attention on the hardware engineering components of such systems. However, experience has repeatedly demonstrated that it is often the human component that is the primary determinant of overall system safety. Both the nuclear reactor accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island and shipping disasters such as the Exxon Valdez and the Herald of Free Enterprise accidents are attributable to human error. Concern over human contributions to system safety prompts us to include reviews of human factors issues in our safety analyses. In the conduct of Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs), human factors issues are addressed using a quantitative method called Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). HRAs typically begin with the identification of potential sources of human error in accident sequences of interest. Human error analysis often employs plant and/or procedures walk-downs in which the analyst considers the ``goodness`` of procedures, training, and human-machine interfaces concerning their potential contribution to human error. Interviews with expert task performers may also be conducted. In the application of HRA, once candidate sources of human error have been identified, error probabilities are developed.

Hahn, H.A.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mapping the Human Genome: UC SANTA CRUZUC SANTA CRUZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping the Human Genome: UC SANTA CRUZUC SANTA CRUZ University of California Santa Cruz Foundation" of the human genome under the direction of UCSC computer science professor David Haussler (right). Story world. Unlocking the mysteries of the human genome and applying this new knowledge to improve our health

California at Santa Cruz, University of

398

Individual Differences in Human Reliability Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While human reliability analysis (HRA) methods include uncertainty in quantification, the nominal model of human error in HRA typically assumes that operator performance does not vary significantly when they are given the same initiating event, indicators, procedures, and training, and that any differences in operator performance are simply aleatory (i.e., random). While this assumption generally holds true when performing routine actions, variability in operator response has been observed in multiple studies, especially in complex situations that go beyond training and procedures. As such, complexity can lead to differences in operator performance (e.g., operator understanding and decision-making). Furthermore, psychological research has shown that there are a number of known antecedents (i.e., attributable causes) that consistently contribute to observable and systematically measurable (i.e., not random) differences in behavior. This paper reviews examples of individual differences taken from operational experience and the psychological literature. The impact of these differences in human behavior and their implications for HRA are then discussed. We propose that individual differences should not be treated as aleatory, but rather as epistemic. Ultimately, by understanding the sources of individual differences, it is possible to remove some epistemic uncertainty from analyses.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J. (BNL); Fleger, S.; Barnes V. (NRC)

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

400

For realizing a robot working in human society, interaction with humans is the key issue. We have  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a robot arm [3]. They used a semantic differential method (SD) to provide humanlike motions for the armAbstract For realizing a robot working in human society, interaction with humans is the key issue. We have developed a robot that interacts with humans based on visual recognition. This robot has two

Kanda, Takayuki

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Developmental Cell Three-Dimensional Epithelial Morphogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@princeton.edu http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2013.01.017 SUMMARY Morphogenesis of the respiratory appendages on eggshells of Drosophila species provides a powerful experimental system for studying how cell sheets give changes in morphology. Computational modeling shows that this mechanism could explain the main features

Shvartsman, Stanislav "Stas"

402

Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis: Benefits and Challenges of Simulating Human Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date, there has been considerable work on dynamic event trees and other areas related to dynamic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The counterpart to these efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) has centered on the development of specific methods to account for the dynamic nature of human performance. In this paper, the author posits that the key to dynamic HRA is not in the development of specific methods but in the utilization of cognitive modeling and simulation to produce a framework of data that may be used in quantifying the likelihood of human error. This paper provides an overview of simulation approaches to HRA; reviews differences between first, second, and dynamic generation HRA; and outlines potential benefits and challenges of this approach.

R. L. Boring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient human genome Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

human genome Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Human Genomics Summary: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY MBB 839-3 Human Genomics... of the human...

404

HES Human Environmental Sciences KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HES Human Environmental Sciences KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped SchoolofHumanEnvironmentalSciences HES 100 AN INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONS IN HUMAN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES. (1) An orientation to human environmental sciences, its history, contemporary issues and philosophy

MacAdam, Keith

405

MODELING HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS USING MIDAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an emerging collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and NASA Ames Research Center regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error with novel control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of risk significance in recreating past event scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of novel staffing levels in control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of risk in next generation control rooms.

Ronald L. Boring; Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; Bruce P. Hallbert; Brian F. Gore

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Human somatic, germinal and heritable mutagenicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report deals with the general process of variant formation rather than with the consequences of a specific variant being present. It focusses on mutational mechanisms, mutagens, and the method for detecting de novo mutants and estimating mutation rate. It is to human genetics much like disease causation and prevention medicine are to medicine as a whole. The word ''mutagenicity'' is used in the title and throughout the text to connote the causation of all classes of genetic damage. Mutagenicity and the corresponding words mutation, mutagen and mutagenesis can have multiple meaning, sometimes relating to gene mutation, sometimes to heritable mutation, and somtimes to all types of genetic damage. 38 refs., 1 tab.

