Sample records for human interface device

  1. T-547: Microsoft Windows Human Interface Device (HID) Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microsoft Windows does not properly warn the user before enabling additional Human Interface Device (HID) functionality over USB, which allows user-assisted attackers to execute arbitrary programs via crafted USB data, as demonstrated by keyboard and mouse data sent by malware on a Smartphone that the user connected to the computer.

  2. A human factors evaluation of computer keyboard interface devices for use by quadriplegics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Lawrence Blair

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering A HUMAN FACTORS EVALUATION OF COMPUTER KEYBOARD INTERFACE DEVICES FOR USE BY QUADRIPLEGICS A Thesis by LAWRENCE BLAIR FLEISCHER Approved as to style and content by... such as Morse Code makes this system very usable. Freewheel, another type of head movement device, is produce by Pointer Systems and available for use on IBM and compatible personal computers. Infrared light is transmitted from a box placed on top...

  3. Human-computer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  4. Chemically sensitive interfaces on SAW devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricco, A.J.; Martin, S.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Crooks, R.M.; Xu, Chuanjing [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Allred, R.E. [Adherent Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, three approaches to the effective use of chemically sensitive interfaces that are not highly chemically selective have been examined: (1) molecular identification from time-resolved permeation transients; (2) using multifrequency SAW devices to determine the frequency dependence of analyte/film interactions; (3) use of an array of SAW devices bearing diverse chemically sensitive interfaces to produce a distinct response pattern for each analyte. In addition to their well-known sensitivity to mass changes (0.0035 monolayer of N{sub 2} can be measured), SAW devices respond to the mechanical and electronic properties of thin films, enhancing response information content but making a thorough understanding of the perturbation critical. Simultaneous measurement of changes in frequency and attenuation, which can provide the information necessary to determine the type of perturbation, are used as part of the above discrimination schemes.

  5. Nitride semiconductor Surface and interface characterization and device design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongtao

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lett. 80 , D. Schroder, Semiconductor Material and Devicein III-V Nitride Semiconductors: Applications and Devices ,SAN DIEGO Nitride Semiconductor Surface and Interface

  6. Video Game Device Haptic Interface for Robotic Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corrie I. Nichol; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in technology for video games have made a broad array of haptic feedback devices available at low cost. This paper presents a bi-manual haptic system to enable an operator to weld remotely using the a commercially available haptic feedback video game device for the user interface. The system showed good performance in initial tests, demonstrating the utility of low cost input devices for remote haptic operations.

  7. Propeller based human powered swimming device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunker, Kristine (Kristine Alina)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently the only human powered swimming device widely sold on the market are swim flippers. However, flippers are not efficient for the human body, and there is a potential to increase the speed while swimming with a ...

  8. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J. (BNL); Fleger, S.; Barnes V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  9. Human Reliability Analysis for Digital Human-Machine Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the fact that existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods do not provide guidance on digital human-machine interfaces (HMIs). Digital HMIs are becoming ubiquitous in nuclear power operations, whether through control room modernization or new-build control rooms. Legacy analog technologies like instrumentation and control (I&C) systems are costly to support, and vendors no longer develop or support analog technology, which is considered technologically obsolete. Yet, despite the inevitability of digital HMI, no current HRA method provides guidance on how to treat human reliability considerations for digital technologies.

  10. An abstract-device interface for implementing portable parallel-I/O interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, R.; Gropp, W.; Lusk, E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable parallel programming has been hampered by the lack of a single, standard, portable application-programmer`s interface (API) for parallel I/O. Instead, the programmer must choose from several different APIs, many of which are not portable. To alleviate this problem, the authors have developed an abstract-device interface for parallel I/O, called ADIO. ADIO is not intended as a new API; rather, it is a strategy for implementing other APIs in a simple, portable, and efficient manner. ADIO facilitates the implementation of any existing or new API on any existing or new file system. ADIO thus enables users to experiment with different APIs, a feature that, they think, would help in the definition of a standard API. It also makes existing applications portable across a wide range of platforms. In this paper, they introduce the concept of ADIO. They describe the design of ADIO and its use in implementing APIs. They have currently implemented subsets of the Intel PFS, IBM PIOFS, and MPI-IO APIs on both the PFS and PIOFS file systems. As a result, they are able to run IBM PIOFS applications on the Intel Paragon, Intel PFS applications on the IBM SP, and MPI-IO applications on both systems. They report performance results obtained from two test programs and one real production application on the SP and Paragon. These results indicate that the performance overhead of using ADIO as an implementation strategy is negligible.

  11. Human-Machine Interface in Building Automation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobczak, N. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    problem between the non-computer knowledgeable operator and the computer based Building Automation System. One of the solutions to this problem is the design and implementation of a human machine interface which educates the operator to utilize the system...

  12. Interface Surprises May Motivate Novel Oxide Electronic Devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by oxygen vacancies highlights the important role of ionic phenomena in oxide electronics and opens a pathway for new device concepts." For example, someday engineers...

  13. M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part I, HCII 2009, LNCS 5617, pp. 628637, 2009. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    intelligent human-computer interaction, is a well-established research area that deals with inves- tigationM.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part I, HCII 2009, LNCS 5617, pp. 628­637, 2009, affective user interface, wearable devices. 1 Introduction "All emotions use the body as their theater

  14. Creation of a gradient polymer-fullerene interface in photovoltaic devices by thermally controlled interdiffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    by providing im- proved donor/acceptor proximity throughout the device using interpenetrating polymer networks5Creation of a gradient polymer-fullerene interface in photovoltaic devices by thermally controlled 24062-1704 Received 29 July 2002; accepted 27 September 2002 Efficient polymer-fullerene photovoltaic

  15. Metal oxide/organic interface investigations for photovoltaic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachoumi, Olympia

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    organic photovoltaics is investigated. We show that using these ternary oxides can lead to superior devices by: prevent- ing a dipole forming between the oxide and the active organic layer in a model ZnMO / P3HT:PCBM OPV as well as lead to improved surface...

  16. Human-computer interface including haptically controlled interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing that provides haptic feedback to control interface interactions such as scrolling or zooming within an application. Haptic feedback in the present method allows the user more intuitive control of the interface interactions, and allows the user's visual focus to remain on the application. The method comprises providing a control domain within which the user can control interactions. For example, a haptic boundary can be provided corresponding to scrollable or scalable portions of the application domain. The user can position a cursor near such a boundary, feeling its presence haptically (reducing the requirement for visual attention for control of scrolling of the display). The user can then apply force relative to the boundary, causing the interface to scroll the domain. The rate of scrolling can be related to the magnitude of applied force, providing the user with additional intuitive, non-visual control of scrolling.

  17. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  18. Advanced human-system interface design review guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced, computer-based, human-system interface designs are emerging in nuclear power plant (NPP) control rooms. These developments may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will greatly affect the ways in which operators interact with systems. At present, however, the only guidance available to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the review of control room-operator interfaces, NUREG-0700, was written prior to these technological changes and is thus not designed to address them. The objective of the project reported in this paper is to develop an Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline for use in performing human factors reviews of advanced operator interfaces. This guideline will be implemented, in part, as a portable, computer-based, interactive document for field use. The paper describes the overall guideline development methodology, the present status of the document, and the plans for further guideline testing and development. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Robotic device for manipulating human stepping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emken, J L; Wynne, J H; Harkema, S J; Reinkensmeyer, D J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper and lower extremity robotic devices for rehabilitationrehabilitation with a 4-DOF robotic orthosis,” IEEE Trans.and S. J. Harkema, “A robotic tool for studying locomotor

  20. AUTHENTICATED SENSOR INTERFACE DEVICE FOR JOINT USE SAFEGUARDS APPLICATIONS - CONCEPTS AND CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poland, R.; Drayer, R.; Wilson, J.

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss the key features of the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device that collectively provide the ability to share data among a number of parties while ensuring the authentication of data and protecting both the operator’s and the IAEA’s interests. The paper will also discuss the development of the prototype, the initial testing with an accountancy scale, and future plans and challenges to implementation into the joint use and remote monitoring applications. As nuclear fuel cycle technology becomes more prevalent throughout the world and the capacity of plants increases, limited resources of the IAEA are being stretched near a breaking point. A strategy is to increase efficiency in safeguards monitoring using “joint use” equipment that will provide the facility operator process data while also providing the IAEA key safeguards data. The data, however, must be authenticated and validated to ensure the data have not been tampered with. The Authenticated Sensor Interface Device provides the capability to share data and can be a valuable component in the IAEA’s ability to collect accountancy data from scales in Uranium conversion and enrichment plants, as well as nuclear fuel fabrication plants. Likewise, the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device can be configured to accept a diverse array of input signals, ranging from analog voltage, to current, to digital interfaces and more. These modular capabilities provide the ability to collect authenticated, joint-use, data streams from various process monitoring sensors.

  1. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger; Valerie Barnes

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  2. 1120 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 53, NO. 5, MAY 2006 Theory of Interface-Trap-Induced NBTI Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Muhammad A.

    mechanisms that generate traps at the Si-channel/gate-oxide interface of MOSFETs during transistor operation. The semiconductor/oxide interface is a rough surface where the highly ordered crystalline channel and the amor lead to poor device performance; therefore, the transistors are annealed in hydrogen ambient during

  3. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Möreke, Janina, E-mail: janina.moereke@bristol.ac.uk; Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Haigh, Sarah J. [Super STEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury Campus, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Bldg, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  4. A Model for the Human Computer Interface Evaluation in Safety Critical Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Fabio A.

    A Model for the Human Computer Interface Evaluation in Safety Critical Computer Applications Fabio of the IEEE International Conference and Workshop: Engineering of Computer­Based Systems March 1998, Jerusalem, Israel #12; 179 A Model for the Human Computer Interface Evaluation in Safety Critical Computer

  5. Service Robot Anthropomorphism and Interface Design for Emotion in Human-Robot Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tao

    . Based on a survey of existing service robot applications and associated interface requirements, we sensors have promoted a wide variety of robot applications in the health care field, including laboratoryService Robot Anthropomorphism and Interface Design for Emotion in Human-Robot Interaction Tao

  6. Three Quantities for Error Evaluation in Safety Critical Human Computer Interface 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Fabio A.

    1 Three Quantities for Error Evaluation in Safety Critical Human Computer Interface 1 Fabio A on the total dependability figures in safety critical systems: usability ­ expressed as a function interface, learning difficulty, MTBF, safety critical systems, usability 1. Introduction The embedding

  7. A Comparison of Interactive Color Specification Systems for Human-Computer Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Evelyn Frances

    Color specification is a time-consuming and challenging task in computer graphics applications. The purpose of this research is to examine the color specification process in the context of current human-computer interface technology...

  8. Spatial user interface : augmenting human sensibilities in a domestic kitchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jackie Chia-Hsun

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The real world is not a computer screen. When can augmented reality and ambient interfaces improve the usability of a physical environment? This thesis presents data from design studies and experiments that demonstrate the ...

  9. Subtle, intimate interfaces for mobile human computer interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costanza, Enrico

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile phone is always carried with the user and is always active: it is a very personal device. It fosters and satisfies a need to be constantly connected to one's significant other, friends or business partners. At ...

  10. Sharing Control Between Human and Automation Using Haptic Interface: Primary and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Brent

    Sharing Control Between Human and Automation Using Haptic Interface: Primary and Secondary Task-- In this paper, a paradigm for hu- man/automation control sharing is described in which a machine's manual the actions of the automatic controller. While perceiving the automation actions, the human may express his

  11. Tracking of Multiple Faces for Human-Computer Interfaces and Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    Tracking of Multiple Faces for Human-Computer Interfaces and Virtual Environments Fu Jie Huang present a tracking software library based on this algorithm. This library can be applied to human-computer based on statistical color modeling and the deformable template. We then expand the algorithm to track

  12. A multimodal speech interface for dynamic creation and retrieval of geographical landmarks on a mobile device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyar, Samuel S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As mobile devices become more powerful, researchers look to develop innovative applications that use new and effective means of input. Furthermore, developers must exploit the device's many capabilities (GPS, camera, touch ...

  13. Microfluidic Device to Culture 3D In Vitro Human Capillary Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    Microfluidic Device to Culture 3D In Vitro Human Capillary Networks Monica L. Moya, Luis F. Alonzo human capillaries. Keywords: Microfluidic platform, Microenviroment, Perfused capillary networks perfusion. To address these limitations, various research groups have explored the use of microfluidic

  14. Wind Display Device for Locomotion Interface in a Virtual Environment Sandip Kulkarni, Charles Fisher, Eric Pardyjak, Mark Minor and John Hollerbach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollerbach, John M.

    Wind Display Device for Locomotion Interface in a Virtual Environment Sandip Kulkarni, Charles ABSTRACT This paper describes development of a wind display system for the TreadPort virtual environment locomotion interface, which is cumulatively known as the TreadPort Active Wind Tunnel (TPAWT). Computational

  15. Jamming user interfaces: Programmable particle stiffness and sensing for malleable and shape-changing devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leithinger, Daniel

    Malleable and organic user interfaces have the potential to enable radically new forms of interactions and expressiveness through flexible, free-form and computationally controlled shapes and displays. This work, specifically ...

  16. Design and Implementation of Functional Nanoelectronic Interfaces With Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissue Using Nanowire Device Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timko, Brian P.

    Nanowire FETs (NWFETs) are promising building blocks for nanoscale bioelectronic interfaces with cells and tissue since they are known to exhibit exquisite sensitivity in the context of chemical and biological detection, ...

  17. Adaptive and Personalized Interfaces for Mobile Web With the rapid advance of mobile technologies and the widely use of handheld mobile devices,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wen-Chen

    the explosive growth of handheld mobile devices such as cell phones, palm pilots, and personal digital device and a user's preference. This paper proposes an innovative approach to adaptive and personalizedAdaptive and Personalized Interfaces for Mobile Web Abstract With the rapid advance of mobile

  18. Plasma-Material Interface Development for Future Spherical Tokamak-based Devices in NSTX.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    et. al, V

    2011-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The divertor plasma-material interface (PMI) must be able to withstand steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} (a limit imposed by the present day divertor material and engineering constraints) with minimal material erosion, as well as to provide impurity control and ion density pumping capabilities. In spherical tokamaks (STs), the compact divertor geometry and the requirement of low core electron collisionality n*{sub e} at n{sub e} < 0.5-0.7 n{sub G} (where n{sub G} is the Greenwald density) for increased neutral beam current drive efficiency impose much greater demands on divertor and first-wall particle and heat flux mitigation solutions. In NSTX, divertor heat flux mitigation and impurity control with an innovative 'snowflake' divertor configuration and ion density pumping by evaporated lithium wall and divertor coatings are studied. Lithium coatings have enabled ion density reduction up to 50% in NSTX through the reduction of wall and divertor recycling rates. The 'snowflake' divertor configuration was obtained in NSTX in 0.8-1 MA 4-6 MW NBI-heated H-mode lithium-assisted discharges using three divertor coils. The snowflake divertor formation was always accompanied by a partial detachment of the outer strike point with an up to 50% increase in divertor radiation from intrinsic carbon, the peak divertor heat flux reduction from 3-6 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-1 MW/m{sup 2}, and a significant increase in divertor volume recombination. High core confinement was maintained with the snowflake divertor, evidenced by the t{sub E}, W{sub MHD} and the H98(y,2) factors similar to those of the standard divertor discharges. Core carbon concentration and radiated power were reduced by 30-70%, apparently as a result of reduced divertor physical and chemical sputtering in the snowflake divertor and ELMs. In the SFD discharges, the MHD stability of the H-mode pedestal region was altered leading to the re-appearance of medium size (DW/W = 5-10%), Type I, ELMs otherwise suppressed due to lithium conditioning. Fast divertor measurements showed that impulsive particle and heat fluxes due to the ELMs were significantly dissipated in the high magnetic flux expansion region of the snowflake divertor. The snowflake divertor configuration is being combined in experiments with extrinsic deuterium or impurity gas puffing for increased dissipative divertor power losses, additional upper divertor nulls for increased power sharing between the upper and the lower divertors, and lithium coated plasma facing components for large area ion pumping. These efforts are aimed at the development of an integrated PMI for future ST-based devices for fusion development applications.

  19. The Impact of Human-Robot Interfaces on the Learning of Visual Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for the development of personal robotics. Indeed, unlike industrial robotics where the environment is very structured1 The Impact of Human-Robot Interfaces on the Learning of Visual Objects Pierre Rouanet, Pierre non-expert users to efficiently and intuitively teach a robot to recognize new visual objects. We

  20. Mind-Prosthesis Metaphor for Design of Human-Computer Interfaces That Support Better Attention Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corran, Ruth

    Mind-Prosthesis Metaphor for Design of Human-Computer Interfaces That Support Better Attention and the desktop metaphor in particular, we propose that the mind-prosthesis metaphor may be better suited in particular, we propose that the mind-prosthesis metaphor may serve as a guide for the design of future

  1. Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Automation has become ubiquitous in modern complex systems and commercial nuclear power plants are no exception. Beyond the control of plant functions and systems, automation is applied to a wide range of additional functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, response implementation, and interface management. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting plant personnel in nearly all aspects of plant operation. In light of the increasing use and importance of automation in new and future plants, guidance is needed to enable the NRC staff to conduct safety reviews of the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of modern automation. The objective of the research described in this report was to develop guidance for reviewing the operator's interface with automation. We first developed a characterization of the important HFE aspects of automation based on how it is implemented in current systems. The characterization included five dimensions: Level of automation, function of automation, modes of automation, flexibility of allocation, and reliability of automation. Next, we reviewed literature pertaining to the effects of these aspects of automation on human performance and the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs) for automation. Then, we used the technical basis established by the literature to develop design review guidance. The guidance is divided into the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, we identified insights into the automaton design process, operator training, and operations.

  2. Controlled growth of larger heterojunction interface area for organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Fan (Somerset, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic device and a method of fabricating a photosensitive optoelectronic device includes depositing a first organic semiconductor material on a first electrode to form a continuous first layer having protrusions, a side of the first layer opposite the first electrode having a surface area at least three times greater than an underlying lateral cross-sectional area; depositing a second organic semiconductor material directly on the first layer to form a discontinuous second layer, portions of the first layer remaining exposed; depositing a third organic semiconductor material directly on the second layer to form a discontinuous third layer, portions of at least the second layer remaining exposed; depositing a fourth organic semiconductor material on the third layer to form a continuous fourth layer, filling any exposed gaps and recesses in the first, second, and third layers; and depositing a second electrode on the fourth layer, wherein at least one of the first electrode and the second electrode is transparent, and the first and third organic semiconductor materials are both of a donor-type or an acceptor-type relative to second and fourth organic semiconductor materials, which are of the other material type.

  3. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O'Hara

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

  4. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  5. Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber thinning and the homo-interface model: Influence of Mo back contact and 3-stage process on device characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, E.; Arzel, L.; Tomassini, M.; Barreau, N., E-mail: nicolas.barreau@univ-nantes.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-UMR 6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Zabierowski, P. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, PL 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Fuertes Marrón, D. [Instituto de Energía Solar–ETSIT, Technical University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s.n., 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thinning the absorber layer is one of the possibilities envisaged to further decrease the production costs of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) thin films solar cell technology. In the present study, the electronic transport in submicron CIGSe-based devices has been investigated and compared to that of standard devices. It is observed that when the absorber is around 0.5??m-thick, tunnelling enhanced interface recombination dominates, which harms cells energy conversion efficiency. It is also shown that by varying either the properties of the Mo back contact or the characteristics of 3-stage growth processing, one can shift the dominating recombination mechanism from interface to space charge region and thereby improve the cells efficiency. Discussions on these experimental facts led to the conclusions that 3-stage process implies the formation of a CIGSe/CIGSe homo-interface, whose location as well as properties rule the device operation; its influence is enhanced in submicron CIGSe based solar cells.

  6. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. Evaluation procedures and guidelines for human factors engineering reviews

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Baker, C.C.; Welch, D.L.; Granda, T.M.; Vingelis, P.J. [Carlow International Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support. NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  7. Nuclear power plant human computer interface design incorporating console simulation, operations personnel, and formal evaluation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, C.; Edwards, R.M.; Goldberg, J.H.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New CRT-based information displays which enhance the human machine interface are playing a very important role and are being increasingly used in control rooms since they present a higher degree of flexibility compared to conventional hardwired instrumentation. To prototype a new console configuration and information display system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), an iterative process of console simulation and evaluation involving operations personnel is being pursued. Entire panels including selector switches and information displays are simulated and driven by plant dynamical simulations with realistic responses that reproduce the actual cognitive and physical environment. Careful analysis and formal evaluation of operator interaction while using the simulated console will be conducted to determine underlying principles for effective control console design for this particular group of operation personnel. Additional iterations of design, simulation, and evaluation will then be conducted as necessary.

  8. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  9. Advanced control room design review guidelines: Integration of the NUREG-0700 guidelines and development of new human-system interface guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.J.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the work conducted in four tasks of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) project entitled Review Criteria for Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Controls and Instrumentation. The purpose of the first task was to integrate the applicable sections of NUREG-0700 into the advanced control room design review (ACRDR) guidelines to ensure that all applicable guidelines are together in one document and conveniently accessible to users. The primary objective of the second task was to formulate a strategy for the development of new ACRDR guidelines that have not otherwise been identified. The main focus of the third task was to modify the individual ACRDR guidelines generated to date to ensure that they are suitable for the intended nuclear power plant (NPP) control station system application. The goal of the fourth task was to develop human factors guidelines for two human-system interface categories that are missing from the current ACRDR guidelines document. During the first task those areas in NUREG-0700 that are not addressed by the ACRDR guidelines document were identified, the areas were subsequently reviewed against six recent industry human factors engineering review guidelines, and the NUREG-0700 guidelines were updated as necessary. In the second task 13 general categories of human-system interface guidelines that are either missing from or not adequately addressed by the ACRDR document were discovered. An approach was derived for the development of new ACRDR guidelines, a preliminary assessment of the available sources that may be useful in the creation of new guidelines and their applicability to the identified human-system interface categories was performed, and an estimate was made of the amount of time and level of effort required to complete the development of needed new ACRDR guidelines. During the third task those NPP control station systems to which the NUREG-0700 and ACRDR guidelines apply were identified, matrices of such applicability were developed to support the needs of the NRC inspectors and reviewers, a guideline modification audit and tracking system was designed, and the ACRDR guidelines were reviewed and modified where appropriate to ensure that their language is applicable to the nuclear industry. In the fourth task control and input device guidelines were generated and human factors guidelines for specific nuclear operations were drafted.

  10. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  11. M.J. Smith, G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part I, HCII 2007, LNCS 4557, pp. 549558, 2007. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Sung-Bae

    M.J. Smith, G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part I, HCII 2007, LNCS 4557, pp. 549­558, 2007 people and objects streamed to a multi-media database server. By analyzing the LPS tracking information

  12. Co-Adaptive and Affective Human-Machine Interface for Improving Training Performances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    and intuitive manner. This paper is focused on the control scheme and interface of a myoelectric prosthesis Myoelectric Forearm Prosthesis Iman Mohammad Rezazadeh, Mohammad Firoozabadi, Huosheng Hu, Senior Member, IEEE) that is developed to control virtual forearm prosthesis over a long period of operation. Direct physical performance

  13. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Reviewer`s checklist: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 2 is a complete set of the guidelines contained in Volume 1, Part 2, but in a checklist format that can be used by reviewers to assemble sets of individual guidelines for use in specific design reviews. The checklist provides space for reviewers to enter guidelines evaluations and comments.