Mendelsohn, M.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

West Nile Encephalitis in Humans and Horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Spain (1960s-1990s); Algeria (1994); Morocco (1996); Romania (1996-1997); Czech Republic 8/00 * Associate Professor and Extension Swine Veterinarian, Texas Agricul- tural Extension Service and Dept. of Large Animal Medicine... and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Texas A&M University System. (1997); Democratic Republic of the Congo and Italy (1998); and Russia (1999). In addition to the human cases in New York, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Centers...

Lawhorn, D. Bruce

2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

408

Human Capital Organization | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergy andAction CenterHuman Capital

409

Human Resource Directors (HRD) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergy andAction CenterHuman

410

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Human Resources Personal Information  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera Generation Limited15 Trico390-12CF -Human

411

ORISE: Human Subjects Protection Resource Protection Book  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK MappingHistory The Oak Ridge Institute forHow toHowHuman

412

Rocky Mountain Humane Investing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm It isRockwall, Texas:Humane

413

Human Capital - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPA addressesHowHugh ChenH-modeHuman

414

Jefferson Lab Human Resources: Training and Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesBQuestions aboutHumanAppraisalHR

415

The Spatial Structure of Transnational Human Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent studies have shown that the spatial structures of animal displacements and local-scale human motion follow L\\'{e}vy flights. Whether transnational human activity (THA) also exhibits such a pattern has however not been thoroughly examined as yet. To fill this gap, this article examines the planet-scale spatial structure of THA (a) across eight types of mobility and communication and (b) in its development over time. Combining data from various sources, it is shown that the spatial structure of THA can indeed be approximated by L\\'{e}vy flights with heavy tails that obey power laws. Scaling exponent and power-law fit differ by type of THA, being highest in refuge-seeking and tourism and lowest in student exchange. Variance in the availability of resources and opportunities for satisfying associated needs appears to explain these differences. Over time, the L\\'{e}vy-flight pattern remains intact and remarkably stable, contradicting the popular idea that socio-technological trends lead to a "death of dista...

Deutschmann, Emanuel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Microwaves, hyperthermia, and human leukocyte function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine whether exposure to microwaves (2450 MHz) affects the function of human leukocytes in the resting state and during antigenic or mitogenic challenge. This publication is a summary report of the construction and calibration of a waveguide exposure facility for in vitro irradiation of human leukocytes. Calorimetric determinations of specific absorption rates (SAR) were made using heating curves measured with a microwave transparent Vitek 101 Electrothermia Monitor. The correlation between SAR and forward power was highly significant (r=0.95). At a forward power of 0.55 W the average SAR was approximately 33 mW/ml. However, inhomogeneity and significant resonance absorption were noted in the dual vial waveguide exposure facility. A 30-point measurement of SAR distribution revealed that the SAR at any of the measured points could range between 0.12- and 3.94-fold of the average SAR within the given vial. Measurements indicated that this variability in SAR values did not create significant thermal gradients within the vials when external agitation was applied.

Roberts, N.J. Jr; Lu, S.; Michaelson, S.M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

Evans, Glen A. (Encinitas, CA); Djabali, Malek (Marseilles, FR); Selleri, Licia (Del Mar, CA); Parry, Pauline (San Diego, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico); Watson, Patrick (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); McDaniel, Mark A. (Washington University); Eichenbaum, Howard B. (Boston University); Cohen, Neal J. (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Beyond The Human Genome: What's Next? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

UC Berkeley's Daniel Rokhsar and his colleagues were instrumental in contributing the sequences for three of the human body's chromosomes in the effort to decipher the blueprint of life- the completion of the DNA sequencing of the human genome. Now he is turning to the structure and function of genes in other organisms, some of them no less important to the planet's future than the human map. Hear the latest in this lecture from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Rokhsar, Daniel

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fuzzy Control Strategies in Human Operator and Sport Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The motivation behind mathematically modeling the human operator is to help explain the response characteristics of the complex dynamical system including the human manual controller. In this paper, we present two different fuzzy logic strategies for human operator and sport modeling: fixed fuzzy-logic inference control and adaptive fuzzy-logic control, including neuro-fuzzy-fractal control. As an application of the presented fuzzy strategies, we present a fuzzy-control based tennis simulator.