  14. CONTRIBUTION TO THE ACM CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS (CHI '89) Topic Area: Interface Design Tools and Techniques (specifically: User Interface Tools Kits; Rapid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    for Constructive and Argumentative Design Gerhard Fischer and Anders Morch Department of Computer Science and contains useful information about the principles of kitchen design. The integration of these two types: Interface Design Tools and Techniques (specifically: User Interface Tools Kits; Rapid Prototyping

  15. Effects of interfaces on dynamics in micro-fluidic devices: slip-boundaries' impact on rotation characteristics of polar liquid film motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Qiang Liu; Su-Rong Jiang; Tamar A. Yinnon; Xiang-Mu Kong; Ying-Jun Li

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip-boundary effects on the polar liquid film motor (PLFM) -- a novel micro-fluidic device with important implications for advancing knowledge on liquid micro-film's structure, dynamics, modeling and technology -- are studied. We develop a mathematical model, under slip boundary conditions, describing electro-hydro-dynamical rotations in the PLFMs induced either by direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) fields. Our main results are: (i) rotation characteristics depend on the ratio $k=l_{s}/D$ ($l_{s}$ denotes the slip length, resulting from the interface's impact on the structure of the liquid and $D$ denotes the film's diameter). (ii) As $k$ ($k>-1/2$) increases: (a) PLFMs subsequently exhibit rotation characteristics under "negative-", "no-", "partial-" and "perfect-" slip boundary conditions; (b) the maximum value of the linear velocity of the steady rotating liquid film increases and its location approaches the film's border; (c) the decay of the angular velocities' dependency on the distance from the center of the film slows down, resulting in a macroscopic flow near the boundary. (iii) In addition to $k$, the rotation characteristics of the AC PLFM depend on the magnitudes, the frequencies, and the phase difference of the AC fields. (iv) Our analytical derived rotation speed distributions are consistent with the existing experimental ones.

  16. Human-computer interaction task learning: an empirical investigation of interface quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packebush, Sherrill Janine

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examines learnability measures derived from the all-or-none stochastic learning model. The all-or-none model represents the paired-associate learning that occurs during the initial learning of human-computer interaction (HCI) tasks...

  17. Non-invasive, MRI-compatible fibreoptic device for functional near-IR reflectometry of human brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorvoja, H.S.S.; Myllylae, T S; Myllylae, Risto A [University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurements Techniques Laboratory (Finland); Kirillin, M Yu; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Elseoud, A A; Nikkinen, J; Tervonen, O; Kiviniemi, V [MRI Research Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-invasive device for measuring blood oxygen variations in human brain is designed, implemented, and tested for MRI compatibility. The device is based on principles of near-IR reflectometry; power LEDs serve as sources of probing radiation delivered to patient skin surface through optical fibres. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations of probing radiation propagation in a multilayer brain model are performed to evaluate signal levels at different source - detector separations at three operation wavelengths and an additional wavelength of 915 nm. It is shown that the device can be applied for brain activity studies using power LEDs operating at 830 and 915 nm, while employment of wavelength of 660 nm requires an increased probing power. Employment of the wavelength of 592 nm in the current configuration is unreasonable. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  18. A Multinuclear Copper(I) Cluster Forms the Dimerization Interface in Copper-Loaded Human Copper Chaperone for Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stasser, J.P.; Siluvai, G.S.; Barry, A.N.; Blackburn, N.J.

    2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Copper binding and X-ray aborption spectroscopy studies are reported on untagged human CCS (hCCS; CCS = copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase) isolated using an intein self-cleaving vector and on single and double Cys to Ala mutants of the hCCS MTCQSC and CSC motifs of domains 1 (D1) and 3 (D3), respectively. The results on the wild-type protein confirmed earlier findings on the CCS-MBP (maltose binding protein) constructs, namely, that Cu(I) coordinates to the CXC motif, forming a cluster at the interface of two D3 polypeptides. In contrast to the single Cys to Ser mutations of the CCS-MBP protein (Stasser, J. P., Eisses, J. F., Barry, A. N., Kaplan, J. H., and Blackburn, N. J. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 3143-3152), single Cys to Ala mutations in D3 were sufficient to eliminate cluster formation and significantly reduce CCS activity. Analysis of the intensity of the Cu-Cu cluster interaction in C244A, C246A, and C244/246A variants suggested that the nuclearity of the cluster was greater than 2 and was most consistent with a Cu4S6 adamantane-type species. The relationship among cluster formation, oligomerization, and metal loading was evaluated. The results support a model in which Cu(I) binding converts the apo dimer with a D2-D2 interface to a new dimer connected by cluster formation at two D3 CSC motifs. The predominance of dimer over tetramer in the cluster-containing species strongly suggests that the D2 dimer interface remains open and available for sequestering an SOD1 monomer. This work implicates the copper cluster in the reactive form and adds detail to the cluster nuclearity and how copper loading affects the oligomerization states and reactivity of CCS for its partner SOD1.

  19. The Effect of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Gunther, B.; Martinez-Guridi, G. (BNL); Xing, J.; Barnes, V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in new and advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs) will support operators in monitoring and controlling the plants. Even though digital systems typically are expected to be reliable, their potential for degradation or failure significantly could affect the operators performance and, consequently, jeopardize plant safety. This U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research investigated the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and on plant operations. The objective was to develop technical basis and guidance for human factors engineering (HFE) reviews addressing the operator's ability to detect and manage degraded digital I&C conditions. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we evaluated the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater control system of a currently operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and the operators performance. Our findings indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems, and the overall effects on the plant's behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations may affect the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, deterioration of the sensors can complicate the operators interpretation of displays, and sometimes may mislead them by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the findings as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance.

  20. Human-machine interface (HMI) report for 241-SY-101 data acquisition [and control] system (DACS) upgrade study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truitt, R.W.

    1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an independent evaluation of information for a Windows based Human Machine Interface (HMI) to replace the existing DOS based Iconics HMI currently used in the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used at Tank 241-SY-101. A fundamental reason for this evaluation is because of the difficulty of maintaining the system with obsolete, unsupported software. The DACS uses a software operator interface (Genesis for DOS HMI) that is no longer supported by its manufacturer, Iconics. In addition to its obsolescence, it is complex and difficult to train additional personnel on. The FY 1997 budget allocated $40K for phase 1 of a software/hardware upgrade that would have allowed the old DOS based system to be replaced by a current Windows based system. Unfortunately, budget constraints during FY 1997 has prompted deferral of the upgrade. The upgrade needs to be performed at the earliest possible time, before other failures render the system useless. Once completed, the upgrade could alleviate other concerns: spare pump software may be able to be incorporated into the same software as the existing pump, thereby eliminating the parallel path dilemma; and the newer, less complex software should expedite training of future personnel, and in the process, require that less technical time be required to maintain the system.

  1. LINEAR COMBINATIONS OF NONLINEAR MODELS FOR PREDICTING HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE FORCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    human neuromechanical characteristics during limb movements in order to predict man-machine interactions of a planar manipulandum robot and attempted to make point-to-point reaching movements. We compared. Furthermore, this prediction should be applied during movement and not just in maintaining posture. Estimating

  2. M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part II, HCII 2009, LNCS 5618, pp. 342351, 2009. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misue, Kazuo

    M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part II, HCII 2009, LNCS 5618, pp. 342 media consumption. Keywords: categorical data, visualization, multi-dimensional analysis. 1 Introduction The visualization of categorical data occurs in various fields, such as mass media and marketing research

  3. Assistive Human-Machine Interfaces for Smart Homes Armando Roy Delgado, Alexia Robinet, John McGinn, Vic Grout and Rich Picking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grout, Vic

    Assistive Human-Machine Interfaces for Smart Homes Armando Roy Delgado, Alexia Robinet, John Mc-for-all, Accessibility, Smart homes, Home automation systems, Multi-agent systems, White goods, Embedded systems 1. Introduction: Design aspects of smart homes for an ageing population As a generic concept, home automation

  4. Development of a Robotic Device for the Physical Training of Human Upper Extremity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Jorge Adrian

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the development of a robotic device to be used in parallel with observational learning techniques for facilitating the recovery of the upper limb in post-stroke patients. It has been shown in the existing observational...

  5. Integration of Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable Thermoelectric Automobile Exhaust Waste Heat Harvesting Devices Integration of Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable...

  6. A Prototyping Environment for Research on Human-Machine Interfaces in Process Control: Use of Microsoft WPF for Microworld and Distributed Control System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Thomas A. Ulrich

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operators of critical processes, such as nuclear power production, must contend with highly complex systems, procedures, and regulations. Developing human-machine interfaces (HMIs) that better support operators is a high priority for ensuring the safe and reliable operation of critical processes. Human factors engineering (HFE) provides a rich and mature set of tools for evaluating the performance of HMIs, but the set of tools for developing and designing HMIs is still in its infancy. Here we propose that Microsoft Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is well suited for many roles in the research and development of HMIs for process control.

  7. Methods for passivating silicon devices at low temperature to achieve low interface state density and low recombination velocity while preserving carrier lifetime

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhizhang (Duluth, GA); Rohatgi, Ajeet (Marietta, GA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new process has been developed to achieve a very low SiO.sub.x /Si interface state density D.sub.it, low recombination velocity S (<2 cm/s), and high effective carrier lifetime T.sub.eff (>5 ms) for oxides deposited on silicon substrates at low temperature. The technique involves direct plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with appropriate growth conditions, followed by a photo-assisted rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process. Approximately 500-A-thick SiO.sub.x layers are deposited on Si by PECVD at 250.degree. C. with 0.02 W/cm.sup.-2 rf power, then covered with SiN or an evaporated thin aluminum layer, and subjected to a photo-assisted anneal in forming gas ambient at 350.degree. C., resulting in an interface state density D.sub.it in the range of about 1-4.times.10.sup.10 cm.sup.-2 eV.sup.-1, which sets a record for the lowest interface state density D.sub.it for PECVD oxides fabricated to date. Detailed analysis shows that the PECVD deposition conditions, photo-assisted anneal, forming gas ambient, and the presence of an aluminum layer on top of the oxides during the anneal, all contributed to this low value of interface state density D.sub.it. Detailed metal-oxide semiconductor analysis and model calculations show that such a low recombination velocity S is the result of moderately high positive oxide charge (5.times.10.sup.11 -1.times.10.sup.12 cm.sup.-2) and relatively low midgap interface state density (1.times.10.sup.10 -4.times.10.sup.10 cm.sup.-2 eV.sup.-1). Photo-assisted anneal was found to be superior to furnace annealing, and a forming gas ambient was better than a nitrogen ambient for achieving a very low surface recombination velocity S.

  8. SVG for Automotive User Interfaces Dr. Sbastien Boisgrault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ................................................................................................................. 1 EDONA and Human-Machine Interface Design for the Automotive Industry1 SVG for Automotive User Interfaces Dr. Sébastien Boisgérault .................................................................................................... 7 SVG standards for automotive HMI modeling

  9. HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE (HMI) EVALUATION OF ROOMS TA-50-1-60/60A AT THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY (RLWTF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Walter E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stender, Kerith K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This effort addressed an evaluation of human machine interfaces (HMIs) in Room TA-50-1-60/60A of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The evaluation was performed in accordance with guidance outlined in DOE-STD-3009, DOE Standard Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, 2006 [DOE 2006]. Specifically, Chapter 13 of DOE 2006 highlights the 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, 2012, [CFR 2012] and DOE G 421.1-2 [DOE 2001a] requirements as they relate to the human factors process and, in this case, the safety of the RLWTF. The RLWTF is a Hazard Category 3 facility and, consequently, does not have safety-class (SSCs). However, safety-significant SSCs are identified. The transuranic (TRU) wastewater tanks and associated piping are the only safety-significant SSCs in Rooms TA-50-1-60/60A [LANL 2010]. Hence, the human factors evaluation described herein is only applicable to this particular assemblage of tanks and piping.

  10. In-situ characterization of growth and interfaces in a-Si:H devices. Annual subcontract report, 1 May 1992--30 April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, R.W.; Wronski, C.R.; An, I.; Lu, Y.; Nguyen, H.V. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to reach two goals--an individual goal and a wide-gap team goal. The individual goal was to investigate the ``top junction`` for defects using the spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. This will include an evaluation if specific defects are associated with C, B, Sn (diffusing from the transparent conducting oxide [TCO]) or Na (diffusing from the glass). It may include an assessment of the function of a graded a-SiC:H buffer layer. As defects are identified and characterized, their influence on the transport properties will be assessed. This should lead to better parameters used as input to models for the electronic materials and device performance. The goal of the wide-gap team was to demonstrate, characterize, and understand improved doped and undoped ``wide gap`` materials for use in achieving 15%-efficient stabilized photovoltaic modules (``wide gap`` materials are defined by this team to have a band gap {ge} 1.9 eV). The major conclusions of the research are discussed in the report.

  11. U.S. Department Of Energy Advanced Small Modular Reactor R&D Program: Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces (ICHMI) are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although the recent progress in constructing new plants has spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, development of advanced reactor concepts, such as Generation IV designs and small modular reactors, introduces different plant conditions (e.g., higher temperatures, different coolants, etc.) and unique plant configurations (e.g., multiunit plants with shared systems, balance of plant architectures with reconfigurable co-generation options) that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve industry goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, significant challenges remain to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of modern ICHMI technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to resolve the technical challenges that may compromise the effective and efficient utilization of modern ICHMI technology and consequently inhibit realization of the benefits offered by expanded utilization of nuclear power. Consequently, several DOE programs have substantial ICHMI RD&D elements within their respective research portfolios. This paper describes current ICHMI research in support of advanced small modular reactors. The objectives that can be achieved through execution of the defined RD&D are to provide optimal technical solutions to critical ICHMI issues, resolve technology gaps arising from the unique measurement and control characteristics of advanced reactor concepts, provide demonstration of needed technologies and methodologies in the nuclear power application domain, mature emerging technologies to facilitate commercialization, and establish necessary technical evidence and application experience to enable timely and predictable licensing. 1 Introduction Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although the recent progress in constructing new plants has spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, development of advanced reactor concepts, such as Generation IV designs and small modular reactors, introduces different plant conditions (e.g., higher temperatures, different coolants, etc.) and unique plant configurations (e.g., multiunit plants with shared systems, balance of plant architectures with reconfigurable co-generation options) that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve industry goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, significant challenges remain to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of m

  12. Sketch Recognition on Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, George 1987-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sketch recognition allows computers to understand and model hand drawn sketches and diagrams. Traditionally sketch recognition systems required a pen based PC interface, but powerful mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones can provide a new...

  13. Sketch Recognition on Mobile Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, George 1987-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sketch recognition allows computers to understand and model hand drawn sketches and diagrams. Traditionally sketch recognition systems required a pen based PC interface, but powerful mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones can provide a new...

  14. Device-transparent personal storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Jacob A. (Jacob Alo), 1979-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Users increasingly store data collections such as digital photographs on multiple personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated from the contents of all other ...

  15. Toward Widely-Available and Usable Multimodal Conversational Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruenstein, Alexander

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multimodal conversational interfaces, which allow humans to interact with a computer using a combination of spoken natural language and a graphical interface, offer the potential to transform the manner by which humans ...

  16. 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Robert

    6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, ...

  17. The Effects of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance: HFE Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, J.M.; W. Gunther, G. Martinez-Guridi

    2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) supported this research project to investigate the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and plant operations. The objective was to develop human factors engineering (HFE) review guidance addressing the detection and management of degraded digital I&C conditions by plant operators. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we conducted an evaluation of the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater system on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and operator performance. The results indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems and the overall effects on plant behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or causing equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations can impact the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, sensor degradations can make displays difficult to interpret and can sometimes mislead operators by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the information obtained as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance. The guidance addresses the treatment of degraded I&C conditions as part of the design process and the HSI features and functions that support operators to monitor I&C performance and manage I&C degradations when they occur. In addition, we identified topics for future research.

  18. PinBus Interface Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  19. Device control at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaffner, S.; Barker, D.; Bookwalter, V. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CEBAF has undergone a major conversion of its accelerator control system from TACL to EPICS, affecting device control for the RF system, magnets, the machine protection system, the vacuum and valves, and the diagnostic systems including beam position monitors, harps, and the camera and solenoid devices (beam viewers, faraday cups, optical transition radiation viewers, synchrotron radiation monitor, etc.). Altogether these devices require approximately 125,000 EPICS database records. The majority of these devices are controlled through CAMAC; some use embedded microprocessors (RF and magnets), and newer interfaces are in VME. The standard EPICS toolkit was extended to include a driver for CAMAC which supports dual processors on one serial highway, custom database records for magnets and BPMs, and custom data acquisition tasks for the BPMs. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  20. SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    communications. References Superconductor Applications: ~on all aspects of superconducting devices. IEEE Trans.on all aspects vf superconducting devices. The IBM Journal

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on all aspects of superconducting devices. IEEE Trans.on all aspects vf superconducting devices. The IBM JournalJ. Matisoo, The Superconducting Computer," Scientific

  2. Novel fluctuations at constrained interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chaudhuri

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we try to answer the qustion : What happens when explicit constraints are introduced such that the low energy, long wavelength modes of a system are unavailable ? This question has assumed some importance in recent years due to the advent of nano technology and the growing use of nanometer scale devices and structures. In a small system, the size limits the scale of the fluctuations and makes it imperative for us to understand how the response of the system is altered in such a situation. In this thesis, this question is answered for the special case of interfacial fluctuations in two dimensions (2d). The energy of an interface between two phases in equilibrium is invariant with respect to translations perpendicular to the plane (or line in 2d) of the interface. We study the consequence of breaking this symmetry explicity using an external field gradient. One expects that since low energy excitations are suppressed, the interface would be flat and inert at all times. We show that surprisingly there are novel fluctuations and phenomena associated with such constrained interfaces which have static as well as dynamic consequences. The Ising interface on a square lattice is shown to undergo a multitude of structural transitions as a function of velocity and the orientation. Liquid solid interfaces show coherent addition and removal of atomic layers providing novel mechanisms of stress relaxation in a nanosized single crystal without defects. We study momentum and energy transfer across the liquid solid interface in the presence of this ``layering'' transition.

  3. User Interfaces 1 Command Line Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    User Interfaces 1 Command Line Interfaces getting arguments of the command line a command line 2013 1 / 39 #12;User Interfaces 1 Command Line Interfaces getting arguments of the command line a command line interface to store points fitting points with polyfit of numpy 2 Encapsulation by Object

  4. A Sonically-Enhanced Interface Toolkit Stephen A. Brewster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    in that an interface designer without a detailed knowledge of graphic design can create an interface using a standard device-dependent and time- consuming. This is a similar problem to that faced by graphical interface designers before graphical toolkits were available. Myers [8] suggests that the use of graphical toolkits

  5. Intelligent interface for design and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draisin, W.; Peter, E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing a system composed of intelligent interfaces, expert systems, and databases that uses artificial intelligence techniques to simplify the use of large simulation codes and to help design complicated physical devices. The simulation codes are used in analyzing and designing weapons, and the devices are themselves parts of weapon systems. From a designer's point of view, the simulation process is the same no matter what is being simulated. In the course of developing two intelligent interfaces for the design of nuclear weapons, we have found that data-driven programming is a useful technique for implementing an open-ended user interface to assist the designer. We discuss the simulation process as it is done now and as it could be done with intelligent interfaces. We then discuss the use of data-driven programming in a database environment to support an interface for an arbitrary number of simulation codes. 3 figs.

  6. ECE 609 Semiconductor Devices Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ECE 609 ­ Semiconductor Devices Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of semiconductor electronic devices in terms of material properties, interface and junction characteristics). ________________________________________________________________________ Preliminary Course Outline 1. Overview of Semiconductor Physics 1.1 Semiconductor Materials

  7. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Silva, Arthur (Ames, IA)

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  8. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  9. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: • Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) • Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information • New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 20–21, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

  10. Piezo-phototronic effect devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.; Yang, Qing

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconducting device includes a piezoelectric structure that has a first end and an opposite second end. A first conductor is in electrical communication with the first end and a second conductor is in electrical communication with the second end so as to form an interface therebetween. A force applying structure is configured to maintain an amount of strain in the piezoelectric member sufficient to generate a desired electrical characteristic in the semiconducting device.

  11. Brain-computer interface controlled functional electrical stimulation system for ankle movement.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, An H; Wang, Po T; King, Christine E; Abiri, Ahmad; Nenadic, Zoran

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N: Breaking the silence: Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) forsignal by a noninvasive brain-computer interface in humans.E: A novel P300-based brain- computer interface stimulus

  12. User interface design for an automated part recognition system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avitts, Tommie Annette

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the inclusion of an interface following the guidelines set forth in Human Interface Guidelines: The Apple Desktop Interface (Apple Computer, 1987) in this study. Figure 1 is a screen image showing the menu bar (top of screen) of the Menu interface designed.... , San Jacinto College; B. S. , Stephen F. Austin State University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Deborah A. Mitta Dr. R. Dale Huchingson This research involved the design and usability evaluation of five user-computer interfaces developed...

  13. Daydreaming Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Ponte, Ana Sofia Lopes

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daydreaming Devices is a project on aspects of daydream and the design of convertible furniture within the context of art. This thesis addresses the concepts and the design of two daydreaming devices developed during my ...

  14. Intermixing at the absorber-buffer layer interface in thin-film solar cells: The electronic effects of point defects in Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(Se,S){sub 4} devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varley, J. B.; Lordi, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate point defects in the buffer layers CdS and ZnS that may arise from intermixing with Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} (CIGS) or Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} (CZTS) absorber layers in thin-film photovoltaics. Using hybrid functional calculations, we characterize the electrical and optical behavior of Cu, In, Ga, Se, Sn, Zn, Na, and K impurities in the buffer. We find that In and Ga substituted on the cation site act as shallow donors in CdS and tend to enhance the prevailing n-type conductivity at the interface facilitated by Cd incorporation in CIGS, whereas they are deep donors in ZnS and will be less effective dopants. Substitutional In and Ga can favorably form complexes with cation vacancies (A-centers) which may contribute to the “red kink” effect observed in some CIGS-based devices. For CZTS absorbers, we find that Zn and Sn defects substituting on the buffer cation site are electrically inactive in n-type buffers and will not supplement the donor doping at the interface as in CIGS/CdS or ZnS devices. Sn may also preferentially incorporate on the S site as a deep acceptor in n-type ZnS, which suggests possible concerns with absorber-related interfacial compensation in CZTS devices with ZnS-derived buffers. Cu, Na, and K impurities are found to all have the same qualitative behavior, most favorably acting as compensating acceptors when substituting on the cation site. Our results suggest one beneficial role of K and Na incorporation in CIGS or CZTS devices is the partial passivation of vacancy-related centers in CdS and ZnS buffers, rendering them less effective interfacial hole traps and recombination centers.

  15. Physical Media Independence: System Support for Dynamically Available Network Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walpole, Jonathan

    (PMI) is the concept of making assumptions about a particular device explicit, detecting events which PMI. Based on device availability, the model iden- ti es implicit device-related assumptions made the Interface Man- agement Module (IMM), that supports PMI in the FreeBSD operating system. The bene ts

  16. advanced user interface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    overload and under load. First, we take a historical look at how the fields of human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence have viewed interface agent research....

  17. Sealing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  18. Nanoscale Josephson Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Chris

    , ferromagnetically (aligned ferromagnetic layers) FIB Focused Ion Beam GL Ginzburg-Landau GPIB General Purpose Interface Bus GMR Giant Magnetoresistance HTS High Temperature Superconductor I Insulator LED Light Emitting Diode LTS Low Temperature Superconductor MR... . The fabrication of intrinsic Josephson junctions in the high temperature superconductor Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 will then be discussed, as well as Nb/MoSi2/Nb junctions, superconducting quantum interference devices, and finally GaN light emitting diodes. The work on Tl2Ba2...

  19. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung-Guen; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly,more »in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.« less

  20. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Malashevich, Andrei [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Disa, Ankit S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Han, Myung-Guen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, Hanghui [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Walker, Frederick J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ahn, Charles H. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States);

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.

  1. Electrochromic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allemand, Pierre M. (Tucson, AZ); Grimes, Randall F. (Ann Arbor, MI); Ingle, Andrew R. (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Kennedy, Steve R. (Tuscon, AZ); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Boulton, Jonathan M. (Tucson, AZ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic device is disclosed having a selective ion transport layer which separates an electrochemically active material from an electrolyte containing a redox active material. The devices are particularly useful as large area architectural and automotive glazings due to there reduced back reaction.