Ivancevic, Tijana T; Markovic, Sasa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health, societal issues, industrial innovation, Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and hea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health, societal issues, industrial innovation, Infrastructure, human resources, international Infrastructure, human resources, international cooperation, research and development, environment and health

Zrich, Universitt

422

Climate change impacts: accounting for the human response Michael Oppenheimer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change impacts: accounting for the human response Michael Oppenheimer Received: 18 July. Shouse, and Robert E. Kopp. M. Oppenheimer (*) Program in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy

Oppenheimer, Michael

423

Identifying Requirements for Effective Human-Automation Teamwork  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies have shown that poorly designed human-automation collaboration, such as poorly designed communication protocols, often leads to problems for the human operators, such as: lack of vigilance, complacency, and loss of skills. These problems often lead to suboptimal system performance. To address this situation, a considerable amount of research has been conducted to improve human-automation collaboration and to make automation function better as a team player. Much of this research is based on an understanding of what it means to be a good team player from the perspective of a human team. However, the research is often based on a simplified view of human teams and teamwork. In this study, we sought to better understand the capabilities and limitations of automation from the standpoint of human teams. We first examined human teams to identify the principles for effective teamwork. We next reviewed the research on integrating automation agents and human agents into mixed agent teams to identify the limitations of automation agents to conform to teamwork principles. This research resulted in insights that can lead to more effective human-automation collaboration by enabling a more realistic set of requirements to be developed based on the strengths and limitations of all agents.

Jeffrey C. Joe; John O'Hara; Heather D. Medema; Johanna H. Oxstrand

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ancient human bones: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reich, David 159 OsteoConduct: Wireless Body-Area Communication based on Bone Conduction Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: , Measurement, Human Factors....

425

anatomically modern humans: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Page Topic Index 1 HIERARCHICAL TOPOLOGICAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF ANATOMICAL HUMAN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY AND Mathematics Websites Summary: HIERARCHICAL TOPOLOGICAL NETWORK...

426

Adjunct Faculty Data Request College of Health and Human Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adjunct Faculty Data Request College of Health and Human Services Bowling Green State University at Bowling Green State University are required to provide the following information. Appointments

Moore, Paul A.

427

active human visceral: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

walk, wave (one hand), wave (2 hands) Ta : Pekee II (Wany robotics, France) PTZ camera, motors + odometers, distance sensors, Kinect Ta Wolf, Christian 15 Human activity...

428

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of...

429

A Human-Information Interaction Perspective on Augmented Cognition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly a half-century ago, J.C.R. Licklider expressed a vision for man-machine symbiosis, coupling human brains and computing machines in a partnership that will think as no human brain has ever thought and process data in a way not approached by the information-handling machines we know today. Until relatively recently, this vision was largely left idle by human factors engineering (HFE) research that grew over the decades from an initial focus on design of equipment to accommodate human limitations to cognitive systems engineering research to a more recent perspective focusing on design of human-information interaction. These perspective shifts and insights have brought a degree of success to the field in design efforts aimed at enhancing human-system performance. In recent years, the research area of augmented cognition has begun to shift the focus once more not only to enhancing the interaction environment, but also the cognitive abilities of the human operators and decision makers themselves. Ambitious goals of increasing total cognitive capacity through augmented cognition technologies are still on the horizon of this research program. This paper describes a framework within which augmented cognition research may identify requirements that compensate for human information processing shortcomings and augment human potential.

Greitzer, Frank L.; Griffith, Douglas

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Stories of Discovery & Innovation: From Human Genome to Materials...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stories of Discovery & Innovation: From Human Genome to Materials "Genome" Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events...

431

DOE human genome program contractor-grantee workshop VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is presented from the workshop on the Human Genome Project. Topics include sequencing, genetic mapping, informatics, ethical and legal issues, and infrastructure.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Algorithms for enhanced spatiotemporal imaging of human brain function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of human brain function require technologies to non-invasively image neuronal dynamics with high spatiotemporal resolution. The electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram (MEG) measure neuronal activity ...

Krishnaswamy, Pavitra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

acid protects human: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MIT - DSpace Summary: Commercial human spaceflight looks ready to take off as an industry, with "space tourism" as its first application. Paying passengers are likely to begin...

434

Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research findings...

435

Apparel, Merchandising, and Design Major College of Human Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science 4 Total 12.5 Total 16 Fall Spring TC 245, Aesthetics and Brand Image 3 TC Humanities Elective (TC

Lin, Zhiqun

436

ageing human fibroblasts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STUDY OF DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS IN BYSTANDER PRIMARY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS L. B. Smilenov-or-nothing manner(7) . Bystander cells exhibit a variety of characteristics of...

437

ancient human dna: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STUDY OF DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS IN BYSTANDER PRIMARY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS L. B. Smilenov-or-nothing manner(7) . Bystander cells exhibit a variety of characteristics of...

438

acid induces human: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STUDY OF DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAKS IN BYSTANDER PRIMARY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS L. B. Smilenov-or-nothing manner(7) . Bystander cells exhibit a variety of characteristics of...

439

MEMORANDUM FOR HUMAN RESOURCE DIRECTORS FROM: ILLA, DIRECTOR...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

C ITAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 17 SPECIAL EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM CODES The purpose of this memorandum is to reiterate the importance of each Servicing Human...

440

Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

human pancreatic islets using LC-MSMS-based proteomics. Abstract: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Human Plasma N-Glycoproteome Analysis by Immunoaffinity Subtraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma N-Glycoproteome Analysis by Immunoaffinity Subtraction, Hydrazide Chemistry, and Mass Spectrometry. Human Plasma N-Glycoproteome Analysis by Immunoaffinity Subtraction,...

442

Finite element analysis of human joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures in nuclear power plant control rooms. It is beyond the scope of this paper to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper provides a review of HRA as applied to traditional paper-based procedures, followed by a discussion of what specific factors should additionally be considered in HRAs for computerized procedures. Performance shaping factors and failure modes unique to computerized procedures are highlighted. Since there is no definitive guide to HRA for paper-based procedures, this paper also serves to clarify the existing guidance on paper-based procedures before delving into the unique aspects of computerized procedures.

Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Katya Le Blanc

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Human Activity Detection from RGBD Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Being able to detect and recognize human activities is important for making personal assistant robots useful in performing assistive tasks. The challenge is to develop a system that is low-cost, reliable in unstructured home settings, and also straightforward to use. In this paper, we use a RGBD sensor (Microsoft Kinect) as the input sensor, and present learning algorithms to infer the activities. Our algorithm is based on a hierarchical maximum entropy Markov model (MEMM). It considers a person's activity as composed of a set of sub-activities, and infers the two-layered graph structure using a dynamic programming approach. We test our algorithm on detecting and recognizing twelve different activities performed by four people in different environments, such as a kitchen, a living room, an office, etc., and achieve an average performance of 84.3% when the person was seen before in the training set (and 64.2% when the person was not seen before).

Sung, Jaeyong; Selman, Bart; Saxena, Ashutosh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Fifty Years of THERP and Human Reliability Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1962 at a Human Factors Society symposium, Alan Swain presented a paper introducing a Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP). This was followed in 1963 by a Sandia Laboratories monograph outlining basic human error quantification using THERP and, in 1964, by a special journal edition of Human Factors on quantification of human performance. Throughout the 1960s, Swain and his colleagues focused on collecting human performance data for the Sandia Human Error Rate Bank (SHERB), primarily in connection with supporting the reliability of nuclear weapons assembly in the US. In 1969, Swain met with Jens Rasmussen of Ris National Laboratory and discussed the applicability of THERP to nuclear power applications. By 1975, in WASH-1400, Swain had articulated the use of THERP for nuclear power applications, and the approach was finalized in the watershed publication of the NUREG/CR-1278 in 1983. THERP is now 50 years old, and remains the most well known and most widely used HRA method. In this paper, the author discusses the history of THERP, based on published reports and personal communication and interviews with Swain. The author also outlines the significance of THERP. The foundations of human reliability analysis are found in THERP: human failure events, task analysis, performance shaping factors, human error probabilities, dependence, event trees, recovery, and pre- and post-initiating events were all introduced in THERP. While THERP is not without its detractors, and it is showing signs of its age in the face of newer technological applications, the longevity of THERP is a testament of its tremendous significance. THERP started the field of human reliability analysis. This paper concludes with a discussion of THERP in the context of newer methods, which can be seen as extensions of or departures from Swains pioneering work.

Ronald L. Boring

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Integrating Knowledge Management and Human Resources via Skill Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Knowledge Management and Human Resources via Skill Management Norbert Gronau. The human resources department can look for certain skills and compare the skills of an employee [Kreitmeier et al. 2000]. The company is able to save costs that otherwise apply to placing adverts for job

Appelrath, Hans-Jrgen

447

Animating Human Athletics Jessica K. Hodgins Wayne L. Wooten  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Animating Human Athletics Jessica K. Hodgins Wayne L. Wooten David C. Brogan James F. O animate these behaviors using control algorithms that cause a physically realistic model to perform and biomechanical data. Key Words and Phrases: computer animation, human motion, motion control, dynamic simulation

Brogan, David

448

Module title Human Resource Management Module code INT3604  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

working and the positive management of conflict and cultural difference Syllabus plan Syllabus planModule title Human Resource Management Module code INT3604 Academic year(s) 2013/4 Credits 15 Basic in the context of human resource management principles and practice as currently applied within organisations

Mumby, Peter J.