  2. M.J. Smith, G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part I, HCII 2007, LNCS 4557, pp. 728737, 2007. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tae-Jin

    the energy consumption of mobile devices. In order to achieve these goals, we propose an energy (BSs) that are connected to each other via a backbone. It provides an access to a user which is in the physical neighborhood of the BS. Despite its advantages, this technology is still very restrictive, since

  3. Web Service Interface (API)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6...

  4. Web Browser Interface (WBUI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6...

  5. Selecting and Applying Interfacings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selecting and using interfacing correctly is an important component of garment construction. The various types of interfacing are described and methods of applying them are discussed in detail....

  6. Eyo: Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Strauss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    Eyo: Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Strauss Justin Mazzola Paluska Chris Lesniewski on multiple personal devices, each of which typically offers a storage management interface oblivious. This paper presents Eyo, a novel personal storage sys- tem that provides device transparency: a user can

  7. Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Alo Strauss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    Device-Transparent Personal Storage by Jacob Alo Strauss S.B., Massachusetts Institute personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated and drift out of sync. This thesis presents Eyo, a novel personal storage system that provides device trans

  8. Device Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Device Performance group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we measure the performance of PV cells and modules with respect to standard reporting conditions--defined as a reference temperature (25 C), total irradiance (1000 Wm-2), and spectral irradiance distribution (IEC standard 60904-3). Typically, these are ''global'' reference conditions, but we can measure with respect to any reference set. To determine device performance, we conduct two general categories of measurements: spectral responsivity (SR) and current versus voltage (I-V). We usually perform these measurements using standard procedures, but we develop new procedures when required by new technologies. We also serve as an independent facility for verifying device performance for the entire PV community. We help the PV community solve its special measurement problems, giving advice on solar simulation, instrumentation for I-V measurements, reference cells, measurement procedures, and anomalous results. And we collaborate with researchers to analyze devices and materials.

  9. Web Interface Call Simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    Web Interface Call Simulator Stage Description Web Interface for VoIP Call Simulator Net) Version 1.0 ­ 3/09/2012 Page 1 of 6 #12;Web Interface Call Simulator Version 1.0 ­ 3/09/2012 Page 2 of 6 #12;Web Interface Call Simulator Document Control Version Date Notes 1.0 25/8/2012 Reviewed

  10. Ghosts in the Machine: Interfaces for Better Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flinn, Jason

    Ghosts in the Machine: Interfaces for Better Power Management Manish Anand, Edmund B. Nightingale observe that the modularity of current power manage­ ment algorithms often leads to poor results. We propose two new interfaces that pierce the abstraction barrier that in­ hibits device power management

  11. Ghosts in the Machine: Interfaces for Better Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Ghosts in the Machine: Interfaces for Better Power Management Manish Anand, Edmund B. Nightingale observe that the modularity of current power manage- ment algorithms often leads to poor results. We propose two new interfaces that pierce the abstraction barrier that in- hibits device power management

  12. Generic device controller for accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariotti, R.; Buxton, W.; Frankel, R.; Hoff, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new distributed intelligence control system has become operational at the AGS for transport, injection, and acceleration of heavy ions. A brief description of the functionality of the physical devices making up the system is given. An attempt has been made to integrate the devices for accelerator specific interfacing into a standard microprocessor system, namely, the Universal Device Controller (UDC). The main goals for such a generic device controller are to provide: local computing power; flexibility to configure; and real time event handling. The UDC assemblies and software are described. (LEW)

  13. Toward an intelligent multimodal interface for natural interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Ying Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in technology are enabling novel approaches to human-computer interaction (HCI) in a wide variety of devices and settings (e.g., the Microsoft® Surface, the Nintendo® Wii, iPhone®, etc.). While many of these devices ...

  14. Natural Language Interfaces for Data Warehouses Nicolas Kuchmann-Beauger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , a new class of search systems, such as Wolfram|Alpha 1 , became popular: question answering systems interfaces in commercial BI tools allow users to combine dimensions and measures to build queries. New device access to mobile devices bring new challenges. In particular, recent success of speech

  15. PINS : a haptic computer interface system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaanta, Bradley C. (Bradley Carter), 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research goal was to develop a dense array of discreet vertical actuators as an input and output device with haptic feedback for Human Computer Interaction (HCI). This expands upon the current research of table surfaces ...

  16. Multijunction photovoltaic device and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arya, Rajeewa R. (Jamison, PA); Catalano, Anthony W. (Furlong, PA)

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first and second amorphous silicon PIN photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one or the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers. The disclosed device is fabricated by a glow discharge process.

  17. Electrochemical device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ); Einstein, Harry (Springfield, NJ); Bellows, Richard J. (Westfield, NJ)

    1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  18. Detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  19. NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chenson K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear Optics (W. A. Benjamin, 1977) p.Research Division NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K.ED LBL-12084 NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K. Chen

  20. Reducing 3G energy consumption on mobile devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Shuo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3G wireless interface is a significant contributor to battery drain on mobile devices. This paper describes the design, implementation, and experimental evaluation of methods to reduce the energy consumption of the 3G ...

  1. Optoelectronic devices utilizing materials having enhanced electronic transitions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, Marcie R. (Newton, MA)

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic device that includes a material having enhanced electronic transitions. The electronic transitions are enhanced by mixing electronic states at an interface. The interface may be formed by a nano-well, a nano-dot, or a nano-wire.

  2. Optoelectronic devices utilizing materials having enhanced electronic transitions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, Marcie R.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic device that includes a material having enhanced electronic transitions. The electronic transitions are enhanced by mixing electronic states at an interface. The interface may be formed by a nano-well, a nano-dot, or a nano-wire.

  3. Diversionary device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diversionary device has a housing having at least one opening and containing a non-explosive propellant and a quantity of fine powder packed within the housing, with the powder being located between the propellant and the opening. When the propellant is activated, it has sufficient energy to propel the powder through the opening to produce a cloud of powder outside the housing. An igniter is also provided for igniting the cloud of powder to create a diversionary flash and bang, but at a low enough pressure to avoid injuring nearby people.

  4. OLED devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapochak, Linda Susan [Arlington, VA; Burrows, Paul Edward [Kennewick, WA; Bimalchandra, Asanga [Richland, WA

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An OLED device having an emission layer formed of an ambipolar phosphine oxide host material and a dopant, a hole transport layer in electrical communication with an anode, an electron transport layer in communication with a cathode, wherein the HOMO energy of the hole transport layer is substantially the same as the HOMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer, and the LUMO energy of the electron transport layer is substantially the same as the LUMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer.

  5. Electrochromic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwendemanm, Irina G. (Wexford, PA); Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Finley, James J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Boykin, Cheri M. (Kingsport, TN); Knowles, Julianna M. (Apollo, PA)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic device includes a first substrate spaced from a second substrate. A first conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the first substrate. A first electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the first conductive member. The first electrochromic material includes an organic material. A second conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the second substrate. A second electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the second conductive member. The second electrochromic material includes an inorganic material. An ionic liquid is positioned between the first electrochromic material and the second electrochromic material.

  6. Impact of SiC Devices on Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    of battery bank can be reduced for optimum design. Keywords -- Silicon carbide (SiC), inverter, hybrid -- The application of SiC devices (as battery interface, motor controller, etc.) in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV has rapidly expanded. The application of SiC devices (as battery interface, motor controller, etc

  7. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 15 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT3026 Tailoring organic heterojunction interfaces in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    the performance of organic photovoltaic devices. T he interfacial properties of organic semiconducting materials interfaces in bilayer polymer photovoltaic devices Akira Tada1 , Yanfang Geng1,2 , Qingshuo Wei3 , Kazuhito moment. Using this method, we fabricated bilayer organic photovoltaic devices with interfacial dipole

  8. Computational Modeling of Electrolyte/Cathode Interfaces in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    Computational Modeling of Electrolyte/Cathode Interfaces in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Dr Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are alternative energy conversion devices that efficiently. The fundamental relationship between operating conditions and device performance will help to optimize the device

  9. VMS software for the Jorway-411 interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, T.; Moore, C.; Pordes, R.; White, V.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a Software Package used to access CAMAC through the Jorway-411 Interface, for use on VAX/VMS systems. The software can be used to access parallel and/or serial CAMAC branch highways, and multiple Jorways may be connected to the VAX UNIBUS or MicroVax QBUS. The software available includes a VAX/VMS device driver for the JORWAY-411 and support routines and programs that access the driver. The software is accompanied by extensive documentation.

  10. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Barinaga, C.J.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement to the system and method is disclosed for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample that comprises improvements to an electrospray ionization source for interfacing to mass spectrometers and other detection devices. The improvement consists of establishing a unique electrical circuit pattern and nozzle configuration, a metallic coated and conical shaped capillary outlet, coupled with sizing of the capillary to obtain maximum sensitivity. 10 figs.

  11. An Interactive Interface for Directing Virtual Gael Sannier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    1015 Lausanne, Switzerland Abstract. Research on Virtual Humans spans from body animation to speech important issues: - Fully integrated virtual humans with facial and body animation, and speech. - A straightforward user interface for designers and directors. VHD system provides a range of virtual human animation

  12. Development of an integrated building design information interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Punjabi, Sonia Arjun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    with each other? [2, 15]. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) is a type of computer human interface. GUI?s usually have common characteristics such as Windows, Icons, Menus, and Push-buttons (WIMP). Collectively, WIMP are pictures that bring forth a certain... .............................................................................14 Methods of Usability Testing...................................................................15 III RESEARCH METHODOLOGY .........................................................................16 Steps Involved in the Creation of New...

  13. Total dose radiation response of plasma-damaged NMOS devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, J.; Lo, E.; Flanery, M. [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)] [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-damaged NMOS devices were subjected to the X-ray total dose irradiation. Unlike the traditional hot-carrier or Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) stress where the hole trap generation is less pronounced, this study shows enhanced hole trap and interface trap generation on plasma-damaged devices after total dose irradiation.

  14. Description Sound Devices USBPre is a complete, portable hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Description Sound Devices USBPre is a complete, portable hardware interface for PC and Mac audio electronics, and S/PDIF digital sources with personal computers. Its high-performance, 24-bit 9.x and Windows. SOUND DEVICES #12;Specifications Frequency Response: (reference 1 kHz) 10 Hz - 20 k

  15. Exploratory Search Interfaces to Support Image Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    Director (1983-2000), Human-Computer Interaction Lab Professor, Department of Computer Science MemberExploratory Search Interfaces to Support Image Discovery Ben Shneiderman ben@cs.umd.edu Founding;Interdisciplinary research community - Computer Science & Psychology - Information Studies & Education (www

  16. Optoelectronic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonekamp, Jeffrey E.; Boven, Michelle L.; Gaston, Ryan S.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an optoelectronic device comprising an active portion which converts light to electricity or converts electricity to light, the active portion having a front side for the transmittal of the light and a back side opposite from the front side, at least two electrical leads to the active portion to convey electricity to or from the active portion, an enclosure surrounding the active portion and through which the at least two electrical leads pass wherein the hermetically sealed enclosure comprises at the front side of the active portion a barrier material which allows for transmittal of light, one or more getter materials disposed so as to not impede the transmission of light to or from the active portion, and a contiguous gap pathway to the getter material which pathway is disposed between the active portion and the barrier material.

  17. Brain-Computer Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Khushbu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I \\ November 16, 2008). CNN. ’Brain’ in a dish ?ies ?ightREFERENCES Adams, Ray. Brain Computer Interfaces: Psychologyaccessed Biever, Celeste. Brain cells in a dish ?y ?ghter

  18. Tangible interfaces for manipulating aggregates of digital information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmer, Brygg Anders

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops new approaches for people to physically represent and interact with aggregates of digital information. These support the concept of Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs), a genre of human-computer interaction ...

  19. A Hybrid Brain-computer Interface for Intelligent Prosthetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yu-Che

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few decades, many researcher have shown that human can use brain signals to communicate with computers or machines by using brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). BCI systems can measure the brain activity and translate them into control...

  20. Apparatus and methods for a human de-amplifier system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kress, Reid L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A human de-amplifier system for interfacing a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant, wherein the physical object has dimensions in the range of 1 micrometer to 1 mm. The human de-amplifier system uses an inner-feedback loop to increases the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human de-amplifier system of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the de-amplifier system is able to manipulate the physical object has dimensions in the range of 1 micrometer to 1 mm with high stability and accuracy. The system also has a monitoring device to monitor the motion of the physical object under manipulation.

  1. Sinch : searching intelligently on a mobile device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Rajeev (Rajeev R.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sinch is an application that allows mobile device users to obtain answers to their questions without having to perform a web search in their mobile browser. Questions are answered by human beings using Mechanical Turk, an ...

  2. Smart Interfaces superhydrophobe Oberflchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    forschen 24 Smart Interfaces ­ superhydrophobe Oberflächen Superhydrophobe, selbstreinigende-Silica-Hybridteilchen ermöglichen, lang- zeitstabile superhydrophobe Oberflächen einfach herzustellen. Smart Interfaces unten). Blattes runter. Neben der Struktur auf der Mikro- meter-Skala muss das Material, aus dem die

  3. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  4. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  5. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kova?evi?, Goran, E-mail: gkova@irb.hr; Pivac, Branko [Department of Materials Physics, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijeni?ka 56, P.O.B. 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

  6. Perceptual and Context Aware Interfaces on Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jingtao

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between global and local views. Through a compact decorationbetween global and local views. Through a compact decoration

  7. University of Newcastle upon Tyne Mobile Devices in Crossmodal Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    in the construction of CROSSFLOW, a crossmodal ambient display prototype for indoor navigation, and demonstrate a significant increase in the performance of users navigating with CROSSFLOW in contrast to their navigation the exploitation of aspects of crossmodal cognition. We utilize this framework in the construction of CROSSFLOW

  8. Nitride semiconductor Surface and interface characterization and device design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongtao

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a a where we assume a GaN substrate for the thin film. c 13assuming a GaN GaN substrate. Because the spontaneouslayer are grown on the GaN substrate and because the lattice

  9. Interface Surprises May Motivate Novel Oxide Electronic Devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | National Nuclear SecurityIntellectualInterconnecting gold

  10. Medical Device Reliability BIOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEMI Medical Electronics team to address short- and long-term reliability issues with medical devices. OurMedical Device Reliability BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to provide medical device manufacturers, and consistency of active implantable medical devices. These devices, including pacemakers, cardiac defibrillators

  11. An empirical investigation of AutoCAD user interfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Patricia Laura

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Deborah A. Mitts This research examined human performance in a computer aided design scenario. Human performance with respect to two AutoCAD user interfaces (Menu and Template) and three AutoCAD task types (drawing... of the few human-computer interaction (HCI) scenarios for which relatively well-developed measures of human performance are not specified (Cuomo and Sharit, 1989). Previous research efforts have focused on measuring hutnan performance in terms of cognitive...

  12. Connector device for building integrated photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Eurich, Gerald K.; Lesniak, Michael J.; Mazor, Michael H.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Gaston, Ryan S.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is premised upon a connector device and method that can more easily electrically connect a plurality of PV devices or photovoltaic system components and/or locate these devices/components upon a building structure. It also may optionally provide some additional sub-components (e.g. at least one bypass diode and/or an indicator means) and may enhance the serviceability of the device.

  13. SRS Interface Input

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interface Input 1. MOA's: The contractor has no MOA's in effect at the Tritium Operations (SRTO) level. 2. AIP's: The contractor has no AIP's in effect at the SRTO level. 3....

  14. A Tangible Mixed Reality Interface for the AMI Automated Meeting Assistant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehnes, Jochen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe our approach to support ongoing meetings with an automated meeting assistant. We propose an alternative user interface for the AMIDA Content Linking Device. In order for the system to be less ...

  15. Operated device estimation framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rengarajan, Janarthanan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Protective device estimation is a challenging task because there are numerous protective devices present in a typical distribution system. Among various protective devices, auto-reclosers and fuses are the main overcurrent protection on distribution...

  16. PHEV and Grid Interfacing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials and Processes for High Temperature Packaging of Power Electronic Devices G. Muralidharan, A. Kercher, M. L. Santella, R. Battiste Materials Science and Technology...

  17. Local intelligent electronic device (IED) rendering templates over limited bandwidth communication link to manage remote IED

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradetich, Ryan; Dearien, Jason A; Grussling, Barry Jakob; Remaley, Gavin

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for remote device management. According to various embodiments, a local intelligent electronic device (IED) may be in communication with a remote IED via a limited bandwidth communication link, such as a serial link. The limited bandwidth communication link may not support traditional remote management interfaces. According to one embodiment, a local IED may present an operator with a management interface for a remote IED by rendering locally stored templates. The local IED may render the locally stored templates using sparse data obtained from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, the management interface may be a web client interface and/or an HTML interface. The bandwidth required to present a remote management interface may be significantly reduced by rendering locally stored templates rather than requesting an entire management interface from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, an IED may comprise an encryption transceiver.

  18. Course Outline Page 1 of 4 August 22, 2013 ECE 4240 Microprocessor Interfacing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major, Arkady

    Outline Page 1 of 4 August 22, 2013 ECE 4240 Microprocessor Interfacing Course Outline ­ Fall Term 2013, microprocessors, and microcomputers to the external world, including interfacing of I/O devices with minimum hardware and software, data acquisition with and without microprocessors, data communications, transmission

  19. Towards a smart sensor interface for wearable cough monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odam, Kofi

    Towards a smart sensor interface for wearable cough monitoring Kofi Odame and Dingkun Du Thayer in a wearable cough monitoring device. In particular, the paper considers the issues of privacy, power is validated with simulation and measurement results. I. INTRODUCTION A cough is the most common condition

  20. Handheld portable real-time tracking and communications device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiseman, James M. (Albuquerque, NM); Riblett, Jr., Loren E. (Edgewood, NM); Green, Karl L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hunter, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cook, III, Robert N. (Rio Rancho, NM); Stevens, James R. (Arlington, VA)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable handheld real-time tracking and communications devices include; a controller module, communications module including global positioning and mesh network radio module, data transfer and storage module, and a user interface module enclosed in a water-resistant enclosure. Real-time tracking and communications devices can be used by protective force, security and first responder personnel to provide situational awareness allowing for enhance coordination and effectiveness in rapid response situations. Such devices communicate to other authorized devices via mobile ad-hoc wireless networks, and do not require fixed infrastructure for their operation.

  1. Fastbus host interface for VAX/VMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siskind, E.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A list processing microprocessor controlled host interface for FASTBUS has been constructed by connection of a FASTBUS cable segment to the VAX DR-32 Device Interconnect (DDI) implemented via the DEC DR-780 channel on a VAX-11/780 system. Block transfer rates of 5.7 megabytes/second (700 ns per 32 bit longword) are achieved on VAX-11/780 systems equipped with a single MS-780 memory controller, while interleaved dual memory controller systems reach 8.0 megabytes/second (500 ns per longword) performance. The hardware and software interface should work equally well on DR-750 equipped VAX-11/750 systems (with appropriate reductions in achievable bandwidth) as well as on any future VAX systems equipped with a DDI adapter.

  2. Optoelectronic fiber interface design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Matthew Edmund

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in materials science have led to the development of an exciting, new class of fibers which integrate metals, semiconductors and insulators in the same codrawing process. Various electrical devices have ...

  3. Effect of residual gases in high vacuum on the energy-level alignment at noble metal/organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helander, M. G.; Wang, Z. B.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces has traditionally been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). However, since most devices are fabricated in high vacuum (HV), these studies do not accurately reflect the interfaces in real devices. We demonstrate, using UPS measurements of samples prepared in HV and UHV and current-voltage measurements of devices prepared in HV, that the small amounts of residual gases that are adsorbed on the surface of clean Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., the noble metals) in HV can significantly alter the energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces.

  4. DEVICE CONTROL TOOL FOR CEBAF BEAM DIAGNOSTICS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuously monitoring the beam quality in the CEBAF accelerator, a variety of beam diagnostics software created at Jefferson Lab makes a significant contribution to very high availability of the machine for nuclear physics experiments. The interface between this software and beam instrumentation hardware components is provided by a device control tool, which is optimized for beam diagnostics tasks. As a part of the device/driver development framework at Jefferson Lab, this tool is very easy to support and extend to integrate new beam instrumentation components. All device control functions are based on the configuration (ASCII text) files that completely define the used hardware interface standards (CAMAC, VME, RS-232, GPIB, etc.) and communication protocols. The paper presents the main elements of the device control tool for beam diagnostics software at Jefferson Lab.

  5. Using a Fingertip Tactile Device to Substitute Kinesthetic Feedback in Haptic Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siena, Università di

    feedback provided by the electric motor of the joystick is nearly indistinguishable from the sensation felt environment, haptic interfaces, of the impedance type, available today use active input devices as motors

  6. Interfaces Module March 28, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    the design solution for the physical interface o Kind of like a ConOps to the IRD · Explicitly identify

  7. Bipolar thermoelectric devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pipe, Kevin P. (Kevin Patrick), 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented here is a theoretical and experimental study of heat production and transport in bipolar electrical devices, with detailed treatment of thermoelectric effects. Both homojunction and heterojunction devices ...

  8. VMS software for the Jorway-411 Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, T.; Moore, C.; Pordes, R.; White, V.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reports on a Software Package to access CAMAC through the Jorway-411 Interface, for use on VAX/VMS systems. The software can be used to access parallel and/or serial CAMAC branch highways, and multiple Jorways may be connected to the VAX UNIBUS or Micro Vax QBUS. The software available includes a VAX/VMS device driver for the JORWAY-411 and support routines and programs that access the driver. The software is accompanied by extensive documentation. As discussed below, several of the packages originated from other institutions and have been enhanced by the Data Acquisition Software Group at Fermilab. The software package is in widespread use at Fermilab and over 20 other sites. The software can be run on any of the UNIBUS VAX-11 family of computers using a UNIBUS Jorway-411 to interface to CAMAC, or on a Microvax-II either interfaced to CAMAC through a Q-BUS Jorway-411, or through a Microverter and UNIBUS Jorway. The package includes facilities for performing CAMAC operations remotely. The VAX on which the user runs his or her program need not be directly connected to the Jorway. Server programs allow a VAX connected via DECNET or a PDP-11 connected via a DR11-W link to be the route for accessing the CAMAC hardware.

  9. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  10. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  11. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  12. INFORMATION DEVICES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    to access or hold sensitive, confidential or personal information on mobile devices, such as laptopsPROTECTION OF INFORMATION HELD ON MOBILE DEVICES AND ENCRYPTION POLICY (V3.5) the place of useful;Protection of Information Held on Mobile Devices and Encryption Policy (v3.5) Page 1 Table of Contents 1

  13. Standard interface file handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook documents many of the standard interface file formats that have been adopted by the US Department of Energy to facilitate communications between and portability of, various large reactor physics and radiation transport software packages. The emphasis is on those files needed for use of the VENTURE/PC diffusion-depletion code system. File structures, contents and some practical advice on use of the various files are provided.

  14. Virtual button interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jake S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch.

  15. Virtual button interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, J.S.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment are disclosed. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch. 4 figs.

  16. Models and evaluation of human-machine systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayout Alvarenga, Marco Antonio

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of human-machine systems and human-machine interfaces is very multidisciplinary. We have to navigate between the knowledge waves brought by several areas of the human learning: cognitive psychology, artificial ...

  17. Portable data collection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick D. (Aurora, CO)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time.

  18. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  19. Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application...

  20. 912 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 47, NO. 2, MARCH/APRIL 2011 Impact of SiC Devices on Hybrid Electric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    ; in particular, the size of the battery bank can be reduced for optimum design. Index Terms--Efficiency, hybrid (SiC) devices as battery interface, motor controller, etc., in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV]­[5]. The application of SiC devices (as battery interface, motor controller, etc.) in a HEV has merit because

  1. Surface segregation at the aluminum interface of poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orimo, Akiko; Masuda, Kohji; Honda, Satoshi; Benten, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinzaburo [Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Ohkita, Hideo [Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510, Japan and PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of thermal annealing before and after Al deposition on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend solar cells were investigated by current density-voltage measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Compared to the preannealed device, the postannealed device exhibited enhanced open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), which is ascribed to the decrease in the reverse saturation current density J{sub 0}. The XPS measurements demonstrated that P3HT is dominant at the Al interface in the preannealed device while PCBM is instead dominant in the postannealed device. This surface-segregated PCBM formed in the postannealed device can serve as a hole-blocking layer at the Al interface to reduce J{sub 0}, and therefore improve V{sub OC}.