449

Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI Tolga Tasdizen, David for classifying multispectral MR scans of the human head into nine tissue classes. User initialization is adopted. #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Classification of head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data

Utah, University of

450

EDITOR'S CORNER HIVdb: A Database of the Structures of Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDITOR'S CORNER HIVdb: A Database of the Structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Human be estimated at many hundreds, making HIV PR the most widely studied enzyme in the history of protein to creation of the Internet- based HIV PR Database (HIVdb).8 After 6 years spent on creating and curating

451

Tanya M. Smith Department of Human Evolutionary Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Tanya M. Smith Department of Human Evolutionary Biology Harvard University 11 Divinity Avenue-Reviewed Publications 53. Carter, K.C., Worthington, S., Smith, T.M. (in review) Molar proportions and third molar agenesis in primates. Evolution 52. Smith, T.M. (in press) Teeth and human life history evolution. An. Rev

Gunawardena, Jeremy

452

Predicted Solution Structure of Zymogen Human Coagulation FVII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the complete tissue factor-free calcium ion-bound human zymogen FVII (residues 1­406) (FVII) has been-ray crystallographic structure of human coagulation FVIIa/TF complex bound with calcium ions (Banner et al., Nature of interactions regulated by positive and negative feedback loops. In the "initiation stage" in the extrinsic

Perera, Lalith

453

World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment The Role of Spatial Data Infrastructure Center for Human Interactions in the Environment Introduction Objective: to document the impacts in the Environment The Underlying Question Which of the observed changes across systems and geographic regions

Columbia University

454

Division of Human Resources Retirement Renewed Membership & Reemployment Restrictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Human Resources Retirement Renewed Membership & Reemployment Restrictions Questions employer after you have been retired for 12 calendar months. #12;Division of Human Resources Retirement Renewed Membership & Reemployment Restrictions Questions (813) 974-2970 Rev. 02/2012 If you are reemployed

Meyers, Steven D.

455

Development of Human-Robot Interaction Systems for Humanoid Robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of Human-Robot Interaction Systems for Humanoid Robots Bruce A. Maxwell, Brian Leighton, Andrew Ramsay Colby College {bmaxwell,bmleight,acramsay}@colby.edu Abstract - Effective human-robot interaction is one of the primary challenges for humanoid robots. Sources of uncertainty, such as robot motion

Maxwell, Bruce

456

Complementary Tactile Sensor and Human Interface for Robotic Telemanipulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operations, nuclear power plants, or difficult to reach environments, such as under-water, extreme climate and human interface for the robotic telemanipulation of physical objects in interactive haptic virtual environments. Keywords-tactile sensor; tactile human interface; robotic telemanipulation; interactive virtual

Payeur, Pierre

457

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance Copyright © 1984 for theories of attention are discussed. The human visual system is exquisitely apparent to anyone viewing a complexscene sensitive to relative movement and to flicker, with a moving object in it: Until the move

Yantis, Steven

458

Roadmap: Human Development and Family Studies -Gerontology -Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Human Development and Family Studies - Gerontology - Bachelor of Science [EH Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 8-June-12/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester or upper division) 3 See note 2 on page 2 #12;Roadmap: Human Development and Family Studies - Gerontology

Sheridan, Scott

459

Three Environmental Discourses in Human-Computer Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three Environmental Discourses in Human-Computer Interaction Abstract A review of the past decade of human-computer interaction relating to environmental issues identifies three discourses whose, environmentalism, nature, design, discourse analysis ACM Classification Keywords H5.m. Information interfaces

O'Brien, James F.

460

Energy and Development: Is Energy a Basic Human Right?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Development: Is Energy a Basic Human Right? Skype/Video presentation for senior pupils national Laboratory/DTU Denmark #12;Is energy a basic human right? · What is energy? ­ the ability to make something happen · Different kinds of energy ­ or energy carriers - fuels · What do we use energy for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

In vitro fracture toughness of human dentin V. Imbeni,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In vitro fracture toughness of human dentin V. Imbeni,1 R. K. Nalla,1 C. Bosi,1 J. H. Kinney,2 R. O August 2002 Abstract: The in vitro fracture toughness of human dentin has been reported measured crit- ical stress intensity, Kc, for the onset of unstable fracture along an orientation

Ritchie, Robert

462

IMAGES IN EMBRYOLOGY............................................................................ Development of the human heart: days 1521  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................ Development of the human heart: days 15­21 I n this series, three dimensional computer graphics are used to present the anatomical structures involved in the different stages of normal human heart development visit: www.virtual-heart- development.univ-rennes1.fr During the third week of gestation (days 15

Boyer, Edmond

463

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Spatiotemporal dynamics in the human brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Spatiotemporal dynamics in the human brain during rest: a virtual brain study Andreas Spiegler* , Enrique Hansen, Viktor K Jirsa From Twenty Second Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS*2013 Paris, France. 13-18 July 2013 Over the past years the ongoing human brain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

464

Zo Rebecca Hunter Plasticity of the adult human brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zoë Rebecca Hunter Plasticity of the adult human brain and motor recovery after stroke PICS © Institute of Cognitive Science #12;1 Bachelor's Thesis Plasticity of the adult human brain and motor brain and motor recovery after stroke 2 Abstract Stroke may cause a major destruction of brain tissue

Kallenrode, May-Britt

465

NUMBER: HR 1.78 SECTION: Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rendered will be considered by all parties concerned. Counsel from the Office of the Attorney General be coordinated through the USC Division of Human Resources and the USC Office of the General Counsel. C CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT. THE UNIVERSITY'S DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES HAS THE AUTHORITY TO INTERPRET

Almor, Amit

466

FOCUS: FROM MOBILITIES TO PROTEOMES Mapping the Human Plasma Proteome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOCUS: FROM MOBILITIES TO PROTEOMES Mapping the Human Plasma Proteome by SCX-LC-IMS-MS Xiaoyun Liu-mass spectrometry has significantly impacted proteomic analyses of complex biological fluids such as plasma. However as a means of characterizing the complex mixture of proteins associated with the human plasma proteome

Clemmer, David E.

467

Human-Automation Interaction By Thomas B. Sheridan & Raja Parasuraman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

89 CHAPTER 2 Human-Automation Interaction By Thomas B. Sheridan & Raja Parasuraman Automation does with automation in complex and typically large-scale systems, including aircraft and air traffic control, nuclear-free task for either the system designer or the human operator/automation supervisor, especially as computer

Parasuraman, Raja

468

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and translating and disseminating research findings to health care providers, researchers, policymakersDCP - 1 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Drug Control Programs ..................................................................................................................................2 #12;DCP - 2 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Resource Summary

Levin, Judith G.

469

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Science & Health SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Teaching Fellowship in Athletic Therapy (half time, 3 year contract) The School of Health and Human Performance invites applications from and assessment, have relevant qualifications and be experienced in emergency care training and be competent

Humphrys, Mark

470

Ecological factors and human threats both drive wildfowl population declines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; human population density. Correspondence Peter R. Long, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, Africa and Asia. Second, we use phylogenetic comparative analyses to test whether population size, globalEcological factors and human threats both drive wildfowl population declines P. R. Long1 , T. Sz

471

BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY JEFFREY S. DUKES Department of as a vast store of solar energy from which society meets >80% of its current energy needs. Here, using of ancient solar energy decline, humans are likely to use an increasing share of modern solar resources. I

Dukes, Jeffrey

472

STAFF POSITION DESCRIPTION SAN JOSE STA TE HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STAFF POSITION DESCRIPTION SAN JOSE STA TE HUMAN RESOURCES UNIVERSITY Workforce Planning l: 408-924-2250 I408-924-1784 (fax) Job Description Staff Date: Workforce Planning, Human Resources (Name [Workforce Planning reviews the CSU classification standards with essential duties of the positions] F

Su, Xiao

473

Coordination Assistance for Mixed Human and Computational Agent Systems 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will discuss the design of a set of distributed autonomous computer programs (``agents'') that assist peopleCoordination Assistance for Mixed Human and Computational Agent Systems 1 Keith S. Decker Commander) and his staff (intelligence, operations, logistics, weather, etc.). As the human planner makes

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

474

Coordination Assistance for Mixed Human and Computational Agent Systems 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will discuss the design of a set of distributed autonomous computer programs ("agents") that assist peopleCoordination Assistance for Mixed Human and Computational Agent Systems 1 Keith S. Decker Commander) and his staff (intelligence, operations, logistics, weather, etc.). As the human planner makes

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

475

A True Mode of Union: Reconsidering the Cartesian Human Being  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When considering the nature of the human being, Descartes holds two main claims: he believes that the human being is a genuine unity and he also holds that it is comprised of two distinct substances, mind and body. These claims appear to be at odds...