  2. Web Browser Interface (WBUI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHE FUTUREBrowser Interface (WBUI)

  3. Web Service Interface (API)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHE FUTUREBrowser Interface

  4. Multijunction photovoltaic device and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arya, Rejeewa R. (Jamison, PA); Catalano, Anthony W. (Boulder, CO); Bennett, Murray (Longhorne, PA)

    1995-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first, second, and third amorphous silicon p-i-n photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. The intrinsic layers of the second and third cells are formed of a-SiGe alloys with differing ratios of Ge such that the bandgap of the intrinsic layers respectively decrease from the first uppermost cell to the third lowermost cell. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one of the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers.

  5. Developing a Framework for a New Visual-Based Interface Design in Autodesk Maya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Timothy Clayton

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    was the fact they did not have a consistent user interface. Luckily, the PARC researchers realized this aw and developed a new visual code development environment called Smalltalk, shown in Fig. 2, the rst modern GUI. What was amazing about Smalltalk wasn..., Leventhal, Wills, and Manaris (2002) noted the importance of Human-computer in- teraction (HCI) suggesting at least 50% of programming code is devoted to the user interface [28]. The most widely used interface type in computer applications is the (W...

  6. Position Teaching of a Robot Arm by Demonstration with a Wearable Input Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckett, Tom

    Position Teaching of a Robot Arm by Demonstration with a Wearable Input Device Jacopo Aleotti device for sensing human arm movements to the software con- troller of a robot arm. The method does method of mapping human motions to the robotic arm domain, assuming that a redundant human arm is used

  7. Micro-cooler enhancements by barrier interface analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen, A.; Dunn, G. M. [Department of Physics, University of Aberdeen, King's College, AB24 3UE Aberdeen (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Aberdeen, King's College, AB24 3UE Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Glover, J.; Oxley, C. H. [Department of Engineering, De Montfort University, Gateway, LE1 9BH Leicester (United Kingdom)] [Department of Engineering, De Montfort University, Gateway, LE1 9BH Leicester (United Kingdom); Bajo, M. Montes; Kuball, M. [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, BS8 1TL Bristol (United Kingdom)] [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, BS8 1TL Bristol (United Kingdom); Cumming, D. R. S.; Khalid, A. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Building, G12 8LT Glasgow (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Building, G12 8LT Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel gallium arsenide (GaAs) based micro-cooler design, previously analysed both experimentally and by an analytical Heat Transfer (HT) model, has been simulated using a self-consistent Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) model for a more in depth analysis of the thermionic cooling in the device. The best fit to the experimental data was found and was used in conjunction with the HT model to estimate the cooler-contact resistance. The cooling results from EMC indicated that the cooling power of the device is highly dependent on the charge distribution across the leading interface. Alteration of this charge distribution via interface extensions on the nanometre scale has shown to produce significant changes in cooler performance.

  8. Barrier breaching device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honodel, C.A.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  9. Barrier breaching device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honodel, Charles A. (Tracy, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  10. Laparoscopic simulation interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  11. We investigate a topic at the interface of machine learning and cognitive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    from statistical learning theory. We conduct a series of human category learning experiments inspired with boundary and noise level . Human Passive and Active Learning Experiments Results For computers, activeAbstract We investigate a topic at the interface of machine learning and cognitive science. Human

  12. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimmer, Derrick P. (White Bear Lake, MN); Paulson, Kenneth R. (North St. Paul, MN); Gilbert, James R. (St. Paul, MN)

    1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  13. High efficiency photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi C. (Troy, MI); Xu, Xi Xiang (Findlay, OH)

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An N-I-P type photovoltaic device includes a multi-layered body of N-doped semiconductor material which has an amorphous, N doped layer in contact with the amorphous body of intrinsic semiconductor material, and a microcrystalline, N doped layer overlying the amorphous, N doped material. A tandem device comprising stacked N-I-P cells may further include a second amorphous, N doped layer interposed between the microcrystalline, N doped layer and a microcrystalline P doped layer. Photovoltaic devices thus configured manifest improved performance, particularly when configured as tandem devices.

  14. Inferring Intent in Eye-Based Interfaces: Tracing Eye Movements with Process Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    Inferring Intent in Eye-Based Interfaces: Tracing Eye Movements with Process Models Dario D dario+@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT While current eye-based interfaces offer enormous potential for efficient human-computer interaction, they also manifest the difficulty of inferring intent from user eye

  15. Energy Efficiency of Handheld Computer Interfaces: Limits, Characterization and Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    Energy Efficiency of Handheld Computer Interfaces: Limits, Characterization and Practice Lin Zhong,jha}@princeton.edu Abstract Energy efficiency has become a critical issue for battery-driven computers. Significant work has energy re- quirements and overheads imposed by known human sensory/speed limits. We then characterize

  16. Warping to Enhance 3D User Interfaces Bruce H. Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bruce

    animation to the interface itself--to enhance or augment the effectiveness of human interaction applied to an object, and the animation effects may augment visual cues for constraints. For virtual Cartoon animation techniques have previously been used to enhance the illusion of direct manipulation in 2

  17. Mobile Device Management Android Device Enrollment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to manage your device. c. Enter your password. #12;d. Accept the Terms and Conditions e. You have completed. 2. Get Touchdown from Google Play a. Open up the Google Play Store. b. Search for Touchdown. c. Use the application. #12;3. Get Citrix Mobile Connect from Google Play a. Open up the Google Play Store. b. Search

  18. A batteryless thermoelectric energy-harvesting interface circuit with 35mV startup voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramadass, Yogesh Kumar

    A batteryless thermoelectric energy-harvesting interface circuit to extract electrical energy from human body heat is implemented in a 0.35 ?m [mu m] CMOS process. A mechanically assisted startup circuit enables operation ...

  19. Capillary interconnect device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renzi, Ronald F

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An interconnecting device for connecting a plurality of first fluid-bearing conduits to a corresponding plurality of second fluid-bearing conduits thereby providing fluid communication between the first fluid-bearing conduits and the second fluid-bearing conduits. The device includes a manifold and one or two ferrule plates that are held by compressive axial forces.

  20. Device for cutting protrusions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  1. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  2. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  3. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson; Craig P. (Lafayette, CA), Visco; Steven J. (Berkeley, CA), De Jonghe; Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  4. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Craig P. (Lafayette, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); De Jonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  5. Surface and Interface Control on Photochemically Initiated Immobilizat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interface Control on Photochemically Initiated Immobilization . Surface and Interface Control on Photochemically Initiated Immobilization . Abstract: Surface and interface...

  6. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  7. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  8. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  9. CollageMachine: Model of ``Interface Ecology''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    CollageMachine: Model of ``Interface Ecology'' By Andruid Kerne dissertation submitted partial addresses browsing creatively, been co­developed with the metadisciplinary framework interface ecology, in addition inside them, open process without definite bounds. a metadiscipline, interface ecology brings

  10. Multimaterial rectifying device fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orf, Nicholas D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic and optoelectronic device processing is commonly thought to be incompatible with much simpler thermal drawing techniques used in optical fiber production. The incorporation of metals, polymer insulators, and ...

  11. Electron Spectrometer: XPS with Laser Interface | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Laser Interface Electron Spectrometer: XPS with Laser Interface This ultrahigh vacuum machine can be applied as a routine means for analyzing the structure and chemical...

  12. Electronic security device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); LeBlanc, Edward J. (Kennewick, WA); Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a security device having a control box (12) containing an electronic system (50) and a communications loop (14) over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system (50) and a detection module (72) capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop.

  13. Electronic security device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eschbach, E.A.; LeBlanc, E.J.; Griffin, J.W.

    1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a security device having a control box containing an electronic system and a communications loop over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system and a detection module capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop. 11 figs.

  14. Improving energy storage devices | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage devices Improving energy storage devices Released: April 15, 2014 Lithium-sulfur batteries last longer with nanomaterial-packed cathode A new PNNL-developed...

  15. Interfacing to the Programmer's Apprentice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitman, Kent

    In this paper, we discuss the design of a user interface to the Knowledge Based Editor (KBE), a prototype implementation of the Programmer's Apprentice. Although internally quite sophisticated, the KBE hides most of its ...

  16. www.octri.org/funding "Electronic Device to Prevent Central Line Infections"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    www.octri.org/funding "Electronic Device to Prevent Central Line Infections" PI: Michael Hutchens to continue development of a device to reduce microbial contamination of central venous access ports of the Dr. Hutchens' device compared favorably with those after standard care, without need for human

  17. Using Analogy to Acquire Commonsense Knowledge from Human Contributors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chklovski, Timothy

    2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the work reported here is to capture the commonsense knowledge of non-expert human contributors. Achieving this goal will enable more intelligent human-computer interfaces and pave the way for computers to ...

  18. Using analogy to acquire commonsense knowledge from human Contributors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chklovski, Timothy A. (Timothy Anatolievich), 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the work reported here is to capture the commonsense knowledge of non-expert human contributors. Achieving this goal will enable more intelligent human-computer interfaces and pave the way for computers to ...

  19. General Relativity at an interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan G. Diaz Ochoa

    2006-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work a simple toy model for a free interface between bulk phases in space and time is presented, derived from the balance equations for extensive thermodynamic variables of Meinhold-Heerlein. In this case the free interface represents geodesics in the space-time, allowing the derivation of the Einstein's equations for gravitational fields. The effect of the balance equation is examined and a simple expression for cold dark matter is derived. The thermodynamically meaning of this model is also discussed.

  20. Intelligent Escort Robot Moving together with Human Methods for Human Position Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    : Light-emitting device used in the experiments. robot is able to know the distance to the human thanksIntelligent Escort Robot Moving together with Human ­ Methods for Human Position Recognition in everyday life by interacting with humans. In order to escort a human, the robot needs to know the position

  1. Spectral tailoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  2. Electrical apparatus lockout device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Rick (Chesapeake, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple lockout device for electrical equipment equipped with recessed power blades is described. The device comprises a face-plate (12) having a threaded member (14) attached thereto and apertures suitable for accommodating the power blades of a piece of electrical equipment, an elastomeric nose (16) abutting the face-plate having a hole for passage of the threaded member therethrough and power blade apertures in registration with those of the face-plate, a block (20) having a recess (34) in its forward face for receiving at least a portion of the hose, a hole therein for receiving the threaded member and an integral extension (26) extending from its rear face. A thumb screw (22) suitable for turning with the hands and having internal threads suitable for engaging the threaded member attached to the face-plate is inserted into a passage in the integral extension to engage the threaded member in such a fashion that when the device is inserted over the recessed power blades of a piece of electrical equipment and the thumb screw (22) tightened, the elastomeric nose (16) is compressed between the face-plate (12) and the block (20) forcing it to expand laterally thereby securing the device in the recess and precluding the accidental or intentional energization of the piece of equipment by attachment of a power cord to the recessed power blades. Means are provided in the interval extension and the thumb screw for the attachment of a locking device (46) which will satisfy OSHA standards.

  3. Electrical apparatus lockout device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, R.

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple lockout device for electrical equipment equipped with recessed power blades is described. The device comprises a face-plate (12) having a threaded member (14) attached thereto and apertures suitable for accommodating the power blades of a piece of electrical equipment, an elastomeric nose (16) abutting the face-plate having a hole for passage of the threaded member therethrough and power blade apertures in registration with those of the face-plate, a block (20) having a recess (34) in its forward face for receiving at least a portion of the hose, a hole therein for receiving the threaded member and an integral extension (26) extending from its rear face. A thumb screw (22) suitable for turning with the hands and having internal threads suitable for engaging the threaded member attached to the face-plate is inserted into a passage in the integral extension to engage the threaded member in such a fashion that when the device is inserted over the recessed power blades of a piece of electrical equipment and the thumb screw (22) tightened, the elastomeric nose (16) is compressed between the face-plate (12) and the block (20) forcing it to expand laterally thereby securing the device in the recess and precluding the accidental or intentional energization of the piece of equipment by attachment of a power cord to the recessed power blades. Means are provided in the interval extension and the thumb screw for the attachment of a locking device (46) which will satisfy OSHA standards.

  4. Characterization of nitrided silicon-silicon dioxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polignano, M.L.; Alessandri, M.; Brazzelli, D. [and others

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A newly-developed technique for the simultaneous characterization of the oxide-silicon interface properties and of bulk impurities was used for a systematic study of the nitridation process of thin oxides. This technique is based upon surface recombination velocity measurements, and does not require the formation of a capacitor structure, so it is very suitable for the characterization of as-grown interfaces. Oxides grown both in dry and in wet environments were considered, and nitridation processes in N{sub 2}O and in NO were compared to N{sub 2} annealing processes. The effect of nitridation temperature and duration were also studied, and RTO/RTN processes were compared to conventional furnace nitridation processes. Surface recombination velocity was correlated with nitrogen concentration at the oxide-silicon interface obtained by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements. Surface recombination velocity (hence surface state density) decreases with increasing nitrogen pile-up at the oxide-silicon interface, indicating that in nitrided interfaces surface state density is limited by nitridation. NO treatments are much more effective than N{sub 2}O treatments in the formation of nitrogen-rich interface layer and, as a consequence, in surface state reduction. Surface state density was measured in fully processed wafers before and after constant current stress. After a complete device process surface states are annealed out by hydrogen passivation, however they are reactivated by the electrical stress, and surface state results after stress were compared with data of surface recombination velocity in as-processed wafers.

  5. Nonaqueous Electrical Storage Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwen, Alan B. (Melrose, MA); Evans, David A. (Seekonk, MA); Blakley, Thomas J. (Woburn, MA); Goldman, Jay L. (Mansfield, MA)

    1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical capacitor is disclosed that features two, separated, high surface area carbon cloth electrodes sandwiched between two current collectors fabricated of a conductive polymer having a flow temperature greater than 130.degree. C., the perimeter of the electrochemical capacitor being sealed with a high temperature gasket to form a single cell device. The gasket material is a thermoplastic stable at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C., preferably a polyester or a polyurethane, and having a reflow temperature above 130.degree. C. but below the softening temperature of the current collector material. The capacitor packaging has good mechanical integrity over a wide temperature range, contributes little to the device equivalent series resistance (ESR), and is stable at high potentials. In addition, the packaging is designed to be easily manufacturable by assembly line methods. The individual cells can be stacked in parallel or series configuration to reach the desired device voltage and capacitance.

  6. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, John M. (Modesto, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  7. Regenerative combustion device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative combustion device having a combustion zone, and chemicals contained within the combustion zone, such as water, having a first equilibrium state, and a second combustible state. Means for transforming the chemicals from the first equilibrium state to the second combustible state, such as electrodes, are disposed within the chemicals. An igniter, such as a spark plug or similar device, is disposed within the combustion zone for igniting combustion of the chemicals in the second combustible state. The combustion products are contained within the combustion zone, and the chemicals are selected such that the combustion products naturally chemically revert into the chemicals in the first equilibrium state following combustion. The combustion device may thus be repeatedly reused, requiring only a brief wait after each ignition to allow the regeneration of combustible gasses within the head space.

  8. Ion manipulation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  9. Fragment capture device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Lloyd R. (Los Lunas, NM); Cole, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  10. Biochip scanner device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perov, Alexander (Troitsk, RU); Belgovskiy, Alexander I. (Mayfield Heights, OH); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Darien, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  11. Electrochromic optical switching device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lampert, C.M.; Visco, S.J.

    1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source. 3 figs.

  12. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  13. Electrochromic optical switching device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, Carl M. (El Sobrante, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source.

  14. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  15. Phononic crystal devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  16. Dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Conrad D. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Mark S. (Tijeras, NM)

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device uses interdigitated microelectrodes to provide a spatially non-uniform electric field in a fluid that generates a dipole within particles in the fluid. The electric field causes the particles to either be attracted to or repelled from regions where the electric field gradient is large, depending on whether the particles are more or less polarizable than the fluid. The particles can thereby be forced into well defined stable paths along the interdigitated microelectrodes. The device can be used for flow cytometry, particle control, and other process applications, including cell counting or other types of particle counting, and for separations in material control.

  17. A 2D Graphics Interface Based on CGI Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clausen, Michael

    ) standards for device independent driving of graphics hardware, both issued from standardization institutes#12; CGI ++ A 2D Graphics Interface Based on CGI Version 1.0 Dieter W. Fellner Martin Fischer Currently, designers of 2D graphics applications have to deal with several (and unfor­ tunately incompatible

  18. In Proceedings of Ubicomp 2005, Tokyo, Japan Fast And Robust Interface Generation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajos, Krzysztof

    Applications Krzysztof Gajos, David Christianson, Raphael Hoffmann, Tal Shaked, Kiera Henning, Jing Jing Long models of the interface and desired hardware device and Supple uses decision-theoretic optimization and describes key extensions that barred the previous ver- sion (reported in [3]) from practical application

  19. Eye Tracking in Advanced Interface Design Robert J.K. Jacob

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Robert J.K.

    Eye Tracking in Advanced Interface Design Robert J.K. Jacob Human-Computer Interaction Lab Naval-sided, with the bandwidth from the computer to the user far greater than that from user to computer. Using eye movements the relevant characteristics of the human eye, eye tracking technology, how to design interaction techniques

  20. Hierarchical Agent Interface for Animation Armin Bruderlin and Sidney Fels and Silvio Esser and Kenji Mase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Columbia, University of

    the domain of animating human- like agents in a virtual world. Keywords: intelligent agents, creative processHierarchical Agent Interface for Animation Armin Bruderlin and Sidney Fels and Silvio Esser hierarchy. In this paper, we argue that this multilevel hierarchy is a convenient way to create a human

  1. Hybrid user interfaces : design guidelines and implementation examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Sehyun

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid user interface is a new type of computer user interface that achieves high usability by combining features of graphical user interfaces and command line interfaces. The main goal of a hybrid user interface is to ...

  2. Band gap engineering at a semiconductor - crystalline oxide interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moghadam, Jahangir-Moghadam; Shen, Xuan; Chrysler, Matthew; Ahmadi-Majlan, Kamyar; Su, Dong; Ngai, Joseph H.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The epitaxial growth of crystalline oxides on semiconductors provides a pathway to introduce new functionalities to semiconductor devices. Key to integrating the functionalities of oxides onto semiconductors is controlling the band alignment at interfaces between the two materials. Here we apply principles of band gap engineering traditionally used at heterojunctions between conventional semiconductors to control the band offset between a single crystalline oxide and a semiconductor. Reactive molecular beam epitaxy is used to realize atomically abrupt and structurally coherent interfaces between SrZrxTi1-xO? and Ge, in which the band gap of the former is enhanced with Zr content x. We presentmore »structural and electrical characterization of SrZrxTi1-xO?-Ge heterojunctions and demonstrate a type-I band offset can be achieved. These results demonstrate that band gap engineering can be exploited to realize functional semiconductor crystalline oxide heterojunctions.« less

  3. Graphical user interface for image acquisition and processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Kenneth A. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An event-driven GUI-based image acquisition interface for the IDL programming environment designed for CCD camera control and image acquisition directly into the IDL environment where image manipulation and data analysis can be performed, and a toolbox of real-time analysis applications. Running the image acquisition hardware directly from IDL removes the necessity of first saving images in one program and then importing the data into IDL for analysis in a second step. Bringing the data directly into IDL creates an opportunity for the implementation of IDL image processing and display functions in real-time. program allows control over the available charge coupled device (CCD) detector parameters, data acquisition, file saving and loading, and image manipulation and processing, all from within IDL. The program is built using IDL's widget libraries to control the on-screen display and user interface.

  4. Effects of Interface Disorder on Valley Splitting in SiGe/Si/SiGe Quantum Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengping Jiang; Neerav Kharche; Timothy Boykin; Gerhard Klimeck

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A sharp potential barrier at the Si/SiGe interface introduces valley splitting (VS), which lifts the 2-fold valley degeneracy in strained SiGe/Si/SiGe quantum wells (QWs). This work examines in detail the effects of Si/SiGe interface disorder on the VS in an atomistic tight binding approach based on statistical sampling. VS is analyzed as a function of electric field, QW thickness, and simulation domain size. Strong electric fields push the electron wavefunctions into the SiGe buffer and introduce significant VS fluctuations from device to device. A Gedankenexperiment with ordered alloys sheds light on the importance of different bonding configurations on VS. We conclude that a single SiGe band offset and effective mass cannot comprehend the complex Si/SiGe interface interactions that dominate VS.

  5. Effects of Interface Disorder on Valley Splitting in SiGe/Si/SiGe Quantum Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Zhengping; Boykin, Timothy; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sharp potential barrier at the Si/SiGe interface introduces valley splitting (VS), which lifts the 2-fold valley degeneracy in strained SiGe/Si/SiGe quantum wells (QWs). This work examines in detail the effects of Si/SiGe interface disorder on the VS in an atomistic tight binding approach based on statistical sampling. VS is analyzed as a function of electric field, QW thickness, and simulation domain size. Strong electric fields push the electron wavefunctions into the SiGe buffer and introduce significant VS fluctuations from device to device. A Gedankenexperiment with ordered alloys sheds light on the importance of different bonding configurations on VS. We conclude that a single SiGe band offset and effective mass cannot comprehend the complex Si/SiGe interface interactions that dominate VS.

  6. CenterforHumanComputerInteraction Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    CHCI CenterforHumanComputerInteraction Nanoscale Science Nano-Bio Interface Sustainable Energy Renewable Materials Sustainable Water Cognition and Communication National Security Emerging Technologies, database management, data mining, digital libraries, information storage and retrieval, and other

  7. Engineering of silicon/HfO{sub 2} interface by variable energy proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurya, Savita, E-mail: mauryasavita5@gmail.com; Maringanti, Radhakrishna [Division of Electronics and Microelectronics, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh 211012 (India); Tribedi, L. C. [DNAP, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400005 (India)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces and interfaces between materials are of paramount importance for various phenomena, such as painting a house, catalyst driven chemical reactions, intricate life processes, corrosion of materials, and fabrication of various semiconductor devices. Interface of silicon or other such substrates with any of the oxides has profound effect on the performance of metal oxide field effect transistors and other similar devices. Since a surface is an abrupt termination of a periodic crystal, surface atoms will have some unsaturated valence electrons and these unsaturated bonds at the semiconductor surface make it chemically highly reactive. Other than annealing, there is not much that can be done to manage these unsaturated bonds. This study was initiated to explore the possibility of repairing these unsaturated dangling bonds that are formed at the silicon and oxide interface during the deposition of oxide layer above silicon, by the use of proton irradiation. In order to improve the interface characteristics, we present a method to modify the interface of silicon and hafnium dioxide after its fabrication, through proton irradiation. Results of the study are promising and probably this method might be used along with other methods such as annealing to modify the interface, after its fabrication.

  8. Condensate removal device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maddox, James W. (Newport News, VA); Berger, David D. (Alexandria, VA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  9. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  10. Device Oriented Project Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  11. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  12. Cascaded thermoacoustic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.; Gardner, David L.

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoacoustic device is formed with a resonator system defining at least one region of high specific acoustic impedance in an acoustic wave within the resonator system. A plurality of thermoacoustic units are cascaded together within the region of high specific acoustic impedance, where at least one of the thermoacoustic units is a regenerator unit.

  13. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  14. Multi-robot control interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walton, Miles C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  15. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  16. User interfaces to expert systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A.; Emrich, M.L.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expert Systems are becoming increasingly popular in environments where the user is not well versed in computers or the subject domain. They offer expert advice and can also explain their lines of reasoning. As these systems are applied to highly technical areas, they become complex and large. Therefore, User Systems Interfaces (USIs) become critical. This paper discusses recent technologies that can be applied to improved user communication. In particular, bar menus/graphics, mouse interfaces, touch screens, and voice links will be highlighted. Their applications in the context of SOFTMAN (The Software Manager Apprentice) a knowledge-based system are discussed. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Technique for converting non-conforming hexahedral-to-hexahedral interfaces into conforming interfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staten, Matthew L.; Shepherd, Jason F.; Ledoux, Frank; Shimada, Kenji; Merkley, Karl G.; Carbonera, Carlos

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for conforming an interface between a first mesh and a second mesh is disclosed. A first interface surface in the first mesh and a second interface surface in the second mesh residing along the interface are identified. The first and second interface surfaces are initially non-conforming along the interface. Chords within the first and second interface surfaces that fall within a threshold separation distance of each other are paired. Sheets having chords that reside within the first or second interface surfaces are recursively inserted into or extracted from one or both of the first and second meshes until all remaining chords within the first interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the second interface surface and all remaining chords within the second interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the first interface surface.

  18. Interface Compilation: Steps toward Compiling Program Interfaces as Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engler, Dawson

    systems, programmers are limited to writing code, while the power to transform the code has been reserved Magik gives to programmers enables a broad class of optimization and code transformations. This paper's data structures and internally), operations on this state (defined by the interface's procedures

  19. Can Online Wait Be Managed? The Effect of Filler Interfaces and Presentation Modes on Perceived Waiting Time Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Younghwa; Chen, Andrew NK; Ilie, Virginia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , cognitive absorption theory, and human computer interaction (HCI) theories (competition for attention, visual search, and motion effect), we design diverse filler interfaces and investigate their effects on antecedents of PWT. The proposed research model...

  20. Propagation of misfit dislocations from buffer/Si interface into Si

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna (El Sobrante, CA); Maltez, Rogerio Luis (Porto Alegre, BR); Morkoc, Hadis (Richmond, VA); Xie, Jinqiao (Raleigh, VA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Misfit dislocations are redirected from the buffer/Si interface and propagated to the Si substrate due to the formation of bubbles in the substrate. The buffer layer growth process is generally a thermal process that also accomplishes annealing of the Si substrate so that bubbles of the implanted ion species are formed in the Si at an appropriate distance from the buffer/Si interface so that the bubbles will not migrate to the Si surface during annealing, but are close enough to the interface so that a strain field around the bubbles will be sensed by dislocations at the buffer/Si interface and dislocations are attracted by the strain field caused by the bubbles and move into the Si substrate instead of into the buffer epi-layer. Fabrication of improved integrated devices based on GaN and Si, such as continuous wave (CW) lasers and light emitting diodes, at reduced cost is thereby enabled.

  1. Spin Coated Plasmonic Nanoparticle Interfaces for Photocurrent Enhancement in Thin Film Si Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israelowitz, Miriam; Cong, Tao; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticle (NP) arrays of noble metals strongly absorb light in the visible to infrared wavelengths through resonant interactions between the incident electromagnetic field and the metal's free electron plasma. Such plasmonic interfaces enhance light absorption and photocurrent in solar cells. We report a cost effective and scalable room temperature/pressure spin-coating route to fabricate broadband plasmonic interfaces consisting of silver NPs. The NP interface yields photocurrent enhancement (PE) in thin film silicon devices by up to 200% which is significantly greater than previously reported values. For coatings produced from Ag nanoink containing particles with average diameter of 40 nm, an optimal NP surface coverage of 7% was observed. Scanning electron microscopy of interface morphologies revealed that for low surface coverage, particles are well-separated, resulting in broadband PE. At higher surface coverage, formation of particle strings and clusters caused red-shifting of the PE peak and a narro...

  2. Method of fabricating an optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shtein, Max (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating an optoelectronic device comprises: depositing a first layer having protrusions over a first electrode, in which the first layer comprises a first organic small molecule material; depositing a second layer on the first layer such that the second layer is in physical contact with the first layer; in which the smallest lateral dimension of the protrusions are between 1 to 5 times the exciton diffusion length of the first organic small molecule material; and depositing a second electrode over the second layer to form the optoelectronic device. A method of fabricating an organic optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction is also provided and comprises: depositing a first layer with protrusions over an electrode by organic vapor phase deposition; depositing a second layer on the first layer where the interface of the first and second layers forms a bulk heterojunction; and depositing another electrode over the second layer.

  3. Non- contacting capacitive diagnostic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellison, Timothy

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-contacting capacitive diagnostic device includes a pulsed light source for producing an electric field in a semiconductor or photovoltaic device or material to be evaluated and a circuit responsive to the electric field. The circuit is not in physical contact with the device or material being evaluated and produces an electrical signal characteristic of the electric field produced in the device or material. The diagnostic device permits quality control and evaluation of semiconductor or photovoltaic device properties in continuous manufacturing processes.

  4. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  5. Course Information --EE 531 Semiconductor Devices and Device Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    of Semiconductor Devices" by Hess "Si Processing for the VLSI Era: Vol. 3-- The Submicron MOSFET" by Wolf "Advanced: 20% Exam 1: 30% Exam 2: 30% Project: 20% Prerequisite: Semiconductor Devices (EE 482) or equivalent

  6. Human Reliability Analysis for Design: Using Reliability Methods for Human Factors Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Laurids Boring

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the application of human reliability analysis methods to human factors design issues. An application framework is sketched in which aspects of modeling typically found in human reliability analysis are used in a complementary fashion to the existing human factors phases of design and testing. The paper provides best achievable practices for design, testing, and modeling. Such best achievable practices may be used to evaluate and human system interface in the context of design safety certifications.

  7. Conductive porous scaffolds as potential neural interface materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Cicotte, Kirsten N.; Buerger, Stephen P.; Reece, Gregory; Dirk, Shawn M.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our overall intent is to develop improved prosthetic devices with the use of nerve interfaces through which transected nerves may grow, such that small groups of nerve fibers come into close contact with electrode sites, each of which is connected to electronics external to the interface. These interfaces must be physically structured to allow nerve fibers to grow through them, either by being porous or by including specific channels for the axons. They must be mechanically compatible with nerves such that they promote growth and do not harm the nervous system, and biocompatible to promote nerve fiber growth and to allow close integration with biological tissue. They must exhibit selective and structured conductivity to allow the connection of electrode sites with external circuitry, and electrical properties must be tuned to enable the transmission of neural signals. Finally, the interfaces must be capable of being physically connected to external circuitry, e.g. through attached wires. We have utilized electrospinning as a tool to create conductive, porous networks of non-woven biocompatible fibers in order to meet the materials requirements for the neural interface. The biocompatible fibers were based on the known biocompatible material poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) as well as a newer biomaterial developed in our laboratories, poly(butylene fumarate) (PBF). Both of the polymers cannot be electrospun using conventional electrospinning techniques due to their low glass transition temperatures, so in situ crosslinking methodologies were developed to facilitate micro- and nano-fiber formation during electrospinning. The conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was controlled by controlling the loading with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Fabrication, electrical and materials characterization will be discussed along with initial in vivo experimental results.

  8. Support and maneuvering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, R.L.

    1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof. 9 figs.

  9. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  10. Support and maneuvering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Richard L. (Arvada, CO)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof.

  11. Light modulating device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauh, R.D.; Goldner, R.B.

    1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity are disclosed. 1 fig.

  12. Light modulating device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity.

  13. Regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are several embodiments of a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a plurality of rubber rollers (24, 26) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (14) connectable to the vehicle drivetrain and an output shaft (16) which is drivingly connected to the input shaft by a variable ratio transmission (20). When the transmission ratio is such that the input shaft rotates faster than the output shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy, thereby slowing the vehicle. When the transmission ratio is such that the output shaft rotates faster than the input shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally relaxed to deliver accumulated energy, thereby accelerating or driving the vehicle.

  14. Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  15. Hybrid electroluminescent devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Michael, Joseph Darryl (Schenectady, NY)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid electroluminescent (EL) device comprises at least one inorganic diode element and at least one organic EL element that are electrically connected in series. The absolute value of the breakdown voltage of the inorganic diode element is greater than the absolute value of the maximum reverse bias voltage across the series. The inorganic diode element can be a power diode, a Schottky barrier diode, or a light-emitting diode.

  16. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  17. Temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  18. Biomolecular detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huo, Qisheng (Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Jun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode.

  19. CS 4317 Human-Computer Interaction Course Number: CS4317

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    interaction. Theory of human-computer interaction. Development methods for interfaces such as user1 CS 4317 Human-Computer Interaction Course Number: CS4317 Course Title: Human-Computer Interaction Course Instructors Nigel Ward Course Description: CS4317: Models and methods of human-computer

  20. Learning expressive human-like head motion sequences from speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busso, Carlos

    With the development of new trends in human-machine interfaces, animated feature films and video games, better avatars and virtual agents are required that more accurately mimic how humans communicate and interact. Gestures the emotional perception of facial animations [6]. Given the importance of head motion in human-human

  1. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

    1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  2. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charache, G.W.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Egley, J.L.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermophotovoltaic device and a method for making the thermophotovoltaic device are disclosed. The device includes an n-type semiconductor material substrate having top and bottom surfaces, a tunnel junction formed on the top surface of the substrate, a region of active layers formed on top of the tunnel junction and a back surface reflector (BSR). The tunnel junction includes a layer of heavily doped n-type semiconductor material that is formed on the top surface of the substrate and a layer of heavily doped p-type semiconductor material formed on the n-type layer. An optional pseudomorphic layer can be formed between the n-type and p-type layers. A region of active layers is formed on top of the tunnel junction. This region includes a base layer of p-type semiconductor material and an emitter layer of n-type semiconductor material. An optional front surface window layer can be formed on top of the emitter layer. An optional interference filter can be formed on top of the emitter layer or the front surface window layer when it is used. 1 fig.

  3. Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -DRAFT - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Thermoelectric Generation ......

  4. AN INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUE FOR THIN FILM INTERFACE TOUGHNESS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.J.

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A material configuration of central importance in microelectronics, optoelectronics, and thermal barrier coating technology is a thin or thick film of one material deposited onto a substrate of a different material. Fabrication of such a structure inevitably gives rise to stress in the film due to lattice mismatch, differing coefficients of thermal expansion, chemical reactions, or other physical effects. Therefore, in general, the weakest link in this composite system often resides at the interface between the film and substrate. In order to make multi-layered electronic devices and structural composites with long-term reliability, the fracture behavior of the material interfaces must be known. Unfortunately, none of the state-of-the-art testing methods for evaluating interface fracture toughness is fully conformed to fracture mechanics theory, as is evident from the severe scatter in the existing data and the procedure dependence in film/coating evaluation methods. This project is intended to address the problems associated with this deficiency and offers an innovative testing procedure for the determination of interface fracture toughness applicable to coating materials in general. This new approach and the associated bi-material fracture mechanics development proposed for evaluating interface fracture toughness are described herein. The effort includes development of specimen configuration and related instrumentation set-up, testing procedures, postmortem examination, and analytical evaluation. A spiral notch torsion fracture toughness test system was utilized. The objective of the testing procedure described is to enable the development of new coating materials by providing a reliable method for use in assessing their performance. This innovative technology for measuring interface toughness was demonstrated for oxide scales formed on high-temperature alloys of MA956. The estimated energy release rate (in terms of J-integral) at the interface of the alumina scale and MA956 substrate is 3.7 N-m/m{sup 2}, and the estimated equivalent Mode I fracture toughness is 1.1 MPa {radical}m. This innovative technique is expected to greatly assist the development of coating materials with improved protective capabilities and provide a reliable method for use in assessing material performance.

  5. Kuali Financial System Implementation Collector Interface Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Kuali Financial System Implementation Collector Interface Meeting December 17, 2008 Presenters of the Kuali Financial System (KFS) Collector Interface Format Differences from FRS Answer your questions #12 Collector File collector

  6. Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems Part 2: Modeling, Development Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems Part 2: Modeling, Development, and Experimental, and Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Control Functions for Single-Phase Utility-Connected Inverter S

  7. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  8. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mc Fee, Matthew C. (New Ellenton, SC); Kirkham, Tim J. (Beech Island, SC); Johnson, Tippi H. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

  9. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

  10. Roughness of the SiC/SiO{sub 2} vicinal interface and atomic structure of the transition layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Peizhi; Li, Guoliang; Duscher, Gerd, E-mail: gduscher@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Sharma, Yogesh K.; Ahyi, Ayayi C.; Isaacs-Smith, Tamara; Williams, John R.; Dhar, Sarit [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface is generally considered to be the cause for the reduced electron mobility of SiC power devices. Previous studies have shown a correlation between the mobility and the transition layer width at the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. The authors investigated this interface with atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and discovered that this transition region was due to the roughness of the vicinal interface. The roughness of a vicinal interface consisted of atomic steps and facets deviating from the ideal off-axis cut plane. The authors conclude that this roughness is limiting the mobility in the channels of SiC MOSFETs.

  11. Process monitoring interface for studying the metamorphism in a design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayrak, C. [Benedict College, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The efforts to improve the system design methodology, which provides the designer with the ability to exercise the prototype at a high abstraction level and to delay the implementation level activity as far into the development activity as possible, have led us to study the process monitoring issue. Particularly we are interested in the three fundamental issues in process monitoring: the abstract sphere of the design, the practical sphere of the user interface, and the gap between these two spheres. Therefore, an integrated graphical user interface architecture, called Process Monitoring Interface (PMI), is introduced not only for the gap between the abstract spheres and practical affairs of building appropriate user-integrated interface but also for supervising the hierarchical human design notion of the abstract design exercised with more efficiency at the highest possible levels of the development. In using PMI, the user/developer can monitor evolution of highly abstract building blocks that are created at the very beginning of the design process and later be refined into different levels of the design, representing different levels of abstractions of a system.

  12. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valone, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beyerlein, Irene J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, T. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  13. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  14. Micro environmental sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polosky, Marc A. (Tijeras, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Tijeras, NM)

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) acceleration switch is disclosed which includes a proof mass flexibly connected to a substrate, with the proof mass being moveable in a direction substantially perpendicular to the substrate in response to a sensed acceleration. An electrode on the proof mass contacts one or more electrodes located below the proof mass to provide a switch closure in response to the sensed acceleration. Electrical latching of the switch in the closed position is possible with an optional latching electrode. The MEM acceleration switch, which has applications for use as an environmental sensing device, can be fabricated using micromachining.

  15. Multiported storage devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grande, Marcus Bryan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of niultiported storage device 3 Linux file I/O subsystem 4 Windows NT layered I/O driver model 10 15 5 Location of multiported module in I/O stack 17 6 The bulfer cache . . . 20 7 Queuing of I/O requests 8 Processing of I/O requests by smart blkfiltcr 9... Registering of filter applet via Linux stacked module mechanism . 21 22 . . 26 10 Table of registered filter applets (functions) . . 27 11 Overhead due to presence of smart blkfilter alone . 12 Overhead of smart blkfilter using rot13 filter port 31 33...

  16. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  17. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

  18. Web Interfaces 1 Python Scripts in Browsers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Web Interfaces 1 Python Scripts in Browsers the web server Apache processing forms with Python scripts Python code to write HTML 2 Web Interfaces for the Determinant dynamic interactive forms passing, 28 October 2013 Scientific Software (MCS 507 L-27) web interfaces 28 October 2013 1 / 42 #12;Web

  19. Stretchable and foldable electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

  20. Stretchable and foldable electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark; Choi, Won Mook; Song, Jizhou; Ahn, Jong Hyun; Kim, Dae Hyeong

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

  1. EvaluatingMobilePhonesasEnergyConsumptionFeedbackDevices MarkusWeiss*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EvaluatingMobilePhonesasEnergyConsumptionFeedbackDevices MarkusWeiss* ,ClaireManagement,ETHZurich Abstract. With smart electricity meters being widely deployed, data on residential energy usage of mobile phones as an interface to provide feedback on overall and de- vice-related energy consumption

  2. Adaptive Brain-Computer Interface Passive brain-computer interfaces are designed to use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boetticher, Gary D.

    Adaptive Brain-Computer Interface Abstract Passive brain-computer interfaces are designed to use brain activity as an additional input, allowing the adaptation of the interface in real time according to the user's mental state. While most current brain computer interface research (BCI) is designed for direct

  3. Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature Anders Lervik transient non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations, heat-transfer through nanometer-scale interfaces processes. We show that the modeling of heat transfer across a nanodroplet/fluid interface requires

  4. Characterization of CZTSSe photovoltaic device with an atomic layer-deposited passivation layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei, E-mail: wei.wu@dupont.com; Cao, Yanyan; Caspar, Jonathan V.; Guo, Qijie; Johnson, Lynda K.; Mclean, Robert S.; Malajovich, Irina; Choudhury, Kaushik Roy [DuPont Central Research and Development, Wilmington, Delaware 19880 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a CZTSSe (Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S{sub 1?x},Se{sub x}){sub 4}) photovoltaic (PV) device with an ALD (atomic layer deposition) coated buffer dielectric layer for CZTSSe surface passivation. An ALD buffer layer, such as TiO{sub 2}, can be applied in order to reduce the interface recombination and improve the device's open-circuit voltage. Detailed characterization data including current-voltage, admittance spectroscopy, and capacitance profiling are presented in order to compare the performance of PV devices with and without the ALD layer.

  5. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  6. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  7. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  8. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, Mark D. (1426 Socastee Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Sweeney, Chad E. (3600 Westhampton Dr., Martinez, GA 30907-3036); Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel (2715 Margate Dr., Augusta, GA 30909)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  9. Experimental evidence of non-Amontons behaviour at a multicontact interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Scheibert; Alexis Prevost; Joel Frelat; Patrice Rey; Georges Debrégeas

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on normal stress field measurements at the multicontact interface between a rough elastomeric film and a smooth glass sphere under normal load, using an original MEMS-based stress sensing device. These measurements are compared to Finite Elements Method calculations with boundary conditions obeying locally Amontons' rigid-plastic-like friction law with a uniform friction coefficient. In dry contact conditions, significant deviations are observed which decrease with increasing load. In lubricated conditions, the measured profile recovers almost perfectly the predicted profile. These results are interpreted as a consequence of the finite compliance of the multicontact interface, a mechanism which is not taken into account in Amontons' law.

  10. Water Dynamics at Rough Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Rosenstihl; Kerstin Kämpf; Felix Klameth; Matthias Sattig; Michael Vogel

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use molecular dynamics computer simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to investigate the dynamics of water at interfaces of molecular roughness and low mobility. We find that, when approaching such interfaces, the structural relaxation of water, i.e., the $\\alpha$ process, slows down even when specific attractive interactions are absent. This prominent effect is accompanied by a smooth transition from Vogel to Arrhenius temperature dependence and by a growing importance of jump events. Consistently, at protein surfaces, deviations from Arrhenius behavior are weak when free water does not exist. Furthermore, in nanoporous silica, a dynamic crossover of liquid water occurs when a fraction of solid water forms near 225 K and, hence, the liquid dynamics changes from bulk-like to interface-dominated. At sufficiently low temperatures, water exhibits a quasi-universal $\\beta$ process, which is characterized by an activation energy of $E_a\\!=\\!0.5$ eV and involves anisotropic reorientation about large angles. As a consequence of its large amplitude, the faster $\\beta$ process destroys essentially all orientational correlation, rendering observation of a possible slower $\\alpha$ process difficult in standard experiments. Nevertheless, we find indications for the existence of structural relaxation down to a glass transition of interfacial water near 185 K. Hydrated proteins show a highly restricted backbone motion with an amplitude, which decreases upon cooling and vanishes at comparable temperatures, providing evidence for a high relevance of water rearrangements in the hydration shell for secondary protein relaxations.

  11. Plastic flow in solids with interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anurag Gupta; David Steigmann

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-equilibrium theory of isothermal and diffusionless evolution of incoherent interfaces within a plastically deforming solid is developed. The irreversible dynamics of the interface are driven by its normal motion, incoherency (slip and misorientation), and an intrinsic plastic flow; and purely by plastic deformation in the bulk away from the interface. Using the continuum theory for defect distribution (in bulk and over the interface) we formulate a general kinematical framework, derive relevant balance laws and jump conditions, and prescribe a thermodynamically consistent constitutive/kinetic structure for interface evolution.

  12. Opportunistic, collaborative and synchronized, proximal device ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledano, Eyal

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CoSync is an on-device software framework for coordinating proximal consumer electronic devices in order to create a synchronized, opportunistic and collaborative device ecology. The CoSync device ecology combines multiple ...

  13. Triboelectrification Based Motion Sensor for Human-Machine Interfacing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    arrays produced a short-circuit current density up to 10.71 mA/m2 , and an open-circuit voltage as high. The motion sensor arrays produced an open-circuit voltage as high as 42.6 V with a remarkable signal- to

  14. Tunable surface plasmon devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Eric A. (Rio Rancho, NM); Wasserman, Daniel (Lowell, MA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) device wherein the tunability derives from controlled variation of the dielectric constant of a semiconducting material (semiconductor) in evanescent-field contact with a metallic array of sub-wavelength apertures. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength can be changed by changing the dielectric constant of the dielectric material. In embodiments of this invention, the dielectric material is a semiconducting material. The dielectric constant of the semiconducting material in the metal/semiconductor interfacial region is controllably adjusted by adjusting one or more of the semiconductor plasma frequency, the concentration and effective mass of free carriers, and the background high-frequency dielectric constant in the interfacial region. Thermal heating and/or voltage-gated carrier-concentration changes may be used to variably adjust the value of the semiconductor dielectric constant.

  15. Personal annunciation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angelo, Peter (Oak Ridge, TN); Younkin, James (Oak Ridge, TN); DeMint, Paul (Kingston, TN)

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal annunciation device (PAD) providing, in an area of interest, compensatory annunciation of the presence of an abnormal condition in a hazardous area and accountability of the user of the PAD. Compensatory annunciation supplements primary annunciation provided by an emergency notification system (ENS). A detection system detects an abnormal condition, and a wireless transmission system transmits a wireless transmission to the PAD. The PAD has a housing enclosing the components of the PAD including a communication module for receiving the wireless transmission, a power supply, processor, memory, annunciation system, and RFID module. The RFID module has an RFID receiver that listens for an RFID transmission from an RFID reader disposed in a portal of an area of interest. The PAD identifies the transmission and changes its operating state based on the transmission. The RFID readers recognize, record, and transmit the state of the PAD to a base station providing accountability of the wearer.

  16. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  17. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  18. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  19. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  20. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outr sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optic elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  1. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outdoor sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optical elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  2. Electrical safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, David B. (Greenock, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical safety device for use in power tools that is designed to automatically discontinue operation of the power tool upon physical contact of the tool with a concealed conductive material. A step down transformer is used to supply the operating power for a disconnect relay and a reset relay. When physical contact is made between the power tool and the conductive material, an electrical circuit through the disconnect relay is completed and the operation of the power tool is automatically interrupted. Once the contact between the tool and conductive material is broken, the power tool can be quickly and easily reactivated by a reset push button activating the reset relay. A remote reset is provided for convenience and efficiency of operation.

  3. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  4. Module isolation devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Cooke, John Albert; Buzinski, Michael David

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas flow isolation device includes a gas flow isolation valve movable from an opened condition to a closed condition. The module isolation valve in one embodiment includes a rupture disk in flow communication with a flow of gas when the module isolation valve is in an opened condition. The rupture disk ruptures when a predetermined pressure differential occurs across it causing the isolation valve to close. In one embodiment the valve is mechanically linked to the rupture disk to maintain the valve in an opened condition when the rupture disk is intact, and which permits the valve to move into a closed condition when the rupture disk ruptures. In another embodiment a crushable member maintains the valve in an open condition, and the flow of gas passed the valve upon rupturing of the rupture disk compresses the crushable member to close the isolation valve.

  5. Air bag restraint device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle`s rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump. 8 figs.

  6. An interactive teaching device simulating intussusception reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1764-x TECHNICAL INNOVATION An interactive teaching deviceIRB. We developed an interactive teaching device to simulate

  7. Adhesion in flexible organic and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting device and solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, D.; Kwabi, D.; Akogwu, O.; Du, J. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Oyewole, O. K. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete, Kwara State (Nigeria); Tong, T. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Anye, V. C.; Rwenyagila, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Asare, J.; Fashina, A. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the adhesion between bi-material pairs that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells on flexible substrates. Adhesion between the possible bi-material pairs is measured using force microscopy (AFM) techniques. These include: interfaces that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid combinations of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results of AFM measurements are incorporated into the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model for the determination of adhesion energies. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust organic and hybrid organic/inorganic electronic devices.