Carlson, Amber

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

476

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities Program in Biomedical Ethics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities Program in Biomedical Ethics School of Medicine University of Virginia 2015 Summer Biomedical Ethics Internship The Program in Biomedical Ethics at the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities at the University of Virginia School of Medicine invites

Acton, Scott

477

Science and the Human Good, Schmitt Lecture, Notre Dame, April 21, 2009 Science and the Human Good  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science and the Human Good, Schmitt Lecture, Notre Dame, April 21, 2009 Science and the Human Good: How to Think Philosophically about the Place of Values in Science Don Howard Department of Philosophy and Program in History and Philosophy of Science Arthur J. Schmitt Lecture Center for Ethics and Culture

Howard, Don

478

COORDINATING HUMAN AND MATERIAL RESOURCES Construction project management is the art of directing and coordinating human and material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COORDINATING HUMAN AND MATERIAL RESOURCES Construction project management is the art of directing and coordinating human and material resources throughout the life of a project by using modern management. Today's construction engineers and managers are faced with unprecedented challenges in planning

Simaan, Nabil

479

Human Mental Models of Humanoid Robots* Sau-lai Lee Sara Kiesler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Mental Models of Humanoid Robots* Sau-lai Lee Sara Kiesler Human Computer Interaction ground of understanding between the two. In two experiments modelled after human-human studies we robot emits a human's voice), their mental model of the system's behavior may approach their mental

Kiesler, Sara

480

Evaluating the Applicability of Current Models of Workload to Peer-based Human-robot Teams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-off possibility into a reality. Human Performance Moderator Functions (HPMFs) can be used to predict human. This trend was predicted by the IMPRINT Pro models. These results are the first to indicate that existing Terms Performance, Experimentation, Human Factors Keywords human-robot peer-based teams, human-performance

Zhang, Tao

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "human mammary epithelial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


482

Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell. Biol. 18, 4577-4588. DiLeonardo, A. , Linke, S. P. ,Chen et al. , 1995; DiLeonardo et al. , 1994; Krtolica andsenesce by X-irradiation (DiLeonardo et al. , 1994; Robles

Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

SHEAN (Simplified Human Error Analysis code) and automated THERP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most widely used human error analysis tools is THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). Unfortunately, this tool has disadvantages. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, realizing these drawbacks, commissioned Dr. Swain, the author of THERP, to create a simpler, more consistent tool for deriving human error rates. That effort produced the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program Human Reliability Analysis Procedure (ASEP), which is more conservative than THERP, but a valuable screening tool. ASEP involves answering simple questions about the scenario in question, and then looking up the appropriate human error rate in the indicated table (THERP also uses look-up tables, but four times as many). The advantages of ASEP are that human factors expertise is not required, and the training to use the method is minimal. Although not originally envisioned by Dr. Swain, the ASEP approach actually begs to be computerized. That WINCO did, calling the code SHEAN, for Simplified Human Error ANalysis. The code was done in TURBO Basic for IBM or IBM-compatible MS-DOS, for fast execution. WINCO is now in the process of comparing this code against THERP for various scenarios. This report provides a discussion of SHEAN.

Wilson, J.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Development of A Human Systems Simulation Laboratory: Strategic Direction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) at the Idaho National Laboratory is one of few facilities of its kind that allows human factors researchers to evaluate various aspects of human performance and human system interaction for proposed reactor designs and upgrades. A basic system architecture, physical configuration and simulation capability were established to enable human factors researchers to support multiple, simultaneous simulations and also different power plant technologies. Although still evolving in terms of its technical and functional architecture, the HSSL is already proving its worth in supporting current and future nuclear industry needs for light water reactor sustainability and small modular reactors. The evolution of the HSSL is focused on continual physical and functional refinement to make it a fully equipped, reconfigurable facility where advanced research, testing and validation studies can be conducted on a wider range of reactor technologies. This requires the implementation of additional plant models to produce empirical research data on human performance with emerging human-system interaction technologies. Additional beneficiaries of this information include system designers and HRA practitioners. To ensure that results of control room crew studies will be generalizable to the existing and evolving fleet of US reactors, future expansion of the HSSL may also include other SMR plant models, plant-specific simulators and a generic plant model aligned to the current generation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and future advanced reactor designs. Collaboration with industry partners is also proving to be a vital component of the facility as this helps to establish a formal basis for current and future human performance experiments to support nuclear industry objectives. A long-range Program Plan has been developed for the HSSL to ensure that the facility will support not only the Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, but also to provide human factors guidance for all future developments of the nuclear industry.