  8. Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices are disclosed for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways (1) intravascularly, (2) extravascularly, (3) by vessel puncture, and (4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting. 6 figs.

  9. Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways 1) intravascularly, 2) extravascularly, 3) by vessel puncture, and 4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting.

  10. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  11. Structured wafer for device processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  12. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

  13. Brain-Computer Interfaces and Quantum Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliano Pessa; Paola zizzi

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The actual (classical) Brain-Computer Interface attempts to use brain signals to drive suitable actuators performing the actions corresponding to subject's intention. However this goal is not fully reached, and when BCI works, it does only in particular situations. The reason of this unsatisfactory result is that intention cannot be conceived simply as a set of classical input-output relationships. It is therefore necessary to resort to quantum theory, allowing the occurrence of stable coherence phenomena, in turn underlying high-level mental processes such as intentions and strategies. More precisely, within the context of a dissipative Quantum Field Theory of brain operation it is possible to introduce generalized coherent states associated, within the framework of logic, to the assertions of a quantum metalanguage. The latter controls the quantum-mechanical computing corresponding to standard mental operation. It thus become possible to conceive a Quantum Cyborg in which a human mind controls, through a quantum metalanguage, the operation of an artificial quantum computer.

  14. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Vigne, Ralph; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Garonne, Vincent; Serfon, Cedric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new data management system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for user-generated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained...

  15. Gradient nanostructures for interfacing microfluidics and nanofluidics Nanostructure Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradient nanostructures for interfacing microfluidics and nanofluidics Han Caoa) Nanostructure to emerge.2,3 In order to uniformly stretch long DNA, the dimensions of nanofluidic structures should the performance of the nanofluidic devices Fig. 1 a . One solution is to fabricate a micropost array in front

  16. UA researchers develop develop a device for moving industrial vehicles without drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    in settings with extreme human conditions (cold storage, waste management , etc....) The device is availableUA researchers develop develop a device for moving industrial vehicles without drivers Researchers Localization And Mapping). This technology is applicable to any business or industrial environment where

  17. High resolution interface nanochemistry and structure: Final project report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, R.W.; Lin, S.H.

    1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Work includes studies of interface and grain boundary chemistry and structure in silicon nitride matrix/silicon carbide whisker composites, and in monolithic silicon nitride and silicon carbide synthesized by several different methods. Off-stoichiometric, impurity, and sintering aid elemental distributions in these materials (and other ceramics) have been of great interest because of expected effects on properties but these distributions have proven very difficult to measure because the spatial resolution required is high. The authors made a number of these measurements for the first time, using techniques and instrumentation developed here. Interfaces between metals and SiC are the basis for important metal matrix composites and contacts for high temperature SiC-based solid state electronic devices. The authors have investigated ultrapure interfaces between Ti, Hf, Ti-Hf alloys, Pt, and Co and Si-terminated (0001) 6H SiC single crystals for the first time.

  18. Hetero-epitaxial EuO interfaces studied by analytic electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundy, Julia A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Hodash, Daniel; Melville, Alexander; Held, Rainer [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Mairoser, Thomas; Schmehl, Andreas [Zentrum für Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universität Augsburg, Universitätsstraße 1, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Muller, David A.; Kourkoutis, Lena F. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Schlom, Darrell G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    With nearly complete spin polarization, the ferromagnetic semiconductor europium monoxide could enable next-generation spintronic devices by providing efficient ohmic spin injection into silicon. Spin injection is greatly affected by the quality of the interface between the injector and silicon. Here, we use atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy to directly image and chemically characterize a series of EuO|Si and EuO|YAlO{sub 3} interfaces fabricated using different growth conditions. We identify the presence of europium silicides and regions of disorder at the EuO|Si interfaces, imperfections that could significantly reduce spin injection efficiencies via spin-flip scattering.

  19. BacNet and Analog/Digital Interfaces of the Building Controls Virtual Testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nouidui, Thierry Stephane; Wetter, Michael; Li, Zhengwei; Pang, Xiufeng; Bhattachayra, Prajesh; Haves, Philip

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives an overview of recent developments in the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB), a framework for co-simulation and hardware-in-the- loop. First, a general overview of the BCVTB is presented. Second, we describe the BACnet interface, a link which has been implemented to couple BACnet devices to the BCVTB. We present a case study where the interface was used to couple a whole building simulation program to a building control system to assess in real-time the performance of a real building. Third, we present the ADInterfaceMCC, an analog/digital interface that allows a USB-based analog/digital converter to be linked to the BCVTB. In a case study, we show how the link was used to couple the analog/digital converter to a building simulation model for local loop control.

  20. High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

  1. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coffland, Douglas R. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  2. Moment of Fluid Interface Reconstruction with Filaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jemison, Matthew B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A moving system made up of multiple fluids (e.g. air and water) may be defined by an evolving interface with a changing topology. MOF uses a piecewise linear interface reconstruction to numerically model deforming boundaries. Given a volume fraction V and reference centroid x for a material in cell {Omega}, we seek to find an interface {Gamma} that exactly captures V and minimizes error in x. This differs from Volume of Fluid methods.

  3. Bio-inspired Electronics for Interfacing Artificial Implants to Living Systems Imagine a world in which damaged parts of the body -an arm, or an eye, or even

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Richard

    1 Bio-inspired Electronics for Interfacing Artificial Implants to Living Systems Imagine a world, today's implants are limited severely by the interface between the artificial and biological systems by artificial implants capable of restoring or even enhancing human performance. The associated improvements

  4. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh Saripalli

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35{micro} CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  5. A Generic Framework based on Ergonomics Rules for Computer Aided Design of User Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farenc, Christelle

    A Generic Framework based on Ergonomics Rules for Computer Aided Design of User Interface Cedex, France E­mail:{farenc, palanque}@univ­tlse1.fr Key words: Ergonomic rules, usability evaluation. Abstract: Ergonomic rules are supposed to help developers to build UI respecting human factor principles

  6. Automatic Mechetronic Wheel Light Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Mohammed John Fitzgerald (Silver Spring, MD)

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A wheel lighting device for illuminating a wheel of a vehicle to increase safety and enhance aesthetics. The device produces the appearance of a "ring of light" on a vehicle's wheels as the vehicle moves. The "ring of light" can automatically change in color and/or brightness according to a vehicle's speed, acceleration, jerk, selection of transmission gears, and/or engine speed. The device provides auxiliary indicator lights by producing light in conjunction with a vehicle's turn signals, hazard lights, alarm systems, and etc. The device comprises a combination of mechanical and electronic components and can be placed on the outer or inner surface of a wheel or made integral to a wheel or wheel cover. The device can be configured for all vehicle types, and is electrically powered by a vehicle's electrical system and/or battery.

  7. Elastic Wave Behavior Across Linear Slip Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, M.

    plane waves incident at arbitrary angles upon a plane linear slip interface are computed ... Also included in these sections is an analysis ... ish, Ut is of the form.

  8. Contested Material Interface Shows Mixing | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EMSL, scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and University College London have shown that intermixing occurs at the interface of two perovskites - lanthanum...

  9. A futuristic approach towards interface layer modifications for improved efficiency in inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, J. P., E-mail: jai-ti2002@yahoo.com, E-mail: tiwarijp@mail.nplindia.org; Ali, Farman; Sharma, Abhishek; Chand, Suresh [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division (Organic and Hybrid Solar Cell Group), CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar Energy (NISE), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Pillai, Sriraj; Parakh, Sonal [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division (Organic and Hybrid Solar Cell Group), CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar Energy (NISE), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, Delhi Technological University, Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Inverted polymer Solar Cells of the classical poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C{sub 61}butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 61}BM) blend on indium tin oxide substrates were fabricated, which shows improved device performance, by using a facile solution–processed ZnO-polyelectrolytes [poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC), Poly (acrylic acid sodium salt) (PAS), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS), and Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)] nanocomposite as a cathode interface layer compared to devices using pristine ZnO as cathode buffer layer in ambient conditions. The devices with different combinations of polyelectrolyte with ZnO show different improvements in the device efficiency. The combinations of ZnO with PVP and PDADMAC show highest amount of improvements in the efficiency by a factor of ?17–19. The improvement of the efficiency may be due to various phenomena, such as the passivation of ZnO surface as well as bulk traps, work function modification, improved energy level alignment, improved electronic coupling of the inorganic/organic interface, improved light harvesting, and decrease of surface as well as bulk charge recombination in the device. The introduction of polyelectrolyte into ZnO inhibits the aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles yielding the large area ZnO nanoclusters; and hence, forming the uniform film of ZnO resulting in the modifications of morphology as well as electronic structure of ZnO-polyelectrolyte nano-composite favouring better electronic coupling between cathode and active layer and hence enhancing the current and, consequently, the efficiency. This simple low temperature ZnO-polyelectrolyte nanocomposite based protocol proposed for cathode interface layer modification may be very much useful for roll to roll industrial manufacturing of organic solar cells.

  10. Message Passing Interface for Python 1 the Message Passing Interface (MPI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Message Passing Interface for Python 1 the Message Passing Interface (MPI) MPI and MPI for Python, and gather processing numpy arrays 3 Probing for Messages nonblocking communications MCS 507 Lecture 38 L-38) MPI for Python 22 November 2013 1 / 37 #12;Message Passing Interface for Python 1 the Message

  11. The Toom Interface Via Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Crawford; Wojciech de Roeck

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a one dimensional interacting particle system which describes the effective interface dynamics of the two dimensional Toom model at low temperature and noise. We prove a number of basic properties of this model. First we consider the dynamics on a half open finite interval $[1, N)$, bounding the mixing time from above by $2N$. Then we consider the model defined on the integers. Due to infinite range interaction, this is a non-Feller process that we can define starting from product Bernoulli measures with density $p \\in (0, 1)$, but not from arbitrary measures. We show, under a modest technical condition, that the only possible invariant measures are those product Bernoulli measures. We further show that the unique stationary measure on $[-k, \\infty)$ converges weakly to a product Bernoulli measure on $\\Z$ as $k \\rightarrow \\infty$.

  12. Glass Transition, Cooperativity and Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salez, Thomas; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the physical ideas of molecular crowding and resultant cooperative motion, and address the effects of free interfaces on dynamics. First, we obtain a simple scaling expression for the diverging number of particles taking part in bulk cooperative relaxation as the system approaches kinetic arrest, and in doing so provide a robust derivation of the Adam and Gibbs description of cooperative dynamics. Then, by including thermal expansivity of the material, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, we predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length $\\xi$ of bulk relaxation, and explore the influence of sample boundaries on the glassy dynamics when the system size becomes comparable to $\\xi$. The theory is in full agreement with measurements of the glass transition temperature of thin polystyrene films. This agreement comes with two adjustable parameters, the critical interparticle distance and the Vogel temperature. Alth...

  13. Interface dynamics for layered structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takao Ohta; David Jasnow

    1997-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamics of large scale and slow deformations of layered structures. Starting from the respective model equations for a non-conserved system, a conserved system and a binary fluid, we derive the interface equations which are a coupled set of equations for deformations of the boundaries of each domain. A further reduction of the degrees of freedom is possible for a non-conserved system such that internal motion of each domain is adiabatically eliminated. The resulting equation of motion contains only the displacement of the center of gravity of domains, which is equivalent to the phase variable of a periodic structure. Thus our formulation automatically includes the phase dynamics of layered structures. In a conserved system and a binary fluid, however, the internal motion of domains turns out to be a slow variable in the long wavelength limit because of concentration conservation. Therefore a reduced description only involving the phase variable is not generally justified.

  14. Nanofluidics, from bulk to interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyderic Bocquet; Elisabeth Charlaix

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluidics has emerged recently in the footsteps of microfluidics, following the quest of scale reduction inherent to nanotechnologies. By definition, nanofluidics explores transport phenomena of fluids at the nanometer scales. Why is the nanometer scale specific ? What fluid properties are probed at nanometric scales ? In other words, why 'nanofluidics' deserves its own brand name ? In this critical review, we will explore the vast manifold of length scales emerging for the fluid behavior at the nanoscales, as well as the associated mechanisms and corresponding applications. We will in particular explore the interplay between bulk and interface phenomena. The limit of validity of the continuum approaches will be discussed, as well as the numerous surface induced effects occuring at these scales, from hydrodynamic slippage to the various electro-kinetic phenomena originating from the couplings between hydrodynamics and electrostatics. An enlightening analogy between ion transport in nanochannels and transport in doped semi-conductors will be discussed.

  15. Diamonds are an Electronic Device’s Best Friend

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers at Argonne National Lab recently devised a way to use diamonds to brighten the performance of electronic devices, which could put a bit more sparkle in everyone’s day.

  16. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  17. Hybrid immersed interface-immersed boundary methods for AC dielectrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossan, Mohammad Robiul [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920 (United States); Department of Engineering and Physics, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK 73034-5209 (United States); Dillon, Robert [Department of Mathematics, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-3113 (United States); Dutta, Prashanta, E-mail: dutta@mail.wsu.edu [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dielectrophoresis, a nonlinear electrokinetic transport mechanism, has become popular in many engineering applications including manipulation, characterization and actuation of biomaterials, particles and biological cells. In this paper, we present a hybrid immersed interface–immersed boundary method to study AC dielectrophoresis where an algorithm is developed to solve the complex Poisson equation using a real variable formulation. An immersed interface method is employed to obtain the AC electric field in a fluid media with suspended particles and an immersed boundary method is used for the fluid equations and particle transport. The convergence of the proposed algorithm as well as validation of the hybrid scheme with experimental results is presented. In this paper, the Maxwell stress tensor is used to calculate the dielectrophoretic force acting on particles by considering the physical effect of particles in the computational domain. Thus, this study eliminates the approximations used in point dipole methods for calculating dielectrophoretic force. A comparative study between Maxwell stress tensor and point dipole methods for computing dielectrophoretic forces are presented. The hybrid method is used to investigate the physics of dielectrophoresis in microfluidic devices using an AC electric field. The numerical results show that with proper design and appropriate selection of applied potential and frequency, global electric field minima can be obtained to facilitate multiple particle trapping by exploiting the mechanism of negative dielectrophoresis. Our numerical results also show that electrically neutral particles form a chain parallel to the applied electric field irrespective of their initial orientation when an AC electric field is applied. This proposed hybrid numerical scheme will help to better understand dielectrophoresis and to design and optimize microfluidic devices.

  18. A simple OASIS interface E. Maisonnave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A simple OASIS interface for CESM E. Maisonnave TR/CMGC/11/63 #12;#12;Index Strategy............................................................................................. 7 Annex 1: OASIS3 interface implementation on CESM..................................... 9 Annex 2. Taking advantage of the IS-ENES OASIS Dedicated User Support program, a COSMO/CLM coupling framework has

  19. OASIS4 coupling interface implementation on ETHZ'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS4 coupling interface implementation on ETHZ' land-atmosphere coupled model E. Maisonnave WN 9 2010 at ETH, Zürich(Switzerland), I implement and validate an OASIS4 interface for a regional) and a land scheme (CLM, NCAR) model have been coupled with OASIS4, at low resolution on a MPP scalar machine

  20. Internal and Interface Shear Strength of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 Internal and Interface Shear Strength of Geosynthetic Clay Liners (GCLs): Additional Data by John Liners (GCLs): Additional Data Geosynthetic Clay Liners (GCLs) are prefabricated geocomposite materials., Zornberg, Jorge G., and Swan, Jr., Robert H. Internal and Interface Shear Strength of Geosynthetic Clay

  1. Model Checking User Interfaces Abigail Cauchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Gordon J.

    Model Checking User Interfaces Abigail Cauchi Dept of Computer Science University of Malta acau0004@um.edu.mt Gordon Pace Dept of Computer Science University of Malta gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Sandro Spina Dept of Computer Science University of Malta sandro.spina@um.edu.mt Abstract User interfaces

  2. Bringing Control System User Interfaces to the Web

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xihui [ORNL] [ORNL; Kasemir, Kay [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the evolution of web based technologies, especially HTML5 [1], it becomes possible to create web-based control system user interfaces (UI) that are cross-browser and cross-device compatible. This article describes two technologies that facilitate this goal. The first one is the WebOPI [2], which can seamlessly display CSS BOY [3] Operator Interfaces (OPI) in web browsers without modification to the original OPI file. The WebOPI leverages the powerful graphical editing capabilities of BOY and provides the convenience of re-using existing OPI files. On the other hand, it uses generic JavaScript and a generic communication mechanism between the web browser and web server. It is not optimized for a control system, which results in unnecessary network traffic and resource usage. Our second technology is the WebSocket-based Process Data Access (WebPDA) [4]. It is a protocol that provides efficient control system data communication using WebSocket [5], so that users can create web-based control system UIs using standard web page technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript. WebPDA is control system independent, potentially supporting any type of control system.

  3. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, R.E. Jr.; Johnson, S.A.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams in the form of illumination bar to the lasing zone of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier. The preferred interface module includes an optical fiber array having a plurality of optical fibers arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source, and their proximal ends delivered into a relay structure. The proximal ends of the optical fibers are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array delivered from the optical fiber array is acted upon by an optical element array to produce an illumination bar which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window. The illumination bar is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout. 5 figs.

  4. NWTC Controllable Grid Interface (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Controllable Grid Interface tests wind turbines off-line from the grid, verifies compliance with standards, and provides grid operators with the performance information they need for a faction of the time and cost it would take to test the turbine in the field. To understand the behavior of wind turbines during grid disturbances, manufacturers and utility grid operators need to perform a series of tests and accurate transient simulation studies. The latest edition of the IEC 61400-21 standard describes methods for such tests that include low voltage ride-through (LVRT), active power set-point control, ramp rate limitations, and reactive power capability tests. The IEC methods are being widely adopted on both national and international levels by wind turbine manufacturers, certification authorities, and utilities. Utility operators also need to estimate how much power wind turbines might be able provide to help regulate grid frequency during situations when they need additional energy quickly, and after design modifications or changes are made to control software, manufacturers may be required to retest their turbines. But testing wind turbines in the field can be a lengthy and expensive process often requiring manufacturers and utility operators to send equipment and personnel to remote locations for long periods of time. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has developed a new Controllable Grid Interface (CGI) test system that can significantly reduce the time and cost required to conduct these tests. The CGI is first test facility in the United States that has fault simulation capabilities and allows manufacturers and system operators to conduct the tests required for certification in a controlled laboratory environment. It is the only system in the world that is fully integrated with two dynamometers and has the capacity to extend that integration to turbines in the field and to a matrix of electronic and mechanical storage devices, all of which are located within close proximity on the same site. NREL's 7.5 MVA CGI tests wind turbines off-line from the grid, verifies compliance with standards, and provides grid operators with the performance information they need for a fraction of the time and cost it would take to test the turbine in the field. The system combines hardware and real-time control software and is designed to operate with the NWTC's 2.5-MW dynamometer as well as the center's new 5-MW dynamometer test facilities. It is designed to work with four types of wind turbines, photovoltaic systems, and energy storage inverters. Results from the dynamometer tests can also be used to fine tune and validate the dynamic models used in integration studies and help industry improve turbine performance and develop test standards for renewable technologies and energy storage.

  5. Positive bias temperature instability in p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with HfSiON/SiO{sub 2} gate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samanta, Piyas, E-mail: piyas@vcfw.org [Department of Physics, Vidyasagar College for Women, 39 Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700 006 (India); Huang, Heng-Sheng; Chen, Shuang-Yuan [Institute of Mechatronic Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-Hsi [Department of Mechatronic Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, No. 162, Sec. 1, He-Ping E. Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Li-Wei [Central R and D Division, United Microelectronics Corporation, No. 3, Li-Hsin Rd. II, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed investigation on positive-bias temperature stress (PBTS) induced degradation of nitrided hafnium silicate (HfSiON)/SiO{sub 2} gate stack in n{sup +}-poly crystalline silicon (polySi) gate p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (pMOS) devices. The measurement results indicate that gate dielectric degradation is a composite effect of electron trapping in as-fabricated as well as newly generated neutral traps, resulting a significant amount of stress-induced leakage current and generation of surface states at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. Although, a significant amount of interface states are created during PBTS, the threshold voltage (V{sub T}) instability of the HfSiON based pMOS devices is primarily caused by electron trapping and detrapping. It is also shown that PBTS creates both acceptor- and donor-like interface traps via different depassivation mechanisms of the Si{sub 3}???SiH bonds at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface in pMOS devices. However, the number of donor-like interface traps ?N{sub it}{sup D} is significantly greater than that of acceptor-like interface traps ?N{sup A}{sub it}, resulting the PBTS induced net interface traps as donor-like.

  6. The design and enhancement of a testbed for the remote system monitoring interface device technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Regan Christopher

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas A&M University is developing an information technology-based system that is able to continuously monitor and diagnose faults of electrical motors, based solely on electrical signals available at the motor terminals, such as current and voltage...

  7. CoolSpots: Reducing the Power Consumption of Wireless Mobile Devices with Multiple Radio Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    Lifetime (Hours,1300mAHbattery) Comm Power System Power Battery Lifetime Permission to make digital or hard copies

  8. Design of user interfaces for selective editing of digital photos on touchscreen devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    pixel between control points. The interpolation is based on a mixture of distances in space, luminance want to change the appearance of the sky while leaving the vegetation untouched. In other words, every

  9. Radio-frequency powered glow discharge device and method with high voltage interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duckworth, Douglas C. (Knoxville, TN); Marcus, R. Kenneth (Clemson, SC); Donohue, David L. (Vienna, AT); Lewis, Trousdale A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage accelerating potential, which is supplied by a high voltage direct current power supply, is applied to the electrically conducting interior wall of an RF powered glow discharge cell. The RF power supply desirably is electrically grounded, and the conductor carrying the RF power to the sample held by the probe is desirably shielded completely excepting only the conductor's terminal point of contact with the sample. The high voltage DC accelerating potential is not supplied to the sample. A high voltage capacitance is electrically connected in series between the sample on the one hand and the RF power supply and an impedance matching network on the other hand. The high voltage capacitance isolates the high DC voltage from the RF electronics, while the RF potential is passed across the high voltage capacitance to the plasma. An inductor protects at least the RF power supply, and desirably the impedance matching network as well, from a short that might occur across the high voltage capacitance. The discharge cell and the probe which holds the sample are configured and disposed to prevent the probe's components, which are maintained at ground potential, from bridging between the relatively low vacuum region in communication with the glow discharge maintained within the cell on the one hand, and the relatively high vacuum region surrounding the probe and cell on the other hand. The probe and cell also are configured and disposed to prevent the probe's components from electrically shorting the cell's components.

  10. Radio-frequency powered glow discharge device and method with high voltage interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duckworth, D.C.; Marcus, R.K.; Donohue, D.L.; Lewis, T.A.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage accelerating potential, which is supplied by a high voltage direct current power supply, is applied to the electrically conducting interior wall of an RF powered glow discharge cell. The RF power supply desirably is electrically grounded, and the conductor carrying the RF power to the sample held by the probe is desirably shielded completely excepting only the conductor's terminal point of contact with the sample. The high voltage DC accelerating potential is not supplied to the sample. A high voltage capacitance is electrically connected in series between the sample on the one hand and the RF power supply and an impedance matching network on the other hand. The high voltage capacitance isolates the high DC voltage from the RF electronics, while the RF potential is passed across the high voltage capacitance to the plasma. An inductor protects at least the RF power supply, and desirably the impedance matching network as well, from a short that might occur across the high voltage capacitance. The discharge cell and the probe which holds the sample are configured and disposed to prevent the probe's components, which are maintained at ground potential, from bridging between the relatively low vacuum region in communication with the glow discharge maintained within the cell on the one hand, and the relatively high vacuum region surrounding the probe and cell on the other hand. The probe and cell also are configured and disposed to prevent the probe's components from electrically shorting the cell's components. 11 figures.