Jacques Hugo; Katya le Blanc; David Gertman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

The human molecular clock and mutation process : a characterization using microsatellite DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade, thousands of human genomes have been catalogued, either by whole-genome sequencing or by targeted genotyping. The variability between human genomes encodes invaluable information about human traits and ...

Sun, James Xin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal human sex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the human sex ratio... in the human sex odds at birth in Europe and the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. Reprod Toxicol 23... (4):593-599 Scherb H, Voigt K (2010) The human...

487

The Role of Human-Automation Consensus in Multiple Unmanned Vehicle Scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Role of Human-Automation Consensus in Multiple Unmanned Vehicle Scheduling M. L. Cummings with the automation, which resulted in better performance. Conclusion: In decentralized unmanned vehicle networks systems. KEYWORDS: multiple unmanned vehicles, human supervisory control, workload, human- automation

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

488

Evolutionary History of Helicobacter pylori Sequences Reflect Past Human Migrations in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolutionary History of Helicobacter pylori Sequences Reflect Past Human Migrations in Southeast analyse housekeeping gene sequences of the human stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori from various, Dieye FB, et al. (2011) Evolutionary History of Helicobacter pylori Sequences Reflect Past Human

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged human skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin-color to track human body. In this paper, we discuss... on human faces. Using skin color as a feature ... Source: Yang, Jie - Human Computer Interaction Institute & School...

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging human skin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin-color to track human body. In this paper, we discuss... on human faces. Using skin color as a feature ... Source: Yang, Jie - Human Computer Interaction Institute & School...

491

Human factors evaluation of the engineering test reactor control room  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reactor and Process Control Rooms at the Engineering Test Reactor were evaluated by a team of human factors engineers using available human factors design criteria. During the evaluation, ETR, equipment and facilities were compared with MIL-STD-1472-B, Human Engineering design Criteria for Military Systems. The focus of recommendations centered on: (a) displays and controls; placing displays and controls in functional groups; (b) establishing a consistent color coding (in compliance with a standard if possible); (c) systematizing annunciator alarms and reducing their number; (d) organizing equipment in functional groups; and (e) modifying labeling and lines of demarcation.

Banks, W.W.; Boone, M.P.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Crucial role of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses in HRA. [Human Reliability Analysis (HRA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses one major cause for large uncertainties in human reliability analysis (HRA) results, that is, an absence of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses. All too often this crucial step in the HRA process is done in a cursory fashion using word of mouth or written procedures which themselves may incompletely or inaccurately represent the human action sequences and human error vulnerabilities being analyzed. The paper examines the potential contributions these detailed analyses can make in achieving quantitative and qualitative HRA results which are: (1) creditable, that is, minimize uncertainty, (2) auditable, that is, systematically linking quantitative results and qualitative information from which the results are derived, (3) capable of supporting root cause analyses on human reliability factors determined to be major contributors to risk, and (4) capable of repeated measures and being combined with similar results from other analyses to examine HRA issues transcending individual systems and facilities. Based on experience analyzing test and commercial nuclear reactors, and medical applications of nuclear technology, an iterative process is suggested for doing detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses using documentation reviews, open-ended and structured interviews, direct observations, and group techniques. Finally, the paper concludes that detailed analyses done in this manner by knowledgeable human factors practitioners, can contribute significantly to the credibility, auditability, causal factor analysis, and combining goals of the HRA.

Ryan, T.G.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Human Disturbance Influences Reproductive Success and Growth Rate in California Sea Lions (Zalophus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Zalophus californianus) in the Gulf of California, Mexico. Increased human presence was associated that explicitly consider the potential impact of human activities such as ecotourism on vertebrate populations

Gerber, Leah R.

495

E-Print Network 3.0 - administered recombinant human Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that recombination rates vary greatly across the human genome, by at least two orders of magnitude. Linkage... . & Weber, J. L. Comprehensive human genetic maps: Individual...

496

Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta March 27, 2014 | Tags:...

497

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrests human monocytic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 Restriction of HIV-1 Replication in Monocytes Is Abolished by Vpx of SIVsmmPBj Summary: Background: Human primary monocytes are refractory to infection with the human...

498

E-Print Network 3.0 - apply human senses Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that are not distinguishable from those of a human. This test is limited... , with the human hand movement being a sophisticated demonstration of this function. Therefore, ......

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing human germ Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Expression and Regulation, University of Dundee Collection: Biology and Medicine 13 German Studies The School of Humanities Summary: 192 German Studies The School of Humanities...

500

E-Print Network 3.0 - attracts human attention Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

human attention. Surprising events were significantly the strongest (t... and video games. Humans ... Source: Itti, Laurent - Department of Computer Science, University of...