  11. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Bong Geun; Park, Jeong Won; Hu, Jia Sheng; Huang, Carlos; Monuki, Edwin S; Jeon, Noo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in space and time using microfluidics. Nature 2005, Takayamamimetics based on microfluidics for imaging the leukocyte--Abstract Background: Microfluidics is an enabling technology

  12. Polymer electronic devices and materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, William Kent; Baca, Paul Martin; Dirk, Shawn M.; Anderson, G. Ronald; Wheeler, David Roger

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer electronic devices and materials have vast potential for future microsystems and could have many advantages over conventional inorganic semiconductor based systems, including ease of manufacturing, cost, weight, flexibility, and the ability to integrate a wide variety of functions on a single platform. Starting materials and substrates are relatively inexpensive and amenable to mass manufacturing methods. This project attempted to plant the seeds for a new core competency in polymer electronics at Sandia National Laboratories. As part of this effort a wide variety of polymer components and devices, ranging from simple resistors to infrared sensitive devices, were fabricated and characterized. Ink jet printing capabilities were established. In addition to promising results on prototype devices the project highlighted the directions where future investments must be made to establish a viable polymer electronics competency.

  13. Personal cooling air filtering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James (Knoxville, TN); Conway, Bret (Denver, NC)

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature modification system for modifying the temperature of fluids includes at least one thermally conductive carbon foam element, the carbon foam element having at least one flow channel for the passage of fluids. At least one temperature modification device is provided, the temperature modification device thermally connected to the carbon foam element and adapted to modify the temperature of the carbon foam to modify the temperature of fluids flowing through the flow channels. Thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements can preferably be used as the temperature modification device. A method for the reversible temperature modification of fluids includes the steps of providing a temperature modification system including at least one thermally conductive carbon foam element having flow channels and at least one temperature modification device, and flowing a fluid through the flow channels.

  14. Optical and optoelectronic fiber devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Ofer, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to integrate materials with disparate electrical, thermal, and optical properties into a single fiber structure enabled the realization of fiber devices with diverse and complex functionalities. Amongst those, ...

  15. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasilva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Colston, Jr., Bill W. (Livermore, CA); James, Dale L. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  16. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  17. Cognitive Security for Personal Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenstadt, Rachel

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Humans should be able to think of computers as extensions of their body, as craftsmen do with their tools. Current security models, however, are too unlike those used in human minds---for example, computers authenticate ...

  18. Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H. (Rigby, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

  19. Assistive Devices for the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , contact a physical therapist or occupational therapist through a home health agency or your local hospital. The following Web sites have information about devices that can make your home safer and more functional: http...Assistive Devices for the Home Janie Harris Extension Specialist, Housing and Environment The Texas A&M University System If you were to become impaired or disabled from an accident or illness, how ?user-friendly? would your home be? There are many...

  20. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  1. Crystalline Nanoporous Frameworks: a Nanolaboratory for Probing Excitonic Device Concepts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Azoulay, Jason; Ford, Alexandra Caroline [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Foster, Michael E.; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Leong-Hau, Kirsty; Stavila, Vitalie; Talin, Albert Alec; Wong, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Van Gough, D.; Lambert, Timothy N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Rodriguez, Mark A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Spoerke, Erik David [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Wheeler, David R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Deaton, Joseph C.; Centrone, Andrea; Haney, Paul; Kinney, R.; Szalai, Veronika; Yoon, Heayoung P.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electro-optical organic materials hold great promise for the development of high-efficiency devices based on exciton formation and dissociation, such as organic photovoltaics (OPV) and organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). However, the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of both OPV and OLEDs must be improved to make these technologies economical. Efficiency rolloff in OLEDs and inability to control morphology at key OPV interfaces both reduce EQE. Only by creating materials that allow manipulation and control of the intimate assembly and communication between various nanoscale excitonic components can we hope to first understand and then engineer the system to allow these materials to reach their potential. The aims of this proposal are to: 1) develop a paradigm-changing platform for probing excitonic processes composed of Crystalline Nanoporous Frameworks (CNFs) infiltrated with secondary materials (such as a complimentary semiconductor); 2) use them to probe fundamental aspects of excitonic processes; and 3) create prototype OPVs and OLEDs using infiltrated CNF as active device components. These functional platforms will allow detailed control of key interactions at the nanoscale, overcoming the disorder and limited synthetic control inherent in conventional organic materials. CNFs are revolutionary inorganic-organic hybrid materials boasting unmatched synthetic flexibility that allow tuning of chemical, geometric, electrical, and light absorption/generation properties. For example, bandgap engineering is feasible and polyaromatic linkers provide tunable photon antennae; rigid 1-5 nm pores provide an oriented, intimate host for triplet emitters (to improve light emission in OLEDs) or secondary semiconducting polymers (creating a charge-separation interface in OPV). These atomically engineered, ordered structures will enable critical fundamental questions to be answered concerning charge transport, nanoscale interfaces, and exciton behavior that are inaccessible in disordered systems. Implementing this concept also creates entirely new dimensions for device fabrication that could both improve performance, increase durability, and reduce costs with unprecedented control of over properties. This report summarizes the key results of this project and is divided into sections based on publications that resulted from the work. We begin in Section 2 with an investigation of light harvesting and energy transfer in a MOF infiltrated with donor and acceptor molecules of the type typically used in OPV devices (thiophenes and fullerenes, respectively). The results show that MOFs can provide multiple functions: as a light harvester, as a stabilizer and organizer or the infiltrated molecules, and as a facilitator of energy transfer. Section 3 describes computational design of MOF linker groups to accomplish light harvesting in the visible and facilitate charge separation and transport. The predictions were validated by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, demonstrating that rational design of MOFs for light-harvesting purposes is feasible. Section 4 extends the infiltration concept discussed in Section to, which we now designate as %22Molecule%40MOF%22 to create an electrically conducting framework. The tailorability and high conductivity of this material are unprecedented, meriting publication in the journal Science and spawning several Technical Advances. Section 5 discusses processes we developed for depositing MOFs as thin films on substrates, a critical enabling technology for fabricating MOF-based electronic devices. Finally, in Section 6 we summarize results showing that a MOF thin film can be used as a sensitizer in a DSSC, demonstrating that MOFs can serve as active layers in excitonic devices. Overall, this project provides several crucial proofs-of- concept that the potential of MOFs for use in optoelectronic devices that we predicted several years ago [ 3 ] can be realized in practice.

  2. SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Haase, Andy

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

  3. Novel method for the prediction of an interface bonding species at alumina/metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshitake, Michiko, E-mail: yoshitake.michiko@nims.go.jp; Yagyu, Shinjiro [National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13, Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Chikyow, Toyohiro [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1, Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Interface bonding between alumina and various metals is discussed from the viewpoint of chemical thermodynamics. A method to predict the interface bonding species at an alumina/metal interface under equilibrium conditions is proposed by using the concept of chemical equilibrium for interface termination. The originality of this method is in the way a simple estimation of the interface binding energy, which is generally applicable to most metals, is developed. The effectiveness of this method is confirmed by careful examination of the experimental results. Comparison of the predicted and experimentally observed interface terminations reveals that the proposed method agrees well with the reported results. The method uses only basic quantities of pure elements and the formation enthalpy of oxides. Therefore, it can be applied to most metals in the periodic table and is useful for screening materials in the quest to develop interfaces with particular functions.

  4. Method and system for providing work machine multi-functional user interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian D. (Peoria, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Baker, Thomas M. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is performed to provide a multi-functional user interface on a work machine for displaying suggested corrective action. The process includes receiving status information associated with the work machine and analyzing the status information to determine an abnormal condition. The process also includes displaying a warning message on the display device indicating the abnormal condition and determining one or more corrective actions to handle the abnormal condition. Further, the process includes determining an appropriate corrective action among the one or more corrective actions and displaying a recommendation message on the display device reflecting the appropriate corrective action. The process may also include displaying a list including the remaining one or more corrective actions on the display device to provide alternative actions to an operator.

  5. Thermodynamic and morphological transitions in crystalline and soft material interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Ming, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces are defects present in all materials. Interface transitions are characterized by abrupt changes in interface structure, chemistry and/or morphology under suitable conditions. They exist in many material systems ...

  6. Direct Manipulation for Comprehensible, Predictable and Controllable User Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    Direct Manipulation for Comprehensible, Predictable and Controllable User Interfaces Ben that are comprehensible, predictable and controllable. Direct manipulation interfaces are seen as more likely candidates Research University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 Abstract: Direct manipulation user interfaces have

  7. Improved performance of railcar/rail truck interface components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Story, Brett Alan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to improve the railcar/rail truck interface by developing a low maintenance bearing interface with a favorable friction coefficient. Friction and wear at the center bowl/center plate bearing interface cause high...

  8. Improved performance of railcar/rail truck interface components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Story, Brett Alan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to improve the railcar/rail truck interface by developing a low maintenance bearing interface with a favorable friction coefficient. Friction and wear at the center bowl/center plate bearing interface cause high...

  9. A standard format and a graphical user interface for spin system specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Biternas; G. T. P. Charnock; Ilya Kuprov

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a simple and general XML format for spin system description that is the result of extensive consultations within Magnetic Resonance community and unifies under one roof all major existing spin interaction specification conventions. The format is human-readable, easy to edit and easy to parse using standard XML libraries. We also describe a graphical user interface that was designed to facilitate construction and visualization of complicated spin systems. The interface is capable of generating input files for several popular spin dynamics simulation packages.

  10. A standard format and a graphical user interface for spin system specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biternas, A G; Kuprov, Ilya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a simple and general XML format for spin system description that is the result of extensive consultations within Magnetic Resonance community and unifies under one roof all major existing spin interaction specification conventions. The format is human-readable, easy to edit and easy to parse using standard XML libraries. We also describe a graphical user interface that was designed to facilitate construction and visualization of complicated spin systems. The interface is capable of generating input files for several popular spin dynamics simulation packages.

  11. DISSERTATION DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS Submitted by Russell M Reserved #12;ABSTRACT DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS Thin-film photovoltaics

  12. Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI Reviews work in engineered...

  13. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

  14. Novel tamper-indicating protective devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several novel tamper-indicating devices, originally developed under DOE auspices for arms control applications, might be useful in nonproliferation. Some devices that have reached the laboratory prototype stage could provide specialized alternatives to established seals. As locks and cables, the following might be useful: (1) a brittle ceramic lock--impervious to toxic, radiation, and thermal extremes--interrogated for identification and continuity by ultrasonic means, (2) a flexible ceramic-fiber seal that also tolerates severe environments, (3) an ultrasonic smart-material strip seal, and (4) an RF-resonant coaxial cable, verified by radio frequency and microwave signals. To validate the identity of secured surfaces, joints, welds, and fasteners--two techniques are applicable: (1) the scanning electron microscope, which examines three- dimensional micron-level topography, and (2) the plastic-casting fingerprint, a simple low-cost technique, analogous to human fingerprinting. The techniques mentioned above have one or more of the potential advantages of low cost, immediate availability, security for large-area enclosures, application to hazardous environments, usability in the FSU, or suitability for covert use.

  15. Capillary migration of microdisks on curved interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu Yao; Nima Sharifi-Mood; Iris B. Liu; Kathleen J. Stebe

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The capillary energy landscape for particles on curved fluid interfaces is strongly influenced by the particle wetting conditions. Contact line pinning has now been widely reported for colloidal particles, but its implications in capillary interactions have not been addressed. Here, we present experiment and analysis for disks with pinned contact lines on curved fluid interfaces. In experiment, we study microdisk migration on a host interface with zero mean curvature; the microdisks have contact lines pinned at their sharp edges and are sufficiently small that gravitational effects are negligible. The disks migrate away from planar regions toward regions of steep curvature with capillary energies inferred from the dissipation along particle trajectories which are linear in the deviatoric curvature. We derive the curvature capillary energy for an interface with arbitrary curvature, and discuss each contribution to the expression. By adsorbing to a curved interface, a particle eliminates a patch of fluid interface and perturbs the surrounding interface shape. Analysis predicts that perfectly smooth, circular disks do not migrate, and that nanometric deviations from a planar circular, contact line, like those around a weakly roughened planar disk, will drive migration with linear dependence on deviatoric curvature, in agreement with experiment.

  16. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  17. PFP Interface identification and management planning guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of-this planning guide is to present the process used to identify, document, and control PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project interfaces. Revisions to this document will include, as attachments, the most recent version of the Project Interface Management List. A preliminary Interface Management List is included in Appendix A. This document is intended be a Project owned management tool. As such, this document will periodically require revisions resulting from improvements of the information, processes, and techniques as now described. For most revisions that suggest improved processes, PFP management approval is all that will be required.

  18. Electrode/electrolyte interface. A status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bard, A.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States)); Abruna, H.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Chidsey, C.E. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Faulkner, L.R. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (United States)); Feldberg, S.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Itaya, Kingo (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)); Majda, M. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Melroy, O. (IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States)); Murray, R.W. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States)); Porter, M.D. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States)); Soriaga, M.P. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (United States)); White, H.S. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States))

    1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report of a workshop on the [open quotes]state of the art[close quotes] and potential future directions in the study of the electrode/electrolyte interface. Recent advances in experimental capabilities of characterizing the structure of the interface, e.g., through the use of such techniques as scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray methods, are described. New approaches to studies of interfacial dynamics and materials aspects of the electrode/electrolyte interface are also discussed. 346 refs., 17 figs.

  19. Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries. Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries....

  20. Water Structure at Hematite-Water Interfaces. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure at Hematite-Water Interfaces. Water Structure at Hematite-Water Interfaces. Abstract: The atomic-level structure of water at mineral surfaces is an important controlling...

  1. Interface-induced magnetism in perovskite quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Clayton A; Stemmer, Susanne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERFACE-INDUCED MAGNETISM IN PEROVSKITE . . . PHYSICALR) (2013) Interface-induced magnetism in perovskite quantumelectron gases, and magnetism can all be found in a single

  2. Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  3. Is the Calcite-Water Interface Understood? Direct Comparisons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the Calcite-Water Interface Understood? Direct Comparisons of Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Specular X-ray Reflectivity Is the Calcite-Water Interface Understood? Direct...

  4. “Cute” displays: Developing an Emotional Bond with Your Mobile Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rousi, Rebekah

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overall, in such a personal device it may seem fair toto develop a personal communication device which is not onlyto compact personal organising devices (personal digital

  5. Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Arthur J. [Professor

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

  6. Is the Human Mind Massively Modular?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuels, Richard

    CHAPTER T H R E E Is the Human Mind Massively Modular? Richard Samuels Introduction: Minds as Mechanisms Among the most pervasive and fundamental assumptions in cognitive science is that the human mind (or mind-brain) is a mechanism of some sort: a physical device com- posed of functionally specifiable

  7. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM); Beyer, James B. (Madison, WI); Nordman, James E. (Madison, WI); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  8. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, M.D.; Klapperick, R.L.; Bell, C.

    1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The device punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container. 7 figures.

  9. Comparison of discrete control devices to select menus on an interactive display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hottman, Stephen Bruce

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Dowd, 1979). The increase This thesis follows the style required for publication in the Human Factors Journal. of digital computers coupled with electronic displays has provided a significant increase in the amount of information which is available..., Simplifying the man machine interface with the touch terminal IEE 0 f ~0i I, 1971, 80. 307-313. Supplemental References Air Force Systems Command. Design handbook 1-3 Human factors engi- neering. Washington, D. C. : Department of the Air Force, AFSC DH 1...

  10. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

  11. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal long after most commercial SNF has degraded and begun moving into the repository environment.

  12. Activity based interfaces in online social networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laraqui, Jawad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project is to explore how activity-based interfaces can create more meaningful experiences for the users and builders of online social networking sites. Medina, a social-networking site based on the idea ...

  13. Autonomous pedestrian interfaces for community networking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonanni, Leonardo Amerigo, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to bridge the digital divide have concentrated on community computer centers dependent on subsidy and constant supervision. This thesis considers the design of public digital interfaces that are physically and ...

  14. Film bonded fuel cell interface configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Terry, Peter L. (Chatham, NJ)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to improved elements for use in fuel cell stacks, and more particularly, to a stack having a corrosion-resistant, electrally conductive, fluid-impervious interface member therein.

  15. Electrical interfaces for electromechanical and energy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaney, Rachel M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, construction, and testing of a versatile robot driver circuit is described. The printed circuit board produced can be used as an interface between any two-motor robot and the R31-JP, an eight-bit microcontroller ...

  16. Vibrational sum frequency study on biological interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Soon Mi

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , which is related to molecular orientation. Since the polarizabilities of molecules in bulk phase will be canceled out, a sum frequency signal can only be generated from interfaces where the inversion symmetry is broken. Because of its interfacial...

  17. From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL, Bldg. 137, Rm 226 Dr. Frank Uwe Renner Max-Planck-Institut fr...

  18. BE 780: Brain Machine Interfaces Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    BE 780: Brain Machine Interfaces Spring 2013 Instructor: Jason Ritt the readings for an assigned class. Homework 30% Mid-semester Report 30, code, or files of any kind. Reports and final projects must

  19. Engineering nanocarbon interfaces for electron transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilmer, Andrew J. (Andrew Joseph)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-transfer reactions at nanometer-scale interfaces, such as those presented by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), are important for emerging optoelectronic and photovoltaic technologies. Electron transfer also ...

  20. Apparatus and methods for a human extender

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A human extender controller for interface between a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant. The human extender controller uses an inner-feedback loop to increase the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human extender controller of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the present invention is able to achieve a force reflection ratio 500 to 1 and capable of handling loads above the two (2) ton range.

  1. Bad data packet capture device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for capturing data packets for analysis on a network computing system includes a sending node and a receiving node connected by a bi-directional communication link. The sending node sends a data transmission to the receiving node on the bi-directional communication link, and the receiving node receives the data transmission and verifies the data transmission to determine valid data and invalid data and verify retransmissions of invalid data as corresponding valid data. A memory device communicates with the receiving node for storing the invalid data and the corresponding valid data. A computing node communicates with the memory device and receives and performs an analysis of the invalid data and the corresponding valid data received from the memory device.

  2. Microelectroporation device for genomic screening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perroud, Thomas D.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Negrete, Oscar; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an microelectroporation device that combines microarrays of oligonucleotides, microfluidic channels, and electroporation for cell transfection and high-throughput screening applications (e.g. RNA interference screens). Microarrays allow the deposition of thousands of different oligonucleotides in microscopic spots. Microfluidic channels and microwells enable efficient loading of cells into the device and prevent cross-contamination between different oligonucleotides spots. Electroporation allows optimal transfection of nucleic acids into cells (especially hard-to-transfect cells such as primary cells) by minimizing cell death while maximizing transfection efficiency. This invention has the advantage of a higher throughput and lower cost, while preventing cross-contamination compared to conventional screening technologies. Moreover, this device does not require bulky robotic liquid handling equipment and is inherently safer given that it is a closed system.

  3. Device Independent Random Number Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mataj Pivoluska; Martin Plesch

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Randomness is an invaluable resource in today's life with a broad use reaching from numerical simulations through randomized algorithms to cryptography. However, on the classical level no true randomness is available and even the use of simple quantum devices in a prepare-measure setting suffers from lack of stability and controllability. This gave rise to a group of quantum protocols that provide randomness certified by classical statistical tests -- Device Independent Quantum Random Number Generators. In this paper we review the most relevant results in this field, which allow the production of almost perfect randomness with help of quantum devices, supplemented with an arbitrary weak source of additional randomness. This is in fact the best one could hope for to achieve, as with no starting randomness (corresponding to no free will in a different concept) even a quantum world would have a fully deterministic description.

  4. GSS, a user interface specification framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, John Graham

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composite of four boxes. 24 Figure 7. A congguration set of three advisory lights, 25 Figure 8. Three airplane icon template example. 26 Figurc 9. Image abstraction manipulation. Figure 10. Rotation about a moving origin. Figure 11. A Symbolic's dynamic... in terms of the small set of con- cepts which make up the ontology. So far, duce issues have been addressed which relate to concept development for a user inter- face ontology: 15 ~ a methodology, ~ gross user interface behavior, ~ user interface...

  5. INSTITUTE for QUANTUM STRUCTURES AND DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Steven S.

    , and #12;the design and fabrication of quantum devices based on magnetic, quantum dot, and superconducting

  6. Interfacial Engineering for Highly Efficient-Conjugated Polymer-Based Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex Jen; David Ginger; Christine Luscombe; Hong Ma

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of our proposal is to apply interface engineering approach to improve charge extraction, guide active layer morphology, improve materials compatibility, and ultimately allow the fabrication of high efficiency tandem cells. Specifically, we aim at developing: i. Interfacial engineering using small molecule self-assembled monolayers ii. Nanostructure engineering in OPVs using polymer brushes iii. Development of efficient light harvesting and high mobility materials for OPVs iv. Physical characterization of the nanostructured systems using electrostatic force microscopy, and conducting atomic force microscopy v. All-solution processed organic-based tandem cells using interfacial engineering to optimize the recombination layer currents vi. Theoretical modeling of charge transport in the active semiconducting layer The material development effort is guided by advanced computer modeling and surface/ interface engineering tools to allow us to obtain better understanding of the effect of electrode modifications on OPV performance for the investigation of more elaborate device structures. The materials and devices developed within this program represent a major conceptual advancement using an integrated approach combining rational molecular design, material, interface, process, and device engineering to achieve solar cells with high efficiency, stability, and the potential to be used for large-area roll-to-roll printing. This may create significant impact in lowering manufacturing cost of polymer solar cells for promoting clean renewable energy use and preventing the side effects from using fossil fuels to impact environment.

  7. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  8. Gas sensing with acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spates, J.J. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butler, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey is made of acoustic devices that are suitable as gas and vapor sensors. This survey focuses on attributes such as operating frequency, mass sensitivity, quality factor (Q), and their ability to be fabricated on a semiconductor substrate to allow integration with electronic circuitry. The treatment of the device surface with chemically-sensitive films to detect species of interest is discussed. Strategies for improving discrimination are described, including sensor arrays and species concentration and separation schemes. The advantages and disadvantages of integrating sensors with microelectronics are considered, along with the effect on sensitivity of scaling acoustic gas sensors to smaller size.

  9. Template attacks on different devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudary, Omar; Kuhn, Markus G.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the devices from a battery via a 3.3 V linear regulator and supplied a 1 MHz sine wave clock signal. We used a Tektronix TDS 7054 8-bit oscilloscope with P6243 active probe, at 250 MS/s, with 500 MHz bandwidth in SAMPLE mode. Devices Alpha and Beta used a CPU... the value zero, meaning that in our traces none of the variability should be caused by variable data in other nearby instructions that may be processed concurrently in various pipeline stages. This approach, also used in other studies [8,13,17], provides a...

  10. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  11. Surface-micromachined microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Montague, Stephen (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Redmond, WA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Krygowski, Thomas W. (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Nichols, Christopher A. (Hauppauge, NY); Jakubczak, II, Jerome F. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators.

  12. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  13. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermostat was part of a smart home system developed by theproduct/smart-overview/) Figure 4: Control4 home automationhome: personal computers, peripherals, mobile computing devices, smart

  14. Comparison of methods to quantify interface trap densities at dielectric/IIIV semiconductor interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stemmer, Susanne

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high-k/III-V interface. 2 Meth- ods to determine the D it ofand capacitance based meth- ods. The dopant concentration

  15. Encapsulation methods for organic electrical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blum, Yigal D.; Chu, William Siu-Keung; MacQueen, David Brent; Shi, Yijian

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides methods and materials suitable for use as encapsulation barriers in electronic devices. In one embodiment, for example, there is provided an electroluminescent device or other electronic device encapsulated by alternating layers of a silicon-containing bonding material and a ceramic material. The encapsulation methods provide, for example, electronic devices with increased stability and shelf-life. The invention is useful, for example, in the field of microelectronic devices.

  16. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  17. Interdigitated photovoltaic power conversion device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, J.S.; Wanlass, M.W.; Gessert, T.A.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic power conversion device has a top surface adapted to receive impinging radiation. The device includes at least two adjacent, serially connected cells. Each cell includes a semi-insulating substrate and a lateral conductivity layer of a first doped electrical conductivity disposed on the substrate. A base layer is disposed on the lateral conductivity layer and has the same electrical charge conductivity thereof. An emitter layer of a second doped electrical conductivity of opposite electrical charge is disposed on the base layer and forms a p-n junction therebetween. A plurality of spaced channels are formed in the emitter and base layers to expose the lateral conductivity layer at the bottoms thereof. A front contact grid is positioned on the top surface of the emitter layer of each cell. A first current collector is positioned along one outside edge of at least one first cell. A back contact grid is positioned in the channels at the top surface of the device for engagement with the lateral conductivity layer. A second current collector is positioned along at least one outside edge of at least one oppositely disposed second cell. Finally, an interdigitation mechanism is provided for serially connecting the front contact grid of one cell to the back contact grid of an adjacent cell at the top surface of the device. 15 figs.

  18. High performance thermoelectric nanocomposite device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Jihui (Lakeshore, CA); Snyder, Dexter D. (Birmingham, MI)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric device includes a nanocomposite material with nanowires of at least one thermoelectric material having a predetermined figure of merit, the nanowires being formed in a porous substrate having a low thermal conductivity and having an average pore diameter ranging from about 4 nm to about 300 nm.

  19. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Michael D. (Las Vegas, NV); Klapperick, Robert L. (Las Vegas, NV); Bell, Chris (Las Vegas, NV)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The ice punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container.

  20. Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, P.T.

    1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer. 5 figs.

  1. Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Peter T. (East Brunswick, NJ)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer.

  2. Surface-Micromachined Microfluidic Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Montague, Stephen (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Redmond, WA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Krygowski, Thomas W. (Coutlandt Manor, NY); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Nichols, Christopher A. (Hauppauge, NY); Jakubczak, II, Jerome F. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators. Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators.

  3. Interdigitated photovoltaic power conversion device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, James Scott (Englewood, CO); Wanlass, Mark Woodbury (Golden, CO); Gessert, Timothy Arthur (Conifer, CO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic power conversion device has a top surface adapted to receive impinging radiation. The device includes at least two adjacent, serially connected cells. Each cell includes a semi-insulating substrate and a lateral conductivity layer of a first doped electrical conductivity disposed on the substrate. A base layer is disposed on the lateral conductivity layer and has the same electrical charge conductivity thereof. An emitter layer of a second doped electrical conductivity of opposite electrical charge is disposed on the base layer and forms a p-n junction therebetween. A plurality of spaced channels are formed in the emitter and base layers to expose the lateral conductivity layer at the bottoms thereof. A front contact grid is positioned on the top surface of the emitter layer of each cell. A first current collector is positioned along one outside edge of at least one first cell. A back contact grid is positioned in the channels at the top surface of the device for engagement with the lateral conductivity layer. A second current collector is positioned along at least one outside edge of at least one oppositely disposed second cell. Finally, an interdigitation mechanism is provided for serially connecting the front contact grid of one cell to the back contact grid of an adjacent cell at the top surface of the device.

  4. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  5. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peyton, Brent M. (Kennewick, WA); Truex, Michael J. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  6. NREL's Controllable Grid Interface for Testing Renewable Energy Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation is an overview of NREL's Controllable Grid Interface capabilities for testing renewable energy technologies.

  7. Human Resources Organizational Readiness Project: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finzi, Adrien

    and easily interface with SAP software Managed by a special Human Resources project team Will be undertaken in close coordination with the BUworks program team HR Organizational Readiness Project BUworks / SAP of SAP Enhanced data security within the new system Current job "system" is 30 years old ­ it must

  8. Federal Aviation Administration Human Factors Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    Federal Aviation Administration Human Factors Team Report on: The Interfaces Between Flightcrews Générale de l'Aviation Civile (France), Douglas Aircraft Company, Federal Aviation Administration, European was produced by a team of highly qualified individuals from the FAA and the European Joint Aviation Authorities

  9. The importance of anharmonicity in thermal transport across solid-solid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xufei [Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 371 Fitzpatrick Hall-Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Luo, Tengfei, E-mail: tluo@nd.edu [Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 371 Fitzpatrick Hall-Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Center for Sustainable Energy at Notre Dame, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding interfacial thermal transport is of great importance for applications like energy devices and thermal management of electronics. Despite the significant efforts in the past few decades, thermal transport across solid-solid interfaces is still not fully understood and cannot be accurately predicted. Anharmonicity is often ignored in many prediction models, such as the mismatch models, the wave-packet method, and the Atomic Green's function. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics to systematically study the role of anharmonicity in thermal transport across solid-solid interfaces. The interatomic interactions are modeled using force constants up to the third order. This model allows controlling the anharmonicity independently by tuning the cubic force constants. The interfacial thermal conductance as a function of anharmonicity inside the materials and that at the interface is studied. We found that the anharmonicity inside the materials plays an important role in the interfacial thermal transport by facilitating the energy communication between different phonon modes. The anharmonicity at the interface has much less impact on the interfacial thermal transport. These results are important to the modification of traditional models to improve their prediction power.

  10. Robust Extraction Interface for Coupling Droplet-Based and Continuous Flow Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xuefei; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable and highly efficient extraction of droplets from oil to aqueous phase is key for downstream coupling with chemical separations and nonoptical detection methods such as amperometry and mass spectrometry. This paper presents an improved interface providing robust extraction for droplet-based poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices. The extraction interface consists of an array of cylindrical posts with narrow apertures in between. The aqueous flow channel into which droplets coalesced was simply and selectively modified to be hydrophilic, while the continuous oil phase flow channel that contained encapsulated aqueous droplets retained a hydrophobic surface. The different surfaces on both sides of the extraction region form a highly stable liquid interface between the two immiscible phases, allowing rapid droplet transfer to the aqueous stream. Entire droplets could be completely extracted within broad ranges of aqueous and oil flow rates (0 - 1 and 0.1 - 1 uL/min, respectively). After extraction, the droplet contents could be transported electrophoretically or by pressure-driven flow to a monolithically integrated emitter for nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) analysis. This interface should be amenable to the separation and identification of droplet contents and on-line monitoring of in-droplet reactions.

  11. Unified Description of Bulk and Interface-Enhanced Spin Pumping S. M. Watts, J. Grollier,* C. H. van der Wal, and B. J. van Wees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Wal, Caspar H.

    Unified Description of Bulk and Interface-Enhanced Spin Pumping S. M. Watts, J. Grollier,* C. H in semiconductors or metals by rf magnetic field pumping. With a semiclassical model we show that a rotating applied dynamics of a ferromagnetic electrode into or out of which the spin currents flow. In spin-pumping devices

  12. Three Environmental Discourses in Human-Computer Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    Three Environmental Discourses in Human-Computer Interaction Abstract A review of the past decade of human-computer interaction relating to environmental issues identifies three discourses whose, environmentalism, nature, design, discourse analysis ACM Classification Keywords H5.m. Information interfaces

  13. Touch-Enabled Interfaces Ming C. Lin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Examples · A Haptic Hybrid Controller for Virtual Prototyping of Vehicle Mechanisms (Ford, BMW, etc) · 3 #12;Basic Pipeline Simulated Environment Grasped Object Scene Haptic Device User motionmotion #12;Basic Pipeline Simulated Environment Scene Haptic Device User motionmotion position Grasped Object #12

  14. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  15. Pressure-flow reducer for aerosol focusing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gard, Eric (San Francisco, CA); Riot, Vincent (Oakland, CA); Coffee, Keith (Diablo Grande, CA); Woods, Bruce (Livermore, CA); Tobias, Herbert (Kensington, CA); Birch, Jim (Albany, CA); Weisgraber, Todd (Brentwood, CA)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure-flow reducer, and an aerosol focusing system incorporating such a pressure-flow reducer, for performing high-flow, atmosphere-pressure sampling while delivering a tightly focused particle beam in vacuum via an aerodynamic focusing lens stack. The pressure-flow reducer has an inlet nozzle for adjusting the sampling flow rate, a pressure-flow reduction region with a skimmer and pumping ports for reducing the pressure and flow to enable interfacing with low pressure, low flow aerosol focusing devices, and a relaxation chamber for slowing or stopping aerosol particles. In this manner, the pressure-flow reducer decouples pressure from flow, and enables aerosol sampling at atmospheric pressure and at rates greater than 1 liter per minute.

  16. Solution processed nickel oxide anodes for organic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mustafa, Bestoon; Griffin, Jonathan; Alsulami, Abdullah S.; Lidzey, David G.; Buckley, Alastair R., E-mail: alastair.buckley@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel oxide thin films have been prepared from a nickel acetylacetonate (Ni(acac)) precursor for use in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices. The conversion of Ni(acac) to NiO{sub x} has been investigated. Oxygen plasma treatment of the NiO layer after annealing at 400?°C affords solar cell efficiencies of 5.2%. Photoelectron spectroscopy shows that high temperature annealing converts the Ni(acac) to a reduced form of nickel oxide. Additional oxygen plasma treatment further oxidizes the surface layers and deepens the NiO work function from 4.7?eV for the annealed film, to 5.0?eV allowing for efficient hole extraction at the organic interface.

  17. Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL] [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph] [University of Guelph; Acharya, Rajesh K [ORNL] [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL] [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

  18. Adsorption of polymer chains at penetrable interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerasimchuk, I. V., E-mail: igor.gera@gmail.com [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine, Institute of Magnetism (Ukraine); Sommer, J.-U. [Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden e.V. (Germany); Gerasimchuk, V. S. [National Technical University of Ukraine 'Kyiv Polytechnic Institute' (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the problem of adsorption (localization) of polymer chains in the system of two penetrable interfaces within the mean-field approximation. The saturation of the polymer system in the limit case of zero bulk concentration is studied. We find the exact solution of this mean-field polymer adsorption problem that opens the possibility to treat various localization problems for polymer chains in such environments using appropriate boundary conditions. The exact solution is controlled by a single scaling variable that describes the coupling between the interfaces due to the polymer chains. We obtain a nonmonotonic behavior of the amount of adsorbed polymers as a function of the distance between the interfaces. This leads to a high-energy and a low-energy phase for the double layer with respect to the amount of polymers localized. At the saturation point, we find the total energy of the system and determine the force acting between the interfaces to be strictly attractive and to monotonically decay to zero when the interface distance increases.

  19. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 105: Interfacing system loss-of-coolant accident in light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interfacing systems loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) involves failure or improper operation of pressure isolation valves (PIVs) that compose the boundary between the reactor coolant system and low-pressure rated systems. Some ISLOCAs can bypass containment and result in direct release of fission products to the environment. A cost/benefit evaluation, using three PWR analyses, calculated the benefit of two potential modifications to the plants. Alternative 1 is improved plant operations to optimize the operator`s performance and reduce human error probabilities. Alternative 2 adds pressure sensing devices, cabling, and instrumentation between two PIVs to provide operators with continuous monitoring of the first PIV. These two alternatives were evaluated for the base case plants (Case 1) and for each plant, assuming the plants had a particular auxiliary building design in which severe flooding would be a problem if an ISLOCA occurred. The auxiliary building design (Case 2) was selected from a survey that revealed a number of designs with features that provided less than optimal resistance to ECCS equipment loss caused by a ISLOCA-induced environment. The results were judged not to provide sufficient basis for generic requirements. It was concluded that the most viable course of action to resolve Generic Issue 105 is licensee participation in individual plant examinations (IPEs).

  20. MIT Device Simulation WebLab : an online simulator for microelectronic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solis, Adrian (Adrian Orbita)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of microelectronics, a device simulator is an important engineering tool with tremendous educational value. With a device simulator, a student can examine the characteristics of a microelectronic device described ...

  1. Human portable preconcentrator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hannum, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated.

  2. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraft, Helmut (Liederbach, DE); Ledjeff, Konstantin (Bad Krozingen, DE)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  3. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  4. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  5. RFQ device for accelerating particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepard, K.W.; Delayen, J.R.

    1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) device includes four spaced elongated, linear, tubular rods disposed parallel to a charged particle beam axis, with each rod supported by two spaced tubular posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. The rod and post geometry of the device has four-fold rotation symmetry, lowers the frequency of the quadrupole mode below that of the dipole mode, and provides large dipole-quadrupole mode isolation to accommodate a range of mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry of the structure, which can be formed by joining eight simple T-sections, provides a high degree of mechanical stability, is insensitive to mechanical displacement, and is particularly adapted for fabrication with superconducting materials such as niobium. 5 figs.

  6. Neutron-absorber release device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VAN Erp, Jan B. (Hinsdale, IL); Kimont, Edward L. (Evergreen Park, IL)

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resettable device is provided for supporting an object, sensing when an environment reaches a critical temperature and releasing the object when the critical temperature is reached. It includes a flexible container having a material inside with a melting point at the critical temperature. The object's weight is supported by the solid material which gives rigidity to the container until the critical temperature is reached at which point the material in the container melts. The flexible container with the now fluid material inside has insufficient strength to support the object which is thereby released. Biasing means forces the container back to its original shape so that when the temperature falls below the melting temperature the material again solidifies, and the object may again be supported by the device.

  7. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bezryadin, Alexey (Champaign, IL); Remeika, Mikas (Urbana, IL)

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  8. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  9. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  10. Encapsulant materials and associated devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kempe, Michael D (Littleton, CO); Thapa, Prem (Lima, OH)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions suitable for use as encapsulants are described. The inventive compositions include a high molecular weight polymeric material, a curing agent, an inorganic compound, and a coupling agent. Optional elements include adhesion promoting agents, colorants, antioxidants, and UV absorbers. The compositions have desirable diffusivity properties, making them suitable for use in devices in which a substantial blocking of moisture ingress is desired, such as photovoltaic (PV) modules.

  11. Encapsulant materials and associated devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kempe, Michael D (Littleton, CO); Thapa, Prem (Lima, OH)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions suitable for use as encapsulants are described. The inventive compositions include a high molecular weight polymeric material, a curing agent, an inorganic compound, and a coupling agent. Optional elements include adhesion promoting agents, colorants, antioxidants, and UV absorbers. The compositions have desirable diffusivity properties, making them suitable for use in devices in which a substantial blocking of moisture ingress is desired, such as photovoltaic (PV) modules.

  12. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Meitl, Matthew (Raleigh, NC); Ko, Heung Cho (Urbana, IL); Yoon, Jongseung (Urbana, IL); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC); Baca, Alfred J. (Urbana, IL)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multilayer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  13. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multilayer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  14. Infrared emitting device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Dawson, L. Ralph (Albuquerque, NM); Howard, Arnold J. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An infrared emitting device and method. The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns.

  15. Editorial: Photovoltaic Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Rupnowski, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the global energy needs grow, there is increasing interest in the generation of electricity by photovoltaics (PVs) devices or solar cells - devices that convert sunlight to electricity. Solar industry has seen an enormous growth during the last decade. The sale of PV modules has exceeded 27 GW in 2011, with significant contributions to the market share from all technologies. While the silicon technology continues to have the dominant share, the other thin film technologies (CdTe, CIGS, a-Si, and organic PV) are experiencing fast growth. Increased production of silicon modules has led to a very rapid reduction in their price and remains as benchmark for other technologies. The PV industry is in full gear to commercialize new automated equipment for solar cell and module production, instrumentation for process monitoring technologies, and for implementation of other cost-reduction approaches, and extensive research continues to be carried out in many laboratories to improve the efficiency of solar cells and modules without increasing the production costs. A large variety of solar cells, which differ in the material systems used, design, PV structure, and even the principle of PV conversion, are designed to date. This special issue contains peer-reviewed papers in the recent developments in research related to broad spectrum of photovoltaic materials and devices. It contains papers on many aspects of solar cells-the growth and deposition, characterization, and new material development.

  16. Implications of interface conventions for morphometric thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Reindl; Markus Bier; S. Dietrich

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Several model fluids in contact with planar, spherical, and cylindrical walls are investigated for small number densities within density functional theory. The dependence of the solid-fluid interfacial tension on the curvature of spherical and cylindrical walls is examined and compared with the corresponding expression derived within the framework of morphometric thermodynamics. Particular attention is paid to the implications of the choice of the interface location, which underlies the definition of the interfacial tension. We find that morphometric thermodynamics is never exact for the considered systems and that its quality as an approximation depends sensitively on the choice of the interface location.

  17. Pressure Driven Pump for Portable Microfluidic Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Vincent

    2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices have become interesting areas of research for their ability to create high throughput chemical analysis and other functions. In some microfluidic devices, fluids are actively moved through the valves to maintain a characteristic...

  18. Implementation for simplifying Bluetooth device connection methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Tehyih Debbie, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis provides a way for users to easily add and remove devices to secure groups, allowing for a more intuitive way of making connections between devices. These groups allow users to seamlessly make connections between ...

  19. Rapid prototyping method for a microfluidics device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klauber, Kameron L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The product design process can be described as a number of steps taken to turn an idea into a reality. One particular design process of creating a microfluidics device was studied and analyzed. A device containing channels ...

  20. A cohesive law for interfaces in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chenxi [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33146 (United States); Lou, Jun [Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251 (United States); Song, Jizhou, E-mail: jzsong@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Mechanics and Soft Matter Research Center, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructure has showed great potential to improve the performance of graphene device. We have established the cohesive law for interfaces between graphene and monolayer or multi-layer h-BN based on the van der Waals force. The cohesive energy and cohesive strength are given in terms of area density of atoms on corresponding layers, number of layers, and parameters in the van der Waals force. It is found that the cohesive law in the graphene/multi-layer h-BN is dominated by the three h-BN layers which are closest to the graphene. The approximate solution is also obtained to simplify the expression of cohesive law. These results are very useful to study the deformation of graphene/h-BN heterostructure, which may have significant impacts on the performance and reliability of the graphene devices especially in the areas of emerging applications such as stretchable electronics.

  1. Environmental Effects on Power Electronic Devices

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the complex relationship between environment (temperature, humidity, and vibration) and automotive power electronic device (PED) performance through materials characterization...

  2. Shared Control Between Human and Machine: Haptic Display of Automation During Manual Control of Vehicle Heading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Brent

    of the human/machine task. Results are presented from 2 experiments in which 11 subjects completed a pathShared Control Between Human and Machine: Haptic Display of Automation During Manual Control control is described in which a machine's manual control interface is motorized to allow a human

  3. Organic electrophosphorescence device having interfacial layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choulis, Stelios A. (San Jose, CA); Mathai, Mathew (Santa Clara, CA); Choong, Vi-En (San Jose, CA); So, Franky (Gainesville, FL)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are described for forming an organic light emitting diode device with improved device efficiency. Materials having at least one energy level that is similar to those of a phosphorescent light emitting material in the diode are incorporated into the device to directly inject holes or electrons to the light emitting material.

  4. Sensor device and methods for using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothgeb, Timothy Michael; Gansle, Kristina Marie Rohal; Joyce, Jonathan Livingston; Jordan, James Madison; Rohwer, Tedd Addison; Lockhart, Randal Ray; Smith, Christopher Lawrence; Trinh, Toan; Cipollone, Mark Gary

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor device and method of employment is provided. More specifically, a sensor device adapted to detect, identify and/or measure a chemical and/or physical characteristic upon placement of the device into an environment, especially a liquid medium for which monitoring is sought is provided.

  5. Medical Devices and Systems PRECISE Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkumar, Ragunathan "Raj"

    that are not likely to be met by research in your field alone? ­ Advances in medical devices domain requires12/16/2008 1 Medical Devices and Systems Insup Lee PRECISE Center Department Computer and Information Science University of Pennsylvania 12/15/08 CPS Information Day Medical Devices Containing

  6. Tunable circuit for tunable capacitor devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivkina, Tatiana; Ginley, David S.

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable circuit (10) for a capacitively tunable capacitor device (12) is provided. The tunable circuit (10) comprises a tunable circuit element (14) and a non-tunable dielectric element (16) coupled to the tunable circuit element (16). A tunable capacitor device (12) and a method for increasing the figure of merit in a tunable capacitor device (12) are also provided.

  7. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  8. Portable control device for networked mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Byrne, Raymond H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Jon R. (Edgewood, NM); Harrington, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gladwell, T. Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A handheld control device provides a way for controlling one or multiple mobile robotic vehicles by incorporating a handheld computer with a radio board. The device and software use a personal data organizer as the handheld computer with an additional microprocessor and communication device on a radio board for use in controlling one robot or multiple networked robots.

  9. 1-ID: Sector 1, Insertion Device Beamline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A No. of Poles 72 Undulator Period 3.3 cm Device Length 2.4 m Minimum Gap 11 mm Downstream insertion device No. of Poles 72 Undulator Period 2.3 cm Device Length 2.4 m Minimum...

  10. Low Frequency Noise in Nano-Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    useless as a result. Extremely small devices are also prone to the large device to device variations and Technology, Leningrad, in 1996. From 1977 he is a research fellow of A. F. Ioffe Institute of Physics and Technology, St. Petersburg, Russia. From 1999 he is with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). His

  11. Device Selection by a Personal Proxy Agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Bochmann, Gregor

    Device Selection by a Personal Proxy Agent N. Hadibi, K. El-khatib, Eric Z. Zhang, Ken Chan, G. v user to access communication devices currently present in his Personal Area Network (PAN) Performs PreferencesDevice Capability An example Scenario: Connecting Alice and Bob w/o a Personal Proxy Internet Home

  12. The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative Giovanni Bartolomeo1, Francesca Martire1 mobile phone that stores and handles personal information about the user. The Simplicity Device can be connected (e.g. via Bluetooth) to several other devices thus allowing personalization of services

  13. SECURITY FOR WIRELESS NETWORKS AND DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    connections. Users of handheld devices such as personal digital assis tants (PDAs) and cell phones can synMarch 2003 SECURITY FOR WIRELESS NETWORKS AND DEVICES Shirley Radack, Editor, Computer Security organizations and users have found that wireless communications and devices are convenient, flexible, and easy

  14. Manual authentication for wireless devices Christian Gehrmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Chris

    is to examine how these services might best be achieved for personal wireless-enabled devices. Using the terminology of Stajano [12], the problem is that of securely `imprinting' a personal device. That is, suppose a user has two wireless-enabled devices, e.g. a mobile phone and a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA

  15. A user interface for representing physical systems across energy domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Heather Lynn

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for State Transition Diagrams . . 3. 2 Object Oriented Interfaces 3. 3 Graphic Interfaces 3. 3. 1 Early Days of Graphic Interfaces 3. 3. 2 Menu Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. 3. 3 Icons 3. 3. 4 Examples of Graphical Interfaces 3. 4 Summary... Explanation of Interface Via Transition Diagrams 4. 2 Programming Environment 4. 2. 1 Programming Platform 4. 2. 2 Example Source Code 4. 2. 3 System Features of BoGIS 4. 3 Graphical Interface for BoGIS 4. 3. 1 Screen Layout 4. 3. 2 Icons 4. 3. 3 Using...

  16. Control system for insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, O.A.; Den Hartog, P.; Moog, E.R.; Smith, M.L. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois60439-4800 (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like {open_quotes}open all IDs{close_quotes} are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Control system for insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, O.A.; Den Hartog, P.; Moog, E.R.; Smith, M.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like ``open all IDs`` are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed.

  18. Control system for insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Oleg A.; Den Hartog, Patric; Moog, Elizabeth R.; Smith, Martin L. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4800 (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like 'open all IDs' are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed.

  19. Sliding Interfaces for Eddy Current Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiptmair, Ralf

    Sliding Interfaces for Eddy Current Simulations Raffael Casagrande Master Thesis Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Ralf Hiptmair Zürich, April 2013 #12;Contents Contents i 1. Introduction 1 2. Eddy Current-formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.4. The eddy current problem in a moving, solid body . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3. Discontinuous

  20. COMMUNICATION Protein Chemistry at Membrane Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    of hydrophobic (ÁGHÈ) and electrostatic (ÁGES) free energies. If these are simply addi- tive, then the observed free energy of binding (ÁGobs) will be given by ÁGobs ÁGHÈ ÁGES, where ÁGHÈ À sNPANP and ÁGES z suggest that hydrophobic and electrostatic binding free energies of proteins at membrane interfaces